Crash Test Dummies – The Ghosts That Haunt Me (1991)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Ghosts That Haunt Me is the 1991 debut album by the Canadian folk rock group Crash Test Dummies. It featured their hit “Superman’s Song”.

The artwork featured on the cover, and throughout the liner notes, is by 19th-century illustrator Gustav Doré and is from ‘The Rime of the Ancient Mariner’ by Samuel Taylor Coleridge. The same painting would later be used for black metal band Judas Iscariot’s final album To Embrace the Corpses Bleeding in 2002.

The artworks on the booklet of the album are by 19th-century illustrator Gustav Doré and are from ‘The Rime of the Ancient Mariner’ by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, except “The Flying Man” by French novelist Nicolas Edme Restif de la Bretonne and is from ‘The Discovery of the Austral Continent by a Flying Man’, 1781. (by wikipedia)

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My introduction to Crash Test Dummies came on June 12, 1994 when I saw them open for Elvis Costello on his Brutal Youth tour. The extent of their exposure at that time was their sole hit, “Mmm Mmm Mmm Mmm,” and, to a far lesser extent, “Superman’s Song” off of their debut album, The Ghosts That Haunt Me, which was released on this date, April 5, 1991.

Since then, Crash Test Dummies have become a bit of a cult-following type of outfit and I often feel that I’m a cult of one, since I talk to few people who recall them at all (oh, that “Mmm Mmm” song…), much less count themselves among fans. And at this point, even the term “band” is a bit inaccurate, as Brad Roberts is the sole remaining member of a group that debuted 26 years ago. But let’s back up.

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Out of Winnipeg, Manitoba, CTD introduced themselves with a college radio-friendly folk-rock number, the aforementioned “Superman’s Song,” a reflection on the lack of humanity in modern-day society (the video plays it as an elegy for Superman, with fellow supers attending the funeral). The song starts with a solo cello intro and flows into a piano-and-strings arrangement that is unlike most of their work. As such, it’s an odd choice for a lead-off single, since it doesn’t give a real feel for the album – or, indeed, the band’s work overall. Ellen Reid (the last member to remain with Brad Roberts as a Crash Test Dummy until she unofficially retired in the new millennium) provides the piano and harmonizing backing vocals. It’s a great song, just not like any other in their oeuvre.

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Overall, the album is more upbeat than its lead single, at times featuring a bit of a Celtic lilt to the music, courtesy of Ellen Reid and Benjamin Darvill. Though the lyrics on the record are more straightforward and less idiosyncratic than they would become on future releases, songs like “Comin’ Back Soon” hint at some of Brad’s whimsy with lines like, “I’ve all my wisdom teeth / Two up top and two beneath / And yet I recognize / My mouth says things that aren’t so wise…” The song goes on to sing the praises of his sweetheart, who has left him, and who wasn’t a very nice person to begin with.

Much of the album has a bucolic tilt to it, with tracks like “Here On Earth,” and, even more particularly, “The Country Life” extolling folksy wisdom and downhome sensibilities, crying the benefits of rural living over the sturm und drang of city life. “I would learn to ride on rodeo / I’ll wear shiny boots and a cowboy hat so that nobody’d ever know / We’d once been city folks who owned sporty cars and fancy homes…” The way he sings it and the accompanying music convince me he really believes it.

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The Ghosts That Haunt Me is the most traditional album that the Dummies ever made. There’s nothing kitsch or overtly clever about it. Brad is just singing, and while his voice is richly baritone and utterly unmistakable, he isn’t forcing the depth and rumble that would characterize later albums. He wrote all of the songs on the album (with the exception of a cover of The Replacements‘ “Androgynous” and “Thick-Necked Man,” Ben Darvill’s tale of comeuppance) but he wrote them without guile or condescension, something that wouldn’t necessarily hold true on future releases.

I’ve been a big fan of Crash Test Dummies since I first saw them live (I went out the next day and bought both of the albums that were out at the time) though I can certainly understand why the appeal might not be universal. Too, it doesn’t really help that their breakthrough hit (and, thusly, one-hit wonder) was so off-kilter. I remember the first time I saw them and Brad changed the third verse of “Mmm Mmm Mmm Mmm” to something about a kid keeping a tooth or tonsils in a jar. After the song ended, he said (and I’m paraphrasing), “I’ve been told it’s ill-advised to change up a verse in your one big hit, but then I’ve also been told that it’s ill-advised to release a single with no words in the title.”

