Rod Stewart – Every Picture Tells A Story (1971)

FrontCover1Sir Roderick David Stewart CBE (born 10 January 1945) is a British rock and pop singer, songwriter and record producer. With his distinctive raspy singing voice, Stewart is one of the best-selling music artists of all time, having sold over 250 million records worldwide. He has had ten number-one albums and 31 top ten singles in the UK, six of which reached number one. Stewart has had 16 top ten singles in the US, with four reaching number one on the Billboard Hot 100. He was knighted in the 2016 Birthday Honours for services to music and charity.

Stewart’s music career began in 1962 when he took up busking with a harmonica. In October 1963, he joined The Dimensions as harmonica player and vocalist. In 1964, Stewart joined Long John Baldry and the All Stars before joining The Jeff Beck Group in 1967. Becoming the singer for the Faces in 1969, he also maintained a solo career releasing his debut solo album that same year. Stewart’s early albums were a fusion of rock, folk music, soul music, and R&B.[5][6] His third solo album, 1971’s Every Picture Tells a Story was his breakthrough, topping the charts in the UK, US, Canada and Australia. The ballad “Maggie May” off of it went to number one for multiple weeks in those same countries. His 1972 follow-up album, Never a Dull Moment, was another UK and Australian chart-topper while reaching the top three in the US and Canada. Its lead single, “You Wear It Well”, also topped the chart in the UK while being a moderate hit elsewhere.

RodStewart02

After a handful more UK top ten hits, Stewart announced the breakup of the Faces in 1975. His next few singles were ballads with “Sailing”, off the 1975 UK and Australian number-one album, Atlantic Crossing, becoming a hit in the UK (number one), Germany (number four) and other countries, but barely charting in North America. A Night on the Town (1976), his fifth straight chart-topper in the UK, began a three-album run of going number one or top three in North America, the UK and Australia with each release. That album’s “Tonight’s the Night (Gonna Be Alright)” spent almost two months at number one in the US and Canada, and made the top five in other countries. Foot Loose & Fancy Free (1977) featured the major hit “You’re In My Heart (The Final Acclaim) as well as the rocker “Hot Legs”. Blondes Have More Fun (1978) and its disco-tinged “Da Ya Think I’m Sexy” both went to number one in Canada, Australia and the US (his second there) with “Da Ya Think I’m Sexy” also hitting number one in the UK and the top ten in other countries.

RodStewart03

After a disco and new wave period in the late 1970s and early 1980s, Stewart’s music turned to a soft rock/middle-of-the-road style, with most of his albums reaching the top ten in the UK, but faring less well in the US. The single “Rhythm of My Heart” was a top five hit in the UK, US and several other countries, with its source album, 1990’s Vagabond Heart, becoming, at number ten in the US and number two in the UK, his highest charting album in a decade. In 1993, he collaborated with Bryan Adams and Sting on the power ballad “All for Love”, which went number one in many countries. In the early 2000s, he released a series of successful albums interpreting the Great American Songbook.

In 2008, Billboard magazine ranked him the 17th most successful artist on the “Billboard Hot 100 All-Time Top Artists”. A Grammy and Brit Award recipient, he was voted at No. 33 in Q Magazine’s list of the Top 100 Greatest Singers of all time As a solo artist, Stewart was inducted into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994, the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2006, and he was inducted a second time into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2012 as a member of Faces.

RodStewart01

Every Picture Tells a Story, is the third studio album by Rod Stewart. It was released on 28 May 1971. It incorporates hard rock, folk, and blues styles. It went to number one on both the UK and US charts and finished third in the Jazz & Pop critics’ poll for best album of 1971.[3] It has been an enduring critical success, including a number 172 ranking on Rolling Stone’s 2003 list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

The album is a mixture of rock, country, blues, soul, and folk, and includes Stewart’s breakthrough hit, “Maggie May”, as well as “Reason to Believe”, a song from Tim Hardin’s debut album of 1966. “Reason to Believe”, with Pete Sears on piano, was released as the first single from the album with “Maggie May” as the B-side; however, “Maggie May” became more popular and was a No. 1 hit in both the UK and US.

The album includes a version of Arthur Crudup’s “That’s All Right (Mama)” (the first single for Elvis Presley) and a cover of the Bob Dylan song “Tomorrow Is a Long Time,” an outtake from Dylan’s 1963 album The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan (it would see release on 1971’s, Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits Vol. II).

