Didier Lockwood – Live In Montreux (1990)

FrontCover1Noted French jazz violinist Didier Lockwood, a disciple of the late Stephane Grappelli, has died of a heart attack in Paris, his agent said.

Lockwood, who turned 62 on February 11, died early on Sunday morning. The night before his death, he had performed at Paris jazz venue Bal Blomet.

“His wife, his three daughters, his family, his agent, his co-workers and his record label are sad to announce the sudden passing of Didier Lockwood,” his agent said in a statement.

Lockwood was playing at a jazz festival when he met Grappelli, another French jazz great who founded a string quintet called the Hot Club of France in 1934 with gypsy guitar legend Django Reinhardt.

The violinist invited the then 20-year-old Lockwood to join him on a European tour, kicking off an international career in which he gave around 4,500 concerts and released more than 35 records.

“That was the start of my career, the launchpad that got me into the world of popular jazz,” Lockwood told Radio France in 2008.

DidierLockwood03Lockwood was committed to music education, in 2001 setting up the Didier Lockwood Music Centre in a town south of Paris teaching improvisation according to a jazz violin method he developed.

French culture minister Francoise Nyssen described Lockwood as “deeply generous and outgoing” and said he would be missed by “his friends, music and all the children he wished to enlighten with his passion”.

“He wanted to make music without borders or prejudices,” she added.
(L) Didier Lockwood performs with colleagues

Born in 1956 in Calais to a French-Scottish family, Lockwood, whose father was a music teacher, gained an early taste for improvisation thanks to his elder brother Francis, a jazz pianist.

Aged 17, Lockwood joined a popular French prog rock band called Magma. He later threw himself into a multitude of musical projects and collaborations, experimenting with varied jazz styles, both electric and acoustic, from classical fusion to gypsy swing.

During his career, he wrote two operas, violin and piano concertos, lyrical works and music for films and cartoons.

“France has lost an exceptional musician, a man with rare qualities,” wrote violinist Renaud Capucon on Twitter.

Lockwood’s widow is the coloratura soprano Patricia Petibon, acclaimed for her interpretations of French Baroque music.

The couple had just recorded an album together, said Lockwood’s agent Christophe Deghelt, who called him “Mr. 100,000 volts” and said the musician had a “huge” number of projects under way when he died.

Lockwood was previously married to the singer Caroline Casadesus, with whom he had created a musical called “Jazz and the diva”.(by The Independent)

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“After Stephane Grappelli and Jean-Luc Ponty, France now has a third great violin player, His name is Didier Lockwood.” (Liberation, Paris). Besides Grapelli and Ponty, Lockwood’s influences include Polish violinist Zbigniew Seifert, John Coltrane, and Frank Zappa. Born in 1956, Lockwood was classically trained, but moved on to rock-inspired jazz at an early age. He followed in Ponty’s fusion footsteps with the use of the electric violin, taking it one step further by experimenting in extending the sounds of the violin.

The 1980 Live in Montreux presents Didier Lockwood at his fusion best. He has multi-Grammy winner Jan Hammer (Mahavishnu Orchestra, music for Miami Vice) along for the ride, as well as the intense, soulful American saxophonist Bob Malach. On Fast Travel, the group performs up-tempo musical legerdemain as first Malach, then Hammer, and finally Lockwood pull out their bag of tricks.

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Flyin’ Kitten radiates a bouncy melodic rock-inflected ambiance, while Ballade des Fees portrays a haunting, wispy fairytale. With its infectiously gamboling 2-beat feel, there’s a folkish quality to Zebulon Dance; Lockwood’s plucked violin and Hammer’s guitar-like synth explorations are highlights. Four Strings Bitch shows off the violin’s willful eccentricities in a virtuoso one-man performance that ventures from classic and bluesy acoustic play on through to electronic experimentation.” (unknown source)

Listen to “Four Strings Bitch”: A masteroiece for the elctric violin !

All in all: a sensational album !

Recorded in the Casino Montreux July 16, 1980 and Mountain Recording Studio Montreux.
Mixed in the MPS Studio Villingen July 28, 29, 30, 1980. 

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Personnel:
Gerry Brown (drums)
Jan Hammer (synthesizer)
Didier Lockwood (violin)
Bob Malach (saxophone)
Marc Perru (guitar)
Bo Stief (bass)

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Tracklist:
01 Fast Travel (Lockwood) 7.15
02. Flyin’ Kitten (Lockwood) 7.43
03 Ballade des Fees (Lockwood) 5.01
04. Zebulon Dance (Lockwood) 3.58
05. ADGC (Lockwood) 5:46
06. Four Strings Bitch (Lockwood)3:45
07. Turtle Shuffle (Kajdan) 8.37

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Didier Lockwood (11 February 1956 – 18 February 2018)

Rest In Peace !

