Alan Hawkshaw – Girl In A Sports Car – The Essential Lounge Music Collection (1997)

FrontCover1William Alan Hawkshaw (born 27 March 1937) is a British composer and performer, particularly of themes for movies and television programmes. Hawkshaw worked extensively for the KPM production music company in the 1960s and 1970s, composing and recording many stock tracks that have been used extensively in film and TV. In 2016, he was awarded a doctorate, officially giving him the title of Doctor for his contributions to the music industry.[citation needed]

As such, he is the composer of a number of familiar theme tunes including Channel 4 News, Grange Hill and Countdown. In addition, he is an arranger and pianist, and in the United States with the studio group Love De-Luxe scored a number 1 single on the Billboard Hot Dance Music/Club Play chart with “Here Comes That Sound Again” in 1979.

He is the father of singer-songwriter Kirsty Hawkshaw, who was a member of the dance music group Opus III from 1991 to 1995, and has also worked with artists such as Tiësto, Delerium, BT, Seba, and Paradox.

Born in Leeds, Hawkshaw worked as a printer for several years before becoming a professional musician, first joining the pop group The Crescendos. In the early 1960s, he was a member of rock and roll group Emile Ford and the Checkmates. He also formed the Mohawks band and Rumplestiltskin with some session musicians. At that time, Hawkshaw was an exponent of the Hammond organ, heard in the Mohawks’ music, and also on the UK recording of the musical Hair. In 1965 Hawkshaw played piano on The Hollies group composed album track; “Put Yourself in My Place” included on the EMI/Parlophone album; Hollies (1965) being featured on a piano solo during the song.

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Hawkshaw was also featured playing with David Bowie on the Bowie at the Beeb album, in a performance recorded for the “John Peel in Top Gear” show on 13 May 1968, in which he played a solo on “In The Heat of the Morning”.

In 1969, Hank Marvin recruited Hawkshaw into The Shadows to tour Japan in which one concert was recorded and subsequently released in Japan, The Shadows Live in Japan (1969), taking a featured lead on piano on “Theme from Exodus”. In 1970, Hawkshaw recorded one more studio album with The Shadows, Shades of Rock before leaving this band.[citation needed] He also did appear as keyboardist on The Shadows’ spin-off vocal group Marvin, Welch, & Farrar’s self-titled debut and follow-up Second Opinion albums both released on EMI’s reactivated Regal Zonophone label in 1971.

In the 1970s, he played in The Shadows; he worked for Olivia Newton-John, Jane Birkin, and Serge Gainsbourg (including on “L’homme à tête de chou”) as a musical director, arranger and pianist and was a keyboard player for Cliff Richard, for whom he also co-wrote (with Douggie Wright) “The Days of Love”, one of six shortlisted songs which Richard performed in A Song for Europe that year. He also played keyboards on Donna Summer’s 1977 double album Once Upon A Time. One of his best-known compositions is “Blarney’s Stoned” (originally recorded for KPM in 1969 under the title “Studio 69”) which was used as the theme tune for Dave Allen’s television shows The Dave Allen Show and Dave Allen at Large. In 1975, he wrote the theme tune to the BBC’s On the Move educational programme, which featured Bob Hoskins as an illiterate lorry driver. The song was sung by The Dooleys. In 1977, he composed “New Earth Parts 1 & 2” for Hank Marvin’s Guitar Syndicate LP project. This was subsequently sampled over 30 years later by Jay-Z for his song “Pray”.

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Hawkshaw also performed the music The Night Rider (the theme for Cadbury’s Milk Tray adverts). He also composed “Best Endeavours”, which has been the theme for Channel 4 News since 1982, and was used for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s The National news and current affairs programme from 1984 to 1987. His tune “Chicken Man” was used as the theme for Grange Hill from its start in 1978 until 1989, and revived for the final series of Grange Hill in 2008. Another recording of Chicken Man was used contemporaneously with the original Grange Hill version for the ITV quiz show Give Us A Clue. The Countdown “Chimes” jingle used on Channel 4’s Countdown game show was also composed by Hawkshaw. He composed all the music for the Arthur C. Clarke’s Mysterious World series, and the theme “Technicolour”, which was used for the BBC Midlands Today programme from 1984 to 1988, following which was replaced with a remix of this tune from 1989 to 1991.

In the United States, he also scored a number 1 single on the Billboard Hot Dance Music/Club Play chart with “Here Comes That Sound Again”, as part of Love De-Luxe With Hawkshaw’s Discophonia in 1979.

Also in 1979, he released a disco album under the moniker “Bizarre” which was essentially a solo project with the help of executive producer Barry Mason. It was released in the UK on Polydor Records (cat. no. 2383 553) in 1979 – tracks: Get Up/Don’t Move/Hot Hollywood Nights/You Make My Life So Beautiful/Let Me Fill Your World With Love/Take The Money And Run. he also once more appeared with The Shadows guesting on their 1979 UK chart-topping album String of Hits playing piano on a cover of Paul Simon’s “Bridge Over Troubled Water”.

