Whitesnake – Live At Castle Donington (VHS rip) (1983)

FrontCover1Whitesnake are a hard rock band formed in England in 1978 by David Coverdale, after his departure from his previous band Deep Purple. Their early material has been compared by critics to the blues rock of Deep Purple, but they slowly began moving toward a more commercially accessible rock style. By the turn of the decade, the band’s commercial fortunes changed and they released a string of UK top 10 albums, Ready an’ Willing (1980), Come an’ Get It (1981), Saints & Sinners (1982) and Slide It In (1984), the last of which was their first to chart in the US and is certified 2x platinum.

The band’s 1987 self-titled album was their most commercially successful worldwide, and contained two major US hits, “Here I Go Again” and “Is This Love”, reaching number one and two on the Billboard Hot 100. The album went 8 times platinum in the US, and the band’s success saw them nominated for the 1988 Brit Award for Best British Group. Slip of the Tongue (1989) was also a success, reaching the top 10 in the UK and the US, and received a platinum US certification. The band split up shortly after this release, but had a reunion in 1994, and released a one-off studio album, Restless Heart (1997).

Whitesnake officially reformed in 2002 and have been touring together since, releasing four albums, Good to Be Bad (2008), Forevermore (2011), The Purple Album (2015) and Flesh & Blood (2019). In 2005, Whitesnake were named the 85th greatest hard rock band of all time by VH1.

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David Coverdale founded Whitesnake in 1978 in Middlesbrough, Cleveland, north-east England. The core line-up had been working as his backing band The White Snake Band on the White Snake (1977) album tour and they retained the title before officially being known as Whitesnake. They toured with Coverdale as his support band and for both of the solo albums he released, White Snake (1977) and Northwinds (1978), between exiting Deep Purple and founding Whitesnake. At this time, the band was made up of David Coverdale, Bernie Marsden, Micky Moody, Neil Murray and drummer David “Duck” Dowle with keyboardist Brian Johnston. Johnston would soon be replaced by Procol Harum organ player and keyboardist Pete Solley. Because of Solley’s producing commitments he was replaced by the former Deep Purple keyboard player Jon Lord, during sessions for the first LP.

Whitesnake recorded the EP Snakebite, which was released in 1978 and included a cover of a Bobby “Blue” Bland song “Ain’t No Love in the Heart of the City”, their first hit song proving the new wave of British heavy metal could have a chart hit. The EP had some success in the UK and subsequent reissues of this EP included four bonus tracks from Coverdale’s second solo album Northwinds (1978) produced by Roger Glover.

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A blues rock debut album Trouble was released in the autumn of 1978 and peaked at No. 50 in the UK album charts. Whitesnake toured Europe to promote the album and their first live album Live at Hammersmith was recorded on this tour and released in Japan in 1979. Tracks from the EP Snakebite were included in a reissue of the album Trouble in 2006.
Whitesnake on stage at the Hammersmith Odeon, London, 1981

Whitesnake released Lovehunter in 1979, which courted controversy due to its risqué album cover by artist Chris Achilleos, which contained an illustration of a naked woman straddling a coiled snake. The album made the UK Top 30 and contained the minor hit “Long Way from Home”, which reached No. 55 in the single charts. Shortly after that, drummer Ian Paice replaced David Dowle. giving Whitesnake three ex-Deep Purple members. The new line-up recorded the 1980 release Ready an’ Willing (1980), which was a breakthrough hit for the band, reaching the UK Top 10 and becoming their first entry into the U.S. Top 100.

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The single “Fool for Your Loving”, which the band originally wrote for B.B. King, made No. 13 in the UK single charts and No. 53 in the US, and the title track also hit No. 43 in the UK charts. The Ready an’ Willing tour included the Saturday night headline appearance at the 1980 Reading Festival, the highlights of which were broadcast by BBC Radio 1 in the UK. While still mostly unknown in the US, the modest success of Ready an’ Willing (1980) helped Whitesnake increase awareness there as an opening act for established bands such as Jethro Tull and AC/DC. The band also released Live…In the Heart of the City, which contained recordings made in 1978 and 1980 at the Hammersmith Odeon in London, and achieved a No. 5 ranking in the UK album charts.

In 1981 the band recorded the album Come an’ Get It, which climbed to No. 2 in the UK album charts and produced the Top 20 hit “Don’t Break My Heart Again” and the Top 40 hit “Would I Lie to You”. During 1982 Coverdale took time off to look after his sick daughter and decided to put Whitesnake on hold.

