Bent Fabric – Music To Dance By (1964)

FrontCover1.JPGBent Fabricius-Bjerre (born 7 December 1924), better known internationally as Bent Fabric, is a Danish pianist and composer.

Bent Fabricius-Bjerre was born in Frederiksberg, Denmark. He started a jazz ensemble after World War II and founded a label, Metronome Records, in 1950. However, he is best known for his 1961 instrumental “Omkring et flygel” (literally, “Around a Piano”) which became a hit in Denmark. The song was re-released worldwide under the name “Alley Cat” on Atco Records the following year, and went to #1 in Australia and #49 in Germany. The tune also became a hit in the United States; the song hit #2 on the AC chart and #7 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the LP of the same name hit #13 on the Billboard 200. “Alley Cat” also won a Grammy Award for Best Instrumental. It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc. The follow-up single, “Chicken Feed”, hit #63 in the U.S.

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Fabricius-Bjerre had done extensive work in film scores prior to the success of his singles, and continued to work in film for decades after. In 2003, Fabricius-Bjerre returned to the charts, this time in his native Denmark. He released the album Jukebox as Bent Fabric, where he worked with critically acclaimed Danish musicians. The singles “Jukebox” hit #3 in Denmark and “Shake” hit #10 that year. In 2006, a remix of “Jukebox” was released, and the title track became a dance music hit, peaking at #7 on the US Dance/Club Play charts. The album was also re-released in the United States, this time Bent Fabric02.jpgfeaturing a remix of his famous instrumental song “Alley Cat”, among others.

In 2005 he released the compilation album, Kan du kende melodien (literally Do you recognize the melody) featuring some of his most famous and recognized film and TV scores.

On 6 December 2009, the day before his 85th birthday, Fabricius-Bjerre played host to a gala-performance of a theatrical concert featuring 24 of his songs. It was performed at the Royal Danish Theatre by a cast of 12 performers, all of whom graduated from the Danish Academy for Musical Theatre. It was developed under The Danish New Works Development Center, Uterus, and directed and choreographed by Tim Zimmermann. Martin Konge was MD. (by wikipedia)

Although pianist Bent Fabric (born Bent Fabricius-Bjerre) formed his own jazz combo after WWII and his own label (Metronome) in 1950, it wasn’t until 1961, when Fabric’s Alley Cat single hit his native Denmark’s airwaves, that he really became known in the music world. The song proved infectious, and was released worldwide in 1962, even garnering an American Grammy Award for Best Rock & Roll Record. Though Atlantic issued some more of his work in the years that followed, Fabric never had another hit like “Alley Cat.” In 2006, however, the Dane received a bit of attention again after Jukebox, a remixed album of some of his work, was released. (by Marisa Brown)

And here´s another early album ….the perfect music including some fine “knack bass” sounds (like Ladi Geissler) … for you and your lady sitting in a small bar … drinking whisky or another dring … a cocktail, or a gin ….

Close your eyes and drift away…

Unfortunately some tracks like “Thanks For The Buggy Ride” weren´t in a good condition, so you really will hear, that this is another vinyl rip by me.

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Personnel:
Kay Boker (drums)
Bent Fabric (piano)
Poul Gregersen (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Titena (Daniderff) 2.06
02. Goofus (Kahn) 1.55
03. Diga Diga Doo (McHugh) 1.48
04. Wonderful One (Whiteman/Grofe) 2.21
05. Something’s Gotta Give (Mercer) 2.09
06. Fly Me To The Moon (Howard) 2.14
07. Thanks For The Buggy Ride (Buffano) 2.17
08. Organ Grinder’s Swing (Parish) 2.12
09. Fourth Man Theme (Fabricius/Bjerre) 2.17
10. Romance (Tschaikovsky) 2.48
11. The Drunken Penguin (Fabricius/Bjerre) 1.56
12. The Old Piano Roll Blues (Coben) 2.02

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Ginger Baker´s Airforce – Same (1970)

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Ginger Baker, wild and brilliant Cream drummer, dies aged 80

Drummer who straddled jazz, blues and rock ‘passed away peacefully’

Ginger Baker, one of the most brilliant, versatile and turbulent drummers in the history of British music, has died aged 80.

