Royal Scottish National Orchestra – The Man In Half Moon Street (Great Film Music By Miklos Rozsa (2014)

FrontCover1Miklós Rózsa (18 April 1907 – 27 July 1995) was a Hungarian-American composer trained in Germany (1925–1931) and active in France (1931–1935), the United Kingdom (1935–1940) and the United States (1940–1995), with extensive sojourns in Italy from 1953 onward. Best known for his nearly one hundred film scores, he nevertheless maintained a steadfast allegiance to absolute concert music throughout what he called his “double life”.

Rózsa achieved early success in Europe with his orchestral Theme, Variations, and Finale (Op. 13) of 1933, and became prominent in the film industry from such early scores as The Four Feathers (1939) and The Thief of Bagdad (1940). The latter project brought him to America when production was transferred from wartime Britain, and Rózsa remained in the United States, becoming an American citizen in 1946.

His notable Hollywood career earned him considerable fame, earning 17 Oscar nominations including three successes for Spellbound (1945), A Double Life (1947), and Ben-Hur (1959), while his concert works were championed by such major artists as Jascha Heifetz, Gregor Piatigorsky, and János Starker. (wikipedia)

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In the 1970s, Miklós Rózsa recorded three compilation albums of his film music with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra for Polydor Records, including a mix of his well-known classics with a few slightly more obscure works. Despite being very popular at the time, for some reason the recordings have never made their way onto CD, which is a great shame. This new CD from Intrada is a spiritual successor to that series, featuring music from five of the composer’s scores, including one suite that was specifically prepared for a fourth volume of the series which never materialised.

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Intrada has made several outstanding re-recordings of Rózsa’s music in the past – I love in particular their Ivanhoe and Julius Caesar recordings conducted by Bruce Broughton. This album is performed by the Royal Scottish National Orchestra – used by Varèse Sarabande for many film music re-recordings in the 1990s and early 2000s – conducted by Allan Wilson. The album opens with a suite from the 1954 romantic adventure Valley of the Kings, which is exotic and exciting and very much a product of film music’s Golden Age. The suite only lasts for five minutes but finds time to move with pace from the dashing main theme through to its romantic conclusion. It’s only a little flavour of the score, but it’s a very fine way to start the album.

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The main event follows next – seven tracks from The Man in Half Moon Street, which take up almost half of the album. The 1945 film is little-remembered today; it is about a man who has prolonged his life – and preserved his youthful appearance – by having a surgeon transplant organs to him from medical students every decade. Unfortunately, with the surgeon now ageing rapidly himself, the man (played by Nils Asther) needs to find another one willing to undertake the procedure for him. Rózsa worked on the film shortly before one of his best-known works, Double Indemnity, and the music is identifiably from that period in his career – tense and atmospheric, at times tortured and always complex, it is a compelling musical portrait of both love and anguish. The swirling main theme is hypnotic; and in stark contrast is the ravishing love theme (I particularly love the solo piano arrangement, played beautifully by Mike Lang). There’s an opulent waltz too but perhaps most impressive of all is the almost overpowering drama of “Transformation”.

Royal Scottish National Orchestra

The long-forgotten 1942 jungle adventure Jacaré is represented by its “Prelude”, a colourful theme of pace and passion. Perhaps my favourite music on the album is the fabulous eleven-minute suite from The Strange Love of Martha Ivers, a 1946 film noir starring Barbara Stanwyck, married to but not in love with Kirk Douglas (in his first ever role). The music is vintage Rózsa in every way – bold and dramatic of course and featuring one of his best love themes, a sumptuous melody blessed with a beautiful passage for solo violin, completely stunning. The composer is rightly lauded for his spectacular action/adventure themes and his game-changing dark dramatic scores of the 1940s (of which this is one) but perhaps isn’t given quite the attention he deserves for his exquisite love themes, several of which are quite heart-wrenchingly beautiful.

