AC/DC – High Voltage (Australia editon) (1975)

frontcover1High Voltage is the debut studio album by Australian hard rock band AC/DC, released only in Australia, on 17 February 1975.

In November 1973, guitarists Malcolm Young and Angus Young formed AC/DC and recruited bassist Larry Van Kriedt, vocalist Dave Evans, and Colin Burgess, ex-Masters Apprentices drummer. Soon the Young brothers decided that Evans was not a suitable frontman for the group; they felt he was more of a glam rocker like Gary Glitter. The band had recorded only one single with Evans, “Can I Sit Next To You, Girl”, with “Rockin’ in the Parlour” as the B-side. In September 1974, Ronald Belford “Bon” Scott, an experienced vocalist and friend of producer George Young, replaced Dave Evans[2] after friend Vince Lovegrove recommended him. The addition of Scott redefined the band; like the Young brothers, Scott had been born in Scotland before emigrating to Australia in his childhood, and loved rock and roll, especially Little Richard. Scott had played in the Valentines and Fraternity. In a 2010 interview with Mojo’s Sylvie Simmons, Angus Young recalled that Scott “moulded the character of AC/DC…Everything became more down to earth and straight ahead. That’s when we became a band.”


The album was produced by Vanda & Young at Albert Studios in Sydney, Australia. George Young is the older brother of Angus and Malcolm, and also plays bass guitar on a number of the album’s songs. Harry Vanda was a bandmate of George’s in The Easybeats, and the pair were the main songwriters of the band’s later hits, including their international smash “Friday on My Mind”. When George Young heard what his younger siblings were up to, he was quite impressed, telling VH1’s Behind the Music in 2000, “All of a sudden the kid brothers were still the kid brothers…but my God, they knew how to play. There was no sort of, ‘Do they have it or don’t they have it?’ It was obvious that they had something.” AC/DC was still developing its sound when High Voltage was recorded in November 1974, and singer Bon Scott and the Young brothers were backed by a different rhythm section than the Mark Evans/Phil Rudd combination featured on their next three full-length studio recordings. Rob Bailey and Peter Clack were the band’s bassist and drummer, respectively, at the time. According to Murray Engleheart’s book AC/DC: Maximum Rock N Roll, bass duties were shared by Malcolm and older brother George, who also played live with the band infrequently, as well as Bailey.


Bon Scott & Angus Young during AC/DC’s free concert at Victoria Park, Sydney 1975

Clack played drums on “Baby, Please Don’t Go”, and the rest of the tracks were recorded by Tony Currenti. AC/DC biographer Jesse Fink laments Currenti’s lack of recognition, noting that his name “doesn’t bob up anywhere on the Australian or international releases of High Voltage, TNT, ’74 Jailbreak, Backtracks or any other releases on which his playing may or may not have appeared.” Malcolm and Angus traded-off lead guitar parts on “Soul Stripper” and “Show Business,” and Malcolm played the solo on “Little Lover.” In the book Highway to Hell: The Life and Times of AC/DC Legend Bon Scott, author Clinton Walker quotes Angus Young: “It was actually recorded in ten days in between gigs, working through the night after we came off stage and then through the day. I suppose it was fun at the time, but there was no thought put into it.”