His family had previously made it public that he was critically ill and asked fans to “please keep him in your prayers”. His Facebook page said he “passed away peacefully” on Sunday morning.

Paul McCartney was among those paying tribute, writing on Twitter: “Great drummer, wild and lovely guy … Sad to hear that he died but the memories never will.”

Baker was born in 1939 in Lewisham, south London, and grew up amid the blitz; his father was killed in action in 1943. He began drumming in his mid-teens, remembering in 2009: “I’d never sat behind a kit before, but I sat down – and I could play! One of the musicians turned round and said, ‘Bloody hell, we’ve got a drummer’, and I thought, ‘Bloody hell, I’m a drummer!’”

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Early work came with the jazz guitarist Diz Disley – which ended when an 18-year-old Baker set fire to a hotel while on tour in Europe – and with bandleader Terry Lightfoot. He played blues in Blues Incorporated – including guest appearances with an early incarnation of the Rolling Stones – and US R&B with the Graham Bond Organisation, both alongside Jack Bruce on bass guitar.

Despite considerable friction between Baker and Bruce, the pair in 1966 formed Cream with Eric Clapton, who had previously played with the Yardbirds and John Mayall. Cream helped define the psychedelic rock sound of the decade, with Baker bringing both a jazz sensibility – Toad, from debut album Fresh Cream, features one of the first ever drum solos in rock – and a hard-hitting style, using two bass drums, that pointed towards heavy metal.

Cream sold more than 15m records worldwide and had hits including Sunshine of Your Love, Strange Brew and White Room; three of their four albums reached both the US and UK top five.

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The band split in 1968, releasing a final album in 1969. A reunion in 2005 ended in animosity, with Baker and Bruce shouting at each other on stage in New York. In 1969, Baker and Clapton formed the short-lived band Blind Faith with Steve Winwood and Ric Grech, and the latter pair joined Baker in his next project, jazz-rock band Ginger Baker’s Air Force.

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Baker moved to Nigeria in 1971 and set up the Batakota recording studio in Lagos, which hosted local musicians as well as established stars (McCartney’s band Wings recorded part of Band on the Run there). He performed with Nigerian star Fela Kuti – “he understands the African beat more than any other westerner,” said Kuti’s drummer Tony Allen – and went on to collaborate or perform with a hugely varied array of musicians: Public Image Ltd, Hawkwind, hard rock band Baker Gurvitz Army, and jazz performers Max Roach, Art Blakey and Elvin Jones. In 1994, he formed a jazz trio with Charlie Haden and Bill Frisell.

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He had spells living in Italy, California, Colorado and South Africa, and developed a passion for polo. In 2008, when living in South Africa, he was defrauded of more than £30,000 by a bank clerk he had hired as a personal assistant. He also suffered from various health issues, including respiratory illness and osteoarthritis, and underwent open heart surgery in 2016. “God is punishing me for my past wickedness by keeping me alive and in as much pain as he can,” he said in 2009.

That wickedness perhaps included his notorious temper – “I used to be mean – I’d deliberately mess up recording sessions with my temper and go mad at the slightest thing,” he said in 1970. He was married four times – “If a plane went down and there was one survivor, it would be Ginger. The devil takes care of his own,” first wife Elizabeth Ann Baker said in 2009 – and used heroin on and off since the mid-60s: he told the Guardian in 2013 that he relapsed “something like 29 times”.

