Herbie Hancock – Takin’ Off (1962)

FrontCover1Takin’ Off is the debut album by jazz pianist Herbie Hancock released in 1962 by Blue Note Records. The recording session features Freddie Hubbard on trumpet and Dexter Gordon on tenor saxophone. The album is in the hard bop idiom, with its characteristic two horns and a rhythm section. The bluesy track “Watermelon Man” made it to the Top 100 of the singles charts, and went on to become a jazz standard. The album has been called “one of the most accomplished and stunning debuts in the annals of jazz.”[7] It was released on CD in 1996 with three alternate takes and then remastered in 2007 by Rudy Van Gelder. The 2007 edition includes new liner notes by Bob Blumenthal. (b wikipedia)

Herbie Hancock’s debut as a leader, Takin’ Off, revealed a composer and pianist able to balance sophistication and accessibility, somewhat in the vein of Blue Note’s prototype hard bopper Horace Silver. Yet while Hancock could be just as funky and blues-rooted as Silver, their overall styles diverged in several ways: Hancock was lighter and more cerebral, a bit more adventurous in his harmonies, and more apt to break his solos out of a groove (instead of using them to create one). So even if, in retrospect, Takin’ Off is among Hancock’s most conventional albums, it shows a young stylist already strikingly mature for his age, and one who can interpret established forms with spirit and imagination. Case in point: the simple, catchy “Watermelon Man,” which became a Hancock signature tune and a jazz standard in the wake of a hit cover by Latin jazz star Mongo Santamaria.

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Hancock’s original version is classic Blue Note hard bop: spare, funky piano riffing and tight, focused solo statements. The other compositions are memorable and well-constructed too (if not quite hit material); all have their moments, but particular highlights include the ruminative ballad “Alone and I,” the minor-key “The Maze” (which features a little bit of free improvisation in the rhythm section), and the bluesy “Empty Pockets.” The backing group includes then up-and-coming trumpeter Freddie Hubbard, tenor saxophonist Dexter Gordon, bassist Butch Warren, and drummer Billy Higgins. All in all, Takin’ Off is an exceptional first effort, laying the groundwork for Hancock to begin pushing the boundaries of hard bop on his next several records. (by Steve Huey)

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Personnel:
Dexter Gordon (saxophone)
Herbie Hancock (piano)
Billy Higgins (drums)
Freddie Hubbard (trumpet)
Butch Warren (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Watermelon Man 7.09
02. Three Bags Full 5.27
03. Empty Pockets 6.12
04. The Maze 6.49
05. Driftin’ 6.58
06. Alone and I 6.30
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07. Watermelon Man (alternate take) 6.35
08. Three Bags Full (alternate take) 5.32
09. Empty Pockets (alternate take) 6.28

Music composed by Herbie Hancock.

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This album brought Herbie to the attention of Miles Davis, who was looking for a keyboard player at the time.

He then joined the Miles Davis Quintet in 1963, with whom he remained for five years, whilst continuing to release his solo material for Blue Note Records.

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