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That mentality, it seems to me, has sort of characterized the Brad Roberts approach. Every album takes on a different musical style – folk followed by pop followed by hard rock followed by electronica followed by country followed by… you get the picture. It hasn’t helped him commercially, but as a longtime fan, I appreciate the adventurous undertaking of each new release and love the fact that, while I never know just what to expect, I know that, at the root of things, it’s going to center on Brad’s voice and lyrics. And that’s what keeps me coming back. (treacherousfriends.blog)

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Personnel:
Vince Lambert (drums)
Ellen Reid (keyboards, accordion, tin whistle, background vocals)
Brad Roberts (vocals, guitar)
Dan Roberts (bass)
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Steve Berlin (percussion)
Benjamin Darvill (mandolin, harmonica)
Bob Doige (recorder on 10.)
Greg Leisz (pedal steel-guitar on 09.)
Garth Reid (banjo on 02.)
Lynn Selwood (cello on 03.)
Bill Zulak (violin on 01., 04. + 10.)

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Tracklist:
01. Winter Song (B.Roberts) 4.01
02. Comin’ Back Soon (The Bereft Man’s Song) (B.Roberts) 4.28
03. Superman’s Song (B.Roberts) 4.31
04. The Country Life (B.Roberts) 4.02
05. Here On Earth (I’ll Have My Cake) (B.Roberts) 3.04
06. The Ghosts That Haunt Me (B.Roberts) 3.45
07. Thick-Necked Man (Darvill) 3.20
08. Androgynous (Westerberg) 2.37
09. The Voyage (B.Roberts) 3.14
10. At My Funeral (B.Roberts) 4.03

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Winter Song:

I can’t say that I miss my old dog much
And I’ve never looked back since I left home long ago
But I hoped a trip into the country
Would help remind me all the things I used to know

That’s what I came for
That’s what I hoped for

There once was good blood in the breeze here
We rode across the lake each new year
What have I remembered
What did this used to be

The ice, it used to shine upon our river
It was a mirror that the cold dark water ran way deep beneath
And here were many years of winter drownings
I kept track of these things as they were told to me

And that’s what I came for
That’s what I hoped for

There once was good blood in the breeze here
We rode across the lake each new year
What have I remembered
What did this used to be

The changes of the year were once a blessing
Well this year they’re the seasons of my discontent
But I cannot rewrite my old diaries
I can only recall all the things that came and went

Simon & Garfunkel / The Everly Brothers – Atlanta (2003)

GARFUNKEL SIMONIn 1968, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel sang about two old friends at 70 ”sharing a park bench silently.” Simon and Garfunkel, now both 62, opened a sold-out three-night stand at Madison Square Garden last night, singing ”Old Friends.” They are on a reunion tour — doing their first shows together since 1993 — that’s likely to sell more than $50 million worth of tickets.

That’s not bad for an act that hasn’t bothered with new material in a generation. The best they could do was have Mr. Garfunkel join in on songs from Mr. Simon’s solo career since they broke up in in the mid-1970’s.

The songs Mr. Simon wrote for Simon and Garfunkel in his 20’s were acutely conscious of time passing. Songs like ”Hazy Shade of Winter,” ”Leaves That Are Green” and ”Old Friends,” and one the duo performed from Mr. Simon’s solo career, ”Slip Slidin’ Away,” see the present disappearing into a past that can never be recaptured. ”Preserve your memories,” the duo sang, ”they’re all that’s left you.” It was a theme the concert embodied far too well.

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In the 1960’s, Simon and Garfunkel offered thoughtful, lapidary music that recognized turbulent times in songs like ”The Sound of Silence.” But Simon and Garfunkel were at their least graceful making grand statements, and they increasingly turned inward, following Mr. Simon’s more whimsical lyrics and expanding musical vocabulary.
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They were comforting without seeming escapist; Mr. Simon’s lyrics were too smart, his music too intricate.

