Available again: Vintage Rock The Beatles – The Early Years + Kenny Burrell – Jim Hall – Attila Zoller – Guitar Genius In Japan (1971)

Click here:

Steve Harnell (Editor) – Vintage Rock The Beatles – The Early Years

Kenny Burrell – Jim Hall – Attila Zoller – Guitar Genius In Japan (1971)

 

Let me know, if links are dead and I will make them available again …
Please write to:

post-fuer-sammelsurium@gmx.net

Joni Mitchell – Philadelphia (1974 – recorded in the Sixties)

FrontCover1.jpgHere are WMMR’s Ed Sciaky and Gene Shay hosting a special program featuring performances and interviews from Joni’s early Philadelphia appearances on the “Folklore” program and live music recorded at The 2nd Fret, between 1966 and 1968. It seems the bootleg “The Posall and the Mosalm” drew a lot of its tracks from this special, but this is as it was broadcast the day before her appearance at the Academy of Music in Philadelphia in 1974. “Just Like Me” has a mid-cut, and there are speed fluctuations throughout the March 17, 1967 tracks and elsewhere, but mainly in “London Bridge.”WMMR-FM Retrospective. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; January 29, 1974.

As above, the songs were sourced from interviews with Joni in the late 1960s, and they reflect her “set list” of that era. The “1974″ designation refers only to the date of the radio re-broadcast of this archival material. (by Art)

There wouldn’t have been any songs from her Jan 1974 album ‘Court and Spark’ as these recordings are much earlier from ‘66-’68
[For clarity in case anyone was confused about the dates and the text.]

Thanks to elegymart for sharing the show at Dime.

Fairly to very good FM broadcast.

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Personnel:
Joni Mitchell (guitar, vocals)
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some unknown musicians

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Tracklist:
01. WMMR intro 1.43
02. interview 3.19
03. Circle Game (Mitchell) 5.32
04. Sugar Mountain (Young) 4.14
05. Backstage interview 5.09
06. Both Sides Now (Mitchell) 4.12
07. interview 6.39
08. Mr Blue (Mitchell) 4.31
09. Carnival In Kenora (Mitchell) 4.59
10. WMMR intro 0.47
11. Just Like Me (Mitchell) 4.56
12, Eastern Rain (Mitchell) 5.51
13. Blue On Blue (Mitchell) 3.05
14. Born To Take The Highway (Mitchell) 4.10
15. Winter Lady (Mitchell) 2.48
16. London Bridge (Mitchell) 8.17
17. interview 7.17
18. Sisotowbell Lane (Mitchell) 4.00
19. nterview 12.18
20. The Gallery (Mitchell) 4.21
21. Go Tell The Drummer Man (Mitchell) 3.51
22. Conversation 5.43

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Fotheringay – Same (1970)

FrontCover1Fotheringay is the self-titled album by the group formed by Sandy Denny after she left Fairport Convention in 1969, and was the group’s only contemporaneous release. It was recorded in 1970 with former Eclection member and Denny’s future husband Trevor Lucas, with Gerry Conway, Jerry Donahue, and Pat Donaldson. The album includes five Sandy Denny compositions (one of which was co-written with Lucas), one song by Lucas, as well as two traditional songs and two cover versions: Bob Dylan’s “Too Much of Nothing” and Gordon Lightfoot’s “The Way I Feel”.

When Sandy Denny departed Fairport Convention, insisting that she wanted to concentrate upon her own songwriting rather than pursue the band’s exploration of traditional English music, she never meant she also intended abandoning the folk idiom itself. Although all but two of the songs on this, her first post-Fairport project, are indeed original compositions, it is readily apparent that, like former bandmate Richard Thompson, her greatest talents lay distinctly within the same traditions as the poets and balladeers of earlier centuries, while the fact that fully one-half of Fotheringay itself would eventually join Fairport illustrates the care that went into the band’s formation. Even the group’s name resonates.

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“Fotheringay” was also one of Denny’s best-loved Fairport songs. Listening to the album, too, one can see and hear the mothership all over the show, from the tight dynamics of “The Sea” to the simple beauty of “Winter Winds” and on to the showpiece “Banks of the Nile,” a Napoleonic Wars-era ballad set firmly in the storytelling mold of “A Sailor’s Life,” “Tam Linn,” and the post-Denny Fairport’s own “Bonnie Bunch of Roses.” The presence of producer Joe Boyd and guest vocalist Linda Peters complete the sense of a family affair.

Where Fotheringay and Fairport drift apart is in the instrumentation — one of Fairport’s most-endearing talents, after all, was the sense of ramshackle adventure that the bandmembers brought to their recordings. Fotheringay was far more “musicianly,” Melody Makerpacking a perfectionism that comes close, in places, to stifling the sheer exuberance of the music. The overuse of Trevor Lucas’ distinctly mannered vocals, too, reveals the album in a disappointing light — great guitarist though he was, his voice offers nothing that you could not hear in any amateur folk club, any night of the week, rendering Dylan’s “Too Much of Nothing,” Gordon Lightfoot’s “The Way I Feel,” and his own “Ballad of Ned Kelly” little more than makeweights. Such failings are completely overshadowed, of course, by the triumphs that are Denny’s finest contributions — the best of which close the album on a peak unheard since “The Sea,” back at the beginning of the cycle. “The Banks of the Nile” rates among the loveliest and most evocative performances of her entire career, while the hauntingly hypnotic “Two Weeks Last Summer” and a moody “Gypsy Davey” draw out an expressiveness that had similarly been in short supply elsewhere on the record. The end result is an album that, while every Denny fan should hear it, is best experienced sliced and diced across the various compilations that purport to tell the story of Fairport Convention. Bereft of the faults that never make those collections, Fotheringay deserves every kind word that has ever been sent in the band’s direction. [In 2004, Fledg’ling records released a remastered edition that included live versions of “Two Weeks of Summer,” “Nothing More,” “Banks of the Nile” and “Memphis Tennessee,” recorded at the 1970 Rotterdam Pop Festival.] (by Dave Thompson)

The only Fotheringay album to be released in vocalist Sandy Denny’s lifetime, the full-throttle folk album is a propulsive proposition. The eight minute long ‘Banks of the Nile’ is a sumptuous, atmospheric vehicle for Denny’s brilliant voice. (New Musical Express)

Without any doubt: A timeless classic of British Folk !

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Personnel:
Gerry Conway (drums)
Sandy Denny (guitar, piano, vocals)
Jerry Donahue (guitar, vocals)
Pat Donaldson (bass, vocals)
Trevor Lucas (guitar, vocals)
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background vocals:
Todd Lloyd – Linda Thompson

Booklet

Tracklist:
01. Nothing More (Denny) 4.36
02. The Sea (Denny) 5.31
03. The Ballad Of Ned Kelly (Lucas) 3.33
04. Winter Winds (Denny) 2.11
05. Peace In The End (Denny/Lucas) 4.02
06. The Way I Feel (Lightfoot) 4.45
07. The Pond And The Stream (Denny) 3.18
08. Too Much Of Nothing (Dylan) 3.54
09. Banks Of The Nile (Traditional) 8.05

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