Rachel Grimes – The Clearing (2015)

CDFrontCover1Rachel Grimes is a pianist, composer, and arranger based in Kentucky – most renowned for her work in Rachel’s, the groundbreaking chamber-rock ensemble that introduced an entire generation of underground rock fans to the unexpected similarities and appeal of neoclassical music. Grimes has toured the world as a solo pianist, and as a collaborator with chamber ensembles such as Portland Cello Project, astrïd, Cicada, the Amsterdam Sinfonietta trio, and Orchestra Kandinskij. Unhurried, at times fleeting, and stretching into the sky, The Clearing is a winding path of transient moments exploring personal memory, relationships, and mystery from a deeply internal place. The music is a wide spectrum of textures in strings, harp, piano, woodwinds, and percussion. Featuring an ensemble that includes Scott Morgan (LOSCIL), Scott Moore, Kyle Crabtree (Shipping News), Amsterdam Sinfonietta, Jacob Duncan (Liberation Prophecy), and Helen Money, The Clearing reveals a broad new chapter for Rachel Grimes. (rachelgrimes.bandcamp.com)

Rachel Grimes02

Most rock musicians who’ve tried to take a flyer at classical music (or something like it) approach their compositions from a position of bombast (Emerson, Lake & Palmer), melodrama (Paul McCartney), high drama (Elvis Costello), or purposeful eccentricity (Frank Zappa). But as pianist and composer with the groundbreaking ensemble Rachel’s, Rachel Grimes showed it was possible to combine the sensibilities and tonal palettes of indie rock and chamber music in a way that flattered both styles and embraced their best qualities, and she’s continued to do so in her solo work. Grimes’ second proper solo album, 2015’s The Clearing, collects 11 short pieces (one just over a minute, another eight times that length) that Grimes first adapted from her own piano improvisations and then arranged using small ensembles of strings, woodwinds, and percussion. The titles used in The Clearing reflect a pastoral bent, celebrating the natural world outdoors, but the music reflects both the beauty and the dangers of the wilderness, finding a sense of ominous wonder amidst the trees and the night sky. Grimes writes and arranges in simple but bold strokes, allowing her accompanists to add texture and shade while the piano and strings establish melodic structures that provide a sturdy framework for the other elements.

Rachel Grimes01

Some might debate if The Clearing should be filed under classical or pop, although the use of structures and ideas gleaned from chamber music doesn’t seem pretentious or a stunt in this context, but an approach well suited to the rich minimalism of her compositions. And by the same token, the rock elements of The Clearing aren’t trundled in for effect, but grow organically from the performances of Grimes and her gifted crew, just as the recording uses approaches common to pop to reinforce compositions written for orchestral instruments. Rachel Grimes has given us a collection of new pieces that quietly dazzle with their evocative power, intelligence, and strength, and The Clearing is something lovely and truly extraordinary that ranks with the best, most enveloping music of recent memory. (by Mark Deming)

In other words: What a beautiful album ! We need to keep her name in mind !

LPBackCover

Personnel:
Kyle Crabtree (percussion)
Jacob Duncan (saxophone, clarinet)
Lisa Spurlock Gilmore (harp)
Rachel Grimes (piano)
Aaron May (bass)
Jennifer Potochnic (oboe)
+
cello:
Helen Money – Wendy Doyle – Örs Köszeghy
+
viola:
Christian Frederickson – David Marks – Melinda Odle
Violin – Adriane Tilanus, Jane Halliday, Scott Moore

Rachel Grimes01

Tracklist:
1 The Air 1:33
2 The Clearing 7:55
3 The Air of Place 1:03
4 The Herald 4:29
5 The Air in Time 1:27
6 In the Vapor with the Air Underneath 4:44
7 Transverse Plane Vertical 2:51
8 Transverse Plane Horizontal 3:10
9 The Air, Her Heart 1:56
10 Further Foundation 6:16
11 The Air at Night 7:01
12 And Today Was Her Birthday 6:19

Music composed by Rachel Grimes

Labels

*
**

Rachel Grimes03

 

John Mayall – A Hard Road (1967)

FrontCover1A Hard Road is the third album (and second studio album) recorded by John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers, released in 1967. It features Peter Green on lead guitar, John McVie on bass, Aynsley Dunbar on drums and John Almond on saxophone. Tracks 5, 7 and 13 feature the horn section of Alan Skidmore and Ray Warleigh. Peter Green sings lead vocals on “You Don’t Love Me” and “The Same Way”.

