Foghat – Fool For The City (1975)

FrontCover1Fool for the City is the fifth album released by English rock band Foghat, released in 1975. This was their first platinum album and features, along with the title track, their signature song “Slow Ride”.Fool for the City is the fifth album released by English rock band Foghat, released in 1975. This was their first platinum album and features, along with the title track, their signature song “Slow Ride”.

The album cover shows drummer Roger Earl sitting alone on a soap box fishing down a manhole in the middle of East 11th Street (between 2nd and 3rd Avenue) in New York City, near the address of Foghat’s American office. The back cover features skeptical bystanders observing Earl’s unusual activity and the other members of the band either asking him what he is doing or trying to dissuade him from it. In a 2014 interview, Earl explained how the picture was taken:“ It was a Sunday morning and I hadn’t slept. […] It was Nick Jameson’s idea […] since I have this penchant for fishing. Anyway, we lift up the manhole cover and I’m sitting on a box. Almost immediately a couple of New York’s Finest come by in their patrol car. They’re looking at us and they wind the window down. We’re like, “Oh shit.” They yell out, “Hey! You got a fishing license?” and then start laughing. So they come over and say, “What the fuck are you doing?” They took some pictures with them handcuffing me. I love New York’s finest.


After building a solid core audience through relentless touring and a string of hard-rocking albums, Foghat finally hit the big time in 1975 with Fool for the City. It still stands out as the best album in the group’s catalog because it matched their road-tested abilities as hard rockers to a consistent set of tunes that were both well-crafted and ambitious. The tone for the album is set by its title track: This hard-rocking gem not only pairs riff-driven verses with an effective shout-along chorus, but also throws in a few surprising moments where the guitars are taken out of the mix completely and Nick Jameson’s bass is allowed to take the lead in a funky breakdown. Fool for the City also produced an enduring rock radio favorite in “Slow Ride,” a stomping rock tune that transcends the inherent clichés of its “love is like a car ride” lyrics with a furious performance from the band and a clever arrangement that works in well-timed automotive sound effects during the verses and plays up the band’s ability to work an R&B-styled groove into their hard-rocking sound (again, note the thumping bassline from Jameson).


Further radio play was earned with “Take It or Leave It,” an acoustic-based ballad that worked synthesizers into its subtle yet carefully layered arrangement to become one of the group’s finest slow numbers. The album’s other songs don’t stand like the aforementioned selections, but they all flow together nicely thanks to a consistently inspired performance from the band and clever little arrangement frills that keep the group’s boogie-oriented rock fresh (example: the witty spoken word bit at the end of “Drive Me Home”). All in all, Fool for the City is both Foghat’s finest achievement in the studio and one of the high points of 1970s hard rock. (by Donald A. Guarisco)


Roger Earl (drums, percussion)
Nick Jameson (bass, keyboards, guitar, vocals)
Lonesome Dave Peverett (vocals, guitar)
Rod “The Bottle” Price (guitar, slide guitar, steel guitar, vocals)


01- Fool For The City (Peverett) 4.32
02. My Babe (Hatfield/Dixon/Medley) 4.37
03. Slow Ride (Peverett) 8.13
04. Terraplane Blues (Johnson) 5.44
05. Save Your Loving (For Me) (Price/Peverett) 3.32
06. Drive Me Home (Peverett) 3.55
07. Take It Or Leave It (Jameson/Peverett) 4.56




Kip Hanrahan – Vertical’s Currency (1995)

FrontCover1Kip Hanrahan (born December 9, 1954) is an American jazz music impresario, record producer and percussionist.

Hanrahan was born in a Puerto Rican neighborhood in the Bronx to an Irish-Jewish family. He has an unusual role in the albums released under his name, one which he has analogized to that of a film director. He assembles players and materials, combining modern/avant-garde/free jazz figures like Don Pullen and Steve Swallow, Latin jazz players such as Milton Cardona and Horacio “El Negro” Hernandez, and occasionally rock musicians like Sting, Jack Bruce and Grayson Hugh, also Bassist,singer,song writer,producer Fernando Saunders.