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The album ends as it began, with a suite from an action/adventure, this time the Humphrey Bogart picture Sahara, a WWII movie set in Libya and released while the war was still raging (in 1943). The flavoursome music, including a kind of patriotic orchestral hymn alongside some pulse-pounding action music, is a thrilling way to round off proceedings. Intrada’s album is a spectacular overview of, mostly, some lesser-known music by one of the greatest of all film composers. Stirring and emotional as well as brilliantly clever, Miklós Rózsa’s music is always so entertaining and works beautifully well in this kind of suites-and-themes form, allowing well-rounded glimpses into five of his scores that are completely musically satisfying in themselves. The performance from the RSNO is very fine, the recording by Phil Rowlands and production by Kevin Kaska to be commended. Frank K. DeWald’s liner notes are authoritative and informative. This is a brilliant album. (James Southall)

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Personnel:
Royal Scottish National Orchestra conducted by Allan Wilson
+
Mike Lang (piano on 05.)

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Tracklist:

Valley Of The Kings (1954):
01. Overture 4.56

The Man In Half Moon Street (1945):
02. Prelude And Ghostly Prologue 3.27
03. Laboratory 4.22
04. Transition I And Body Is Found 2.51
05. Waltz 2.21
06. Love Theme 3.02
07. Transformation 3.17
08. Finale 2.17

Jacaré (1942):
09. Prelude 3.05

The Strange Love Of Martha Ivers (1946):
10. Prelude / Love Part 1 / Love Part 2 10.44

Sahara (1943):
11. Suite 7.21

 

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Miklos Rozsa01Miklós Rózsa (18 April 1907 – 27 July 1995)

Joan Baez with The Grateful Dead – Unreleased Studio Album (1981)

FrontCover1And here´s another fine rarity in this crazy, little blog:

A Joan Baez studio album with the Grateful Dead backing her, was recorded in late 1981, but never released !

And I never knew this existed.

Joan Baez was dating Mickey when this happened, which is a major reason why it was created.

And we can hear some real fine compositions of Joan Baez.

Her version of “Children Of The 80s” is much better than the one that was recorded later. And “Warriors Of The Sun”is another highlight … a perfect mix between the music of Joan Baez and Grateful Dead.

And her version of the Traditional “Jack-A-Roe” really fantastic  ..

And her “Happy Birthday, Leonid Brezhnev” was another example, that she was a very political person:

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So … Listen and enjoy this rarity.

Alternate front+backcover:

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I guess this album was put together from different sources. because the sound differs from track to track.

Thanks to everyone who made these tracks available. And I add some more lyrics from this really interesting album.

Recorded at the Barn, Novato, CA 1980

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Personnel:
Joan Baez (guitar, vocals)
Jerry Garcia (guitar)
Mickey Hart (drums)
Jim McPherson (keyboards, drums)
Bob Weir (guitar)
Bobby Vega (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. (For The) Children Of The Eighties 5.41
02. Don’t Blame My Mother 4.02
03. Marriott, USA 5.47
04. Happy Birthday, Leonid Brezhnev 4.43
05. Lady Di And I 5.14
06. Lucifer’s Eyes 4.10
07. Warriors Of The Sun 8.38
08. Jack-A-Roe 4.00

All song written by Joan Baez,
except 08, which is a Traditional

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Bill Withers – Just As I Am (1971)

FrontCover1Bill Withers, the influential US soul singer who wrote Lean on Me, Ain’t No Sunshine and Lovely Day has died aged 81 of heart complications, according to a statement from his family.

Withers wrote and recorded several other major hits including Use Me and Just the Two of Us, before retiring in the mid-1980s and staying out of the public eye.

He is survived by his wife Marcia Johnson and their two children, Todd and Kori. The family statement reads:

We are devastated by the loss of our beloved, devoted husband and father. A solitary man with a heart driven to connect to the world at large, with his poetry and music, he spoke honestly to people and connected them to each other. As private a life as he lived close to intimate family and friends, his music forever belongs to the world. In this difficult time, we pray his music offers comfort and entertainment as fans hold tight to loved ones.

Lin-Manuel Miranda was among those paying tribute, writing: “Rest In Peace, maestro Bill. What a legacy.” Chance the Rapper said Withers “was really the greatest”, while Chic’s Nile Rodgers described him as “class, class and more class”

Withers’ songs are some of the most beloved in the American songbook. Ain’t No Sunshine is regarded as one of the all-time great breakup tracks, while Lean on Me, an ode to the supportive power of friendship, was performed at the inaugurations of presidents Barack Obama and Bill Clinton. Heavily influenced by the church hymns and gospel music of his childhood, it was his first and only No 1 single on the US Billboard pop charts, in 1972.