The album reached #8 on the UK album charts which is Mayall’s third biggest chart next to Bare Wires and Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton which reached #3 and #6, respectively.

The cover art and the original LP sleeve design are by Mayall. In 2003 and 2006 two different expanded versions of the album were released. (by wikipedia)

Eric Clapton is usually thought of as John Mayall’s most important right-hand man, but the case could also be made for his successor, Peter Green. The future Fleetwood Mac founder leaves a strong stamp on his only album with the Bluesbreakers, singing a few tracks and writing a couple, including the devastating instrumental “Supernatural.” JohnMayall01AGreen’s use of thick sustain on this track clearly pointed the way to his use of guitar riffs with elongated, slithery tones on Fleetwood Mac’s “Albatross” and “Black Magic Woman,” as well as anticipating some aspects of Carlos Santana’s style. Mayall acquits himself fairly well on this mostly original set (with occasional guest horns), though some of the material is fairly mundane. Highlights include the uncharacteristically rambunctious “Leaping Christine” and the cover of Freddie King’s “Someday After a While (You’ll Be Sorry).” (by Richie Unterberger)

Recorded in October and November of the previous year, A Hard Road was released on the Decca label in February 1967. In addition to the leader on vocals, guitar, harmonica, piano, and organ, Green on guitar, John McVie (soon to contribute the third syllable to Fleetwood Mac) on bass, either Hughie Flint or Aynsley Dunbar on drums, this version of the Bluesbreakers also packed brass in its pocket. John Almond and Alan Skidmore added sax while Ray Warleigh contributed ‘wind instruments’.

A Hard Road is a solid sixties British blues album. Mayall’s vocals were never the slam-you-against-the-wall kind, but he truly sings with character. Eight of the fourteen tracks are Mayall originals with Green getting onto the scoreboard with two songs. Indeed, where this LP really flies is when Peter Green steps forward, as on the instrumental number “The Stumble” and his own “The Super-Natural”, two highlights. The latter piece Peter Green 1967is worth the price of admission alone. In fact the sustained opening note of “The Super-Natural” is worth the entry fee.

I like the echoing “Another kind of love” (another Mayall why-doesn’t-she-behave-properly-and-love-me-the-way-I-deserve song) where the saxes sing in the background and Green soars in the foreground. The sinewy R&B of “Leaping Christine” is foot-tappingly energetic and another highlight. And any blues album containing a cover of Elmore James “Dust my blues” is OK by me. This Bluesbreakers version really pops; fast, driving, committed to an absence of dust.

The cover painting, a wintery portrait of the band by John Mayall himself, fits perfectly with a bluesy English February; moody and downbeat.

This is British blues played with respect for the sources but keen to differentiate. On A Hard Road John Mayall and his band mostly succeed. Less than compulsive, perhaps, yet an entertaining listen. (Vinyl Connection)

LPBackCover

Personnel:
Aynsley Dunbar (drums)
Peter Green (guitar, vocals)
John Mayall (vocals, guitar, harmonica, keyboards)
John McVie (bass)
+
John Almond (saxophone)
Hughie Flint (drums)
Alan Skidmore (saxophone)
Ray Warleigh (wind instruments)

JohnMayall02

Tracklist:
01. A Hard Road (Mayall) 3.11
02. It’s Over (Mayall) 2.51
03. You Don’t Love Me (Cobbs) 2.51
04. The Stumble (King/Thompson) 2.54
05. Another Kinda Love (Mayall) 3.07
06. Hit The Highway (Mayall) 2.18
07. Leaping Christine (Mayall) 2.24
08. Dust My Blues (James) 2.51
09. There’s Always Work (Mayall) 1.38
10. The Same Way (Green) 2.12
11. The Supernatural (Green) 2.55
12. Top Of The Hill (Mayall) 2.41
13. Someday After Awhile (You’ll Be Sorry) (Mayall) 3.02
14. Living Alone (Mayall) 2.24

LabelB1

*
**

Status Quo – Hello (1973)

FrontCover1Hello! is the sixth studio album by the British rock band Status Quo. Released in September 1973, it was the first of four Quo albums to top the UK Albums Chart. It was also the first Quo album on which drummer John Coghlan was credited with songwriting.

