Albert King – King Does The King’s Things (Blues For Elvis) (1970)

FrontCover1.jpgAlbert Nelson (April 25, 1923 – December 21, 1992), known by his stage name Albert King, was an American blues guitarist and singer whose playing influenced many other blues guitarists. He is perhaps best known for the popular and influential album Born Under a Bad Sign (1967) and its title track. He is one of the three performers (together with B.B. King and Freddie King) known as the “Kings of the Blues.” King was known for his “deep, dramatic sound that was widely imitated by both blues and rock guitarists.”

He was also known as “The Velvet Bulldozer” because of his smooth singing and large size—he stood taller than average, with sources reporting 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) or 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m), and weighed 250 lb (110 kg)—and also because he drove a bulldozer in one of his day jobs early in his career.

AlbertKing01King was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1983. He was posthumously inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2013. In 2011, he was ranked #13 on Rolling Stone’s 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time.

King Does the King’s Things (Blues For Elvis) is the fifth studio album by Albert King. The songs in this album are versions of songs previously recorded by Elvis Presley. On the album sleeve there is a review by Albert Goldman, Music Critic of LIFE Magazine, who says, among other things “For the first time on record, the King of Blues is meeting the King of Rock.” and “…you’re gonna love every minute of this musical feast fit for kings.”. (by wikipedia)

Originally titled King Does the King’s Thing, here’s Albert King adding his own touch to a batch of Elvis Presley tunes. Because King’s style is so irreducible, the concept actually works, as he fills this album with his traditional, high-voltage guitar work and strong vocals. That isn’t surprising, since four of the nine tunes on here originally started as R&B hits covered by Presley, including an instrumental version of Smiley Lewis’ “One Night.” No matter what the original sources may be, though, this is a strong showing in King’s catalog. (by Cub Koda)

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Personnel:
James Alexander (bass)
Donald Dunn (bass)
Willie Hall (drums)
Albert King (guitar, vocals)
Marvell Thomas (keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01. Hound Dog (Leiber/Stoller) 4.07
02. That’s All Right (Crudup) 4.13
03. All Shook Up (Blackwell/Presley) 2.32
04. Jailhouse Rock (Leiber/Stoller) 3.40
05. Heartbreak Hotel (Axton/Durden/Presley) 6.09
06. Don’t Be Cruel (Blackwell/Presley) 3.30
07. One Night (Bartholomew/King/Steiman) 4.21
08. Blue Suede Shoes (Perkins) 3.19
09. Love Me Tender (Matson/Presley) 5.21

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AlbertKing02Albert King (April 25, 1923 – December 21, 1992)

Raymond Lefevre – Soul Symphonies 1 (1971)

FrontCover1.jpgRaymond Lefèvre (November 20, 1929 – June 27, 2008) was a French easy listening orchestra leader, arranger and composer.

Born on November 20, 1929 in Calais, France, Raymond Lefèvre is best known for his interpretation of the 1968 theme “Soul Coaxing (Ame Caline)” (composed by Michel Polnareff), which became an international hit. He also wrote soundtracks for movies with Louis de Funès such as La Soupe Aux Choux (1981) or the legendary series Le Gendarme de Saint Tropez. During the late 1950s and early 1960s he accompanied Dalida on most of her recordings (Bambino, Por Favor, Tu peux tout faire de moi, Quand on n’a que l’amour), amongst many others. He started his musical career in 1956 on the Barclay Records label. His recordings were released in the United States on the Kapp and Four Corners record labels until 1969.

He was accepted at the Paris Conservatory when 17 years old. During the early 1950s he played the piano for the Franck Pourcel orchestra. In 1953 he played the piano at the Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles. He started his musical career in 1956 on the Barclay label and recorded his debut album that year.

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He worked on the French television programmes Musicorama (1950s) and Palmarés des Chansons (1965, 1966, 1967) accompanying such famous artists as Dalida, Claude François, Richard Anthony, with his own orchestra.

His recording of “The Day the Rains Came” was a best seller in the United States in 1958. The song “Ame câline” (Soul Coaxing) became an international hit in 1968 and “La La La (He Gives Me Love)” was a minor hit in 1968 in Canada and the United States. In 1969 his recording of “La Reine de Saba” (Queen of Sheba) became a big hit in Japan. From 1972 until the early 2000s (decade), he undertook several successful tours of Japan.

He worked on the soundtracks of many Louis de Funès movies.

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Lefèvre conducted entries four times at the Eurovision Song Contest, three times for Monaco (in 1961, 1962, and 1963) and once for Luxembourg (in 1970).

Raymond Lefèvre died on June 27, 2008 at the age of 78. (by wikipedia)

And here´s his first album of the very sucessful “Soul Symphonies” … I guess the best way to play Classic tunes in a very uniques Easy Listening was ..

Enjoy, dream (like me) or whatever !

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Personnel:
Raymond Lefevre Orchestra

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Tracklist:
01. Allegro De La 40ème Symphonie De Mozart (Mozart) 3.05
02. Largo De Dvorak De La Symphonie Du Nouveau Monde (Dvorak) 3.03
03. Aria De Jean-Sebastien Bach (Bach) 2.45
04. Largo De Haendel (Händel) 2.31
05. Aranjuez (D’Après L’Adagio 2ème Mouvement Du Concerto D’Aranjuez De Joaquin Rodrigo-Vidre) (Rodrigo-Vidre) 4.43
06. 5ème Symphonie De Beethoven (Beethoven) 2.53
07. Prelude En Do De Jean-Sebastien Bach (Bach) 2.53
08. Adagio De La Sonate Pathetique De Beethoven (Beethoven) 3.07
09. Modinha (Préludio Tiré Des Bachianas Brasileiras № 1 De Villa-Lobos) (Villa-Lobos) 3.41
10. Adagio Cardinal (Vacquez) 2.40
11. Andante Maggiore Du Concerto Pour 2 Mandolines De Vivaldi (Vivaldi) 3.33
12. Le Canon De Pachelbel (Pachelbel) 3.29
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13. Concierto en do menor para oboe – 2º mov, Adagio (Marcello) 2.40
14. Concierto para una voz (Saint-Preux) 3.31

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Raymond Lefèvre (November 20, 1929 – June 27, 2008)