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It has also become an anthem during the coronavirus outbreak, sung by schoolchildren and in impromptu balcony renditions to show support for one another. Donald Trump’s daughter Ivanka wrote on Twitter: “There is no more appropriate time to reflect on his words than now as we lean on each other.”
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Just the Two of Us, another song of solidarity, was successfully covered by Will Smith and sampled by Eminem (as well as being spoofed by Bill Cosby and Mike Myers).

The joyous Lovely Day, with its signature 18-second-long held note, was his only UK Top 10 hit, reaching No 7 in 1977 and No 4 in 1988. Withers also won three Grammy awards from nine nominations and entered the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2015.

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Born William Harrison Withers Jr in 1938, he faced a difficult childhood in Slab Fork, West Virginia. A stutter held him back from making friends, and, after his father died when Bill was 13, his grandmother helped to raise him. Withers would write a tribute to her with the song Grandma’s Hands from his 1971 debut album Just As I Am: “Grandma’s hands / Used to issue out a warning / She’d say, ‘Billy don’t you run so fast / Might fall on a piece of glass / Might be snakes there in that grass.’” The intro was memorably sampled by Blackstreet for their 1996 R&B classic, No Diggity.

Withers spent nine years in the US Navy before pursuing a career in music. After moving to Los Angeles in 1967, he found a job making toilet seats and recorded demos through the night. Possessed of a smooth and soulful baritone, he signed to Sussex Records and enlisted Booker T Jones to produce Just As I Am. That album spawned the hit Ain’t No Sunshine, which won Withers his first Grammy for best R&B song.

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His time with Sussex Records didn’t end well. “They weren’t paying me,” he told Rolling Stone in 2015. “They looked at me and said, ‘So, I owe you some money, so what?’ I was socialised in the military. When some guy is smushing my face down, it doesn’t go down well.” He claims to have erased an entire album that he had recorded for the label in a fit of pique. “I could probably have handled that differently,” he said.

Withers signed with Columbia Records and married his second wife, Marcia Johnson, shortly afterwards, in 1976; she eventually became his manager. Withers continued having hit records with Columbia, including the laid-back and optimistic Lovely Day. After three albums in three years, Withers claimed Columbia’s head of A&R, Mickey Eichner, prevented him from going into the studio, leaving a gap of seven years between ’Bout Love (1978) and Watching You Watching Me (1985).

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After the latter failed to chart, Withers went into early retirement. The 2009 documentary, Still Bill, explored his reasons for quitting the music industry and painted the picture of a fulfilled musician and human being. Writing in the Chicago Sun-Times, film critic Roger Ebert said: “[Withers] still lives and survives as a happy man. Still Bill is about a man who topped the charts, walked away from it all in 1985 and is pleased that he did.” (by Tim Jonze and Ben Beaumont-Thomas)

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Though low-key by the standards of early-’70s soul, Withers’ debut record is by most measures an astonishing maiden outing. Perhaps being at a relatively advanced age for a singer/songwriter doing his first album (Withers was in his early thirties by the time it was released) helped give the songs a maturity and weight lacking in most initial efforts. Withers immediately carved a distinct niche for himself within soul music by integrating folkier, more introspective elements than what was being heard almost anywhere else within the style. While gentle orchestration and jazz-funk rhythms could often be heard, he didn’t forsake some down-home blues and gospel influences, which really came to the forefront on songs like “Grandma’s Hands.” The lilting, melancholy “Ain’t No Sunshine” was the deserved smash hit from the record, but there were a bunch of fine effervescently grooving songs on the rest of the album that remain unjustly familiar to the general audience, like “Harlem,” “Sweet Wanomi,” “Moanin’ and Groanin’,” and “Better Off Dead.” All the material was original save covers of Fred Neil’s “Everybody’s Talkin'” and the Beatles’ “Let It Be,” both of which Withers made over into his own memorable acoustic-based soul style. (by Richie Unterberger)