Eddie Cochran – The Eddie Cochran Memorial Album (1960)

FrontCover1The Eddie Cochran Memorial Album is the second album by Eddie Cochran, released on Liberty Records in mono, LRP 3172, in May 1960. It had previously been issued as 12 of His Biggest Hits in April 1960 with the same catalogue number, but after Cochran’s death on April 17 it was retitled and reissued, and has remained so titled ever since. It is currently in print on the Magic Records label in France, on CD on EMI-Toshiba in Japan, and on BGO in the UK as a twofer with “Singin’ To My Baby.”The Eddie Cochran Memorial Album is the second album by Eddie Cochran, released on Liberty Records in mono, LRP 3172, in May 1960. It had previously been issued as 12 of His Biggest Hits in April 1960 with the same catalogue number, but after Cochran’s death on April 17 it was retitled and reissued, and has remained so titled ever since.

Eight tracks were released as singles, with “Three Steps to Heaven” appearing as a b-side. Three additional tracks “Have I Told You Lately That I Love You,” “Lovin’ Time,” and “Tell Me Why” had been released on his first album, Singin’ to My Baby in 1957. All five singles that appeared on the Billboard Hot 100 are included, with the teen anthem “Summertime Blues” being the only time Cochran made the top ten. No Cochran album has ever charted in the United States (by wikipedia)

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This compilation was released by Liberty Records in 1960, shortly after Eddie Cochran’s death that spring, the first of several memorial albums (including one called Memorial Album) to come out on Cochran. And while it doesn’t really live up to its title — sad to say, Cochran never had a dozen hits, big or otherwise, to compile — it is a surprisingly good collection as an overview of Cochran’s career and sound (flaws and all), the hits included. At the time of its release, this album would have presented the very first chance that anyone would have had for an overview of Cochran’s career — the problem with the record, as with most early Cochran compilations, lies in the errors made by Liberty Daily MirrorRecords in handling Cochran’s career in the first place; the label apparently saw him developing in the same manner as Elvis Presley (which was understandable, as Elvis was the quintessential white rock & roll star of the era), and, like Presley, doing ballads as often as rockers, and found nothing incongruous in the fact that Cochran just didn’t have the voice to pull that off the way that Elvis did. It wasn’t that Cochran couldn’t do it — he could — but it was more of a stretch, and became an impossible one when he was saddled with second-rate material, as was often the case (where Elvis, until he started doing the movies full-time, never had that problem). But this album starts off on the right foot, with “C’mon Everybody” — one of Cochran’s best songs but never a huge hit in the U.S. — leading off the set, which proceeds with the deceptively complex rocker “Three Steps to Heaven.” We jump back to Cochran’s country roots with “Cut Across Shorty” and “Have I Told You Lately That I Love You,” the latter a ballad that Cochran handled surprisingly well — trying for a sound akin to what Elvis was doing on slow numbers — given his relative antipathy to the form. “Hallelujah, I Love Her So” puts us back in the heart of Cochran’s mature sound, showcasing his guitar amid its string accompaniment and some very strong singing as well. The first side closes with the obligatory “Sittin’ in the Balcony” — which, in fairness, was his first Liberty single, and does have a more than decent guitar break even if the song is a little wimpy. Side two storms out with “Summertime Blues,” as powerful a song as any white rock & roller charted in 1957.

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But listeners who skip the sappy “Lovin’ Time” and jump to “Somethin’ Else” will be doing Cochran’s memory a world of good. “Tell Me Why” is another slowie, but it shows some power to Cochran’s singing, even if he doesn’t pull off what the record label wanted. “Teenage Heaven” was probably obligatory, as it was featured in the then relatively recent movie Go Johnny Go, and it avoids being totally lame by virtue of Cochran’s raspy vocalizing and a reasonably hot sax solo. And “Drive In Show” closes the set out in a manner that probably ought to be skipped, except out of curiosity over some of the more absurd numbers that Cochran was made to record in his tragically brief career. It’s not an ideal collection, by any means, but it is an honest snapshot of his music, warts and all.  (by Bruce Eder)

