The Hollies – Hello Graham Nash (Reunion) (1983)

FrontCover1The Hollies – no introduction nessesary …

This live album is a byproduct of the Hollies’ 1983 reunion tour with Graham Nash, mixing new songs off of the accompanying album, What Goes Around…, with their classic material. Instrumentally, lead guitarist Tony Hicks and drummer Bobby Elliott (who is recorded exceptionally well) are supported by Steve Stroud (bass), Alan Coates (rhythm guitar), Pete Anderson (piano), and Paul Bliss (keyboards), who make a smoother, more polished sound; the openings of “Bus Stop” and “Just One Look,” for example, are more keyboard-dominated than they ever were on the original records or any prior concert release, including the mid-’70s Hollies Live LP. Luckily, the middle sections of most of the songs better represent the band’s classic sound, and there’s no complaining about the singing or the harmonies. The new repertoire presented here, including “Casualty,” doesn’t have the staying power of the group’s vintage work, and it’s clear that the crowd is there to hear the oldies, not the new songs, to judge by the gradations in applause.

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“On a Carousel” evokes far more enthusiasm than the newer stuff — as an added benefit of this disc, it captures the group’s first performance on this tour of “King Midas in Reverse,” which is everything one would wish for in delicacy and nuance, as well as radiant harmonies, and here they get the guitar sound (a mix of acoustic and low-amplification electric) exactly right. And when they do “Wasted on the Way” and “Teach Your Children,” it’s worth the price of the disc (as well as the price of admission — the crowd’s delight is almost palpable). The disc isn’t quite essential for Hollies fans — some of its desirability depends upon how one felt about that tour and the What Goes Around… album — but it’s extremely close to it, and shouldn’t be overlooked (and CSN and Graham Nash completists will have to own it).  ( by Bruce Eder)

This concert from the 1983 reunion with Graham Nash was recorded for a planned live album, which was never released … So, we can hear an excellent soundbaoard recording …

Close your eyes and drift away … what a great concert !

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Personnel:
Allan Clarke (vocals, guitar, harmonica)
Bobby Elliott (drums)
Tony Hicks (guitar, vocals)
Graham Nash (guitar, vocals)
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Pete Anderson (piano, synthesizer)
Paul Bliss (keyboards)
Alan Coates (guitar)
Dennis Haines (keyboards)
Steve Stroud (bass)

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Tracklist:
01 1 I Can’t Let Go (Gorgoni/Taylor 2.31
02. Just One Look (Carrol/Payne) 3.54
03. Bus Stop (Gouldman) 3.29
04. Casualty (Bliss) 3.32
05. On A Carousel (Clarke/Hicks/Nash) 3.32
06. Someone Else’s Eyes (Bliss) 4.11
07. Look Through My Window (Gouldman/Silverman) 2.59
08 .King Midas In Reverse (Clark/Hicks/Nash) 2.53
09. Wasted On The Way (Nash) 3.29
10. Teach Your Children (Nash) 4.01
11. Soldier’s Song (Batt) 4.53
12. Stop, Stop, Stop (Clark/Hicks/Nash The Hollies 2.56
13. The Air That I Breathe (Hammond/Hazelwood) 4.30
14. Carrie Anne (Clarke/Hicks/Nash) 3.33
15. Stop In The Name Of Love (Dozier/Holland) 3.37
16. He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother (Russell/Scott) 4.15
17. Long Cool Woman In A Black Dress (Clarke/Cook/Greenaway) 10.30

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REO Speedwagon – Hi Infidelity (1980)

FrontCover1Hi Infidelity is the ninth studio album by the band REO Speedwagon, it was released on November 21, 1980 (see 1980 in music). The album became a big hit in the United States peaking at number one on the Billboard 200. It went on to become the biggest selling rock albums of 1981, eventually being certified nine times platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America. From the singles released, the band got their first of two number one hits on the Billboard Hot 100, “Keep On Loving You”.Hi Infidelity is the ninth studio album by the band REO Speedwagon, it was released on November 21, 1980 (see 1980 in music). The album became a big hit in the United States peaking at number one on the Billboard 200. It went on to become the biggest selling rock albums of 1981, eventually being certified nine times platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America. From the singles released, the band got their first of two number one hits on the Billboard Hot 100, “Keep On Loving You”.

