Thin Lizzy – Live And Dangerous (1978)

FrontCover1.JPGLive and Dangerous is a live double album by the Irish rock band Thin Lizzy, released in June 1978. It was recorded in London in 1976, and Philadelphia and Toronto in 1977, with further production in Paris. It was also the last Thin Lizzy album to feature guitarist Brian Robertson,[a] who left the band shortly after its release.

The band decided to release a live album after their producer Tony Visconti did not have enough time to work on a full studio session. The group listened through various archive recordings from earlier tours and compiled the album from the best versions. Various studio overdubs were made to the live recordings during early 1978 in Paris; exactly how much of the album is overdubbed has been a contentious topic since its release. The album reached No. 2 in the UK album charts, ultimately selling over half a million copies. It has continued to attract critical acclaim and it has appeared in several lists of the greatest live albums of all time.

By the mid-1970s, Thin Lizzy had stabilised around founding members, lead singer and bassist Phil Lynott and drummer Brian Downey, alongside guitarists Scott Gorham and Brian Robertson. The band had found commercial success with several hit singles and developed a strong live following, including headlining the Reading Festival. Robertson had briefly left the band in 1977 but subsequently returned. The group had planned to ThinLizzy01make a new studio album at the start of 1978. Working with producer Tony Visconti, Thin Lizzy retained commercial success with the album Bad Reputation, and the group wanted to work with him again. However, Visconti had a very tight schedule and had committed to producing several albums for other artists, so Lynott suggested instead that they spend two weeks together compiling a live album from earlier recordings.

The band and Visconti listened to over 30 hours of archive recordings, looking for the best performances to release.[3] The album sleeve notes credit two concerts as the source of the album – Hammersmith Odeon, London, England on 14 November 1976 (as part of the tour for Johnny the Fox, released earlier that year), and Seneca College Fieldhouse, Don Mills, Toronto, Ontario, Canada on 28 October 1977 (as part of the tour for Bad Reputation).[1] Visconti later revealed that shows at the Tower Theater, Philadelphia on 20 and 21 October 1977, a week earlier than the Toronto gig, had also been recorded. The band had listened back to the Hammersmith tapes shortly after recording and agreed that the performances sounded better than the studio versions. Thin Lizzy biographer Mark Putterford believes the majority of recordings on the finished album are from the Hammersmith show. Visconti later said the performance of “Southbound” came from a soundcheck before one of the Philadelphia gigs, with the audience reaction dubbed in from another song.

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On this album, the band segues immediately from “Cowboy Song” into “The Boys Are Back in Town”, on the line “a cowboy’s life is the life for me” – the last chord of the former was the first of the latter, although their studio versions were recorded as separate songs.[8] This segue between the two tracks remained a staple of the band’s setlist for the rest of their career, and examples can be found on other live releases. The band had rearranged “Still in Love with You” to be slower and more emotional than the original studio version, and the version recorded on Live and Dangerous was considered by Putterford to be the highlight of Lynott’s musical career.

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To promote the album, the group filmed a gig at the Rainbow Theatre, London on 29 March 1978 for a television broadcast. However, this was cancelled and the footage went unaired.

The album was mixed and overdubbed at Studio Des Dames, Paris in January 1978. All sources agree that overdubbing took place on Live and Dangerous, although there is considerable disagreement about the extent of them. According to Visconti, the album was “75% recorded in the studio” with only the drums and audience noise remaining from the original live recordings. Visconti later said the overdubs and production were essential in order that the listener could hear a professional sounding band. He claims to have created some audience sounds from a keyboard-triggered tape loop in a similar manner to a Mellotron or sampling keyboard. Nevertheless, Visconti was happy with the production and believes the end result sounds authentic.

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However, manager Chris O’Donnell said the album was 75% live, with overdubs restricted to backing vocals and a few guitar solos to “clean the sound up”. Lynott said that there were a few necessary overdubs, but “anything else would have ruined the atmosphere on those recordings and made a mockery of putting out a live album”. Robertson has been particularly critical over Visconti’s view. He has said the album is almost all live, and the sound levels on stage would make overdubbing impossible due to the lack of acoustic separation between instruments. He claims a recording of “Still In Love With You”, featuring a guitar solo he felt was better than the one at the gig that was eventually released, could not be used due to phaser noise on the bass. From this, he concluded that if the bass could not be overdubbed, nothing else could either.

