Louis Armstrong And His All Stars – En Concert Avec Europe 1. Olympia 24 Avril 1962 (1992)

FrontCover1.jpgBy the 1950s, Armstrong was a widely beloved American icon and cultural ambassador who commanded an international fanbase. However, a growing generation gap became apparent between him and the young jazz musicians who emerged in the postwar era such as Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, and Sonny Rollins. The postwar generation regarded their music as abstract art and considered Armstrong’s vaudevillian style, half-musician and half-stage entertainer, outmoded and Uncle Tomism, “… he seemed a link to minstrelsy that we were ashamed of.”[61] He called bebop “Chinese music”. While touring Australia, 1954, he was asked if he could play bebop. “Bebop?” he husked. “I just play music. Guys who invent terms like that are walking the streets with their instruments under their arms.”[63] “Mack the Knife” was released in 1956. Record of Armstrong’s visit to Brazil, 1957. In June 1950, Suzy Delair performed rehearsals of the song “C’est si bon” with Aimé Barelli and his Orchestra at the Monte Carlo casino where Louis Armstrong was finishing the evening. Armstrong enjoyed the song and he recorded the American version in New York City on June 26, 1950. In the 1960s, he toured Ghana and Nigeria.[64][65] After finishing his contract with Decca Records, he became a freelance artist and recorded for other labels.[66][67] He continued an intense international touring schedule, but in 1959 he suffered a heart attack in Italy and had to rest.

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In 1964, after over two years without setting foot in a studio, he recorded his biggest-selling record, “Hello, Dolly!”, a song by Jerry Herman, originally sung by Carol Channing. Armstrong’s version remained on the Hot 100 for 22 weeks, longer than any other record produced that year, and went to No. 1 making him, at 62 years, 9 months and 5 days, the oldest person ever to accomplish that feat. In the process, he dislodged the Beatles from the No. 1 position they had occupied for 14 consecutive weeks with three different songs.[69] External audio Louis Daniel Armstrong talks with Studs Terkel on WFMT; 1962/6/24, 33:43, Studs Terkel Radio Archive. Armstrong kept touring well into his 60s, even visiting part of the communist bloc in 1965. He also toured Africa, Europe, and Asia under the sponsorship of the US State Department with great success, earning the nickname “Ambassador Satch” and inspiring Dave Brubeck to compose his jazz musical The Real Ambassadors.

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By 1968, he was approaching 70 and his health began to give out. He suffered heart and kidney ailments that forced him to stop touring. He did not perform publicly at all in 1969 and spent most of the year recuperating at home. Meanwhile, his longtime manager Joe Glaser died. By the summer of 1970, his doctors pronounced him fit enough to resume live performances. He embarked on another world tour, but a heart attack forced him to take a break for two months. Armstrong made his last recorded trumpet performances on his 1968 album Disney Songs the Satchmo Way. (by wikipedia)

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And here´s a great concert from 1962, I guess this was a radio broadcast show, released 30 years later.

Let´s celebrate one of these great jazz musicians from the erly days of Jazz !

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Personnel:
Louis Armstrong (trumpet, vocals)
Danny Barcelona (drums)
Jewel Brown (vocals)
Billy Cronk (bass)
Joe Darensbourg (clarinet)
Billy Kyle (piano)
Trummy Young (trombone)

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Tracklist:
01. When It’s Sleepy Time Down South (René/Muse) 3.17
02. (Back Home Again In) Indiana (McDonald/Hanley) 4.22
03, A Kiss To Build A Dream On Kalmar/Ruby/Hammerstein) 4.27
04. My Bucket’s Got A Hole In It (‘Williams) 3.16
05. Tiger Rag (LaRocca/DaCosta) 1.26
06. Now You Has Jazz (Porter) 6.51
07. High Society (Williams/Piron) 3.03
08. Ole Miss (Handy) 3.48
09. When I Grow Too Old To Dream (Hammerstein/Wood/Romberg) 4.17
10. Tin Roof Blues (Roppolo/Mares/Pollack/Brunies/Stitzel/Melrose) 5.18
11. Yellow Dog Blues (Handy) 3.00
12- When The Saints (Traditional) 3.33
13. Struttin’ With Some Barbecue (Armstrong/Raye) 5.51
14. Nobody Knows The Trouble I’ve Seen (Traditional) 3.13
15. Blueberry Hill (Lewis/Stock/Rose) 3.27
16. The Faithful Hussar (Frantzen) 5.10
17. Saint Louis Blues (Handy) 3.36
18. After You’ve Gone (Creamer/Layton) 3.23
19. Mack The Knife (Brecht/Weill) 4.54

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Louis Daniel Armstrong (August 4, 1901 – July 6, 1971)

The Faces – Live At The Paris Theatre, London (BBC In Concert) (1973)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Faces were an English rock band formed in 1969 by members of Small Faces after lead singer/guitarist Steve Marriott left that group to form Humble Pie. The remaining Small Faces—Ian McLagan (keyboards), Ronnie Lane (bass guitar, vocals), and Kenney Jones (drums and percussion)—were joined by Ronnie Wood (guitar) and Rod Stewart (lead vocals), both from the Jeff Beck Group, and the new line-up was renamed Faces.