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The album title is a play on the term Hi-Fi (high fidelity), and the album art is an illustration of this pun where an act of sexual infidelity is occurring while the man is putting a record LP to play on the hi-fi stereo.

From the album six songs charted Billboard charts, including “Keep On Loving You” which was the band’s first Number 1 hit, and “Take It on the Run”, which reached No. 5 on the charts. The song “Tough Guys” uses an audio clip from the 1938 Our Gang episode “Hearts Are Thumps”.

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“Tough Guys” was one of two songs from the album that charted on the Billboard Mainstream Rock chart despite not being released as singles. Music critic Robert Christgau called “Tough Guys” his favorite song from the album but suggested that the line “They think they’re full of fire/She thinks they’re full of shit” would prevent the song from reaching the pop Top 40.
In October 2004, the band recorded the songs of this album live from beginning to end for an XM Radio “Then Again Live” special. (by wikipedia)

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Many albums have scaled to the top of the American charts, many of them not so good, but few have been as widely forgotten and spurned as REO Speedwagon’s Hi Infidelity. In a way, the group deserved this kind of success. They had been slogging it out in the arenas of the U.S., building up a sizeable audience because they could deliver live. And then, in 1980, they delivered a record that not just summarized their strengths, but captured everything that was good about arena rock. This is the sound of the stadiums in that netherworld between giants like Zeppelin and MTV’s slick, video-ready anthems. This is unabashedly mainstream rock, but there’s a real urgency to the songs and the performances that gives it a real emotional core, even if the production keeps it tied to the early, previsual ’80s. And so what if it does, because this is great arena rock, filled with hooks as expansive as Three Rivers Stadium and as catchy as the flu. That, of course, applies to the record’s two biggest hits — the power ballad “Keep on Loving You” and the surging “Take It on the Run” — which define their era, but what gives the album real staying power is that the rest of the record works equally well.

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That’s most apparent on the Bo Diddley-inspired opener, “Don’t Let Him Go,” whose insistent beat sent it to the album rock charts, but also such great album tracks as “Follow My Heart,” the sun-kissed ’60s homage “In Your Letter,” and “Tough Guys.” What’s really great about these songs is not just the sheen of professionalism that makes them addictive to listen to, but there’s a real strain of pathos that runs through these songs — the album’s title isn’t just a clever pun, but a description of the tortured romantic relationships that populate this record’s songs. This is really arena rock’s Blood on the Tracks, albeit by a group of guys instead of a singular vision, but that makes it more affecting, as well as a killer slice of ear candy. It’s easy to dismiss REO Speedwagon, since they weren’t hip at the time, and no amount of historical revisionism will make them cool kitsch. And, let’s face it, their records were usually hit-and-miss affairs. But they did get it right on. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Neal Doughty (keyboards)
Alan Gratzer (drums, percussion, background vocals)
Bruce Hall (bass, background vocals, vocals on 09.)
Kevin Cronin (vocals, guitar, piano)
Gary Richrath (guitar)
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Steve Forman (percussion)
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background vocals:
He-Man Broken Hearts Club Choir – Tom Kelly – Richard Page – N. Yolletta

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Tracklist:
01. Don’t Let Him Go (Cronin) 3.46
02. Keep On Loving You (Cronin) 3.23
03. Follow My Heart (Kelly/Richrath) 3.51
04. In Your Letter (Richrath 3.18
05. Take It On The Run (Richrath) 3.01
06. Tough Guys (Cronin) 3.51
07. Out Of Season (Cronin/Kelly) 3:07
08. Shakin’ It Loose (Richrath) 2:27
09. Someone Tonight (Bruce/Hall) 2.41
10. I Wish You Were There (Cronin) 4.27

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Gary Dean Richrath (October 18, 1949 – September 13, 2015)

Ten Years After – Same (1967)

LPFrontCover1Ten Years After are an English blues rock band, most popular in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Between 1968 and 1973, Ten Years After scored eight Top 40 albums on the UK Albums Chart. In addition they had twelve albums enter the US Billboard 200, and are best known for tracks such as “I’m Going Home”, “Hear Me Calling”, “I’d Love to Change the World” and “Love Like a Man”. Their musical style consisted of blues rock,and hard rock (???)