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O’Donnell hired Chalkie Davies, a photographer for New Musical Express for two weeks to photograph the band on a US tour in early 1978 in order to capture enough pictures suitable for the album artwork. The front cover, featuring Lynott in the foreground, was originally supposed to be the back cover as the group wanted equal coverage of all members. O’Donnell disagreed and reversed the front and back photographs at the last minute. The album had a working title of Thin Lizzy Live but Lynott decided that Live and Dangerous was better.

The record sleeve includes a montage photograph in the studio consisting of a mirror, straw, razor blade and a rolled up five pound note (as an overt reference to cocaine consumption). Lynott insisted on adding the picture over the rest of the band’s objections.

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Live and Dangerous was released as a double album on 2 June 1978. In the UK, it was released on Vertigo Records and reached a high of No. 2 in the UK album charts, held from the top spot by the Grease soundtrack album. It remained in the charts for 62 weeks[16] and eventually sold 600,000 copies. It was also the first album to be released by Warner Bros. Records in America after the band left Mercury Records in that area. A single from the album, “Rosalie / Cowgirl’s Song” was released in April and reached No. 20 in the UK single charts.

The band began touring to promote the album, but after a one-off gig in Ibiza, Lynott and Robertson had an acrimonious argument. Robertson subsequently quit Thin Lizzy permanently to form Wild Horses with former Rainbow bassist Jimmy Bain. He was replaced by a returning Gary Moore, who had already been a band member in 1974 and 1977.

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The album was reissued on CD in 1989. The March 1978 footage from the Rainbow Theater concert was released a first time in 1980 on VHS by VCL Video and as a 60-minute edit by Castle Communications in 1994 and titled Live & Dangerous.[21][22] The complete footage was released on DVD in 2007, with other group performances including a show from their farewell tour on 26 January 1983, and four Top of the Pops clips from the 1970s.

In 2009, the live album Still Dangerous was released, which features material from the 20 October 1977 gig at Philadelphia that was used for some of Live and Dangerous. There is some overlap of tracks between the two albums, though Still Dangerous is completely live with no overdubs.

Kerrang! magazine listed the album at No. 50 among the “100 Greatest Heavy Metal Albums of All Time”.

The album continues to attract critical praise. In 2010 Live and Dangerous was ranked number one in PlanetRock.com’s The Greatest Live Album Top 40. The following year, the British music magazine NME ranked Live and Dangerous at No. 1 in its 50 Greatest Live Albums of All Time. In 2015, Rolling Stone put the album at No. 46 in its list of the greatest live albums. The album is included in the 2011 revision of 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die. (by wikipedia)

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Released in 1978, just as the hot streak starting with 1975’s Fighting and running through 1977’s Bad Reputation came to an end, Live and Dangerous was a glorious way to celebrate Thin Lizzy’s glory days and one of the best double live LPs of the 70s. Of course, this, like a lot of double-lives of that decade — Kiss’ Alive! immediately springs to mind — isn’t strictly live; it was overdubbed and colored in the studio (the very presence of studio whiz Tony Visconti as producer should have been an indication that some corrective steering may have been afoot). But even if there was some tweaking in the studio, Live and Dangerous feels live, containing more energy and power than the original LPs, which were already dynamic in their own right. It’s this energy, combined with the expert song selection, that makes Live and Dangerous a true live classic. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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I usually prefer to listen to studio albums than live albums, but this one, as Made in Japan to Deep Purple, is an exception: it is the best option to get into Thin Lizzy and start to know them. It works like a greatest hits, including the best themes of the band until this album, but offering the listener a high level performance. I’ve read somwehere that it is re-recorded so it isn’t “pure live”, but listening to the result I don’t care a lot, because it’s excellent.
I especially love, for example, the transition from “Dancing in the moonlight” to “Massacre”, the solo in “Emerald” and “Still in love with you”. Lynnot really put sentiment into his singing. (reymonmvc toledo)