While the songs on High Voltage showcase a glam rock influence that the band would soon discard in favor of a more ear-splitting hard rock sound, the foundation for the band’s songwriting structures are clearly evident. As Angus told Benjamin Smith of VH1 in 2014, “I think the ‘60s was a great time for music, especially for rock and roll. It was the era of The Beatles, of the Stones, and then later on The Who and Led Zeppelin. But at one point in the ‘70s it just kind of became…mellow. When Malcolm put the band together, it was obvious what was missing at the time: another great rock band. So it was basically a reaction to that, because the music at that point had just turned into that soft, melodic kind of period, and that seemed to be all over the world. For us, it was a pretty easy choice, especially because Malcolm and myself – we’re two guitarists – so from the get-go, it was going to be a guitar band.” Six of its eight songs were written by the Young brothers and Scott, with “Soul Stripper” being credited to the Young brothers alone. “Soul Stripper” evolved from an older song called “Sunset Strip”, written by Malcolm and the band’s original singer Dave Evans, revamped for the album with new lyrics by Scott, and is similar in theme and structure to “Squealer,” a song that would be included on Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap in 1976. “Baby, Please Don’t Go” is a cover version of a Big Joe Williams song and was chosen as the LP’s first single, leading to the first of many AC/DC appearances on Australia’s Countdown music program. The band’s earliest appearances included a now-legendary live performance of “Baby, Please Don’t Go” (featuring Scott dressed as a blonde schoolgirl) and a filmed performance of “Show Business.” “Love Song” evolved from an unrecorded song called “Fell in Love”, also written by Malcolm and Evans. This earlier version of the song had different lyrics, and the finished lyrics as heard on the album were added by Scott. In 1994, Bon Scott biographer Clinton Walker speculated that the uncharacteristically maudlin lyric to “Love Song” was likely a leftover from Scott’s previous band Fraternity. “Love Song” was released as the album’s first single (under the title “Love Song (Oh Jene)”) and was backed with “Baby, Please Don’t Go”, but radio preferred the flip. “She’s Got Balls” (about Scott’s ex-wife Irene) was the first song that Scott and the Young brothers put together, while “Little Lover” had been a song Malcolm Young had been tinkering with since he was about 14 and had been originally titled “Front Row Fantasies” (Scott, who wrote the song about Angus, mentions glam rock star Gary Glitter by name in the song)


High Voltage was originally released on Albert Productions only in Australia, and has never been reissued by another label in this format. The international version of High Voltage, which was issued on Atlantic Records in 1976, has a different cover art and track listing, with only “She’s Got Balls” and “Little Lover” appearing overseas. “Baby Please Don’t Go”, “Soul Stripper”, “You Ain’t Got a Hold On Me” and “Show Business” were later released on ’74 Jailbreak in 1984. “Stick Around” (about Scott’s inability to hold onto a lover for more than one night) and “Love Song” have been released on Backtracks in 2009. The title and artwork were the suggestion of Chris Gilbey of Albert Productions. In the 1994 Scott biography Highway to Hell, Gilbey explains that he came up with the concept of “an electricity substation with a dog pissing against it. It’s so tame now, but back then we thought it was pretty revolutionary.”

AllMusic deems this version of AC/DC “a very young band who were still coming into their own at the time, and that process of self-discovery is what makes the original version of High Voltage both the most inconsistent and unique of all the Bon Scott albums.” (by wikipedia)


Rob Bailey (bass)
Tony Currenti (drums)
Bon Scott (vocals)
Angus Young (guitar)
George Young (bass, guitar, background vocals)
Malcolm Young (guitar, background vocals)
Peter Clack (drums on 01.)
Harry Vanda (background vocals)

01. Baby, Please Don’t Go (Williams) 4.50
02. She’s Got Balls (A.Young/M.Young/Scott) 4.51
03. Little Lover(A.Young/M.Young/Scott) 5.37
04. Stick Around (A.Young/M.Young/Scott) 4.40
05. Soul Stripper (A.Young/M.Young) 6.25
06. You Ain’t Got A Hold On Me (A.Young/M.Young/Scott) 3.31
07. Love Song (A.Young/M.Young/Scott) 5.15
08. Show Business (A.Young/M.Young/Scott) 4.46



Mott the Hoople – Brain Capers (1971)

frontcover1Brain Capers is the fourth album by the band Mott the Hoople.

It was originally released in November 1971 in the UK by Island Records (catalogue number ILPS 9178) and on Island Records in Canada (cat. no. SW-9178), and was reissued in 2003 (on CD) by Angel Air (cat. no. SJPCD160). It was released January 1972 in the US on Atlantic Records (cat. no. SD 8304).

The album was not initially a commercial success, and was the only Mott the Hoople album that failed to chart in either the UK[4] or US.

