Rob Hoeke Boogie Woogie Quartet – Robby´s Saloon (1968)

FrontCover1Rob Hoeke (9 January 1939 – 6 November 1999) was a Dutch singer, pianist, composer and songwriter most famous for his renditions in the field of Boogie-woogie releasing over 20 albums. Besides that he played and recorded in a musical variety of styles ranging from Blues, Soul, Rock and Rhythm & Blues.
Rob Hoeke’s most successful period was in the second half of the 1960s and early 1970s with his Rob Hoeke’s Rhythm & Blues Group. He scored hits with “Margio” (number 12 on the Dutch Top 40 in 1966), “Drinking on My Bed” (number 11 in 1966) and “Down South” which would become Hoeke’s signature tune and biggest hit reaching number 6 in 1970. His sole charting album was Four Hands Up, a collaboration with fellow Boogie-woogie artist Hein van der Gaag which charted at number 7 in 1971.

In 1974, Rob Hoeke lost two fingers in a gardening accident and his career all but seemed to be over. After a few years, he started playing and performing for audiences again but his heyday was over. He recorded many more albums, one with Alan Price from the Animals. Hoeke made a solo performance at the first Amsterdam Blues Festival in 1983 where his solo performance received a standing ovation from the audience of 1,100. Subsequently, he made his first solo album Jumpin’ on the “88” for the Oldie Blues label in 1983.

Rob Hoeke died in 1999 after a short illness.(by wikipedia)

And here´s a fine example of this great boogie woogie Player … it´s an instrumentla Album and the musicians celebrate the “Wild West” (including the Comic stars Rantanplant and Lucky Luke !)

Enjoy it as I did  … it´s boogie time !

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Personnel:
Rob Hoeke (keyboards, harmonica)
Will de Meijer (guitar)
Martin Rudelsheim (drums)
Willem Schoone (bass)

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Tracklist:

01. Calamity Jane (Hoeke/de Meijer) 3.08
02. Robby’s Saloon (Hoeke/de Meijer) 3.46
03. Marsupilami (Hoeke/de Meijer) 3.13
04. For My Little Gringo (Hoeke/de Meijer) 2.08
05. A Bone For Rataplan (Hoeke/de Meijer) 3.52
06. Deep In The Heart Of Texas (Swander/Hershey) 2.23
07. San Antonio Rose (Wills) 2.25
08. Coyote Will (Hoeke/de Meijer) 2.53
09. Lotus 268 (Hoeke/de Meijer) 3.33
10. Swinging Clock Boogie (Hoeke/de Meijer) 3.09
11. Ode To Lucky Luke (Hoeke/de Meijer) 4.24
12. Red River Valley (Traditional) 2.04

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Wally – Valley Gardens (1975)

LPFrontCover1Valley Gardens carries on in a similar vein to their debut album, Wally, including a side-long track, “The Reason Why”, which is possibly the best track in their repertoire. Dispensing with the production skills of Rick Wakeman this time around the album is produced by Bob Harris and Wally. (by wikipedia)

A sensitive artist, deafened by our endless noise of opinions, has questioned the value of amateur music criticism. Frankly Mr Shankly, I don’t know if I should give one jot for the opinion of an artist I’d never heard of until yesterday. In spite of my bias, ignorance and inability to make a critical evaluation, I’m going to keep on crawling out of my dunghill to write ”so-called” reviews for ProgArchives. If it wasn’t for this website I wouldn’t be aware of bands like Wally, or Porcupine Tree for that matter.
”Valley Gardens”, released in 1975 and named after the area of Harrogate where most of the band lived, was Wally’s second album. They split up following the album’s release due to a lack support from their record company, although they have recently reformed and released a DVD of their comeback concert and a CD of old demos and new material. Whereas the band’s debut album is a curious hybrid of country and progressive music ”Valley Gardens” is pure symphonic, although extremely light in weight and still featuring the prominent use of traditional instruments.

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Nick Glennie-Smith, who had replaced original keyboards player Paul Gerrett, ploughs straight in with a fitful synthesizer flurry on the title track before it settles into a gossamer space rock groove of intertwining Mellotron and steel guitar. ”Nez Perce” features guest vocals by American soul singer Madeline Bell, probably most famous for her work with Blue Mink. The Nez Perce, a tribe of Native Americans, got their name from the French term for pierced noses. Among the traditions of the Nez Perce is the legend of the Wallowa Lake Monster, often referred to as Wally. This song artfully combines the band’s pop sensibility with Pete Sage’s ethereal electric violin, and it even managed to achieve some airplay back in the day.