A documentary, Beware of Mr Baker, was made about his life in 2012. He is survived by his three children, Kofi, Leda and Ginette.(by Ben Beaumont-Thomas, The Guardian)

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To hnor this great drummr, here´s his first album wih his “Air Force” group:

Ginger Baker’s Air Force is the eponymous debut album by Ginger Baker’s Air Force, released in 1970. This album is a recording of a sold-out live show at the Royal Albert Hall, on 15 January 1970, with the original 10-piece line up. The gatefold LP cover was designed left-handed; i.e. the front cover artwork was on what traditionally would be considered the back and vice versa. (by wikipedia)

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For a change, the late 1960s yielded up a supergroup that lived up to its hype and then some. Ginger Baker’s Air Force was recorded live at Royal Albert Hall in January of 1970 — in fact, this may be the best-sounding live album ever to come out of that notoriously difficult venue — at a show that must have been a wonder to watch, as the ten-piece band blazed away in sheets of sound, projected delicate flute parts behind multi-layered African percussion, or built their songs up Bolero-like, out of rhythms from a single instrument into huge jazz-cum-R&B crescendos. Considering that this was only their second gig, the group sounds astonishingly tight, which greatly reduces the level of self-indulgence that one would expect to find on an album where five of the eight tracks run in excess of ten minutes. There aren’t too many wasted notes or phrases in the 78 minutes of music included here, and Steve Winwood’s organ, Baker, Phil Seamen, and Remi Kabaka’s drums, and the sax playing by Chris Wood, Graham Bond (on alto), and Harold McNair, all stand out, especially the sax trio’s interwoven playing on “Don’t Care.”

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Additionally, Denny Laine plays louder, flashier, more virtuoso-level guitar than he ever got to turn in with the Moody Blues, bending notes in exquisite fashion in the opening of Air Force’s rendition of the Cream standard “Toad,” crunching away on rhythm elsewhere, and indulging in some more introspective blues for “Man of Constant Sorrow.” The original CD reissue, which sounded pretty good, was deleted in the early ’90s, but this album has been remastered again and repackaged as part of the Ginger Baker retrospective Do What You Like on Polygram’s Chronicles series. It’s a must-own for jazz-rock, Afro-fusion, blues-rock, or percussion fans. (by Bruce Eder)

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Personnel:
Ginger Baker (drums, percussion, vocals)
Graham Bond (organ, saxophone, vocals)
Ric Grech (bass, violin on 06.)
Jeanette Jacobs (vocals)
Remi Kabaka (drums, percussion)
Denny Laine – guitars, vocals on 06.)
Harold McNair (saxophones, flute)
Phil Seamen (drums, percussion)
Steve Winwood (organ, bass on 06., vocals on 03. + 07.)
Chris Wood (saxophone, flute)

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Tracklist:
01. Da Da Man (McNair) 7.14
02. Early in the Morning (Traditional) 11.17
03. Don’t Care (Baker/Winwood) 12.29
04. Toad (Baker) 13.00
05. Aiko Biaye (Kabaka/Osei) 13.01
06. Man Of Constant Sorrow (Traditional) 3.55
07. Do What You Like (Baker) 11.39
08. Doin’ It (Baker/Grech) 5.29

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Peter Edward “Ginger” Baker (19 August 1939 – 6 October 2019)

REST IN PEACE !

Arc Angels – Same (1992)

FrontCover1.jpgArc Angels were a blues rock band formed in Austin, Texas in the early 1990s. The band was composed of guitarist and singers Doyle Bramhall II and Charlie Sexton and two former members of Stevie Ray Vaughan’s band Double Trouble, drummer Chris Layton and bassist Tommy Shannon. The ‘Arc’ in the band’s name came from the Austin Rehearsal Complex where the band first started jamming.

Their 1992 debut album, Arc Angels, met with critical approval and reached No. 127 on the Billboard chart. Arc Angels made their network television debut on the NBC show Late Night with David Letterman on June 9, 1992, performing “Living In A Dream”. They performed on the show again on January 6, 1993, this time playing “Too Many Ways to Fall”.

Bramhall’s heroin addiction and internal friction caused the breakup of the band in 1993. The Arc Angels broke up in October of that year, concluding their run with a series of farewell concerts at Austin’s Backyard outdoor venue. Beginning in 2002, the Arc Angels reunited for occasional live performances.