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What Simon and Garfunkel are selling now, at up to $250 a ticket, isn’t harmony. Mr. Simon, both songwriter and guitarist, and Mr. Garfunkel, whose job was to add airy upper harmonies and sing an occasional Simon song by himself, have been famously estranged through the years.

On stage, Mr. Simon said they started singing together at 13 and started arguing at 14. And since they first broke up in the 1970’s, they have found it increasingly difficult to recreate the precise vocal blend preserved on Simon and Garfunkel albums. A live album, like the one they made from a 1981 reunion, would need a lot of doctoring.

Mr. Garfunkel briefly put an arm around Mr. Simon as they began ”Old Friends,” and S&G03while he made a point of calling Mr. Simon’s songwriting a gift, he still seems to have trouble believing he’s the second banana. When he had a foreground part in a song, he sustained it to the point of dragging the tempo; ”I Am a Rock” and ”The Boxer” were nearly transformed from folk-rockers to dirges. When Mr. Garfunkel had a high note in the background, he often pushed it, perhaps because he now has to strain to reach it.

Mr. Simon’s voice has, like his songwriting, grown more supple and conversational through the years. But Mr. Garfunkel’s voice has frayed; it buzzes like a drafty old house. When the duo traded verses on formerly solo Simon songs like ”El Condor Pasa,” ”American Tune,” and on Mr. Garfunkel’s old showpiece, ”Bridge Over Troubled Water,” the contrasts were glaring.

Although nostalgia was thick in the arena from an audience filled with baby boomers, Simon and Garfunkel didn’t try to replicate their younger selves. Sometimes, as in ”Scarborough Fair,” they simplified the music, using a cello to replace what had been vocal counterpoint; sometimes Mr. Simon sang improvisational variants of his old melodies.

S&G04‘The Sound of Silence,” which was released during the 1960’s in an acoustic guitar version but became a hit after as a folk-rock remake, segued between both versions. The band also added touches of Mr. Simon’s more recent delvings into world music. ”The 59th Street Bridge Song” included a slide version of a didgeridoo, an Australian wooden trumpet.

Singing the old songs together, Simon and Garfunkel don’t follow some of the rudiments of vocal harmony groups, like breathing in the same place or watching each others’ faces.

It’s something that might not have occurred to a spectator if Simon and Garfunkel weren’t touring with the duo they learned their harmonies from, the Everly Brothers.

Don Everly, 66, and Phil Everly, 64, haven’t always gotten along, either. But when, in mid-concert, they sang their hits like ”Wake Up Little Susie” and ”All I Have to Do Is Dream,” their brotherly unanimity was virtually untouched by time. (by Jon Pareles)

Recorded live at the Phillips Arena, Atlanta, GA, December 20, 2003
Soundboard Recording

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Personnel:
Art Garfunkel (vocals)
Paul Simon (vocals, guitar)
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Warren Bernhard (piano)
Jamey Haddad (percussion)
Jim Keltner (drums)
Pino Palladino (bass)
Larry Saltzman: Guitar;
Rob Schwimmer (keyboards, theremin)
Mark Stewart (guitar, cello)
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The Everly Brothers (on 10. – 13.)
Don Everly (guitar, vocals)
Phil Everly (guitar, vocals)

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Tracklist:

Simon & Garfunkel:
01. Old Friends 3.36
02. A Hazy Shade Of Winter
03. I Am A Rock
04. America
05. At The Zoo
06. Baby Driver
07. Kathy’s Song
08. History of S&G
09. Hey Schoolgirl

The Everly Brothers:
10. Wake Up Little Suzie (The Everly Brother
11. All I Have To Do Is Dream
12. Let It Be Me
13. Bye Bye Love (with S&G) 3.14

Simon & Garfunkel:
14. Scarborough Fair (Traditional) 4.05
15. Homeward Bound 6.07
16. The Sound Of Silence 5.10
17. Mrs Robinson 5.51
18. Slip Sliding Away 5.08
19. El Conda Pasa (Traditional) 3.53
20. Keep The Customer Satisfied 3.32
21. The Only Living Boy In New York 4.32
22. American Tune 5.06
23. My Little Town 4.35
24. Bridge Over Troubled Water 8.57
25. Cecilia 4.40
26. The Boxer 8.21
27. The Leaves That Are Green 2.52
28. Feelin Groovy 7.12
29. Mrs. Robinson 3.27