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Personnel:
Brian Downey (drums, percussion)
Scott Gorham (guitar, background vocals)
Phil Lynott (vocals, bass)
Brian Robertson (guitar, background vocals)
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John Earle – saxophone on “Dancing in the Moonlight”
Huey Lewis (as “Bluesey Huey Lewis”) – harmonica on “Baby Drives Me Crazy”

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Tracklist:
01. Jailbreak (Lynott) 4.33.
02. Emerald (Downey/Gorham/Lynott/Robertson) 4.33
03. Southbound (Lynott) 4,41
04. Rosalie (Seger)/ Cowgirl’s Song (Downey/Lynott) 4.13
05. Dancing In The Moonlight (It’s Caught Me In Its Spotlight) (Lynott) / Massacre (Downey/Gorham/Lynott) 6.48
06. Still In Love With You (Lynott) 7.41
07. Johnny The Fox Meets Jimmy The Weed (Downey/Gorham/Lynott) 3.44
08. Cowboy Song (Downey/Lynott) /  The Boys Are Back In Town (Lynott) 9.43
09. Don’t Believe a Word” Lynott 2:05
10. Warriors (Gorham/Lynott) 3.56
11. Are You Ready (Downey/Gorham/Lynott/Robertson) 2.47
12. Suicide (Lynott) 5.13
13. Sha La La (Downey/Lynott) 5.33
14. Baby Drives Me Crazy (Downey/Gorham/Lynott/Robertson) 6.41
15. The Rocker (Bell/Downey/Lynott) 4.01
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16. Live And Dangerous (full album – uncut edition) 1.16.51

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Philip Parris Lynott (20 August 1949 – 4 January 1986)

 

When I passed you in the doorway
Well you took me with a glance
I should have took that last bus home
But I asked you for a dance

Now we go steady to the pictures
I always get chocolate stains on my pants
And my father he’s going crazy
He says I’m living in a trance

But I’m dancing in the moonlight
It’s caught me in its spotlight
It’s alright, alright
Dancing in the moonlight
On this long hot summer night

It’s three o’clock in the morning
And I’m on the streets again
I disobeyed another warning
I should have been in by ten

Now I won’t get out until Sunday
I’ll have to say I stayed with friends
But it’s a habit worth forming
If it means to justify the end

Dancing in the moonlight
It’s caught me in its spotlight
It’s alright, alright
Dancing in the moonlight
On this long hot summer night

And I’m walking home
The last bus has long gone
But I’m dancing in the moonlight

 

 

The Rolling Stones – Sydney (1966)

FrontCover1.jpgI was given this cassette of the 2UW 1966 Stones Sydney broadcast in 1972 (I was 16) by a chap only 4 years older than me who went on to be one of Australia’s leading music historians. Hadn’t seen him for years except on the telly /radio or on the rare occasion on the opposite side of a music venue. After The Monkees Sydney Opera House June 2019 concert I bumped into him in the foyer, re-introduced myself, we chatted, then shared a train ride home to my suburb where he had parked his car.

I took the opportunity to quiz him about the 2UW Broadcast cassette he had given me decades before. Such as, did he record it himself from the radio at the time? If not did someone else tape it, was my copy a dub from a cassette or reel to reel, did he have any idea when 2UW broadcast the show? I was dead set gobsmacked when he replied he couldn’t remember having this cassette & most likely it was his copy that he gave me.

So what do I have? Methinks i have either a 1st or 2nd generation. I’m sure this would have been aired on radio like the Melbourne 3UZ 1966 broadcast with advertisements / radio station ID, probably too hard to edit them out at the time of taping so possibly this cassette could be a dub from that but with the ads removed. What is present In track 12 Satisfaction at the 3.41 mark are 5 loud pips. I’ve been told that these could represent that it’s 5.00 PM at the time of this broadcast or the 5.00 PM news was coming up next.