”The Mood I’m In” is a fairly nondescript West Coast ballad with a bit of saxophone tagged onto the end for interest, but it’s ”The Reason Why” that grabs the most attention here. At over 19-minutes it takes up the entire second half of the album and is based on Lord Tennyson’s anti-war poem ”The Charge of the Light Brigade”. It’s an ambitious, moving piece and no mistake, with a lengthy improvised instrumental section.
”Valley Gardens” neither sucks nor rules. It will obviously have more appeal for fans of mellow progressive music, but others might even enjoy something along the way. Wally are sadly over-looked and I wonder if they would be whining if there were more than half a million reviews of their output online? (by seventhsojourn)

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Personnel:
Pete Cosker (guitar, vocals, bass)
Paul Middleton (steel guitar, bass)
Roger Narraway (drums, percussion)
Pete Sage (violin, bass, mandolin)
Nick Glennie-Smith (keyboards)
Roy Webber (vocals, guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Valley Gardens (Gerrett/Cosker) 9.51
02. Nez Perce (Webber) 5.03
03. The Mood I’m In (Webber) 7.07
04. The Reason Why 1828

04.1. Nolan (Sage/Webber)
04.2.The Charge (Glennie-Smith/Sage)
04.3. Disillusion (Webbber)
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Amazing Blondel – Dancing Supertivoli (1972)

FrontCover1Amazing Blondel are an English acoustic progressive folk band, containing Eddie Baird, John Gladwin, and Terry Wincott. They released a number of LPs for Island Records in the early 1970s. They are sometimes categorised as psychedelic folk or as medieval folk rock, but their music was much more a reinvention of Renaissance music, based around the use of period instruments such as lutes and recorders.
John Gladwin and Terry Wincott had both played in a loud “electric” band called Methuselah. However, at some point in Methuselah concerts, the duo would play an acoustic number together: they found that this went down well with the audiences and allowed them to bring out more of the subtlety of their singing and instrumental work. They left Methuselah in 1969 and began working on their own acoustic material.

Initially their material was derived from folk music, in line with many of the other performers of the time. However, they began to develop their own musical idiom, influenced, at one extreme, by the early music revivalists such as David Munrow, and the other extreme, by their childhood memories of the Robin Hood TV series, with its pseudo-mediaeval soundtrack by Elton Hayes.

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The band was named after Blondel de Nesle, the musician in the court of Richard I. According to legend, when Richard was held prisoner, Blondel travelled through central Europe, singing at every castle to locate the King and assist his escape. This name for the band was suggested by a chef, Eugene McCoy, who listened to some of their songs and commented: “Oh, very Blondel!” and they began to use that name. They were then advised to add an adjective (in line, for example, with The Incredible String Band) and so they became “Amazing Blondel”.

Their first album The Amazing Blondel (also called “Amazing Blondel and a Few Faces,”) was recorded in 1969 and released by Bell Records. It was directed by session guitarist Big Jim Sullivan. At about this time, Eddie Baird (who had known the other members at school) joined the band. On 19 September 1970 they were one of the bands to play at the first Glastonbury Festival. Following what Baird described as “a disastrous ‘showbiz’ record signing”, Amazing Blondel were introduced, by members of the band Free, to Chris Blackwell of Island Records and Artists. Blackwell signed them up to Island, for whom they recorded their albums Evensong, Fantasia Lindum and England. (by Wikipedia)

And this is a very fine bootleg from a Show, recorded in Italy. It´s a very good audience recording … and you can you hear … you can hear the Magic of Amazing Blondel … really amazing !

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Personnel:
Edwards Baird (guitar, vocals)
John David Gladwin (vocals, guitar)
Terence Alan Wincott (Recorder, woodwinds, vocals)BackCover1

Tracklist:

01. Toye 3.02
02. Pavan 3.02
03. Seascape 6.09
04. A Spring Air *  3.03
05. Willowood 3.02
06. Afterglow 3.34
07. The Shepherd’s Song 7.41
08. Saxon Lady
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09. Travagliato BresciaItaly (1972) (uncut version) 32.06All songs written by John David Gladwin

*Problems with the microphones on stage.

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Art Farmer & Quincy Jones – Last Night When We Were Young (1957)

LPFrontCover1Last Night When We Were Young is a studio album by trumpeter Art Farmer, with an orchestra of strings arranged and composed by Quincy Jones. It was recorded in two sessions in 1957.
The beauty of Art Farmer’s tone is well featured on this out of print ABC/Paramount album. Farmer is backed by a string orchestra arranged by Quincy Jones as he plays lyrical solos on eight standards and Dizzy Gillespie’s “Tangorine.” Farmer mostly sticks close to the melodies but he makes such tunes as “Two Sleepy People,” “Ill Wind,” and “When I Fall in Love” sound fresh and pretty. (by Scott Yanow)

This album be renamed “Art for Lovers”. It’s a change of pace from his bop orientated ’50s lps on prestige- and a welcomed one at that. I’m usually cautious of “horns and strings” albums but this one works because Quincy Jones keeps the arraingments tasteful without allowing the strings to become overwhelming. Art’s fans will not be disappointed because his trademark beautiful warm and fuzzy tone is on dislpay throughout the first nine tracks. Of lesser importance are the last four jazzy tracks recorded earlier in ’53 with some swedish allstars. (by John W.)