Keyboard player Andy Bown and saxophonist Stewart Blandamer both played on “Forty Five Hundred Times”. This was Bown’s first appearance on a Status Quo album; he guested on several subsequent releases, and became a permanent member of the line-up a few years later.

1973 started for Status Quo with the belated chart success, in January, of the 1972 releases on their new label Vertigo, leading to their first top ten entry on the album charts and a long-awaited return to the top ten of the singles chart. As a result, Status Quo’s previous record company Pye decided to release a single from their 1971 album Dog of Two Head. The single, Francis Rossi and Bob Young’s “Mean Girl”, reached No. 20 upon its release. It was backed by the Rossi/Parfitt composition “Everything”, taken from the band’s 1970 album Ma Kelly’s Greasy Spoon.

Status Quo01

In August 1973 the only single from the new album, Rossi and Young’s “Caroline”, was released, reaching No. 5. It was the group’s first single to reach the UK top five. Its B-side was a non-album track titled “Joanne”, written by Alan Lancaster and Rick Parfitt.

Hello! was released in September that year, and became the most successful album the band had ever released. Initial copies of the record on vinyl came with a large black and white poster of the group. Of the eight tracks on the album, only six of them were new. “Caroline” had already been heard by the public as a single release, while “Softer Ride” had served as the B-side to the band’s “Paper Plane” single from their previous album Piledriver.

Single

No other singles were issued from the album, although a live version of “Roll Over Lay Down” appeared on a three-track EP released in May 1975, which reached No. 9 in the UK Singles Chart and No. 2 on the Australian Singles Chart, making it the band’s only top-ten hit Down Under.

This was the band’s first album to feature the band’s name written in the now-familiar font used on most subsequent album covers. (by wikipedia)

Status Quo03
Following the success of Piledriver, Status Quo opted not to change a thing, unfurling the mind-numbing boogie attack of Hello! The strategy worked, resulting in the group’s first number one album and in “Caroline,” its first top-five single. Mostly, the album succeeds in spite of itself. “Roll Over Lay Down,” not immediately impressive, builds into a tizzy over the course of five minutes. It is one-upped by “Caroline,” the definitive Status Quo rock song, a not particularly hard or fast four-on-the-floor stomp saved by a massive, deceptively simple guitar hook. “Forty-Five Hundred Times,” less catchy but harder rocking, is brutally long, but is rescued by its placement as the album’s closer. In between, the group, writing in some instances with coordinator Robert Young, offer up slight variations of their standard formula. Several of those, like the rickety, Beatlesque “Claudie” and the bluesy “Softer Ride” transcend their three-chords-and-a-riff construction enough to render them decent, memorable pop songs. Down to the proto-Spinal Tap black-on-black cover, this was the vanguard of British denim rock in 1975, and given the narrow conceptual and technical limits within which the Status Quo had to work, it has held up well, though it is certainly not for the faint of heart or attention span. Clearly the product of a band at their commercial and creative peak, Hello! wears its strengths and weaknesses well: not particularly flashy or intelligent, but without exception confident, comfortable and fun. (by Steve May)

LPBackCover1

Personnel:
John Coghlan (drums, percussion)
Alan Lancaster (bass, vocals)
Rick Parfitt (guitar, piano, vocals)
Francis Rossi (guitar, vocals)
+
Andy Bown (keyboards)

Inlet02

Tracklist:
01. Roll Over Lay Down (Rossi/Parfitt/Lancaster/Coghlan/Young) 5.41
02. Claudie (Rossi/Young) 4.02
03. A Reason For Living (Rossi/Parfitt) 3.42
04. Blue Eyed Lady (Parfitt/Lancaster)
05. Caroline (Rossi/Young) 4.17
06. Softer Ride (Parfitt/Lancaster) 4.00
07. And It’s Better Now (Rossi/Young) 3.18
08. Forty Five Hundred Times (Rossi/Parfitt) 9.54

LabelB1

*
**

FromTheMakersOf

More from Status Quo:

More

John Renton – Half In Half Out (1975)

FrontCover1John Renton was a singer and multi-instrumentalist (guitar, keyboards, harmonica, etc.). Born in India, lived for a shirt time in England and then moved to Vancouver, Canada where he first worked as session musician in the 1960s.

During the Sixties he played in locals bands like
The Raja and Three To One before he tried to start a shortlived solo career.

And this album is a pretty good one … a great mixture between Folk-Rock with some Psych elements (“Picture Tree”, “Monday Morning”).