All songs written by Paul Simon except as indicated

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The Byrds – Reunion Concert In San Francisco (1978)

FrontCover1.jpgIn early 1978, three of the founding members of the Byrds – Roger McGuinn, Gene Clark, and Chris Hillman – were touring the West Coast with a show in which they each played short solo sets before concluding the show as a trio, performing a handful of Byrds classics. The shows were so well received that the trio would later land a record deal and record a pair of new albums, but on February 9, 1978, fans who came to see McGuinn, Clark & Hillman at the Boarding House in San Francisco got a special surprise.

David Crosby joined his former Byrds bandmates on-stage for eight numbers, delivering a memorable performance that was the closest thing to a reunion of the original Byrds most of the audience would ever see, with only drummer Michael Clarke missing on-stage. The show was recorded by a local radio station, and Live at the Boarding House: The Historic Radio Broadcast preserves this oft-bootlegged show…

Clark performs “Silver Raven” and “Release Me Girl,” followed by Hillman singing “Bound to Fail” and “It Doesn’t Matter,” while McGuinn tackles “The Ballad of Easy Rider” and “Jolly Roger.” Then the trio teams up for three songs before Crosby takes the stage, and the foursome performs a number of Byrds favorites, including “Turn! Turn! Turn!” “Mr Tambourine Man,” “Eight Miles High,” and “Feel a Whole Lot Better.”

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If the performances are sometimes less than perfect, there’s a spontaneity and passion in this recording that makes it clear the artists really did feel something special was happening, and this was a stronger and more heartfelt reunion of one of the great American bands of the ’60s than the tremendously disappointing studio reunion that took place in 1973. Live at the Boarding House: The Historic Radio Broadcast is a rumpled treasure for Byrds fans who cherished their harmonies most of all. (The CD skips the concert opening numbers by Gene Clark for reasons unknown, though.) (by Mark Deming)

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Personnel:
Gene Clark (vocals, guitar)
Chris Hillman  (vocals, guitar, mandolin)
Roger McGuinn (vocals, guitar)
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David Crosby (vocals on 08. – 16.)

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Tracklist:

Chris Hillman:
01. Bound To Fall (Brewer/Mastin) 2.38
02. It Doesn’t Matter (Hillman/Roberts) 2.31

Roger McGuinn:
03. Ballad Of The Easy Rider (mcGuoinn) 2:11
04. Jolly Roger (McGuinn/Levy) 2.57

Gene Clark, Chris Hillman, Roger McGuinn:
05. Chestnut Mare (McGuinn/Levy) 6.10
06. Crazy Ladies (Clark/Kaye) 3.42
07. The Train Leaves Here This Morning (Clark/Dillard) 4.04

The Byrds with David Crosby:
08. Mr Tambourine Man (Dylan) 7.05
09. You Ain’t Going Nowhere (Dylan) 4.50
10. Turn! Turn! Turn! (Seeger) 2.59
11. Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door (Dylan) 5.18
12. Bye Bye Baby (Hippard/McGuinn) 3.52
13. So You Want To Be A Rock ‘n’ Roll Star (McGuinn/Hillman) 2.38
14. Interlude 0.38
15. Eight Miles High (Clark/Crosby/McGuinn) 5.05
16. I’ll Feel A Whole Lot Better (When You’re Gone) (Clark) 3.33

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Scorpions – Rio de Janeiro (2019)

FrontCover1Scorpions is a rock band from Hannover, Germany that was formed in 1965. Internationally acclaimed for their 1984 rock anthem “Rock You Like a Hurricane” as well as other popular singles such as “Big City Nights”, “No One Like You”, “Send Me an Angel”, “Still Loving You”, and “Wind of Change”, the band has sold over 100 million records worldwide. Along with metal contemporaries such as Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Iron Maiden, Judas Priest, Metallica, Whitesnake, and others, Scorpions is one of the most successful acts in heavy metal and hard rock in history as well as, by far, the most successful German rock band in the U.K. and the U.S.