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Personnel:
Addison Farmer (bass)
Art Farmer (trumpet, flugelhorn)
Barry Galbraith (guitar)
Osie Johnson (drums)
Hank Jones (piano)

Arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones

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Tracklist:
01. Two Sleepy People (Carmichael/Loesser) 3.20
02. Someone To Watch Over Me (Gershwin) 3.34
03. I Concentrate On You (Porter) 2.51
04. I´ll Wind (Arlen/Koehler) 3.42
05. Last Night When We Were Young (Arlen/Harburg) 2.58
06. Out Of This World (Arlen/Mercer) 4.11
07. When I Fall in Love (Young/Heyman) 3.32
08. Tangerine (Schertzinger/Mercer) 2.46
09. What’s Good About Goodbye? (Arlen/Robin) 3.39
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10.  Pogo Stick (Jones) 6.17
11. Liza (Gershwin) 5.34
12. Jones Bones (Jones) 5.40
13. Sometimes I’m Happy (Caesar/Grey/Youmans) 5.52

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Tantor – Same (1979)

FrontCover1This Argentinian Prog/Fusion act from Buenos Aires was sort of a supergroup, when it was formed back in late-70’s with Héctor Starc on guitars, Rodolfo García on drums and Carlos Alberto Machi Rufino on bass/vocals.Starc was an ex-member of Prog/Psych Rockers Aquelarre, Garcia played drums both in Almendra and Aquelarre, while Rufino was a former Invisible member.Tantor released their self-titled debut in 1979 on Phillips, helped by keyboardists Lito Vitale from M.I.A. (Músicos Independientes Asociados) and Leo Sujatovich of Spinetta Jade.
This is a perfect example of well-executed, tight and highly technical Prog/Fusion with some really georgeous interplays and fantastic grooves.Fast and furious rhythms led by incredible guitar work and delicate electric piano combine with jazzy pianos and distinct synths to present a number of consistent and well-arranged mostly instrumental tracks.The vocals are limited in just a couple of tracks, which come as a combination of light Jazz/Fusion and Soft Rock, but even these contain some good synth work and PromotionPostersmooth guitar playing.However the instrumental ones are the real winners here with top-notch performances by all the members, the sound is incredibly rich, the guitar and electric piano solos are stunning and the rhythm section is solid all the way.
One of the finest examples of fiery Prog/Fusion, only comparable to the consistency of CRUCIS.Both the original LP and the 2-CD reissue (along with the band’s second album) come highly recommended. (by apps79)

Consistently good to great fusion. Latin vibes are everywhere here, generating a warm melodic texture. The instrumentals with the outstanding electric pulses of piano, synthesizer and guitar levitate towards high jazzy peaks, while the frenetic drumming rains dynamic fills all over. Would’ve been four stars if some of these softer tracks had been replaced with something more progressive, but it’s an album worth checking out nonetheless. (by King Insano)

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Personnel:
Rodolfo García (drums)
Carlos Alberto Machi Rufino (bass, vocals)
Héctor Starc (guitar)
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Leo Sujatovich (keyboards on 01., 02., 04.
Leo Vitale (keyboards on 03., 05., 07. + 08., strings on 04.)

Tracklist:
01. Guarreras Club (Starc) 4.29
02. Niedernwohren (Starc) 5.18
03. Llama Siempre (Starc/Spinetta) 3.11
04. Oreja Y Vuelta Al Ruedo (Starc) 6.34
05. Halitos (Starc) 7.03
06. El Sol de la Pobreza (Starc/Spinetta) 4.33
07. Carrera de Chanchos (Starc) 7.32

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Alexander’s Timeless Bloozband – Same (1967)

FrontCover1The information about the band is rather scarce, various sources mention Charles Lamont, Carl Lockhart and Larry Marks as founders, although, when they recorded their self-titled debut LP (1967) for private label “Smack”, they were five.

Their debut album (rather raw, “home-made” sounding) featured classic “Killing Floor” and unusual instrumental version of “My Favourite Things” (from 1959 musical “The Sounds Of Music”) (by Golovanov Alexey)

I guess, this is one of the rarest psychedelic blues Album ever … and I will  dedicate this entry to all These unknown bands from this period of music …  it was not the worst period of music … really not !

Recorded Live At The Brother’s Gallery in Goleta – August 1967

Alexander's Timeless Bloozband

Personnel:
Spencer Conway (drums)
Dennis Geaney (guitar, bass)
Charles Lamont (Keyboards, bass, guitar, french horn, harmonica, vocals)
Reed Lockhart (saxphone, keyboards, vocals)
Larry Marks (harmonica, trombone, vocals)

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Tracklist: 
01. Help Me (Williamson/Bass) 5.27
02. Killing Floor (Burnett) 3.02
03. Guitar Song (Lamont) 2.46
04. Favorite Things (Rodgers/Hammerstein) 5.13
05. Sloopy Drunk (Rogers) 4.09
06. #1 (unknown) 4.57
07. Swannoa Tunnel (unkown) 4.19
08. Sweet Little Angel  (King/Taub) 2.37

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