Its working title was “AC/DC” though this was abandoned in favour of either “Brain Damage” or “Bizarre Capers” before a compromise was settled on. Earlier sessions, self-produced by the band, were also abandoned when svengali Guy Stevens was called in to rescue the album but a number of these recordings have resurfaced on All the Young Dudes: The Anthology and as bonus material on Angel Air’s re-issues of Mott the Hoople albums.

The covers of the original UK and Canadian LPs do not feature the mask seen on the US version (and some later re-releases). There was an actual mask packaged inside with the UK version of the album, but not with the Canadian LP. The band name and line under it are in the centre of the cover where the mask would be and the title shifted upwards. The US and Canadian LPs do not have the inner sleeve picturing fighter planes that the original UK album had.

The album is dedicated to James Dean, as stated below the band photo on the back cover. (by wikipedia)


Re-teaming with producer Guy Stevens, Mott the Hoople delivered the great forgotten British hard rock album with their fourth outing, Brain Capers. Stevens was a legendary rock & roll wildman and he kept Mott careening through their performances; they sound harder than ever, even dangerous at times. Fortunately, this coincided with Ian Hunter’s emergence as a fantastic songwriter, as tuneful and clever as any of his peers. All these changes are evident from the moment Brain Capers kicks in with the monumental “Death May Be Your Santa Claus,” a phenomenally pile-driving number that just seems inevitable. As it gives way to a cover of Dion’s “Your Own Backyard,” it becomes clear that Mott have pulled off the trick of being sensitive while still rocking. And that’s not the end of it — they ride an epic wave on the nine-minute “The Journey,” pull off a love song on “Sweet Angeline,” and generally rock like hell throughout the record. The most amazing thing about the album is that none of the songs really change character — it’s all straightforward hard rock, graced with Dylanesque organ — but there are all sorts of variations on that basic sound, proving how versatile they are. It’s a fantastic album, and stands as the culmination of their early years. When a record this confident and tremendous is stiffed, it’s little wonder they thought about chucking it all in; and it isn’t a surprise that, when they decided to continue, it was with a change in sound. They couldn’t have topped this if they tried. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)


The original Island labels

Verden Allen (keyboards, vocals)
Dale “Buffin” Griffin (drums, vocals)
Ian Hunter (guitar, keyboards, vocals)
Mick Ralphs (guitar, vocals)
Pete Watts (bass, vocals)
Jim Price (trumpet)
Guy Stevens (piano)

01. Death May Be Your Santa Claus (Hunter/Allen) 4.55
02. Your Own Backyard (DiMucci) 4.13
03. Darkness, Darkness (Young) 4.33
04. The Journey (Hunter) 9.15
05. Sweet Angeline (Hunter) 4:53
06. Second Love (Allen) 3.46
07. The Moon Upstairs (Hunter/Ralphs) 5.07
08. The Wheel Of The Quivering Meat Conception (Hunter/Stevens) 1.21

(“The Wheel of the Quivering Meat Conception” is essentially part two of “The Journey,” beginning with a fade-in at the point where “The Journey” was earlier faded out.)



Van Morrison – Enlightenment (1990)

frontcover1Enlightenment is the twentieth studio album by Northern Irish singer-songwriter Van Morrison. It was released in 1990 (see 1990 in music) and reached #5 in the UK charts and “Real Real Gone” charted at #18 in Mainstream Rock Tracks.

The June 2008 re-issued and re-mastered version of the album contains alternative takes of “Enlightenment” and “So Quiet in Here”.”Start All Over Again” from this album was listed as one of the standout tracks from the six album reissue.

The album was recorded in London, England, and Real World in Box. The arrangements were by Fiachra Trench and Micheal O’Suilleabhain played piano with a brass section made up of British jazz musicians from the late sixties: Frank Ricotti, Henry Lowther and Malcolm Griffiths. One of the songs “So Quiet in Here” was recorded at the Kirk, Rode, Somerset, a setting which served as both church or studio.