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When David Coverdale returned to music, he reformed the band, and after the recording of the album Saints & Sinners (1982) replaced Bernie Marsden, Ian Paice, and bass player Neil Murray with Mel Galley from Trapeze, bassist Colin Hodgkinson, and Cozy Powell as the new drummer. Saints & Sinners was another Top 10 UK album and contained the hit “Here I Go Again”, with Malcolm Birch from Chesterfield-based band Pegasus on keyboards. The new lineup toured in 1982–83 and headlined the Monsters of Rock Festival at Castle Donington UK in August 1983, and the single “Guilty of Love” reached No. 31 in the UK singles chart- (wikipedia)

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And here´s the legendary Castle Donington concert:

Live! At Castle Donington 1983 showcases David Coverdale and his Whitesnake commandos performing from the boards before the masses, during the group’s 1983 headlining slot for the Monsters of Rock gig, that also featured ZZ Top, Dio, Twisted Sister, Diamond Head and Meatloaf. Touring in support of the Saints & Sinners album, Whitesnake took over the huge stage with the striding “Walking in the Shadow of the Blues” followed by “Rough an’ Ready”. Whitesnake confidently surge through the festival set with the powerful “Fool for Your Loving” closing out the inspired ten song performance. Coverdale’s tight group, featuring guitarists Mel Galley and Micky Moody, Jon Lord on keyboards, hard hitting drummer Cozy Powell and bassist Colin Hodgkinson, pushed the set with authority, while previewing “Guilt of Love” and packing swagger via “Ready an’ Willing”. The lengthy “Mistreated” shines and places the spotlight on the mic-stand thrusting front man. Live! At Castle Donington 1983 is vintage Whitesnake, before the Tawny years kicked in and image ruled the rent-a-player support to Coverdale. (Jon Fox)

Attention please: the is a VHS rip, don´t expect a perfect quality, but the sound is still very good !

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Recorded live at the Monsters Of Rock Festival, Donington Park on August 20th 1983.

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Personnel:
David Coverdale (vocals)
Colin Hodgkinson (bass, background vocals)
Mel Galley (guitar, background vocals)
Jon Lord (keyboards)
Micky Moody (guitar, background vocals)
Cozy Powell (drums)

Whitesnake01Tracklist:
01. Walking In The Shadow Of The Blues (Coverdale/Marsden) 4.42
02. Rough An’ Ready (Coverdale/Moody) 3.46
03. Ready An’ Willing (Coverdale/Moody/Lord) 4.32
04. Guilty Of Love (Coverdale) 4.18
05. Here I Go Again (Coverdale/Marsden) 4.48
06. Love Hunter (Coverdale/Marsden/Moody) 9.09
07. Mistreated (Blackmore/Coverdale 9.57
08. Soldier Of Fortune (Blackmore/Coverdale) 2.32
09. Ain’t No Love In The Heart Of The City (Price/Walsh) 7.14
10. Fool For Your Loving (Coverdale/Marsden/Moody) 4.58

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And this is one of the most important songs of my life:

I don’t know where I’m going
But, I sure know where I’ve been
Hanging on the promises
In songs of yesterday
An’ I’ve made up my mind,
I ain’t wasting no more time
Here I go again
Here I go again

Tho’ I keep searching for an answer,
I never seem to find what I’m looking for
Oh Lord, I pray
You give me strength to carry on,
‘Cos I know what it means
To walk along the lonely street of dreams

An’ here I go again on my own
Goin’ down the only road I’ve ever known,
Like a drifter I was born to walk alone
An’ I’ve made up my mind
I ain’t wasting no more time

I’m just another heart in need of rescue,
Waiting on love’s sweet charity
An’ I’m gonna hold on
For the rest of my days,
‘Cos I know what it means
To walk along the lonely street of dreams

An’ here I go again on my own
Goin’ down the only road I’ve ever known,
Like a drifter I was born to walk alone
An’ I’ve made up my mind
I ain’t wasting no more time

But, here I go again,
Here I go again,
Here I go again,
Here I go

‘Cos I know what it means
To walk along the lonely street of dreams

An’ here I go again on my own
Goin’ down the only road I’ve ever known,
Like a drifter I was born to walk alone
An’ I’ve made up my mind,
I ain’t wasting no more time

An’ here I go again on my own
Goin’ down the only road I’ve ever known,
Like a drifter I was born to walk alone
‘Cos I know what it means
To walk along the lonely street of dreams
An’ here I go again on my own
Goin’ down the only road I’ve ever known,
Like a drifter I was born to walk alone

More Whitesnake:
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Big Bad Voodoo Daddy – How Big Can You Get (2009)

FrontCover1Big Bad Voodoo Daddy is a contemporary swing revival band from Southern California. Their notable singles include “Go Daddy-O”, “You & Me & the Bottle Makes 3 Tonight (Baby)”, and “Mr. Pinstripe Suit”. The band played at the Super Bowl XXXIII half-time show in 1999.

The band was originally formed in Ventura, California, in 1989 by leader Scotty Morris. The band was named Big Bad Voodoo Daddy after Scotty Morris met blues guitar legend Albert Collins at one of the latter’s concerts. “He signed my poster ‘To Scotty, the big bad voodoo daddy’,” Morris explains. “I thought it was the coolest name I ever heard on one of the coolest musical nights I ever had. So when it came time to name this band, I didn’t really have a choice. I felt like it was handed down to me”. He and Kurt Sodergren are the two original members, with the rest of the band joining later. The band has concentrated on the swing of the 1940s and 1950s, playing clubs and lounges in their early years.

