The Rolling Stones – Chicago Chess Sessions (1998)

FrontCover1In the beginning, the Stones wanted nothing more than to be a blues band. And for a long time, they were — albeit one that realized it could never, ever be as good as the musicians who schooled them from overseas. Dixon once told the Tribune that he remembered playing Piccadilly Square in London during the early ’60s. The callow Jagger, Richards and Jones were in the audience. “(These kids would) tell us, ‘Look, man, we got a little group and we want to do some of your songs,'” Dixon said. “We put a lot of songs on tape for them … and then some years later, somebody played me a record of (Dixon’s classic) ‘Little Red Rooster’ and told me some fellows called the Rolling Stones had done that song out of England. … (But) back then they were just little kids, no hair on their faces or anything, so how would I remember them?”

The Stones early albums were stuffed with cover versions of American blues and soul music, and as soon as the quintet became popular enough to tour America in the late spring of 1964, they beelined to Chess studios in Chicago for a two-day recording session. There they were greeted by the mighty Waters himself, who, according to the oft-repeated story, was slapping a coat of paint on the studio walls. Waters had no idea who these long-haired kids were, but helped them unload their gear anyway. While there, the Stones recorded the master’s “I Can’t Be Satisfied,” which appeared on their second album, “Rolling Stones No. 2,” while Dixon’s “Little Red Rooster” wound up on its U.K. companion, “Rolling Stones Now!”

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The Stones early recordings — newly reissued on the boxed set “The Rolling Stones in Mono” (ABKCO) — affirm how much the Stones borrowed from the Chicago blues: the songs, the mix of jazzy swing and backstreet menace, even the recording engineer, Ron Malo. All told the Stones recorded more than two dozen songs in three visits to Chess studios in 1964-65, which they sprinkled across several albums. (chicagotribune.com)

And here´s  very fine bootleg from this period … excellent soundoard recording … the early days of the British Blues … what a great period, what an unforgetable period !

Listen and enjoy !

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals, harmonica)
Brian Jones (guitar)
Keith Richards (guitar)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Bill Wyman (bass)
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Ian Stewart (piano)

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Tracklist:
01. 2120 South Michigan Avenue (long version) (Nanker/Phelge) 3.57
02. Confessin’ The Blues (stereo version) (McShann/Brown) 3.16
03. High Heel Sneakers (Higginbotham ) 3.16
04. Reelin’ And Rockin’ (Berry) 3.57
05. It’s All Over Now (B.Womack/S.Womack) 3.49
06. If You Need Me (Domino/Bartholomew) 2.30
07. Empty Heart (Nanker/Phelge) 2.59
08. Around And Around (Berry) 3.24
09. Good Times, Bad Times (Jagger/Richards) 2.59
10. Down The Road Apiece (stereo version) (Raye) 3.20
11. I Can’t Be Satisfied (stereo version) (Morganfield) 3.57
12. Look What You’ve Done (stereo version) (Morganfield) 2.51
13. Stewed And Keefed (Brian´s Blues) (Nanker/Phelge) 4.34
14. Tell Me Baby (How Many Times) (Broonzy) 2.18
15. Down In The Bottom (Dixon) 3.07
16. Confessin’ The Blues (McShann/Brown) 3.07
17. I Can’t Be Satisfied (Morganfield) 3.49
18. Look What You’ve Done (Morganfield) 2.51
19.  2120 South Michigan Avenue (stereo version) (Nanker/Phelge) 2.30
20.  It’s All Over Now (stereo version) (B.Womack/S.Womack) 3.53

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Sammy Davis Jr. – Closest Of Friends (1982)

FrontCover1Sammy Davis Jr. goes Country:

In 1982, Sammy Davis, Jr. made the musical move to Nashville. Perhaps the last place you would expect the diminutive wonder to turn up, but he cut ten songs there for the Applause label and the Closest of Friends album was the result. The songs assembled for Davis to sing come from some of the finest writers the town had to offer (“Oh Lonesome Me” by Don Gibson, “Come Sundown” and “Please Don’t Tell Me How the Story Ends” by Kris Kristofferson, “Smoke Smoke Smoke (That Cigarette)” by Tex Williams and Merle Travis) and while the aging Sammy did what he could vocally, the wooden arrangements and pedestrian playing really bring the album down. The best of the songs, like Sammy’s light bounce through “Hey, Won’t You Play (Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song)” and his knowing take on “Smoke Smoke Smoke (That Cigarette)” (which contains the cruelly foreshadowing lyric “I’ve smoked ’em all my life and I ain’t dead yet”) are miles away from his best work and have only the slightest glimmer of what made Davis so spectacular in his prime. Only a true Davis fanatic would ever want to hear these songs. It was one of his last forays into a recording studio and should probably just be forgotten. Unfortunately, it is one of the few Davis sessions that turns up time and time again on cheap reissue labels, often with mis-leading titles and cover shots. (by Tim Sendra)

But:

You normally wouldn’t think of Country music and Sammy Davis Jr going together, but they do! As a long time country fan, I recommend this album. He does justice to the fine selection of songs and actually went on Hee Haw to promote it! Jimmy Capps of the Grand Ole Opry staff band plays guitar along with Billy Sanford. The album was produced by Larry Butler. (by Hank Will)

This is a very sentimental trip … including two songs by the great Kris Kristofferson !

Alternate front+back cover from Venezuela:
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Personnel:
Larry Butler (piano)
James Capps (guitar)
Jerry Carrigan (drums)
Steve Chapman (guitar)
Sammy Davis Jr. (vocals)
Ray Edenton (guitar)
Bob Moore (bass)
Leon Rhodes (bass)
Hargus Robbins (piano)
Billy Sanford (guitar)
Jerry Shook (guitar)
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Sheldon Kurland Strings
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background vocals:
James Cason – Don Gant – Diane Fidwell – Bergen White – Lisa Silver – Sheryln Hoffman

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Tracklist:
01. What I’ve Got In Mind (O´Dell) 2.49
02. Come Sundown (Kristofferson) 3.24
03. Mention A Mansion (Hupp/Morrison) 2.22
04. You’re Gonna Love Yourself (In The Morning) (Fritts) 3.07
05. Smoke, Smoke, Smoke (That Cigarette) (Travis/Williams) 3.03
06. Oh Lonesome Me (Gibson) 2.24
07. We Could Have Been Closest Of Friends (Pippin/Slade) 3.15
08. Hey Won’t You Play (Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song) (Butler/Moman) 3.22
09. Please Don’t Tell Me How The Story Ends (Kristofferson) 3.26
10. The River’s Too Wide (Morrison) 2.43

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This is another item from the great greygoose record collection.
Thanks a lot !