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The cassette also included two radio reports. The first of these is about the Stones arrival at Kingsford Smith Sydney Airport on the 16th February 1966. The second a short interview with the Stones in Sydney most likely before the 18th February shows. Unfortunately both are incomplete. Both conducted by Ward “Pally” Austin, a Sydney Radio 2UW DJ. In the 60’s he was probably Sydney’s most famous albeit notorious disc jockey. Ward also introduces the band at the concert.

The 2UW Feb 1966 interview with Mick Jagger and Brian Jones (I think Keith Richards is in there as well) cuts in after a discussion has already started regarding As Tears Go By. Jagger states he recorded it first before Marianne Faithful but his voice was deemed to be a bit camp so they decided to re record it again in a deeper voice.

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Mick & Brian talk about engagements prior to marriage. Ward asks the boys what they’re going to do while in Sydney.
Jagger in an exaggerated Aussie accent talks about going down the beach, doing a bit of water skiing, watch the old sheila’s, sheilas being Australian slang for females, young or old. (The equivalent of the terms birds in the UK & broads in the USA.)

During the interview a voice comes on to tell us that at the time 2UW was one of Sydney’s lowest rated radio stations but they’d been building a new image of 24 hour nonstop teenage music. The voice continues that this has paid off because 2UW is now Sydney’s 3rd highest rated radio station & Ward is the top DJ.

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In the 80’s I had a fling with a 2UW employee who when I asked if they had access to the station’s radio library, replied they did as it was part of the job. I asked if it they would be agreeable to conduct a search of the 2UW library for me looking for the broadcast, “no worries” was the reply. And if located could they one way or the other obtain a copy of it for me. They searched high & low but nowhere could they find the 1966 Broadcast nor could any documentation regarding the broadcast be found. Probably long ago wiped or discarded.

The broadcast does not feature the 1st song of the concert The Last Time, it starts with the 2nd song of the night Mercy Mercy. audiowhore & myself have tried to find the actual date of the broadcast but have been unsuccessful. But he did find a newspaper ad for the Brisbane 4BH Stones 1966 live broadcast aired on the 22nd February 1966, so perhaps the Sydney broadcast was aired the day after the show as well. Hopefully one day the Brisbane broadcast might magically surface just as the Melbourne 3UZ 1966 broadcast did decades later.

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We couldn’t find any reviews of the Sydney 1966 concerts apart from a very brief show report in Go-Set magazine but I have the next best thing. Someone who not only attended this very show but took photographs as well. My friend Big Knob (Big from here on in) attended this concert as a 20 year old, not as a professional photographer but as a fan whose hobby / passion was photography.

Not even a year after attending this show he would be drafted into the Australian army & fighting in Vietnam. I asked him if in his days of being an audience member taking photographs at concerts (starting with The Beatles in 1964) was he hassled in any way for doing so. He replied no, it was the opposite, people would come up to him asking why was he was bothering to take photographs. He told me that if any newspaper photographer did bother to turn up to shoot a show, they would grab a few photos & then bugger off asap.

When audiowhore & myself searched newspaper articles regarding the Stones Australian 1966 tour we located a few pro-shot B/W Sydney photos but they hadn’t been reproduced in very good quality & in all honesty Big’s photos piss all over them & in colour too! It’s his photographs that he has so kindly allowed me to use for the artwork. The inside front cover photograph with Brian playing harmonica was taken during Not Fade Away. The back cover photograph with Brian sitting down playing the organ is That’s How Strong My Love Is.

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The show was held in the Commemorative Auditorium which is one of the halls inside the Sydney Showgrounds complex, it’s only a hop, skip & jump from the Hordern Pavilion where I would see many groups in the early 70’s to late 80’s. In some of the photographs you can see in the background a stained glass window of a reversed map of Australia on which NSW is the only state coloured in & because this was the early show the sunlight is streaming through it. Of course outside the building the map was the correct way round.

The concert was advertised (as can be seen in the newspaper add on the Back Inside Cover artwork) with the band being on the Centre Revolving Stage, which Big informed me was transported over from the Sydney Stadium at Rushcutters Bay. This would have been a bit of a task to do so. This stage was not electric but hand cranked around by stage hands, with a few songs performed to the front, then cranked around to the right for the next couple of numbers & so on.