 

The band’s core formed in late 1960 as Ivan Jay and the Jaycats. After several years of local success in the Nottingham/Mansfield area, known since 1962 as the Jaybirds and later as Ivan Jay and the Jaymen, Alvin Lee and Leo Lyons founded Ten Years After. Ivan Jay (born Ivan Joseph Harrison, 1939, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, died in April 2009, USA) sang lead vocals from late 1960 to 1962 and was joined by Ric Lee in August 1965, replacing drummer Dave Quickmire (born David Quickmire, 1940, Mansfield, Nottinghamshire), who had replaced Pete Evans (born Peter Evans, 1940, Mansfield, Nottinghamshire) in 1962. Ray Cooper (born 11 November 1943, Huthwaite, Nottinghamshire) played rhythm guitar, vocals from 1960 to 1962.

TenYearsAfter1968_03In 1966, The Jaybirds moved to London to back The Ivy League. In the same year, Chick Churchill joined the group as keyboard player. That November, the quartet signed a manager, Chris Wright, and changed their name to Blues Trip. Using the name Blues Yard they played one show at the Marquee Club supporting the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band. They again changed their name, to Ten Years After – in honour of Elvis Presley, an idol of Lee’s.[10] (This was ten years after Presley’s successful year, 1956). Some sources[which?] claim that the name was pulled by Leo Lyons from a magazine, advertising a book, Ten Years After The Suez (referring to the Suez Crisis).

The group was the first act booked by the soon-to-be Chrysalis Agency. It secured a residency at the Marquee, and was invited to play at the Windsor Jazz Festival in 1967. That performance led to a contract with Deram, a subsidiary of Decca — the first band Deram signed without a hit single. In October 1967 they released the self-titled debut album, Ten Years After.

Ten Years After is the debut album by the English blues rock band Ten Years After. It was one of the first blues rock albums released by British musicians. The album is also low on original material in comparison to the band’s later works which were, in most cases, entirely composed of Alvin Lee’s songs.

It features “Spoonful”, a Howlin’ Wolf song (written for him by Willie Dixon) that the British blues rock group Cream covered as well (on their albums Fresh Cream and Wheels of Fire). (by wikipedia)

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Rare pic of Alvin Lee with a fender guitar !

ReviewMelodyMaker

Melody Maker, October 21, 1967

Amazing. Where it all started. Almost completely devoid of all the blues/rock clichés of their later albums. Stylistically impressive. And dig that crazy cover. (by Emilio Gironda)

This was the start of one of the findest blues-rock groups from the late Sixties … listen to “I Can’t Keep From Crying Sometimes” and “Help me” and you will definitly know what I mean … !

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Personnel:
Chick Churchill (organ)
Alvin Lee (guitar, vocals)
Ric Lee (drums)
Leo Lyons (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. I Want to Know (Sheila McLeod as pseudonym Paul Jones) 2.15
02. I Can’t Keep From Crying Sometimes (Kooper) 5.25
03. Adventures Of A Young Organ (A.Lee/Churchill) 2.37
04. Spoonful (Dixon) 6.07
05. Losing The Dogs (A.Lee/Dudgeon) 3.07
06. Feel It For Me (Alvin Lee) 2.42
07. Love Until I Die (A.Lee) 2.08
08. Don’t Want You Woman (A.Lee) 2.39
09. Help Me (Bass/Dixon/Williamson) 9.51

 

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