Unfortunately I gave no idea what was happened with John Renton after recording this beautiful album.

A forgotten treasure ot the Seventies (including a great cover) !

Single

This first and last solo album of this Canadian musician, released by the label “Reprise Records”, was not reprinted on the CD …

So you hear another vinyl rip by myself.

And … Hey … Mr. John Renton … where are you now ?

BackCover1

Personnel:
Paul Beedham (drums)
Susie Campbell (background vocals)
Hagood Hardy (vibraphone, marimba)
John Hartford (banjo, fiddle)
Jerry Lester  (bass)
John Renton (guitar, vocals, harmonica percussion)
Pat Riccio (keyboards)
Lance Saegusa (guitar)
Don Thompson (flute, reeds)

TestpressingFC
Frontcover of the test pressing

Tracklist:
01. In The Middle (Renton/Bay) 2.27
02. When I Talk (Renton) 3.07
03. Monday Morning (Renton/Bay) 2.45
04. City Walking Blues (Renton/Bay) 3.22
05. You Know (Renton/Beckwith) 2.16
06. Half In, Half Out (Renton/Bay) 4,01
07. Darkness And Light (Renton/Bay) 3.45
08. Picture Tree (Renton/Bay) 4.46
09. Down Parade (Renton/Bay) 3.57

LabelB1

*
**

InletsThe inlets

TestpressingLabelA+BTestpressing Labels A + B

The Rolling Stones – It’s Only Rock ‘N Roll (1974)

FrontCover1It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll is the 12th British and 14th American studio album by The Rolling Stones, released in 1974. It was the last Rolling Stones album for guitarist Mick Taylor and the songwriting and recording of the album’s title track had a connection to Taylor’s eventual replacement, Ronnie Wood. The album also marked the 10th anniversary since the release of the band’s debut album, The Rolling Stones. It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll combines the core blues and rock ‘n’ roll-oriented sound with elements of funk and reggae. It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll reached number one in the United States and number two in the UK.

Though it wasn’t as successful as their prior albums, It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll was an important transitional album for the Rolling Stones. Long-time producer Jimmy Miller was out, and the album was self-produced by guitarist Keith Richards and singer Mick Jagger under the pseudonym “The Glimmer Twins”. Guitarist Mick Taylor missed the initial recording sessions with health problems, and ended up quitting the Rolling Stones a few months after the album’s release. The rest of the instrumentation included bassist Bill Wyman and drummer Charlie Watts, as well as frequent collaborators Ian Stewart, Nicky Hopkins, and Billy Preston, and featured the first appearance of percussionist Ray Cooper, who would continue to work with the Rolling Stones into the 1980s.

RollingStones1974_01

The title track bears special note as it was recorded separately from the rest of the album. The basic rhythm track had been laid down by members of the Faces, including rhythm guitarist Ronnie Wood and drummer Kenney Jones during a jam session with Mick Jagger, David Bowie, and bassist Willie Weeks. Jagger liked the song so much, he brought the basic track to Richards, who added some guitar overdubs, and after some polishing, was put on the album as-is. After Taylor left the Rolling Stones at the end of 1974, the band would approach Wood to become a full-time member.

Work began on It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll following the Rolling Stones’ autumn 1973 European tour. Production began in November at Munich, Germany’s Musicland Studios. According to guitarist Keith Richards, “We were really hot (off the road) and ready just to play some new material.” The recording sessions were attended by Belgian painter Guy Peellaert, who Mick Jagger invited to do the album cover after seeing his work in the book Rock Dreams, which featured illustrations of various rock musicians such as the Stones. Peellaert eventually painted the band as “rock deities,” descending a temple staircase, surrounded by young girls and women worshiping them in Grecian clothing. The artist refused to sign a deal of exclusivity, and in 1974 provided the album art for David Bowie’s Diamond Dogs.

Singles

The album was at first developed as a half-live, half-studio production with one side of the album featuring live performances from the Stones’ European tour while the other side was to be composed of newly recorded cover versions of the band’s favourite R&B songs. Covers recorded included a take of Dobie Gray’s “Drift Away”, Jimmy Reed’s “Shame Shame Shame,” and The Temptations’ “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg.” Soon the band began working off riffs by Richards and new ideas by Mick Jagger and the original concept was scrapped in favour of an album with all-new material. The cover of “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg” was the only recording to make the cut, while the “Drift Away” cover is a popular bootleg.