He produced a number of significant recordings by the nuevo tango master Ástor Piazzolla in the last decade of Piazzolla’s life, as well as recordings by Latin music figures including Jerry Gonzalez. Hanrahan also worked with the poet Ishmael Reed on three recordings with the Conjure Ensemble, featuring Taj Mahal on the first release. These side projects were not the only poetry-based discs: Darn It from 1994 celebrates the work of Paul Haines (by wikipedia)


Sting founded the Pangea label in the mid-’80s, unearthing some important and overlooked recordings from the defunct American Clave catalogue, much to the delight of ears lucky enough to hear (as a side note, some of tango sensation Astor Piazolla’s most important work would be lost were it not for the mining of such treasure). Such is the case for Kip Hanrahan, a soulful, New York-based percussionist and producer who unleashed two particularly fantastic albums — Days and Nights of Blue Luck Inverted and Vertical’s Currency — a lush, sensuous Afro-Cubano feast for the ears that is so warm as to engulf the listener with flames. There is a wonderful spirit to “Shadow Song,” an instantly recognizable anthem of Ricky Ricardo cliché that roars with boisterous horn arrangements, congas, cowbells, and vocals of uncanny, third-person self-analysis: “Today I have these blues that are wittier than me/That jokes with my girlfriend while drinking my rum.” “Smiles and Grins” follows with tight polyrhythms that snap and clap along with syncopated piano clusters, as vocalist Jack Bruce hurriedly lilts beat poetry through the chord changes that only twice pause for contemplation.


Elsewhere in the disc there is an element of sultry longing and hot Miami sunsets, as with “Two Heartedly, To the Other Side,” “Make Love 2,” and “Dark (Kip’s Tune).” It is with this all-star cast of the New York underground jazz fusion scene that Hanrahan finds such rich moods, textures, and symbiosis. Steve Swallow on the bass rarely disappoints, and both guitarist/avant-gardist Arto Lidsay and keyboardist Peter Scherer, who together comprise the group Ambitious Lovers, fill out the room with equally reliable musicianship. Vertical’s Currency overflows with rich contributions in an organic stew of worldly fusion that slinks through the city streets after hours. Find this album and pounce on it. (by Keir Langley)


Taken from the American Clave catalogue
(is a part of the file)

Frisner Augustin (quinto, tambou, tamboura)
Ignacio Berroa (drums)
Jack Bruce (bass, piano, vocals)
Milton Cardona (percussion)
Anton Fier(drums)
Kip Hanrahan (percussion)
Nancy Hanrahan (vocals)
Andriau Jeremie (saxophone)
Arto Lindsay (guitar)
Claudette Mitchell (chekere)
David Murray (sacophone)
Elysee Pyronneau (guitar) (Electric)Charles Reilly PhotographyOrlando
Orlando “Puntilla” Rios (percussion)
Mario Rivera (saxophone)
Ned Rothenberg (saxophone)
Peter Scherer (organ, synclavier, synthesizer)
Lew Soloff (trumpet)
John Stubblefield (saxophone)
Steve Swallow (bass)
Richie Vitale (trumpet)
Nancy Weiss (vocals)


01. A Small Map Of Heaven (Hanrahan/Swallows) 5.17
02. Shadow Song (Mario’s In) (Hanrahan/Hernandez) 4.06
03. Smiles And Grins (Bruce/Brown) 3.02
04. Two Heartedly To The Other Side (Hanrahan/Swallows) 3.03
05. Chances Are Good (Baden’s Distance) (Hanrahan/Powell) 5.08
06. Make Love 2 (Bruce/Brown) 4.27
07. One Casual Song (After Another) (Bruce/Hanrahan) 3.03
08. Intimate Distances (Jack’s Margrit’s Natasha) (Hanrahan) 3.01
09. Describing It To Yourself As Convex (Hanrahan/Scherer) 4.07
10. What Do You Think ? That This Mountain Was Once Fire ? (Hanrahan/Swallows)v 1.41
11. Dark (Kip’s Tune) (Hanrahan/Lindsay) 2.59