Contrary to the meaning of the title, the theme of the album is actually full of doubt and the songs seem to be saying that everything is what you make of it — heaven or hell. The song “Enlightenment” contains the words: “I’m in the here and now and I’m meditating/ And still I’m suffering but that’s my problem/ Enlightenment, don’t know what it is”. “So Quiet in Here” is a continuation of the song “Into the Mystic” from the Moondance album. The single released from the album, “Real Real Gone”, was originally written and meant for the 1980 album Common One.[9] The song “In the Days Before Rock ‘N’ Roll” was a collaboration between Morrison and the Irish poet Paul Durcan. (by wikipedia9

Throughout Van Morrison’s long career, his hit records have usually been followed by more obscure ones, so it should come as no surprise that 1990’s Enlightenment was more subtle than its hit predecessor, Avalon Sunset. The intention of Enlightenment is marked by its first two songs, the scorching Celtic rhythm & blues of the opener, “Real Real Gone,” and the pained spiritual yearning of the title track, a midtempo ballad drenched in nylon-string guitars, atmospheric synths, a gorgeous melody, and a tough Wurlitzer piano. The first tune, with its raucous horns, B-3, and crackling hi-hat and snare work, comes from the shouting R&B singer we’ve known since Moondance. It’s addressed to a nameless other, with a call-and-response horn section answering his every line like it was the gospel truth. The slippery bridge-like lines at the ends of the verses and his invocation of truths from the gods of soul — “And Sam Cooke is on the radio and the night is filled with space/Wilson Pickett said ‘In the Midnight Hour’/That’s when my love comes tumblin’ down/Solomon Burke said, ‘If you need me, why don’t you call me’/James Brown said, ‘When you’re tired of what you got, try me’/ Gene Chandler said, ‘There’s a rainbow in my soul'” — suggest he’s almost found the truth in these moments from his past, a past that haunts him and whose secrets pour from his mouth when he sings, though they elude him. We can add to these, “Van Morrison said, ‘Real, real gone/I can’t stand up by myself/Don’t you know I need your help/I’m real real gone.'” This is only underscored in “Enlightenment,” where these koans mix with those of the Buddhist masters. Some of them come literally from Zen, others from the pit of the protagonist’s life: “I’m in the here and now/And I’m meditating/I’m still suffering/But that’s my problem…wake up.” The rest of the album becomes a suite, with these themes underscored everywhere through an ethereal blend of sonic atmospheres and carefully crafted melodies that seem to come from the oblique shadow of the soul as it wanders, discovers, and sheds its trappings, still seeking. There’s the folksy Irish folk-pop of “So Quiet in Here” and the dramatic yet elegiac regality of “Avalon of the Heart,” where the ghosts of Keats, Shelley, and Yeats all meet to confer and wail. These songs are kissed further down the road by the contemplative jazz in “See Me Through,” a sung prayer that is partially obscured by its chant-like melody. Morrison also does his trademark evocation of memory in the sprightly gospel of “Youth of 1,000 Summers.” Jazz returns in the Friday night strut of “Start All Over Again,” where sadness and hope mix inextricably. “She’s My Baby,” with its nylon-string guitars and taut snares, is breezy Celtic soul at its best, expressing an adult lovesickness in song. Enlightenment, like Avalon Sunset, marks one of Morrison’s best productions, if not albums. Its sound is warm, enveloping, and humid. If the songs seem to bleed together a bit, that’s on purpose; it’s meant to be taken as a whole. It’s an overlooked gem. (by Thom Jurek)


Dave Bishop (saxophone)
Dave Early (drums)
Georgie Fame (keyboards, background vocals)
Alex Gifford (synthesizers piano)
Steve Gregory (saxophone, flute)
Malcolm Griffiths (trombone)
Van Morrison (vocals, guitar, harmonica)
Steve Pearce (bass)
The Ambrosian Singers (choir, with John McCarthy as choirmaster on 04.)
Paul Durcan (spoken word on 07.)
Bernie Holland (guitar on 02., 06. + 09.)
Henry Lowther (trumpet on 06., 08. + 09.)
Brian Odgers (bass on 02. + 09.)
Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin (piano on 03.)
Frank Ricotti (vibraphone on 08.)
Steve Sanger (drums on 04+ + 10.)
Steve Waterman (flugelhorn on 06., 08. + 09.)


