Blackfoot – Dry Country + Too Hard To Handle + 2 (1981)

FrontCover1.JPGBlackfoot is an American Southern rock band from Jacksonville, Florida formed during 1969. Though they primarily play with a Southern rock style, they are also known as a hard rock act. The band’s classic lineup consisted of guitarist and vocalist Rickey Medlocke, guitarist Charlie Hargrett, bassist Greg T. Walker, and drummer Jakson Spires.

They had a number of successful albums during the 1970s and early 1980s, including Strikes (1979), Tomcattin’ (1980) and Marauder (1981).

By late 1975, the group was living back in Gainesville, Florida. During 1977 they communicated with Black Oak Arkansas’ manager, Butch Stone, who hired them as the backing group for one of his clients, Ruby Starr, who had been a backup singer for Black Oak but was now becoming self-employed. After the stint with Ruby ended during 1978, they met Brownsville Station manager Al Nalli and his partner Jay Frey, who got them a contract with the company Atco Records.

Blackfoot Strikes, produced by Al Nalli and engineered by Brownsville Station drummer Henry Weck, was recorded in Nalli’s basement studio in Ann Arbor, Michigan and was completed by January 1979. It was destined to be the band’s most commercially successful effort. The song “Train, Train”, written by Rickey’s grandfather, “Shorty” Medlocke, became their first success and best known song. “Highway Song” proved to be another success for them later that year.

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The group toured frequently during 1979; late during the year they opened for the band The Who at the Silverdome in Pontiac, Michigan while developing their next album, Tomcattin, which was released during 1980. They went on to release the album Marauder during 1981 and Highway Song Live during 1982. (by wikipedia)

And here´s a rare single including as a bonus a “free live single”, recorded at the Castle Donnington Festival, including their legendary “Train Train” written by Shorty Medlocke (the grandpa auf Ricky Melock).

The two sutio tracks were taken from their “Marauder” album.

Enjoy the power of one of the finest Southern Hard Rock groups ever … !

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Personnel:
Charlie Hargrett (guitar)
Rickey Medlocke (vocals, guitar)
Greg T. Walker (bass, background vocals)
Jakson Spires (drums, background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Dry Country (R.Medlocke/Spires) 3.42
02. Too Hard To Handel (R.Medlocke/Spires) 4.04
03. On The Run (live Donington 1981) (R.Medlocke/Spires) 4.37
04. Train Train (live Donington 1981) (S.Medlocke) 7.01

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Jakson Spires

Jakson Spires April 12th 1951 – March 16th 2005

Redwing – Dead Or Alive (1974)

FrontCover1.JPGEssentially, Redwing, Glad, and the New Breed are all the same band…sort of. As the band evolved and their styles changed, so did their name.

Actually, the story begins in Sacramento, CA in 1962 when Timothy (B.) Schmit, Ron Floegel, and Tom Phillips played together in a folk trio, appropriately named Tim Tom & Ron. In 1963, as high school sophomores at Encina High, the band added drummer George Hullin and switched to surf music. With this new change in direction and new member, Tim Tom & Ron became The Contenders.

Then the British Invasion hit, and the group jumped on that ship. Surf music was out and Beatlesque-sounding music was their new thing. By now, the quartet of Tim Schmit, Ron Floegel, Tom Phillips, and George Hullin went by the name, the New Breed.

In 1965, the New Breed cut a single, “Green Eyed Woman” b/w “I’m in Love,” which was quite successful as a regional hit in Northern California. The B-Side, “I’m in Love,” was actually a Lennon-McCartney tune that never appeared on a Beatles record. However, the New Breed’s rendition was extremely faithful to the Beatle-sound, almost sounding as though it was a track that could have been pulled right off of A Hard Days Night; production-wise, it was very much in the “I’m Happy Just to Dance With You” vein.

The New Breed next recorded an album’s worth of material. Most of the 11 tracks were cover tunes, but there were a few New Breed originals recorded. Due to problems with their label, the record was not released.