In recent years, Bramhall has played guitar in Eric Clapton’s band and toured with Roger Waters. Charlie Sexton has toured with Bob Dylan. Meanwhile, Layton and Shannon have recorded three albums with the Texas soul quintet Storyville. They have also backed such artists as Buddy Guy, Kenny Wayne Shepherd and John Mayer.

ArcAngels.jpgIn March 2009, the members of Arc Angels, minus Shannon, announced that they would be reuniting, releasing a live album and DVD of concert footage/audio taken during 2005, touring extensively and beginning work on their second album. The album/DVD “Living in a Dream” was released in 2009, containing live renditions of previously released Arc Angels songs, new songs performed live and three new studio tracks. The launch of their tour was at Austin’s annual South by Southwest Festival. Although the band never officially broke up again, members pursued solo projects and there have been no talks about future Arc Angels releases or concerts to this date. In 2014 while on stage Bramhall referred to the Arc Angels as “this band I was in”[5] further cementing their demise.

Arc Angels is the self-titled debut album by Arc Angels, released in 1992. (by wikipedia)

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There are one-hit wonders throughout the history of music, but very few one-album wonders like the Arc Angels. After the death of blues-rock guitar hero Stevie Ray Vaughan, fellow singing guitarists, Texans, and Vaughan devotees Doyle Bramhall II and Charlie Sexton formed the quartet with Vaughan’s rhythm section of bassist Tommy Shannon and drummer Chris Layton.

Their 1992 debut release would also be their swan song, but the self-titled album would prove to be one of the best rock/pop/blues recordings of the decade as well. The opening “Living in a Dream” is the only tune Sexton and Bramhall II co-composed, and is perhaps the closest that the Arc Angels come to re-creating Vaughan’s signature sound. “Paradise Cafe” is one of a handful of tracks Sexton co-wrote with pop composer Tonio K., but he and Bramhall II engage in some ZZ Top-like call-and-response vocals, and Bramhall II’s Vaughan dedication, “Sent by Angels,” features some of the album’s most impassioned singing. Funky tunes like “Sweet Nadine,” “Good Time,” and “Carry Me On” lighten the mood, and Shannon, Layton, and guest keyboardist Ian McLagan play brilliantly throughout in setting up the singing guitarists.

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The spirit of Vaughan permeates the recording, from the production of Little Steven to the liner notes (“Dedicated to our friend, Stevie Ray Vaughan. We miss you”), yet never sounds forced, purposeful, or contrived. Alas, the final two songs — the rocking “Shape I’m In” and epic “Too Many Ways to Fall” — sport titles that point toward the Arc Angels being a Vaughan-like comet rather than a future veteran group. Sexton’s solo recording career had started as a teenager; Bramhall II and his father Doyle Bramhall were friends of Vaughan’s (the elder Bramhall even composing and co-composing tunes with the guitar giant). But the two frontmen who complemented each other so well nonetheless couldn’t blend their egos as easily. Arc Angels stands as testimony that a band needn’t have a long career to have a lasting legacy. (by Bill Meredith)

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Personnel:
Doyle Bramhall II (guitar, vocals)
Chris Layton (drums)
Charlie Sexton (guitar, vocals)
Tommy Shannon (bass)
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Ian McLagan (keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01. Living In A Dream (Bramhall II/Sexton) 4.53
02. Paradise Cafe (Sexton/Tonio K) 5.14
03. Sent By Angels (Bramhall II) 5.44
04. Sweet Nadine (Sexton/Tonio K) 4.31
05. Good Time (Bramhall II/Piazza) 4.47
06. See What Tomorrow Brings (Bramhall II) 6.27
07. Always Believed In You (Sexton/(Tonio K) 4.54
08. The Famous Jane (Sexton/Tonio K) 4.31
09. Spanish Moon (Bramhall II/Sexton/Layton) 5.48
10. Carry Me On (Doyle Bramhall II) 4.08
11. Shape I’m In (Bramhall II/Sexton/Benno) 4.07
12. Too Many Ways To Fall (Layton/Shannon/Sexton/Tonio K) 5.52

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A screenshot from their website:

Website