01. Real Real Gone (Morrison) 3.43
02. Enlightenment (Morrison) 4.04
03. So Quiet In Here (Morrison) 6.09
04. Avalon Of The Heart (Morrison) 4.45
05. See Me Through (Morrison)  6.13
06. Youth Of 1,000 Summers (Morrison) 3.45
07. In The Days Before Rock ‘N’ Roll (Durcan/Morrison) 8.13
08. Start All Over Again (Morrison) 4.10
09. She’s My Baby (Morrison) 5.14
10. Memories (Morrison) 4.14



Various Artists – American Folk Blues Festival 69 (1969)

frontcover1The American Folk Blues Festival was a music festival that toured Europe as an annual event for several years beginning in 1962. It introduced audiences in Europe, including the UK, to leading blues performers of the day such as Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, John Lee Hooker and Sonny Boy Williamson, most of whom had never previously performed outside the US. The tours attracted substantial media coverage, including TV shows, and contributed to the growth of the audience for blues music in Europe.

German jazz publicist Joachim-Ernst Berendt first had the idea of bringing original African-American blues performers to Europe. Jazz had become very popular, and rock and roll was just gaining a foothold, and both genres drew influences directly back to the blues. Berendt thought that European audiences would flock to concert halls to see them in person.

Promoters Horst Lippmann and Fritz Rau brought this idea to reality. By contacting Willie Dixon, an influential blues composer and bassist from Chicago, they were given access to the blues culture of the southern United States. The first festival was held in 1962, and they continued almost annually until 1972, after an eight-year hiatus reviving the festival in 1980 until its final performance in 1985. (by wikipedia)

And this is rare live recording from the 1969 show, recorded live at the Royal Albert Hall (October 3, 1969) and this album include rare recordings by more or less unknown blues artists like Juke Boy Bonner. John Jackson and Whistling Alex Moore but although well known artists like Earl Hooker and Carey Bell.

And not to fortget, the pioneer of Zydeco, the one and only Clifton Chenier !

Enjoy this mixture of American tradtional music !



Juke Boy Bonner:
Juke Boy Bonner (vocals, guitar, harmonica)

Earl Hooker Band + Carey Bell Band: :
Carey Bell (harmonica)
Earl Hooker (guitar, vocals)
Robert St. Julien (drums)
Mack Thompson (bass)

Clifton Chenier Band:
Cleveland Chenier (washboard)
Clifton Chenier (accordeon, vocals)
Robert St. Julien (drums)

John Jackson:
John Jackson (guitar, vocals)

Magic Sam Band:
Robert St. Julien (drums)
Magic Sam (guitar, vocals)
Mack Thompson (bass)

Whistling Alex Moore:
Whistling Alex Moore (piano, vocals, whistling)


01. Juke Boy Bonner: Jumpin’ With Juke Boy (Bonner) 1.40
02. Earl Hooker: Going Up And Down (Hooker) 5.07
03. Carey Bell: Rocking With Chromanica/I Feel Bad, Bad, Bad (Bell) 7.00
04. Juke Boy Bonner: Running Shoes (Bonner) 2.25
05. John Jackson: Poor Boy (Jackson) 3.02
06. Clifton Chenier:  Zydeco Et Pas Sale (Traditional) 2.50
07. Earl Hooker: Blue Shadows Fall (Hooker) 5.12
08. Clifton Chenier: Wrap It Up (Traditional) 3.08
09. Magic Sam: Easy Baby (Maghett) 3.24
10. Magic Sam: Looking Good (Maghett) 2.06
11. Whistling Alex Moore: Across The Atlantic Ocean (Moore) 6.34
12. John Jackson: John Jackson Breakdown (Jackson) 1.43




Alternate frontcover

Tuna Universitaria – Toledo (2002)

frontcover1A tuna is a group of university students in traditional university dress who play traditional instruments and sing serenades. The tradition originated in Spain and Portugal in the 13th century as a means of students to earn money or food. Nowadays students don’t belong to a “tuna” for money nor food, but seeking to keep a tradition alive, for fun, to travel a lot and to meet new people from other universities. A member of a tuna is a “tunante”, but is usually known simply as a “tuno”. “Sopista” was the name given in the earlier times of the “tunas” but is still accepted as well.