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Personnel:
Donald “Duck” Dunn (drums)
Chris Ethridge (bass)
Al Jackson (drums)
Booker T. Jones (keyboards, guitar)
Jim Keltner (drums)
Bobbie Hall Porter (percussion)
Stephen Stills (guitar)
Bill Withers (vocals, guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Harlem (Withers) 3.23
02. Ain’t No Sunshine (Withers) 2.07
03. Grandma’s Hands (Withers) 2.03
04. Sweet Wanomi (Withers) 2.35
05. Everybody’s Talkin’ (Neil) 3.28
06. Do It Good (Withers) 2.54
07. Hope She’ll Be Happier (Withers) 3.49
08. Let It Be (McCartney/Lennon) 2.37
09. I’m Her Daddy (Withers) 3.18
10. In My Heart (Withers) 4.20
11. Moanin’ And Groanin’ (Withers) 2.59
12. Better Off Dead (Withers) 2.17

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Bill Withers
William Harrison Withers Jr. (July 4, 1938 – March 30, 2020)

Rory Gallagher – Lausanne Radio (1972)

FrontCover1William Rory Gallagher (2 March 1948 – 14 June 1995) was an Irish blues and rock multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, and producer. Born in Ballyshannon, County Donegal,[3] and brought up in Cork, Gallagher recorded solo albums throughout the 1970s and 1980s, after forming the band Taste during the late 1960s. His albums have sold over 30 million copies worldwide.

Gallagher received a liver transplant in 1995, but died of complications later that year in London at the age of 47.

After the break-up of Taste, Gallagher toured under his own name, hiring former Deep Joy bass player Gerry McAvoy to play on Gallagher’s self-titled debut album, Rory Gallagher.

It was the beginning of a twenty-year musical relationship between Gallagher and McAvoy; the other band member was drummer Wilgar Campbell. The 1970s were Gallagher’s most prolific period. He produced ten albums in that decade, including two live albums, Live in Europe and Irish Tour ’74. November 1971 saw the release of the album Deuce.

In the same year he was voted Melody Maker’s International Top Guitarist of the Year, ahead of Eric Clapton. However, despite a number of his albums from this period reaching the UK Albums Chart, Gallagher did not attain major star status.

Gallagher played and recorded what he said was “in me all the time, and not just something I turn on …”. Though he sold over thirty million albums worldwide, it was his marathon live performances that won him greatest acclaim. He is documented in Irish Tour ’74, a film directed by Tony Palmer. (by wikipedia)

And here´s another fine bootleg from this period. This entry is dedicated to all Rory Gallagher fans all over the world !

Thanks to Stef; Jeff James; and to kmr_78 for sharing the show at Dime.

Recorded live at the Pavillion des Sports, Lausanne, Switzerland; June 3, 1972. Swiss Radio Session. Very good FM broadcast.

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Personnel:
Rod de’Ath (drums)
Rory Gallagher (guitar, vocals)
Gerry McAvoy (bass)

Alternate frontcover:
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Tracklist:

Lausanne, June 3, 1972:
01. Going To My Hometown (end only) (Gallagher) 1.35
02. Intro 0.24
03. In Your Town (Gallagher) 9:24
04. Used To Be (Gallagher) 3:46
05. Interview 2.06
06. Hoodoo Man (Gallagher) 7.50
07. Intro 0.18
08. Messing With The Kid (Wells) 5:04
09. Intro 2.29
10. I Could’ve Had Religion (Traditional) 7.45

Popgala; Vliegermolen, Voorborg, Holland TV (SBD); March 10, 1973:
11. Messing With The Kid (Wells) 7:50
12. Hands Off (Gallagher) 6.07

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Acker Bilk – Great Themes From Great European (Foreign) Films (1964)

UKFrontCover1Bernard Stanley Bilk, MBE (28 January 1929 – 2 November 2014), known professionally as Acker Bilk, was an English clarinettist and vocalist known for his breathy, vibrato-rich, lower-register style, and distinctive appearance – of goatee, bowler hat and striped waistcoat.

Bilk’s 1962 instrumental tune “Stranger on the Shore” became the UK’s biggest selling single of 1962: it was in the UK charts for more than 50 weeks, peaking at number two, and was the first No. 1 single in the United States by a British artist in the era of the modern Billboard Hot 100 pop chart.