The first collaboration among the future Faces was in a formation called Quiet Melon, which also featured Wood’s older brother Art Wood and Kim Gardner; they recorded four songs and played a few shows in May 1969, during a break in Ronnie Wood’s and Rod Stewart’s commitments with The Jeff Beck Group. Later that summer Wood and Stewart parted ways with Beck and joined Lane, McLagan and Jones full-time. Prior to any releases by the new Faces lineup, Wood and McLagan appeared on Stewart’s first solo album in 1969, An Old Raincoat Won’t Ever Let You Down (known as The Rod Stewart Album in the US). The rest of the backing band on the album included drummer Micky Waller, keyboardist Keith Emerson and guitarists Martin Pugh (of Steamhammer, and later Armageddon and 7th Order) and Martin Quittenton (also from Steamhammer).

TheFaces01With the addition of Wood and Stewart, the “small” part of the original band name was dropped, partly because the two newcomers (at 5’9″ and 5’10” respectively) were significantly taller than the three former Small Faces.[5] Hoping to capitalise on the Small Faces’ earlier success, record company executives wanted the band to keep their old name; however, the band objected, arguing the personnel changes resulted in a group very different from the Small Faces. As a compromise, in the US their debut album was credited to the Small Faces, while subsequent albums appeared under their new name.

The group regularly toured Britain, Europe and the United States from 1970 to 1975, and were among the top-grossing live acts in that period; in 1974 their touring also encompassed Australia, New Zealand and Japan. They toured the United States and Canada in 1975. Among their most successful songs were “Had Me a Real Good Time”, their breakthrough UK hit “Stay with Me”, “Cindy Incidentally” and “Pool Hall Richard”. As Rod Stewart’s solo career became more successful than that of the group, the band became overshadowed by their lead singer. A disillusioned Ronnie Lane left the band in 1973; one reason given later for his departure was frustration over not having more opportunities to sing lead vocals.

Lane’s role as bassist was taken over by Tetsu Yamauchi (who had replaced Andy Fraser in Free). Released just months before Lane left the band, the Faces’ final studio album was Ooh La La.

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The following year a live album was released, entitled Coast to Coast: Overture and Beginners; it was criticised by reviewers for being poorly recorded and thought out.[9] It featured selections from their late 1973 tour, the first featuring Yamauchi.[9][10] They recorded a few tracks for another studio album, but had lost enthusiasm and their final release as a group was the late 1974 UK Top 20 hit “You Can Make Me Dance, Sing or Anything”. In 1975 Wood began working with the Rolling Stones, which brought differences between Stewart and the others to a head, and after a troubled fall US tour (with Jesse Ed Davis on rhythm guitar), in December the band announced that they were splitting. (by wikipedia)

And here´s a superb braodcasting reording by The Faces, recorded live at the Pais Theatre, London for he legendary “BBC In Concer” series.

Ladies & Gentlemen: The Faces … loud and proud … listen !

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Personnel:
Kenny Jones (drums)
Ronnie Lane (bass, guitar)
Ian McLagen (keyboards)
Rod Stewart (vocals)
Ron Wood (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Silicone Grown (Stewart/Wood) 2.27
02. Cindy Incidentaly (McLagan/Stewart/Wood) 2.42
03. Angel (Hendrix) 4.19
04. Memphis Tennessee (Berry) 4.01
05. True Blue (Stewart/Wood) 3.53
06. I’d Rather Go Blind (Foster/Jordan) 5.06
07. You’re My Girl (Cooper/Beatty/Shelby) 4.56
08. Twistin’ The Night Away (Cooke) 4.08
09. It’s All Over Now (B.Womack/S.Womack) 3.48
10. Miss Judy’s Farm (Stewart/Wood) 3.54
11. I Know I’m Losing You (Whitfield/Holland, Jr./Grant) 5:43
12. Three Button Hand Me Down (Stewart/Wood/Lane/McLagan/Jones) 4.31
13. Maybe I’m Amazed (McCartney) 6.01

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Ray Lema – Medecine (1985)