RollingStones1974_02

It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll marked the Stones’ first effort in the producer’s chair since Their Satanic Majesties Request, and the first for Jagger and Richards under their pseudonym “The Glimmer Twins.” On the choice to produce, Richards said at the time:

“I think we’d come to a point with Jimmy (Miller) where the contribution level had dropped because it’d got to be a habit, a way of life, for Jimmy to do one Stones album a year. He’d got over the initial sort of excitement which you can feel on Beggars Banquet and Let It Bleed. Also, Mick and I felt that we wanted to try and do it ourselves because we really felt we knew much more about techniques and recording and had our own ideas of how we wanted things to go. Goats Head Soup hadn’t turned out as we wanted to – not blaming Jimmy or anything like that… But it was obvious that it was time for a change in that particular part of the process of making records.”[2]

Starting with this release, all future Rolling Stones albums would either be produced by themselves or in collaboration with an outside producer.

Most of the album’s backing tracks were recorded first at Musicland; solo vocals were recorded later by Jagger, about whom Richards would say, “he often comes up with his best stuff alone in the studio with just an engineer.”

Inlet02A

The song “Luxury” showed the band’s growing interest in reggae music, while “Till the Next Goodbye” and “If You Really Want to Be My Friend” continued their immersion in ballads. Seven of the album’s 10 songs crack the four-minute mark, a feature that would come to be disparaged during the rising punk rock scene of the late 1970s.

Ronnie Wood, a long-time acquaintance of the band, began to get closer to the Rolling Stones during these sessions after he invited Mick Taylor to play on his debut album, I’ve Got My Own Album to Do. Taylor spent some time recording and hanging out at Wood’s house The Wick. By chance, Richards was asked one night by Wood’s wife at the time, Krissy, to join them at the guitarist’s home.[citation needed] While there, Richards recorded some tracks with Wood and quickly developed a close friendship, with Richards going as far as moving into Wood’s guest room.[citation needed] Jagger soon entered the mix and it was here that the album’s lead single and title track, “It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It)”, was first recorded. Wood worked closely on the track with Jagger, who subsequently took the song and title for their album. The released version of this song features Wood on 12-string acoustic guitar.

It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll was Mick Taylor’s last album with the Rolling Stones, and he played on just seven of the 10 tracks (he did not play on tracks 2, 3 or 6).

RollingStones1974_04

Similar to receiving no writing credits on the Stones’ previous album, Goats Head Soup, Taylor reportedly had made songwriting contributions to “Till the Next Goodbye” and “Time Waits for No One,” but on the album jacket, all original songs were credited to Jagger/Richards. Taylor said in 1997:

“I did have a falling out with Mick Jagger over some songs I felt I should have been credited with co-writing on It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll. We were quite close friends and co-operated quite closely on getting that album made. By that time Mick and Keith weren’t really working together as a team so I’d spend a lot of time in the studio.”[6]

Taylor’s statement contradicts Jagger’s earlier comment concerning the album. Jagger stated in a 1995 Rolling Stone interview about “Time Waits for No One” that Taylor “maybe threw in a couple of chords.”

Alongside the usual outside contributors, namely Billy Preston, Nicky Hopkins and unofficial member Ian Stewart, Elton John sideman Ray Cooper acted as percussionist for the album. Several songs were finished songs and overdubs and mixing were performed at Jagger’s home, Stargroves, in the early summer of 1974. (by wikipedia)

RollingStones1974_03

It’s uneven, but at times It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll catches fire. The songs and performances are stronger than those on Goats Head Soup; the tossed-off numbers sound effortless, not careless. Throughout, the Stones wear their title as the “World’s Greatest Rock & Roll Band” with a defiant smirk, which makes the bitter cynicism of “If You Can’t Rock Me” and the title track all the more striking, and the reggae experimentation of “Luxury,” the aching beauty of “Time Waits for No One,” and the agreeable filler of “Dance Little Sister” and “Short and Curlies” all the more enjoyable. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

“It’s Only Rock n Roll”, like it’s predecessor “Goats Head Soup” and follow up, ( a couple of years later), “Black and Blue ” are underrated albums. The title track “It’s Only Rock n Roll” and “If You Can’t Rock Me” are the Stones at their swaggering best. “Dance Little Sister” is in the same vein. “Time Waits For No One” is a beautiful song. “Fingerprint File”, a great number. “Luxury” another favorite. “Beggars Banquet”, “Let It Bleed”, Sticky Fingers” and “Exile on Main Street” are masterpieces. But the other two mentioned and this one are great albums.”Till the next goodbye” is a lovely song. (by Graham Paterson)