Bilk was born in Pensford, Somerset, in 1929. He earned the nickname “Acker” from the Somerset slang for “friend” or “mate”. His parents tried to teach him the piano but, as a boy, Bilk found it restricted his love of outdoor activities, including football. He lost two front teeth in a school fight and half a finger in a sledging accident, both of which he said affected his eventual clarinet style.

Acker Bilk02On leaving school Bilk joined the workforce of W.D. & H.O. Wills’s cigarette factory in Bristol; he stayed there for three years, putting tobacco in the cooling room and then pushing tobacco through a blower. He then undertook three years of National Service with the Royal Engineers in the Suez Canal Zone. He learned the clarinet there after his sapper friend, John A. Britten, gave him one bought at a bazaar and for which Britten had no use. The clarinet had no reed, so Britten fashioned a makeshift one for the instrument from scrap wood. Bilk later borrowed a better instrument from the army and kept it after demobilisation. After National Service, Bilk joined his uncle’s blacksmith business and qualified in the trade.

Bilk played with friends on the Bristol jazz circuit and in 1951 moved to London to play with Ken Colyer’s band. Bilk disliked London, so returned west and formed his own band in Pensford called the Chew Valley Jazzmen, which was renamed the Bristol Paramount Jazz Band when they moved to London in 1951. Their agent then booked them for a six-week gig in Düsseldorf, Germany, playing in a beer bar seven hours a night, seven nights a week. During this time, Bilk and the band developed their distinctive style and appearance, complete with striped-waistcoats and bowler hats.

Acker Bilk03After returning from Germany, Bilk became based in Plaistow, London, and his band played in London jazz clubs. It was from here that Bilk became part of the boom in trad jazz in the United Kingdom in the late 1950s. In 1960, their single “Summer Set” (a pun on their home county), co-written by Bilk and pianist Dave Collett, reached number five on the UK Singles Chart, and began a run of 11 chart hit singles. In 1961 “Acker Bilk and His Paramount Jazz Band” appeared at the Royal Variety Performance.

Bilk was not an internationally known musician until 1962, when the experimental use of a string ensemble on one of his albums and the inclusion of a composition of his own as its keynote piece won him an audience outside the UK. He had composed a melody, entitled “Jenny” after his daughter, but was asked to change the title to “Stranger on the Shore” for use in a British television series of the same name. He went on to record it as the title track of a new album in which his deep and quavering clarinet was backed by the Leon Young String Chorale.

The Leon Young String Chorale

The single was not only a big hit in the United Kingdom, where it stayed on the charts for 55 weeks, helped by Bilk being the subject of the TV show This Is Your Life, but also topped the American charts. As a result, Bilk was the second British artist to have a single in the number-one position on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. (Vera Lynn was the first, with “Auf Wiederseh’n Sweetheart” in 1952.) “Stranger on the Shore” sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc. At the height of his career, Bilk’s public relations workers were known as the “Bilk Marketing Board”, a pun on the Milk Marketing Board.

At the height of his international fame in 1962, he appeared in two theatrical motion pictures. It’s Trad, Dad! (released in the United States by Columbia Pictures as Ring-a-Ding Rhythm) was a Richard Lester musical combining dixieland and rock-and-roll specialties; “Mr. Acker Bilk” and his band were the best represented, with three songs and a speaking role for Bilk. The second picture, Band of Thieves, was a comedy starring “Mr. Acker Bilk” and his group as musicians in prison.

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Bilk recorded a series of albums in Britain that were also released successfully in the United States (on the Atlantic Records subsidiary Atco), including a collaboration, Together, with the Danish jazz pianist and composer Bent Fabric (“The Alley Cat”). Bilk’s success tapered off when British rock and roll made its big international impact beginning in 1964 and he shifted direction to the cabaret circuit. (by wikipedia)

Alternate frontcovers:

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Another nice album from this period is this album (In UK: “Great Themes From Great European Films”in US : “Great Themes From Great Foreign Films “) .. A sweet and gentle mixture of soundtrack tunes …

And Mr. Acker Bilk … celebrates this music with his very unique way he plays he clarinet … what a beautiful sound …