The name TUNA may come from French roi de Thunes, “king of Tunis”, a title used by leaders of vagabonds. But there is also a legend of a real King of Tunis, known for his love to music and party that usually liked to walk around the streets at night playing and singing. That explains why the term roi de Thunes was applied.

In the old times (medieval days) the Sopistas would use their musical talents to entertain people in exchange for a coin and a bowl of soup (sopa, in Portuguese and Spanish, hence the name sopistas). They would also play their music under the windows of the ladies they wished to court.

From its origins to the present day, from and through of the Tunas have continued the cultivation of popular instruments such as the bandurria, lute, guitar and tambourine, instruments which are named in the Spanish book Libro del Buen Amor by Juan Ruiz (c. 1283 – c. 1350).

For these occupations, they took their guitars and bandurrias and sang popular songs. The tunos or sopistas also showed abilities for music, and in courting ladies that they had been wooing to.[3] The sopistas were poor students that with their music, friendly personality and craftiness scoured for cheap eats for a few coins in the eating-houses, convents, streets and squares. (by wikipedia)

And this is an album, recored in the tradition of the old traditions by students of the University of Castilla-La Mancha in Tuna/Spain:

The University of Castilla-La Mancha was created by law on June 30th, 1982 through the union of different university centres into a single institution. The UCLM began its first academic year in 1985. Its introduction represented the Autonomous Community’s calling to provide its own university system, at the service of over two million citizens residing in the 79,000 square kilometers of its territory.

The first universities in the region can be traced back to Toledo (1485) –although the historic “School of Translators” dates back to 1172- later on Siguenza (1489), and finally Almagro (1550). However, the political measures adopted with the liberal revolution left the region without any university centres for over a century until Toledo University College was opened in 1969. (by

Enjoy all these traditional sounds from decades, that were forgotten .. but here we can hear them again …


Student Choir of The University of Castilla-La Mancha – Tuna/Spain


01. Son de Tuna (Torres) 3.58
02. Ay, ay, ay (Freire) 3.22
03. Popurri Navarro (Traditional) 4.14
04. Lágrimas Negras (Matamoros) 3.04
05. Granada (Lara) 4.22
06. Isa Parrandera (Traditional) 4.39
07. Vagabundo (Simón/Gil) 2.42
08. Suspiros de España (Alonso) 3.55
09. La Salamantina (Alonso) 5.39
10. La Golondrina (Infante) 3.44
11. María ‘La Portuguesa’ (Cano) 4.18
12. Toledo (Lara) 5.15




Chicken Shack – Accept (1970)

frontcover1Accept is the fourth album by the blues band, Chicken Shack, released in 1970. Accept was Chicken Shack’s last album on the Blue Horizon label. This album was also the last for Andy Sylvester, Dave Bidwell and Paul Raymond as members of Chicken Shack. It also marks a departure from pure blues to a more progressive and psychedelic sound. (by wikipedia)

This band’s fourth album, it was released in 1970 and seems to offer a prescient blend of nascent prog and heavy blues rock, where their prior outings skewed more decisively toward the latter. That it came out in 1970 and not 1971 is a big difference considering the changes in the rock scene that the next year would bring — if one had to pinpoint a moment when “rock got heavy,” even factoring in Blue Cheer‘s prior contributions, there are solid arguments to be made for ’71 — but though Chicken Shack weren’t the first to blend blues jams and more progressive and melodic flair, what with Jethro Tull around and all, Accept Chicken Shack does it with remarkable balance between the two sounds that, over the ensuing years, would only grow more and more incongruous.