BackCover1

Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals, guitar on 04 – 10.) (4)
Keith Richards (guitar, bass on 01., background vocals)
Mick Taylor (guitar, bass on 10.)
Charlie Watts (drums, percussion)
Bill Wyman (bass, synthesizer on 05. + 10.)
+
Ray Cooper (percussion on 01., 02., 05. + 06.)
Nicky Hopkins (piano on 04. – 06., 08. + 10.)
Charlie Jolly (tabla on 10.)
Ed Leach (cowbell on 02.)
Blue Magic (background vocals on 08.)
Billy Preston (piano on 01., 02. + 10, clavinet on 02. + 10., organ on 08.)
Ian Stewart – piano (3, 7, 9)
+
Basic track on “It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It)”:
David Bowie (background vocals)
Kenney Jones (drums)
Willie Weeks (bass)
Ronnie Wood (guitar, background vocals)

Muro do Classic Rock

Tracklist:
01. If You Can’t Rock Me 3.48
02. Ain’t Too Proud To Beg 3.32
03. It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It) 5.06
04. Till The Next Goodbye 4.39
05. Time Waits For No One 6.48
06. Luxury 5.03
07. Dance Little Sister 4.12
08. If You Really Want To Be My Friend 6.19
09. Short And Curlies 2.45
10. Fingerprint File 7.01

All tracks written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards,
except “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg” which was written by Norman Whitfield and Eddie Holland

LabelB1

*
**

JaggerObermaier

Mick Jagger & Uschi Obermaier in the “La Cave” club, Munich/Germany, 1974

Roy Orbinson – Cry Softly Lonely One (1968)

FrontCover1Cry Softly Lonely One is the twelfth music album recorded by Roy Orbison, and his sixth for MGM Records. The album was released in October 1967 and included two singles: “Communication Breakdown” and the title tune, both of which were minor hits in the States early that year. “Communication Breakdown” did much better in Australia, where it reached #9 in February. According to the official Roy Orbison discography by Marcel Riesco,[2] the London Records release (non U.S.) of this album featured the extra track “Just One Time”. (by wikipedia)

Cry Softly, Lonely One had a tremendously convoluted recording history, interrupted as it was for work on two other projects (including the shooting and soundtrack of The Fastest Guitar Alive) and not released until 1967. That was sad because that album caught Orbison firing on all cylinders in his best voice ever, and with Joe Melson backing him vocally on the classic Monument sides with a killer array of songs — from the opener, “She,” across to the title track by way of “Communication Breakdown” — had this record come out in 1964, it might well have charted high behind any of those songs, or the more rhythm-driven “Girl Like Mine.”

RoyOrbinson01

In late 1967, however, the album was an anachronism (the other irony is that, had it come out 18 months later, it might have ridden the same roots rock wave as Elvis Presley’s Memphis albums, or Joe South, to success). Some of it, such as “That’s a No No,” was a true throwback to an earlier pop/rock era, but most of what was here was a great showcase for Orbison’s classic sound as it had evolved, oblivious to the musical trends around him (and at least he never tried to emulate the psychedelic sounds of the period in the way that the Everly Brothers did on their live album). (by Bruce Eder)

BackCover1

Personnel:
Roy Orbinson (vocals)
+
a bunch of unknown studio musicians

Single

Tracklist:
01. She (Orbison/Dees) 2.42
02. Communication Breakdown (Orbison/Dees) 3.01
03. Cry Softly, Lonely One (Gant/Melson) 2.53
04. Girl Like Mine (Mathis) 2.20
05. It Takes One (To Know One) (Orbison/Dees) 3.00
06. Just Let Me Make Believe (Blackwell) 2.27
07. Here Comes The Rain, Baby (Newbury) 2.52
08. That’s A No-No (Orbison/Dees) 2.10
09. Memories (Orbison/Dees) 2.53
10. Time To Cry (Orbison/Dees) 2.r42
11. Only Alive (R.Blackwell/D.Blackwell)  2.09
12. Just One Time (Gibson) 2.15

LabelB1

*
**

RoyOrbinson02
Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988)