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In 1966, under their own label, World United, the band recorded a new single, “Fine With Me” b/w “The Sound of Music.” The band’s music mirrored the progressive changes that were happening in the music world around this time, and their follow-up single “Wand Ad Reader,” was, essentially, a New Breed re-write of “Paperback Writer.”

Around 1968, the band signed on with a new label, Equinox, under producer Terry Melcher, who had the group change their name to Glad. In Los Angeles, Glad recorded one album, Feelin’ Glad. The album, again, is very Beatlesque, but it is a highly produced effort, more so like the post-’65 Beatles. Apparently, the band was unhappy with the album due to the fact that they had very little control over it. Certain parts of the record were overdubbed with strings, horns, and fancy production against the band’s wishes. Furthermore, its been stated that Tim Schmit is the only Glad member that appeared on the LP’s track, “Shape of Things to Come,” and this was apparently a sore spot for the group. Regardless, the album, which is mostly Glad originals, is a solid album filled with great cuts and great singing and harmonies.

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Unfortunately, Feelin’ Glad did not sell particularly well, and in 1969, Tim Schmit, aka, Timothy B. Schmit was offered the position of bassist for Poco . He accepted it and went onto record some of the most under appreciated music ever with the band. He became ConcertPosterthe replacement for Randy Meisner, who, ironically, he would replace again in the Eagles in 1977. With Poco, Tim released 11 albums.

Glad, again, changed their name. This time, they became Redwing. Replacing Tim was Andy Samuels, formerly of Nate Shiner’s Band. Samuels was really another guitarist, and not really a bassist, although he would play some bass on Redwing’s albums and was–according to soon-to-be-bassist Dale Lyberger–quite accomplished. Although it seems that the band never actually found an “official,” long-term bassist, several four-stringers played with the group over the ensuing years–most notably Dale Lyberger, John Myers, and Buddy Harpham.

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Redwing did well locally, but, unfortunately, never made it nationally. Under the Fantasy label, they released 5 records–one each year starting in 1971: Redwing, What this Country Needs…, Take Me Home, Dead or Alive, and Beyond the Sun and Stars. Much like with the New Breed and Glad, each record reflected the band’s style evolving and incorporated new ideas. (More information is available on each record on the records page.)

By the time of the release of Beyond the Sun andStars, the band’s final record, the spark that originally defined the band had diminished. The end was not too far away, and the group disbanded not too long aftewards.

Although the 5 Redwing LPs remain unreleased on CD and long out of print, those who have had or have been able to find vinyl copies recognize that the group left behind some fine music. The members of the New Breed (including Timothy B. Schmit) still occasionally see each other, and have reunited for a few jams over the years: usually at high school reunions. After all, Encina High School was the place where it all started so many years back. (by desktop21.com/redwing)

And this is their 4th album …

… and if you like the sound of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, The Eagles, The Marshall Tucker Band or The Band …. then is this album for you.

And songs like “Rainbow Mountain”, “I’m Holding On”, “Two Brothers (Dead Or Alive)”. “Early Mornin’ Sunrise” or “Shine On Me” … stands the test of time ! Listen and enjoy !

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Personnel:
Ron Floegel (guitar)
George Hullin (drums, percussion, fiddle)
Tom Phillips (guitar, slide-guitar, steel-guitar, dobro, banjo, harmonica, saxophone, vocals)
Andrew Samuels (guitar, bass, vocals)
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David Fraser (piano on 04., 08. + 10.)
Tiny Moore (fiddle, mandolin on 06. + 09.)
Kenneth Nash (percussion on 01., 05., 06. + 08.)
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background vocals:
Debbie Moore – George Hullin

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Tracklist:
01. I’m Holding On (Phillips) 3.58
02. You’ve Got It (Phillips) 2.47
03. Two Brothers (Dead Or Alive) (Phillips) 3.26
04. The Rhythm King (Floegel) 2.01
05. Early Mornin’ Sunrise (Phillips) 4.49
06. Foxfire (Phillips) 2.19
07. Shine On Me (Phillips) 3.12
08. Angel Eyes (Floegel) 3.01
09. Give Me A Song (Phillips) 2.59
10. Rainbow Mountain (Floegel) 3.38

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Tom Phillips

Tom Phillips today

Duke Ellington – Jumpin´ Punkins (1965)

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Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington (April 29, 1899 – May 24, 1974) was an American composer, pianist, and leader of a jazz orchestra, which he led from 1923 until his death over a career spanning more than fifty years.

