Hubert Laws – Crying Song (1969)

FrontCover1.jpgCrying Song is an album by jazz flautist Hubert Laws released on the CTI label featuring performances of popular music (including songs by The Beatles and Pink Floyd) by Laws recorded in Memphis with Elvis Presley’s rhythm section and at Rudy Van Gelder’s studio.

Hubert Laws occupies rather an ambivalent position in critical estimation. He was very unusual in concentrating on the flute but signing for Creed Taylor and his band of Memphis Soul specialists should have orientated him squarely in the vanguard of late 1960s Jazz. If the precedent was another elite flautist, Herbie Mann – who’d already had a hit single for Atlantic – then the decision was sound. This album, made in 1969, didn’t seem somewhat incongruous stylistically at the time – and they did, to many people – they certainly do today.

That’s not to denigrate Laws, whose tone is utterly ravishing throughout, but the attempt in the first album, Crying Song, to construct a pop album with fringe Memphis and Country Soul stylings was never going to satisfy the purists. Others, such as Keith Jarrett and Gary Burton, were naturally situated along Country Roads and their albums of the late 60s showed strong affinities for the genre within a broader musical context. But Laws’ first album, despite the presence of stellar sidemen such as Ron Carter, Billy Cobham, and on several tracks George Benson – along with a raft of other superb players – fails to cohere. Country Soul, the Monkees, mild Psychedelia, the Bee Gees and Lennon/McCartney with sitar impersonations; well, it’s a big ask for much of this to stand the sterner tests of time. (Jonathan Woolf)

I guess, this album deserves a chance … it´s a pretty good gently Jazz album including a wonderful version of “Let It Be”.

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Personnel:
George Benson (guitar)
Garnett Brown (trombone)
Ron Carter (bass)
Gene Chrisman (drums)
Art Clarke (saxophone)
Billy Cobham (drums)
Bobby Emmons (organ)
Bob James (keyboards)
Hubert Laws (flute)
Mike Leech (bass)
Seldon Powell (saxophone)
Ernie Royal (trumpet, flugelhorn)
Ed Shaughnessy (tabla, sand blocks)
Marvin Stamm (trumpet, flugelhorn)
Tony Studd (trombone)
Grady Tate (drums)
Bobby Wood (piano)
Reggie Young (guitar)
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violin:
Lewis Eley – Paul Gershman – George Ockner – Gene Orloff – Raoul Pollikoff – Matthew Raimondi – Sylvan Shulman – Avram Weiss
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cello:
Charles McCracken – George Ricci

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Tracklist:
01. La Jean (Christopher) 2.30
02. Love Is Blue/Sing A Rainbow (Popp/Hamilton) 3.23
03. Crying Song (Waters) 4.53
04. Listen To The Band (Nesmith) 3.21
05. I’ve Gotta Get A Message to You (B.Gibb/R.Gibb/M.Gibb) 3.08
06. Feelin’ Alright (Mason) 2.32
07. Cymbaline (Waters) 3.52
08. How Long Will It Be? (Laws) 6.09
09. Let It Be (Lennon/McCartney) 3.32

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Doris Day – On Moonlight Bay (1951)

FrontCover1.jpgDoris Day (born Doris Mary Ann Kappelhoff; April 3, 1922 – May 13, 2019) was an American actress, singer, and animal welfare activist. After she began her career as a big band singer in 1939, her popularity increased with her first hit recording “Sentimental Journey” (1945). After leaving Les Brown & His Band of Renown to embark on a solo career, she recorded more than 650 songs from 1947 to 1967, which made her one of the most popular and acclaimed singers of the 20th century.

Day’s film career began during the latter part of the Classical Hollywood Film era with the 1948 film Romance on the High Seas, and its success sparked her twenty-year career as a motion picture actress. She starred in a series of successful films, including musicals, comedies, and dramas. She played the title role in Calamity Jane (1953), and starred in Alfred Hitchcock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956) with James Stewart. Her most successful films were the ones she made co-starring Rock Hudson and James Garner, such as Pillow Talk (1959) and Move Over, Darling (1963), respectively. She also co-starred in films with such leading men as Clark Gable, Cary Grant, James Stewart, David Niven, and Rod Taylor. After her final film in 1968, she went on to star in the CBS sitcom The Doris Day Show (1968–1973).