After a short break they decided to cotinue … and here´s a brilliant soundboard recording from their concert at the Rock In Rio Festival.

The Scorpions were voted the best concert at Rock in Rio 2019. The Scorpions performed at Rock in Rio on Friday (the Metal Day – 4 October 2019). On stage, the band played “Cidade Maravilhosa” and used a yellow and green guitar in honor to Brazil at Rock in Rio.

And yes, these guys knows how to rock … till today !

Thanks to Chesterchaz for sharing the HDTV broadcast at Dime.

Recorded live at the Parque Olímpico, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, October 04, 2019

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Personnel:
Mikkey Dee (drums)
Matthias Jabs (guitar, background vocals)
Paweł Mąciwoda (bass, background vocals)
Klaus Meine (vocals, guitar)
Rudolf Schenker (guitar, background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Intro 8.11
02. Going Out With A Bang (Meine/Andersson/Hansen)/Make It Real (Schenker/Rarebell)  8.46
03. The Zoo (Schenker/Meine)/Coast To Coast (M.Schenker/R.Schenker) 12.13
04. ’70s Medley 8.45
04.1. Top Of The Bill (R.Schenker/Meine)
04.2. Steamrock Fever (R.Schenker/Meine)
04.3. Speedy’s Coming (R.Schenker/Meine)
04.4. Catch Your Train (Roth)
05. We Built This House (Meine/Andersson/Hansen) 4.20
06. Delicate Dance (Jabs) 5.06
07. Cidade Maravilhosa (Filho)/Send Me An Angel (R.Schenker/Meine) 6.05
08. Wind Of Change (Meine)  5.47
09. Tease Me Please Me (Meine/Jabs/Vallance/Rarebell) 8.58
10. Blackout (Meine/Rarebell/Kittelsen) 4.18
11. Big City Nights (R.Schenker/Meine) 7.46
12. Radio announcer 1.45
13. Still Loving You (R.Schenker/Meine)/Rock You Like A Hurricane (R.Schenker/Meine/ Rarebell) 15.00
14. Radio outro 4:44

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Charlie Ventura – A Charlie Ventura Concert (1953)

FrontCover1.jpgA fine swing-oriented tenor saxophonist, Ventura is best-remembered for his attempt at popularizing bebop during the tail end of the music’s mid- to late-’40s heyday. Born Charles Venturo, he came from a large, musically inclined family. His first instrument was C-melody sax. He switched to alto before eventually settling on tenor. Ventura left his day job at the Philadelphia Navy Yard in 1942 to join Gene Krupa’s band. He became a featured soloist with Krupa, playing with the drummer from 1942-1943 and 1944-1946 (working in the interim with guitarist/bandleader Teddy Powell). Ventura achieved considerable popularity while with Krupa, winning a Down Beat magazine award as best tenor saxophonist in 1945. He started his own big band in 1946 with middling results. He had more success fronting a small band, one version of which included trumpeter Conte Candoli, trombonist Bennie Green, alto saxophonist Boots Mussulli, drummer Ed Shaughnessy, and vocalists Jackie Cain and Roy Kral. Ventura recorded for small labels before getting signed to RCA Victor, which at the time wanted to capitalize on the emergence of bebop.

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An RCA executive purportedly told him that they wanted the word “bop” in the band’s name. Ventura came up with the phrase “Bop for the People,” which implied an accessible form of the music. Ventura formed a big band in 1948, but soon cut it down to eight members, retaining Cain and Kral, who were crucial components of the band’s sound. The Bop for the People band worked through 1949 (during which time Ventura employed modern jazz’s greatest saxophonist, Charlie Parker, on a record date), but in the end Ventura’s stab at making a commercial success of bop failed. Indeed, as fine a player as he was, Ventura himself was never really a bopper. During the early ’50s Ventura led another big band; formed a highly acclaimed group called the Big Four with bassist Chubby Jackson, drummer Buddy Rich, and pianist Marty Napoleon; briefly ran his own night club in Philadelphia; and also worked again with Cain and Kral. Ventura’s health was not the best, yet he continued to work with Krupa into the ’60s. After the ’50s, Ventura recorded commercially only once (in 1977, with pianist John Bunch for the Famous Door label). Still, he remained active. He worked in Las Vegas (with comedian Jackie Gleason), and fronted various groups in the ’70s and ’80s, before dying of lung cancer in 1992. (by Chris Kelsey)

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And here´s a splendid jazz set featuring excellent live performance engineering.