Born in Washington, D.C., Ellington was based in New York City from the mid-1920s onward and gained a national profile through his orchestra’s appearances at the Cotton Club in Harlem. In the 1930s, his orchestra toured in Europe. Although widely considered to have been a pivotal figure in the history of jazz, Ellington embraced the phrase “beyond category” as a liberating principle and referred to his music as part of the more general category of American Music rather than to a musical genre such as jazz.

Some of the jazz musicians who were members of Ellington’s orchestra, such as saxophonist Johnny Hodges, are considered to be among the best players in the idiom. Ellington melded them into the best-known orchestral unit in the history of jazz. Some members stayed with the orchestra for several decades. A master at writing miniatures for the three-minute 78 rpm recording format, Ellington wrote more than one thousand compositions; his extensive body of work is the largest recorded personal jazz legacy, with many of his pieces having become standards. Ellington also recorded songs written by his bandsmen, for example Juan Tizol’s “Caravan”, and “Perdido”, which brought a Spanish tinge to big band jazz. In the early 1940s, Ellington began a nearly thirty-year collaboration with composer-arranger-pianist Billy Strayhorn, whom he called his writing and arranging companion. With Strayhorn, he composed many extended compositions, or suites, as well as additional short pieces. Following an appearance at the Newport Jazz Festival, in July 1956, Ellington and his orchestra enjoyed a major revival and embarked on world tours. Ellington recorded for most American record companies of his era, performed in several films, scored several, and composed a handful of stage musicals.

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Ellington was noted for his inventive use of the orchestra, or big band, and for his eloquence and charisma. His reputation continued to rise after he died, and he was awarded a posthumous Pulitzer Prize Special Award for music in 1999. (by wikipedia)

And here´s a fine sampler from his early to mid-1940s period. We hear “16 rare sides from his 1940/1941 band” …

And it´s another chance to hear all these charming Big Band tunes from one of the geatest Jazz musicians of the last century.

My copy is from Italy … so all the liner notes are in Italian.

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Original US front + back cover

Personnel:
Ivie Anderson (vocals)
Barney Bigard (saxophone, clarinet)
Jimmy Blanton (bass)
Lawrence Brown (trombone)
Harry Carney (saxophone, clarinet)
Duke Ellington (piano)
Sonny Greer (drums)
Fred Guy (guitar)
Otto Hardwick (saxophone, clarinet)
Johnny Hodges (saxophone)
Wallace Jones (trumpet)
Ray Nance (trumpet, violin, vocals)
Joe Nanton (trombone)
Rex Stewart (cornet)
Billy Strayhorn (piano)
Juan Tizol (trombone)
Ben Webster (saxophone)
Cootie Williams (trumpet)

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Tracklist:
01. Conga Brava (Ellington/Tizol) 2.55
02. Me And You (Ellington) 2.52
03. Dusk (Ellington) 3.13
04. Blue Goose (Ellington) 3.18
05. Five O’ Clock Whistle (Gannon/Myrow/Irwin) 3.15
06. The Sidewalks Of New York (Lawlor/Blake) 3.10
07. After All (Strayhorn) 3.16
08. John Hardy’s Wife (Ellington) 3.23
09. Jumpin’ Punkins (Mercer/Ellington) 3.41
10. Are You Sticking ? (Ellington) 3.04
11. The Giddy Bug Gallop (Ellington) 3.29
12. Chocolate Shake (Webster/Ellington) 2.53
13. Clementine (Strayhorn) 2.58
14. Jump For Joy (Webster/Ellington/Kuller) 2.53
15. Bli-Blip (Kuller/Ellington) 3.03
16. Five O’ Clock Drag (Ellington) 3.09

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“Duke” Ellington (April 29, 1899 – May 24, 1974)