Recorded with the lineup of founding guitarist/vocalist Stan Webb, bassist Andy Sylvester, keyboardist/vocalist Paul Raymond and drummer Dave Bidwell, it would be their final outing through Blue Horizon Records and after it came out, Webb would have to completely revamp the lineup after losing Sylvester, Raymond and Bidwell all to Savoy Brown.

chickenshack1969Chicken Shack live at the  Bath Festival 1969 (© Al By)

All the same, listening to the rolling start of “Diary of Your Life,” the gritty swing and harmonies of “Never Ever,” the complex structure and arrangement of “Some Other Time” — vaguely post-Beatles but grown outward — and the soft departure of “Andalucian Blues,” whatever friction there might’ve been in the band doesn’t show up in the compositions, which are more varied than some of what would follow in the UK (also a good deal of what preceded), but hit with no less impact when they choose to do so. At 35 minutes, Accept Chicken Shack leaves one wondering how anybody couldn’t with its niche blend of elements and confident execution, earning its place in that great dusty canon of heavy ’70s classics just waiting to be discovered by new generations of listeners in a vinyl shop or online. In this case, clearly the latter.

Webb has kept Chicken Shack going. Over the years he’s brought in nearly 50 players, but they still perform as Chicken Shack from time to time (seem like a good bet for the next installment of Psycho fest) and had releases out as recently as 2008. Accept Chicken Shack is more than a footnote in a larger career, however, and as you can hear in these songs, whatever came later, this lineup was able to come together to accomplish something special during their time. (by


Dave Bidwell (drums)
Paul Raymond (keyboards, vocals)
Andy Sylvester (bass)
Stan Webb (guitar, vocals)



01. Diary Of Your Life (Webb) 3.06
02. Pocket (Webb/Raymond) 3.23
03. Never Ever (Webb/Raymond) 2.43
04. Sad Clown (Webb/Raymond) 3.41
05. Maudie (Webb/Raymond) 2.54
06. Telling Your Fortune (Webb) 4.23
07. Tired Eyes (Webb) 2.06
08. Some Other Time (Webb/Raymond) 3.06
09. Going Round (Webb/Raymond) 2.32
10. Andalucian Blues (Webb/Raymond) 2.21
11. You Knew You Did You Did (Webb) 2.26
12. She Didn’t Use Her Loaf (unknown) 4.12
13. Maudie (single version) (Webb/Raymond) 3.01



German single version of Maudi b/w Andalucian Blues


Miles Davis – `Round About Midnight (1957)

frontcover1‘Round About Midnight is an album by jazz musician Miles Davis. It was his debut on Columbia Records, and was originally released in March 1957 (CL 949). The album took its name from the Thelonious Monk song “‘Round Midnight”. Recording sessions took place at Columbia Studio D on October 26, 1955, and at Columbia’s 30th Street Studio on June 5 and September 10, 1956.

Although it had a lukewarm reception upon its release, ‘Round About Midnight has since been regarded by critics as a masterpiece of the hard bop genre and one of the greatest jazz albums of all time.

At the Newport Jazz Festival in 1955, Davis performed the song “‘Round Midnight” as part of an all-star jam session, with the song’s composer Thelonious Monk, along with Connie Kay and Percy Heath of the Modern Jazz Quartet, Zoot Sims, and Gerry Mulligan. Davis’s solo received an extremely positive reception from many jazz fans, and critics. It was viewed as a significant comeback and indication of a healthy, drug-free Davis (he had in fact been free from heroin addiction for well over a year). Davis’ response to this performance was typically laconic: “What are they talking about? I just played the way I always play.”[5] George Avakian of Columbia Records was in the audience, and his brother Aram persuaded him that he ought to sign Davis to the label.[6] Davis was eventually signed to Columbia Records, and was able to form his famous “first great quintet” with John Coltrane on saxophone. ‘Round About Midnight was to be his first album for his new label.