This is an outstanding example of live jazz performed by some of the greatest players of the day. The recording quality is little short of miraculous. Gene Norman told Los Angeles-based producer Dick Bank years later that he called RCA because Charlie Ventura was under contract with them, asking if they’d be interested in recording the concert.

They sent technicians plus tape machines. But they didn’t published the result and sold him the tapes for 100$. For this price, he purchased one of the greatest jazz concert ever recorded.  (freshsoundrecords.com)

Recorded live at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium, Pasadena, California in 1949

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Personnel:
Conti Condilo (trumpet)
Benny Green (trombone)
Roy Kral (piano)
Boots Musailli (saxophone)
Kenny O’Brien (bass)
Ed Shaughnessy (drums)
Charlie Ventura (saxophone)

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Tracklist:
01. Introduction and Theme Music 3.39
01.1. Yesterdays (Kern/Harbach)
01.2. The Peanut Vendor (Simons)
02. Euphoria (Kral/Ventura) 6.35
03. Fine And Dandy (Swift/Jones) 2.34
04. East Of Suez (Stein/Ventura) 3.26
05. If I Had You (Shaprio/Campbell/Connelly) 2.35
06. I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles (Kenbrovin/Kellete) 2.34
07. Pennies From Heaven (Johnston/Burke) 2.17
08. How High The Moon (Hamiliton/Lewis) 8.29

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CharlieVentura04(December 2, 1916 – January 17, 1992)

That Cello Guy – Love On Christmas (2018)

FrontCover1.jpgCremaine Booker (alias “That Cello Guy”) is a cellist from Dallas, TX. He has made appearances with the Sewanee Symphony, Roy “Futureman” Wooten’s Black Mozart Ensemble, Nashville Philharmonic Orchestra and Jackson Symphony. He was the recipient of the Holy Cross BachFest Scholarship, Nashville Symphony Orchestra League Thor Johnson Scholarship Finalist, and was invited to the National Society of Collegiate Scholars. Cremaine has performed masterclasses with teachers such as Julia Tanner, Eric Kutz, Peter Sheppard, and Yo-Yo Ma. Cremaine completed his undergraduate studies at the Middle Tennessee State University.

ThatCelloGuy’ was taking the internet by storm with his stunning multi-screen cello arrangements with Tina Guo, from China, is an internationally acclaimed and Grammy-nominated virtuoso acoustic/electric cellist, recording artist, and composer.

Despite having never met, these two talented musicians have been brought together by the internet and the music community to create a brilliant collaboration video of Vivaldi’s Double Cello Concerto.

So he become an internet star … and here´s very special C’hristmas album …  a real nice one !

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Personnel:
Cremaine Booker (cello)
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a bunch of other musicians

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Tracklist:
01. Intro 0.43
02. I’ll Be Home for Christmas 3.13
03. All Is Well (feat. Roz Malone) 3.55
04. Ave Maria 3.18
05. Christmas Time Is Here (feat. Roz Malone) 4.20
06. O Come, O Come Emmanuel 3.56
07. White Christmas 3.31
08. We Three Kings 4.34
09. Love On Christmas 3.34

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And here´s another Christmas tune by (O Holy Night is one of my all time favorite Christmas Songs! Enjoy my single of the great song!)

Various Artists – Crossroads Guitar Festival (2007)

FrontCover1.jpgReleased almost exactly three years after the first, tremendously successful Crossroads DVD, this double-disc documents the 2007 benefit concert for Clapton’s Crossroads Center substance abuse facility. “Guitar” is the operative word here, since all the participants are six-string players. As in the last show, the genres include country (Willie Nelson, Vince Gill), gospel (Robert Randolph), Latin rock (Los Lobos), pop (Sheryl Crow, John Mayer), jazz fusion (John McLaughlin, Jeff Beck) and lots of blues (everyone else). Some performers such as Randolph, Mayer, B.B. King, Jimmie Vaughan, Robert Cray, Hubert Sumlin, Buddy Guy, and of course Clapton return from the 2004 lineup. That was a two-day event held in Dallas, TX. This was a one day — a very long day — show moved to the home of the blues, a stadium just outside of Chicago, and features a very funny Bill Murray introducing the acts.