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Personnel:
Jerry Allison (drums)
Perry Botkin, Jr. (guitar)
Sonny Curtis (guitar)
Mike Deasy (saxophone)
Eddie Cochran (guitar, ukulele, bass, piano, percussion, vocals)
Mike Henderson (saxophone)
Ray Johnson (piano)
Earl Palmer (drums)
Gene Riggio (drums)
Sharon Sheeley (percussion)
Dave Shriver (bass)
Connie “Guybo” Smith (bass)
Jim Stivers (piano)
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The Johnny Mann Chorus (background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. C’mon Everybody (Cochran/Capehart) 1.58
ß2. Three Steps to Heaven (Cochran) 2.25
03. Cut Across Shorty (Wilkin/Walker) 1.53
04. Have I Told You Lately That I Love You? (Wiseman) 2.38
05. Hallelujah I Love Her So (Charles) 2.21
06. Sittin’ In The Balcony (Loudermilk) 2.02
07. Summertime Blues (Cochran/Capehart) 1.59
08. Lovin’ Time (Woolsey) 2.09
09. Somethin’ Else (B.Cochran/Sheeley 2.10
10. Tell Me Why (Cochran) 2.20
11. Teenage Heaven (Cochran/Capehart) 2.07
12. Drive In Show (Dexter) 2.05

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Edward Raymond Cochran (October 3, 1938 – April 17, 1960)

Zakk Wylde – Book Of Shadows (1996)

FrontCover1Zakk Wylde (born Jeffrey Phillip Wielandt on January 14, 1967) is an American musician, singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and occasional actor who is best known as the guitarist for Ozzy Osbourne, and founder of the heavy metal band Black Label Society. His signature bulls-eye design appears on many of his guitars and is widely recognized. He was the lead guitarist and vocalist in Pride & Glory, who released one self-titled album in 1994 before disbanding. As a solo artist he released Book of Shadows and Book of Shadows II.

Book of Shadows is the first solo studio album by the heavy metal guitarist Zakk Wylde. The album was first released in 1996, and was reissued by Spitfire in 1999 with the bonus disc containing “Evil Ways” (the Japanese bonus track from the album’s original release), “The Color Green”, and “Peddlers of Death” (an acoustic version of a track that features on Black Label Society’s Sonic Brew).

Unlike his work with Ozzy Osbourne and Black Label Society, here Zakk Wylde shows a different side to his music; an introspective and mostly acoustic style recalling many of the lighter moments from his previous project, Pride & Glory as well as classic folk rock artists such as Neil Young.

SinglePromotional singles were released for “Between Heaven and Hell” and “Way Beyond Empty”, the latter of which also had an accompanying music video.

“Throwin’ It All Away” was written about the death of Shannon Hoon from the band Blind Melon. Shannon and Zakk had lived together and became close friends a few months before he died of a drug overdose. (by wikipedia)

After spending several years with Ozzy Osbourne and recording one album with the heavy Southern rock trio Pride & Glory, guitarist Zakk Wylde released his debut solo album, Book of Shadows, in June of 1996. Naturally, the album is a guitar showcase, with each song boasting a dazzling guitar solo or two. That much was expected. What is a surprise is the musical diversity apparent throughout the album. Wylde does kick out some heavy riff-driven rockers, but he also detours into blues, country, and folk on occasion. That diversity ensures that Book of Shadows is more listenable for the average listener than most guitarist-led albums. However, Wylde’s songwriting skills remain weak; although the playing is memorable, the melodies rarely are. Nevertheless, there’s enough prime instrumental work here to make it a very worthwhile listen for guitar aficionados and a few of the tracks should satiate fans of straight-ahead heavy boogie rock.(by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

This isn´t a hevy rock album, it´s an album full with ballads with very pensive thoughts.

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Personnel:
James LoMenzo (bass)
Joe Vitale (drums, keyboards, piano on “I Thank You Child”)
Zakk Wylde (vocals, guitar, keyboards, harmonica, bass on 10.)
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John Sambataro (background vocals on 05.)

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Tracklist:
01. Between Heaven And Hell 3.26
02. Sold My Soul (feat. Guiggs) 4.52
03. Road Back Home 5.48
04. Way Beyond Empty 5.25
05. Throwin’ It All Away 5.47
06. What You’re Look’n For 5.31
07. Dead As Yesterday 2.51
08. Too Numb To Cry 2.23
09. The Things You Do 4.11
10. 1,000,000 Miles Away 6.29
11. I Thank You Child 4.41

All songs written by Zakk Wylde

CDs

Two different labels

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