Davis was still under contract to Prestige Records, but had an agreement that he could record material for Columbia to release after the expiration of his Prestige contract. The recording dates for the album were at Columbia Records’ studios; the first session was on October 26, 1955, at Studio D, during which the track “Ah-Leu-Cha” was recorded along with three other numbers that did not appear on the album. This is the first studio recording of the quintet. The remainder of the album was recorded during sessions on June 5, 1956 (“Dear Old Stockholm”, “Bye Bye Blackbird” and “Tadd’s Delight”) and September 10, 1956 (“All of You” and the titular “‘Round Midnight”) at Columbia’s 30th Street Studio. During the same period, the Miles Davis Quintet was also recording sessions to fulfill its contract with Prestige. (by wikipedia)


Given that ‘Round About Midnight was Miles Davis’ debut Columbia recording, it was both a beginning and an ending. Certainly the beginning of his recording career with the label that issued most if not all of his important recordings; and the recording debut of an exciting new band that had within its ranks Philly Joe Jones, Paul Chambers, pianist Red Garland, and an all but unknown tenor player named John Coltrane. The title track was chosen because of its unique rendition with a muted trumpet, and debuted at the Newport Jazz Festival the summer before to a thunderous reception. The date was also an ending of sorts because by the time of the album’s release, Davis had already broken up the band, which re-formed with Cannonball Adderley a year later as a sextet, but it was a tense year.

Musically, this sound is as unusual and as beautiful as it was when issued in 1956. Davis had already led the charge through two changes in jazz — both cool jazz and hard bop — and was beginning to move in another direction here that wouldn’t be defined for another two years. Besides the obvious lyrical and harmonic beauty of “Round About Midnight” that is arguably its definitive version even over Monk’s own, there are the edges of Charlie Parker’s “Au Leu-Cha” with its Bluesology leaping from every chord change in Red Garland’s left hand. Coltrane’s solo here too is notable for its stark contrast to Davis’ own: he chooses an angular tack where he finds the heart of the mode and plays a melody in harmonic counterpoint to the changes but never sounds outside. Cole Porter’s “All of You” has Davis quoting from Louis Armstrong’s “Basin Street Blues” in his solo that takes out the tune, and Coltrane has never respected a melody so much.


But it’s in “Bye-Bye Blackbird” that we get to hear the band gel as a unit, beginning with Davis playing through the melody, muted and sweet, slightly flatted out until he reaches the harmony on the refrain and begins his solo on a high note. Garland is doing more than comping in the background; he’s slipping chord shapes into those interval cracks and shifting them as the rhythm section keeps “soft time.” When Coltrane moves in for his break, rather than Davis’ spare method, he smatters notes quickly all though the melodic body of the tune and Garland has to compensate harmonically, moving the mode and tempo up a notch until his own solo can bring it back down again. Which he does with a gorgeous all-blues read of the tune utilizing first one hand and then both hands to create fat harmonic chords to bring Davis back in to close it out. It’s breathtaking how seamless it all is. There’s little else to say except that ‘Round About Midnight is among the most essential of Davis’ Columbia recordings. (by Thom Jurek)


Miles Davis with french actress Jeanne Moreau in 1957

Paul Chambers (bass)
John Coltrane (saxophone)
Miles Davis (trumpet)
Red Garland (piano)
Philly Joe Jones (drums)

01. ‘Round Midnight (Monk/Hanighen/Williams) 5.58
02. Ah-Leu-Cha (Parker) 5.53
03. All Of You (Porter) 7.03
04. Bye Bye Blackbird (Dixon/Henderson) 7.57
05. Tadd’s Delight (Dameron) 4.29
06. Dear Old Stockholm (Traditional/Getz) 7.52
07. Two Bass Hit (Lewis/Gillespie) 3.45
08. Little Melonae (McLean) 7.22
09. Budo (Powell/Davis) 4.17
10. Sweet Sue, Just You (Harris/Young) 3.40