FrontCover1.jpgRaymond Lema A’nsi Nzinga (born 30 March 1946), known as Ray Lema, is a Congolese (DRC) musician. A pianist, guitarist, and songwriter, he settled in France in 1982.rn in Lufu-Toto, Bas-Congo Province. As a child he wanted to be a priest and in 1957 at the age of 11 entered a seminary of the White Fathers (a Roman Catholic society of apostolic life), where his talent for music was recognized. He began learning the organ and piano, within a European classical canon that included Gregorian chants, Mozart and Chopin; his concert debut was Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata. He left the seminary in 1962 and subsequently attended the University of Kinshasa, where he studied chemistry. He became interested in popular music from outside Africa and after learning to play guitar he began his involvement with the Kinshasa music scene. He became a performer in clubs and was a fan of musicians such as Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton.

In the early 1970s Lema went round the country recording as an ethnomusicologist. In 1974 he became music director for two years of the National Ballet of Zaire. Over the years he has played with the bands of Tabu Ley Rochereau, Joseph Kabasele and Franco, and in 1978 his own band, Ya Tupas, won the French Maracas d’Or award.

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In 1979 he was invited by the Rockefeller Foundation to the United States, where he recorded his first album, Koteja (1982). He then moved to Europe, settling in 1982 in France. His album Kinshasa-Washington DC-Paris was released in 1983. His album Medecine was recorded in London with Martin Meissonnier. His first recordings in the early 1980s were for Celluloid Records, and by 1989 he had international success signing with the Island Records subsidiary, Mango.

Lema has become a major figure in world music, performing at numerous music festivals, and has also worked as a film composer. He has also been involved with various international collaborations. He appears as a vocalist (and composer on three tracks) on Stewart Copeland’s 1985 album, The Rhythmatist. Guests on Lema’s 1989 album Nangadeef include Courtney Pine and the Mahotella Queens. In 1992 he spent time in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, writing the opera Un Touareg s’est marié avec une pygmée with Cameroonian Werewere Liking, and also that year worked with German pianist Joachim Kuhn to record Euro African Suites. In 1997, he recorded the album Bulgarian Voices with the choir of the Pirin Folk Ensemble, and composed The Dream of the Gazelle for a Swedish chamber orchestra. In 2000 he worked with Moroccan band Tyour Gnaoua and brought out the CD Saf.

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In 2002, Lema appeared on a track titled “No Agreement” on the Red Hot Organization’s tribute album to Fela Kuti, Red Hot and Riot alongside Res, Tony Allen, Baaba Maal, Positive Black Soul and Archie Shepp.

He was awarded the “Django d’Or” in October 2003 (by wikipedia)

And here´s his second solo-album:

Born in Zaire (now D.R.Congo) in 1946, Ray Lema proved at a young age to be a gifted pianist and guitarist. He worked as an ethnomusicologist, and in the mid-70s was commissioned by the Zairean government to assemble a National Ballet for Zaire. In 1979 Ray received a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation to travel and perform in USA. There he recorded his first album, Koteja. Two years later he moved to Europe, staying in Belgium and France. In France he formed the band Carma and started a record label, Celluloid with his album Kinshasa-Washington DC-Paris in 1983. Medecine followed in 1985. Since then, he has travelled the world, working with musicians from Ivory Coast, Cape Verde, Cameroon, Morocco and Europe. In 1989, the Mahotella Queens featured on the track ‘Kamulang’ on the Nangadeef album.

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Medecine draws on traditional central African music and translates it into reggae-tinged electronic funk for your Nintendo. He strikes the perfect balance between traditional and electronic, African and western. Every song is a gem, none more so that the 7-minute ‘Bored Whore’. Lema handles vocals, guitar, percussion and keyboards on the album, while the electronics were programmed by Martyn Philips and Martin Meissonnier. Legendary Afrobeat drummer Tony Allen lays down the groove on ‘Marabout’ and ‘Peuple Eyo’.

Progressive South African label Shifty re-released the album in 1990. (afrosynth.com)

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Personnel:
Athey Dialopa (saxophone)
Ray Lema (vocals, guitar, keyboards, percussion)
Martin Meissonnier (electronics, synthesizer)
amba N’Go (guitar)
Martyn Phillips (electronics, synthesizer)
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Tony Allen (drums on 01. + 04.)
M’Bamina (vocals on 02. + 06.)
Boffi Banengola (drums on 01. + 07.)
Fanfan (guitar on 01.)
Pape Thiam (percussion on 03.)

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Tracklist:
01. Marabout (Iyolela) 6.55
02. Ninga 6.43
03. Nzola 4.37
04. Peuple Eyo 5.54
05. Lusala 3.01
06. Bored Whore 7.09
07. Dansometer Reprise 3.17

All songs written by Ray Lema

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