After playing in punk and alternative rock bands during the 1980s, including False Confession part of the Oxnard, California Nardcore scene, Scotty Morris founded Big Bad Voodoo Daddy with Kurt Sodergren. The band launched two CDs, Big Bad Voodoo Daddy and Watchu’ Want for Christmas? under their own label (Big Bad Records) before getting their big break when their songs “You & Me & the Bottle Makes 3 Tonight (Baby)”, “I Wan’na Be Like You” and “Go Daddy-O” were featured in the soundtrack of the 1996 comedy-drama Swingers.

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From there, they were signed by Interscope Records. With Interscope, the band released Americana Deluxe, This Beautiful Life, and Save My Soul. The band has continued their tours, performances and album releases. The band appeared at the half-time show of Super Bowl XXXIII (January 31, 1999)[4] and the 2006 Capital One Bowl, and also served as the house band for ESPN’s ESPY Awards for a few years. The band created a version of the opening theme for the sitcom 3rd Rock from the Sun, which was used for the 1998-1999 and 1999–2000 seasons.

They created a new song for the movie The Wild, and recorded a song for Disney’s Phineas and Ferb Christmas Vacation Special. BBVD also performed on the hit television show Dancing with the Stars, and The Tonight Show with Jay Leno to promote their album How Big Can You Get?: The Music of Cab Calloway, a collection of their renditions of Cab Calloway songs in April 2009.[6] They also have been performing at EPCOT for the annual Food and Wine Festival since 2008. They performed at Kahilu Theatre, Waimea Hawaii and while Kurt was there he spoke of going to Scott’s house in Ventura and working on a new album beginning February 2019. (wikipedia)

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Big Bad Voodoo Daddy’s reputation as a pop star styled retro-jazz band has to be enhanced and authenticated by this homage to the leading commercial proponent of jump, jive, and wailing swing in the ’30s and ’40s, Cab Calloway. The band, with its solid horn section and half-crazed vocal cops channeled through the Hi-De-Ho Man by Scotty Morris is faithful to the core from the originals. Though the band does not do all of Calloway’s big hits (missing are “Viper’s Drag,” “St. Louis Blues,” and “Kickin’ the Gong Around,” among many others), their selection of tunes is a delightful mix of favorites and some zingers, all well done in the style that made Calloway both revered and in some circles reviled. His overly dramatic songs are avoided, and fun is the operative word for these tunes that still are good to hear. Among the true blue covers: the definitive shuffle “Calloway Boogie” with the animated vocals of Morris, the energetic and stoned “Reefer Man,” the easy swinger “Hey Now” with the band’s vocal choruses, and the Gene Krupa bompity bomp beat tacked onto “Tarzan of Harlem.”

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There are two versions of the all-time classic “Minnie the Moocher,” one laid-back featuring growl trumpet, the other in a quicker mode with rhythms rolling along. “The Jumpin’ Jive” is pretty typical, a stomp-down rhythm identifies the title track, and a horse-drawn clippity clop beat steadies “The Old Man on the Mountain,” with phrases inserted similar to “Comes Love.” It’s clear that the band has always enjoyed these tunes and this era of jazz, and now that they have a bit of success under their belts, their desire to do a tribute close to their hearts is fully realized. Perhaps their March 2009 showcase on Dancing with the Stars playing vintage throwback swing also prompted this excursion way back to the roots. Their first recording in five years, it would seem Big Bad Voodoo Daddy have career longevity in mind, and a tribute to Louis Jordan, Slim Gaillard, or a second volume of Calloway’s tunes would also be in order for a future project. This recording comes easily recommended to their fans and early period jazz lovers.(by Michael G. Nastos)

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Personnel:
Karl Hunter (saxophone, clarinet)
Joshua Levy (piano)
Glen “The Kid” Marhevka (trumpet)
Scotty Morris (guitar, vocals)
Dirk Shumaker (bass, vocals)
Andy Rowley (saxophone, vocals)
Kurt Sodergren (drums)

Booklet

Tracklist:
01. Come On With The “Come On” (Gibson/Calloway) 3.22
02. Calloway Boogie (Gibson/Calloway) 34.03
03. The Call Of The Jitterbug (Calloway/Swayze/Mills) 3.30
04. Hey Now, Hey Now (Calloway/Hill) 4.35
05. The Jumpin’ Jive (Calloway/Frolba/Palmer) 4.02
06. How Big Can You Get? (Ram/Calloway) 4.06
07. The Old Man Of The Mountain (Brown/Young) 4.16
08. The Ghost Of Smokey Joe (Bloom/Koehler) 5.29
09. Reefer Man (Razaf/Robinson/Hoover/Roberts) 2.55
10. Minnie The Moocher (Calloway/Gaskill/Mills) 4.59
11. Tarzan Of Harlem (Ram/Nemo/Mills/Fein) 3.25

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