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Based on the sunlight, it seems to be in chronological order, or close to it. Each artist gets one or two tunes cherrypicked from longer sets which keeps this album fast paced, even at its three-hour length. Still, it would make sense to release more music on a separate DVD or even CD for those who would like to hear the rest of the material. That is especially the case with Jeff Beck and Robert Randolph, two artists that burn up the stage with abbreviated performances. A highly anticipated reunion with Clapton and his Blind Faith bandmate Steve Winwood results in three songs, “Presence of the Lord,” “Can’t Find My Way Home,” and “Had to Cry Today” from that band’s only album.

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While it sounds fine, there is a noticeable spark and edge missing from the interaction, leaving it somewhat bland and certainly anti-climactic. Derek Trucks burns through Layla’s “Anyday,” though, and Clapton sounds inspired on “Tell the Truth,” another Layla track cranked up with Trucks taking the Duane Allman slide part. Collaborations also bring out the best in some axe slingers, with Vince Gill and Albert Lee’s hot-wired “Country Boy,” and Jimmie Vaughan fronting the Robert Cray band on a sizzling slow blues “Dirty Work at the Crossroads.” (by Hal Horowitz)

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Tracklist:
01. Sonny Landreth: Hell At Home (with Eric Clapton) (Landreth) 6.38
02. John McLaughlin: Maharina (McLaughlin) 8.00
03. Doyle Bramhall II; Outside Woman Blues (Reynolds) 3.45
04. Derek Trucks Band: Highway 61 Revisited (with Johnny Winter) (Dylan) 9.17
05. Robert Randolph & The Family Band: The March (Randolph) 12.04
06. The Robert Cray Band: Poor Johnny (Cray) 6.20
07. Jimmie Vaughan: Dirty Work At The Crossroads (with The Robert Cray Band) (Brown/ Robey) 4.09
08. Hubert Sumlin: Sitting On The Top Of The World (with he Robert Cray Band & Jimmie Vaughan (Burnett) 4.29
09. B.B. King: The Thrill Is Gone (Benson/Pettie) 7.14
10. John Mayer: I Don´t Need No Doctor (Ashford/Simpson/Armstead) 7.10
11. Vince Gill: Sweet Thing (Nicholson/Gill) 5.04
12. Albert Lee: Country Boy (with Vince Gill) (Lee/Smith/Colton)
13. Eric Clapton & Sheryl Crow: Tulsa Time (with Vince Gill & Albert Lee) (Flowers) 6.32
14. Willie Nelson: On The Road Again  (with Sheryl Crow, Vince Gill & Albert Lee) (Nelson) 2.50
15. Los Lobos: Chains Of Love (Hidalgo/Pérez) 6.53
16. Jeff Beck: Big Block (Beck/Bozzio/Hymas) 5.44
17. Eric Clapton: Little Queen Of Spades (Johnson) 12.59
18. Eric Clapton & Robbie Robertson: Further On Up The Road (Robey‎/Veasey) 7.18
19. Steve Winwood & Eric Clapton: Pearly Queen (Capaldi/Winwood) 5.47
20. Steve Winwood & Eric Clapton: Had To Cry Today (Winwood) 6.24
21. Steve Winwood & Eric Clapton: Cocaine (Cale) 9.30
22. Eric Clapton & Steve Winwood: Crossroads (Johnson) 5.59
23. Buddy Guy: Stone Crazy
24. Buddy Guy: Damn Right I’ve Got The Blues (Guy) 5.21
25. Buddy Guy & Eric Clapton: Hoochie Coochie Man (Dixon) 9.18
26. Buddy Guy: Sweet Home Chicago (with Eric Clapton, Robert Cray, John Mayer, Hubert Sumlin, Jimmie Vaughan, Johnny Winter) (Johnson) 8.53

Jeff Beck2

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