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Hawkshaw is credited with the co-composition (with B. Henry) of “I Feel So Good”, a 1966 release by Manchester’s Playboys (Fontana TF745).

The Alan Hawkshaw Foundation in conjunction with the Performing Rights Society has since 2003 supported young underprivileged music students and Media composers to gain degrees and scholarships at both the Leeds College of Music and the National Film and Television School.

In July 2016, Hawkshaw was awarded a doctorate for his contributions to the music industry, adding the title of Doctor to his name.[citation needed]
Personal life
After a brief early marriage, Hawkshaw married German-born Christiane Bieberbach in 1968; they have two children; singer, composer and musician Kirsty (b.1969), and Sheldon (b.1971) (by wikipedia)

29/10/2008: at the Gold Badge Awards 2008, The Park Lane Hotel, London.

And here´s a nice compolation with many of his early compositions;

This retrospective album is entirely devoted to the wearly worj of Alan Hawkshaw and it represents only one of the variety of styles for which he is known. For example, nothing could be a diverse as the piece “!Girls In A Sports Car”and say “The Champ” from the group Mohawks in which Hawkshaw played organ and is known as “Morris Hawk”.

The original names of these instrumental appear in bold but new titels have been assigned to each and are indicated in brackets. They were originally published as libary pieces and thesetendto adopt the nmes of the particular programme for which they are used. (taken from the original liner notes.)

Enjoy this more or less happy sounds of Alan Hawkshaw !

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Personnel:
Alan Hawkshaw (keyboards)
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many, many unknown studio musicians

Booklet

Tracklist:
01. Girl In A Sports Car (Clarissa) (Hawkshaw) 2.44
02. Scooter Girl (Tanta) (Hawkshaw) 2.42
03. Sunflower (Sunbird) (Hawkshaw) 2.24
04. Warm Hearts (Love On A Summer’s Day) (Hawkshaw) 2.30
05. Bluebird (Hummingbird) (Hawkshaw) 2.17
06. Midnight Rhapsody (Melody At Midnight) (Hawkshaw) 3.08
07. Happy Rainbow (Colours In the Rain) (Hawkshaw) 2.30
08. Amour (Love In Paris) (Hawkshaw) 2.15
09. Blue Note (Deep Blue) (Hawkshaw) 4.26
10. Grange Hill (Back To School) (Hawkshaw) 2.07
11. Brush Off (Cold Shoulder) (Hawkshaw) 2.14
12. Playmate (Great Pals) (Hawkshaw) 2.03
13. Flapjack (Dessert Storm) (Hawkshaw) 1.58
14. Knock About (Hang About) (Hawkshaw) 2.05
15. Lazy Evening Blues (Lay-Back Blues) (Hawkshaw) 4.41
16. Cruising (Cruise Around) (Hawkshaw) 4.27
17. A Man Alone (In Solitude) (Hawkshaw) 4.21
18. Sky Train (The Shuttle) (Hawkshaw) 2.36
19. Man Of Means (In the Money) (Hawkshaw) 3.14
20. Love At First Sight (Dumbstruck) (Hawkshaw) 2.36
21. Beauty Spot (The Mole) (Hawkshaw/Parker) 1.58
22. Moody (Dreamy) (Hawkshaw) 3.18
23. Sheer Elegance (Suave & Sophisticated) (Hawkshaw) 3.37
24. Blue Haze (Smokey) (Hawkshaw/Parker) 3.28
25. Piccadilly Night Ride (On Oxford Street) (Hawkshaw/Mansfield) 1.50
26. Beat Boutique (Mary Quant) (Hawkshaw/Mansfield) 1.52
27. Dave Allen At Large (Irish Gnome) (Hawkshaw) 1.51
28. Destination Venus (Jupiter Bound) (Hawkshaw) 2.41

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Walter (Wendy) Carlos – The Well-Tempered Synthesizer (1969)

FrontCover1Wendy Carlos (born Walter Carlos; November 14, 1939) is an American musician and composer best known for her electronic music and film scores. Born and raised in Rhode Island, Carlos studied physics and music at Brown University before moving to New York City in 1962 to study music composition at Columbia University. Studying and working with various electronic musicians and technicians at the city’s Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center, she helped the development of the Moog synthesizer, the first commercially available keyboard instrument created by Robert Moog.