RollingStones1966_07In the artwork photographs you can notice that the reversed map of Australia appears in slightly different positions. The photograph of the Stones taken from the back that features on the back inner artwork was taken when the stage had revolved around. I asked Big if he had moved around to take that particular photograph, he replied that he’d taken all his photos basically staying in the same position.

Before Not Fade Away Jagger can be heard asking “Will you stop this thing this going round” referring to the stage. Apparently it was annoying him in some way. Big can’t remember if Jagger’s plea was granted but he does remember that the American singer P.J. Proby’s scarf was caught up in this stage the year before. Jagger says “Where are we?” followed by “Wait right there” & then something undecipherable in Satisfaction that could also be a another reference to the revolving stage.

Big definitely remembers the endless screaming of the sheilas, says it was just as loud as it was for the Beatles Sydney shows two years previously. He added that some brave girls would dash out of their seats, run past the cops to throw streamers at the stage, in the photographs some of these can be seen wrapped around various Stones & their instruments. I was aware that on this tour the Stones where supported by another UK band The Searchers plus New Zealand band Max Merritt & The Meteors but I was unaware until Big informed me that two Australian acts were also on the bill. They being Tony Barber and Steve & The Board.

Although this recording is certainly not Hi-Fi by any stretch I love hearing Brian’s contributions in this Sydney show. This live version of Satisfaction being my mid-60’s favourite version. Revisiting this show finds me wishing that one day soon hopefully the Stones From The Vaults series will release a Brian Jones era live concert instead of endless latter day releases that feature Ron Wood – the king of bum notes & out of tune solos.

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Australian Women’s Weekly Magazine (February 23rd 1966)

I first traded this recording with Stones collectors in the late 70’s, but when I told people I had this recording I was asked a number of times how could I be sure this radio show was Sydney. Easy I wrote back – Ward Austin who can be heard introducing the show was a Sydney DJ plus Jagger himself can be heard shortly before Satisfaction starts saying “Thank you very much Sydney”. Although the word Sydney is not as loud as the preceding words because of background tuning, Jagger definitely says Sydney.

I’m sure it was one of my trades that became the source for it’s appearance on the Japanese Silver Bootleg VGP Label entitled He Is Not Dead because it has the same tape wobble in Get Off Of My Cloud plus the radio pips in Satisfaction. But Ward Austin’s concert introduction is missing and the two 2UW radio segments didn’t make it either. IMHO my original cassette version has slightly more definition & is somewhat superior than the VGP title & other CD-R versions I’ve heard.

Thanks to my old friend for the original cassette, Big Knob for his photographs & audiowhore for the 2019 transfer and mixing and last but not least Bobel. (by wazza50)

Recorded live at the Commemorative Auditorium, Sydney Showgrounds, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; February 18, 1966 (1st show). Passable Sydney 2UW Radio broadcast (unknown airdate)

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals, tambourine)
Brian Jones (guitar, organ, harmonica, background vocals)
Keith Richards (guitar, background vocals)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Bill Wyman (bass, background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Stones Arrival At Sydney Airport 16th February 1966 #1 1:21
(Soundtrack From UK TV Report)
02. Stones Arrival At Sydney Airport 16th February 1966 #2 1:57
(Ward Austin 2UW Report – Cuts out / then 2UW Ward Austin Stones Interview – Start of interview missing)

03. Intro 0.29
04. Mercy, Mercy (Covay/Miller) 2.19
05. She Said Yeah (Christy/Jackson) 2.01
06. Play With Fire (Jagger/Richards) 2.20
07. Not Fade Away (Hardin/Petty)  2.16
08. Spider And The Fly (Jagger/Richards)  2:57
09. That’s How Strong My Love Is (Jamison) 2.09
10. Get Off Of My Cloud (Jagger/Richards) 3.06
11. 19th Nervous Breakdown (Jagger/Richards) 3.52
12. Satisfaction (Jagger/Richards) 5.03

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Thanks to wazza50 for sharing the show at Dime