Listen and enjoy …  and yes, heré´s another sentimental journey …

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Personnel:
Acker Bilk (clarinet)
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his ensemble

US front+backcover:
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Tracklist:
01. The Good Life – ‘The Seven Capital Sins’ (Reardon/Distel) 2.27
02. More – ‘Mondo Cane’ (Oliviero/Newell/Ortolani) 2.32
03. La Ronde (Straus) 2.38
04.Non Dimenticar – ‘Anna’ (Redi) 2.45
05.Canto D’Amore – ‘Divorce Italian Style’ (Rossi/Rustichelli) 2.40
06. Theme from Billy Liar (Hart/Bennett) 2.23
07. Warsaw Concerto – ‘Dangerous Moonlight’ (Addinsell) 2.40
08. Firestar – ‘To Bed Ot Not To Bed’ (Piccioni) 2.45
09. La Strada (Rota) 2.43
10. From Russia With Love (Bart) 2.51
11. Autumn In Rome – ‘Indiscretion Of An American Wife’ (Cicognini/Weston/Cahn) 2.27
12. Never On A Sunday (Hadjidakis) 2.42

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More from Mr. Acker Bilk:
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Ian Carr’s Nucleus – Out Of The Long Dark (1979)

FrontCover1Although, I recently found out this album was not the Group’s final studio album, since there was a German-released Awakening album a few years after the present, Out Of The Long Dark is very much in the line of its predecessors. Out Of The Long Dark is the last album of the second full- fledged stable lie-up Nucleus group (one that had started with Under The Sun) and we’re still finding keyboardist Geoff Castle and drummer Roger Sellers, and returning to the fold, woodwind player Brian Smith. Only bassist Billy Kristian is new, replacing the usual Sutton. Great ‘proggy artwork on the artwork cover too.

Recorded hot on the heels of In Flagrante Delicto, OOTLD is almost a brother album, even though there is a general light concept feel to the present as most of the pieces on the flipside are dedicated to long-time buddy and sculptor Gerald Laing (the titles in the brackets are named after a few of his sculptures). But let’s return to the A-side with the 9-mins+ funky Lady Bountyful (inspired by his second wife) track that features long solos from Brian and Ian over a solid groove. The quieter 7-mins Solar Winds features two more percussionist, but the main theme seems to emerge from the Plexus project from almost a decade earlier, even though the groove and keyboard layers are definitely late 70’s-ish, somewhat reminiscent of his buddy Neil Ardley’s Hamony Of The Spheres, on which most of the band participated. The sensual Selina track feature some ecstatic background brass and piano riff.

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As mentioned above, the flipside tracks have a bit their own life as the opening 7-mins+ title track features Brian’s flute, the 5-mins Sassy has an ultra-funky bass-line, Simply This’ disputable synth choices (the late-70’s synths were rather tacky in some cases) despite Castle’s superb Rhodes in the second part, the gentle 7-mins Black Ballad’s shifts from slow- mo ballad to mid-tempo funk and the closing trumpet requiem For Liam. Well the least we can say is that Nucleus remained a superb and relevant band all the way until the 70’s decade and that OOTLD might just be a tad better than the IFD release. Definitely worth your while if you’re into classic fusion sounds from the later-70’s. (by Sean Trane)

Ian Carr died aged 75 on 25 February 2009, having suffered from Alzheimer’s disease.

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Personnel:
Ian Carr (trumpet, flugelhorn, piano)
Geoff Castle (synthesizer, piano)
Billy Kristian (bass)
Roger Sellers (drums, percussion)
Brian Smith (saxophone, flute, percussion)
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Chris Fletcher (percussion on 03.)

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Tracklist:
01. Gone With The Weed (Carr) 3.26
02. Lady Bountiful 9.14
03. Solar Wind 7.32
04. Selina 4.09
05. Out Of The Long Dark 7.28
06. Sassy (American Girl) 5.08
07. Simply This (The Human Condition) 4.30
08. Black Ballad (Ecce Domina) 6.55
09. For Liam 1.04

Music composed by Ian Carr,
except 03, which was composed by Geoff Castle

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Ian Carr (21 April 1933 – 25 February 2009)