Carlos came to prominence with Switched-On Bach (1968), an album of music by Johann Sebastian Bach performed on a Moog synthesizer which helped popularize its use in the 1970s and won her three Grammy Awards. Its commercial success led to several more keyboard albums from Carlos of varying genres including further synthesized classical music adaptations and experimental and ambient music. She composed the score to two Stanley Kubrick films, A Clockwork Orange (1971) and The Shining (1980), and also Tron (1982) for Walt Disney Productions.

In 1979, Carlos was one of the first public figures to disclose having undergone gender reassignment surgery.

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The Well-Tempered Synthesizer is the second studio album from the American musician and composer Wendy Carlos, originally released under her birth name, Walter Carlos, in November 1969 on Columbia Masterworks Records. Following the success of her previous album, Switched-On Bach (1968), Carlos proceeded to record a second album of classical music performed on a modular Moog synthesizer from multiple composers, including Johann Sebastian Bach, Claudio Monteverdi, Domenico Scarlatti, and George Frideric Handel. Its title is a play on words from Bach’s set of preludes and fugues named The Well-Tempered Clavier.

Upon its release, the album peaked at No. 199 on the US Billboard 200 chart and was nominated for two Grammy Awards.

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In 1969, during the unexpected commercial success of her debut studio album Switched-On Bach (1968), Carlos and her friend, collaborator, and producer Rachel Elkind started work on a follow-up using the same formula as Switched-On Bach: performing selections of classical music on a modular Moog synthesizer. Carlos planned to record an “ambitious 19th-century work”, but the lack of sufficient multitrack recording capabilities at the time did not allow such an undertaking. Ideas for Carlos to record her own compositions seemed “untimely” and was shelved for potential future albums. The two decided on a “new switched on Baroque album” featuring multiple composers, including Johann Sebastian Bach, Claudio Monteverdi, Domenico Scarlatti, and George Frideric Handel.

Like Switched-On Bach, the album was recorded on an 8-track Ampex tape recorder using numerous takes and overdubs. Carlos chose pieces from Handel’s Water Music suites as the music contained passages that suited to the limitations of the Moog synthesizer.

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Canadian pianist Glenn Gould spoke about Carlos’ rendition of Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 in G major: “To put it bluntly, the finest performance of any of the Brandenburgs—live, canned, or intuited—I’ve ever heard.”

The Well-Tempered Synthesizer was released in November 1969. It peaked at No. 199 on the Billboard 200 chart and was nominated for two Grammy Awards. In February 1974, Billboard reported that the album had sold around 200,000 copies in the US. (by wikipedia)

The soundtrack of my life (Steve Morse, Deep Purple):

Steve Morse

Pressed for a sequel to Switched-On Bach, the unexpectedly hot-selling breakthrough album for the synthesizer, Wendy Carlos temporarily shelved plans to move out of the 18th century and instead came up with an album that is, in some ways, even better than its famous predecessor. Her instrument rack had grown larger and more flexible and her technical abilities even sharper in the year since SOB came out — and the improvements are audible in the thicker harmonies and more sophisticated timbres, all without losing the zest and experimental zeal of the earlier record. Here, she revisits J.S. Bach and imaginatively translates the music of Monteverdi, Handel, and especially Domenico Scarlatti into the electronic medium. Excerpts from Monteverdi’s “Orfeo” and “1610 Vespers” serve as the gateway and closing benediction, respectively, to this collection, and four Scarlatti keyboard sonatas are given dazzling treatments (the sonata in G became well-known in the ’90s on a Christmas TV commercial). There is a mini-suite from Handel’s “Water Music” at the center of the album, and the densely orchestrated yet still dancing treatment of Bach’s “Brandenburg Concerto No. 4” serves as a signpost as to how far Carlos had come in only a year. (by Richard S. Ginell)

BackCover1Personnel:
Wendy Carlos (synthesizer)

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Tracklist:
01. Orfeo Suite (Toccata; Ritornello I; Choro II; Ritornello II; Choro II; Ritornello II) (Monteverdi) 3.22
02. Sonata in G major, L. 209/K. 455 (Scarlatti) 1.42
03. Sonata in D major, L. 164/K. 491 (Scarlatti) 3.55
04. Water Music: “Bourrée (Händel) 0.48
05. Water Music: Air (Händel) 2.47
06. Water Music: Allegro Deciso (Händel) 3.01
07. Sonata in E major, L. 430/K. 531 (Scarlatti) 1.56
08. Sonata in D major, L. 465/K. 96 (Scarlatti) 2.31
09. Brandenburg Concerto #4 in G major: Allegro (Bach) 8.06
10. Brandenburg Concerto #4 in G major: Andante (Bach) 3.37
11. Brandenburg Concerto #4 in G major: Presto (Bach) 4.46
12. Domine ad adjuvandum (from the 1610 Vespers) (Monteverdi) 2.22+
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13. Stereo Alignment Tones 0.10
14. Well Tempered Experiments (Wendy Carlos talks about her / his music) 9.08

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