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Day was usually one of the top ten singers between 1951 and 1966. As an actress, she became the biggest female film star in the early 1960s, and ranked sixth among the box office performers by 2012. In 2011, she released her 29th studio album, My Heart, which became a UK Top 10 album featuring new material. Among her awards, Day has received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award and a Legend Award from the Society of Singers. In 1960, she was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress, and in 1989 was given the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement in motion pictures. In 2004, she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President George W. Bush followed in 2011 by the Los Angeles Film Critics Association’s Career Achievement Award. She was one of the last surviving stars of the Golden Age of Hollywood. (by wikipedia)

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And here are some songs from the Warner Bros. movie “On Moonlight Bay”

On Moonlight Bay is a 1951 musical film directed by Roy Del Ruth which tells the story of the Winfield family at the turn of the 20th century. The movie is based loosely on the Penrod stories by Booth Tarkington. There was a 1953 sequel, By the Light of the Silvery Moon.

In a small Indiana town in the mid-1910s, the Winfield household – banker father George, his wife Alice, their grown tomboyish daughter Marjorie, their precocious trouble-making son Wesley, and their exasperated housekeeper Stella – have just moved into a larger house in a nicer neighborhood.

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No one but George is happy about the move, until Marjorie meets their new neighbor, William Sherman, home on a break from his studies at Indiana University. The two are immediately attracted to each other, which makes Margie change her focus from baseball to trying to become a proper young woman. Their resulting relationship is despite, or perhaps because of Bill’s unconventional thoughts on life, including not believing in the institution of marriage, or believing in the role money plays in society.

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The road to a happy life between Margie and Bill is not only hindered by distance as Bill returns to school and Margie’s attempts to learn feminine things, but also George’s dislike of Bill because of their differing beliefs, the stuffy Hubert Wakely also trying to court Margie (he who is George’s choice as an appropriate suitor for her), Wesley’s continual meddling in his sister’s life, and World War I. One of those issues may be overcome when Wesley receives a gift from Aunt Martha that used to be his father old slingshot that he used to kill Aunt Martha’s’ best hen. His father discovers the old slingshot after Wesley cracks a window with it, his father gets emotional after he sees it and everything is resolved in time for a happy ending. (by wikipedia)

And this is of course the perfect story for all these romantic, sentiental and old fashioned songs ….

RIP … Doris Day

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Alternate frontcover

Personnel:
Doris Day (vocals)
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Jack Smith (vocals)
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Paul Weston & His Orchestra
The Norman Luboff Choir

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Tracklist:
01. Moonlight Bay (Madden/Wenrich) 2.32
02. Till We Meet Again (Egan/Whiting) 2.42
03. Love Ya Tobias (De Rose) 2.19
04. Christmas Story (Walsh) 3.12
05. I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles (Kenbrovin/Kellette) 2.19
06. Cuddle Up A Little Closer (Harbach/Hoschma) 2.55
07. Every Little Movement (Harbach/Hoschma) 2.45
08. Tell Me (Tell Me Why) (Callahan/Kortlander) 3.20
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09. Closing Remarks (acoustic record ad) 0.26

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Day was married four times. She was married to Al Jorden, a trombonist whom she first met in Barney Rapp’s Band, from March 1941 to February 1943. Her only child, son Terrence Paul Jorden (later known as Terry Melcher), resulted from this marriage; he died in 2004. Her second marriage was to George William Weidler, a saxophonist and the brother of actress Virginia Weidler, from March 30, 1946, to May 31, 1949. Weidler and Day met again several years later; during a brief reconciliation, he introduced her to Christian Science.

On April 3, 1951, her 29th birthday, she married Martin Melcher. This marriage lasted until Melcher’s death in April 1968. Melcher adopted Day’s son Terry, who, with the name Terry Melcher, became a successful musician and record producer (The Byrds, Paul Revere & the Raiders and many more)