The backcover from the German edition:
GermanBackCover1

All five members of the Faces (with whom Stewart at that time was lead vocalist) appeared on the album, with guitarist/bassist Ronnie Wood and keyboardist Ian McLagan on Hammond B3 organ being employed most. Due to contractual restrictions, the personnel listings were somewhat vague, and it was unclear that the full Faces line-up recorded the version of the Motown hit “(I Know) I’m Losing You”. Other contributors included Ray Jackson on mandolin (though Stewart allegedly forgot his name and merely mentioned “the mandolin player in Lindisfarne” on the sleeve). Micky Waller on drums. Maggie Bell performed backing vocals (mentioned on the sleeve as “vocal abrasives”) on the title track, and Madeline Bell sang backup on the next track, “Seems Like A Long Time”. Pete Sears played all the piano on the album except for one track, “I’m Losing You”, which had Ian McLagan on piano, along with the Faces as a band.

The album reached the number-one position in both the UK (for six weeks) and the US (four weeks) at the same time that “Maggie May” was topping the singles charts in both territories.

The Temptations cover, “I Know I’m Losing You” reached the top 40, at No. 24 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US.

Singles

In his original Rolling Stone review, John Mendelsohn wrote: “Boring as half of it may be, there’s enough that is unqualifiedly magnificent on the other half.”[7] However, Village Voice critic Robert Christgau gave the album a glowing review, writing: “Rod the Wordslinger is a lot more literate than the typical English bloozeman, Rod the Singer can make words flesh, and though Rod the Bandleader’s music is literally electric it’s the mandolin and pedal steel that come through sharpest.”

The album has been an enduring critical success, including a number 172 ranking on Rolling Stone’s 2003 list of the 500 greatest albums of all time, maintaining the rating in a 2012 revised list. In 1992, the album was awarded the number-one spot in Jimmy Guterman’s book The Best Rock ‘N’ Roll Records of All Time: A Fan’s Guide to the Stuff You Love. It was ranked 99th in a 2005 survey held by British television’s Channel 4 to determine the 100 greatest albums of all time. (wikipedia)

Rod Stewart & Maggie Bell:
RodStewart04

Without greatly altering his approach, Rod Stewart perfected his blend of hard rock, folk, and blues on his masterpiece, Every Picture Tells a Story. Marginally a harder-rocking album than Gasoline Alley — the Faces blister on the Temptations cover “(I Know I’m) Losing You,” and the acoustic title track goes into hyper-drive with Mick Waller’s primitive drumming — the great triumph of Every Picture Tells a Story lies in its content. Every song on the album, whether it’s a cover or original, is a gem, combining to form a romantic, earthy portrait of a young man joyously celebrating his young life. Of course, “Maggie May” — the ornate, ringing ode about a seduction from an older woman — is the centerpiece, but each song, whether it’s the devilishly witty title track or the unbearably poignant “Mandolin Wind,” has the same appeal. And the covers, including definitive readings of Bob Dylan’s “Tomorrow Is Such a Long Time” and Tim Hardin’s “Reason to Believe,” as well as a rollicking “That’s All Right,” are equally terrific, bringing new dimension to the songs. It’s a beautiful album, one that has the timeless qualities of the best folk, yet one that rocks harder than most pop music — few rock albums are quite this powerful or this rich. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

BackCover1

Personnel:
Lindsay Raymond Jackson (mandolin)
Sam Mitchell (slide guitar)
Dick Powell (violin)
Andy Pyle (bass)
Martin Quittenton (guitar)
Pete Sears (piano, celeste)
Rod Stewart (vocals, guitar)
Danny Thompson (bass)
Micky Waller (drums)
Ronnie Wood (guitar, pedal steel guitar, bass)
+
Long John Baldry (vocals on 01.)
Maggie Bell (vocals on 01. + 02.)
+
Kenney Jones (drums on 09.)
Ronnie Lane (bass, background vocals on 09.)
Ian McLagan (keyboards on 09.)

Booklet

Tracklist:
01. Every Picture Tells A Story (Stewart/Wood) 6.00
02. Seems Like A Long Time (Anderson) 4.02
03. That’s All Right (Crudup) 4.00
04. Amazing Grace (Traditional) 2.00
05. Tomorrow Is Such A Long Time (Dylan) 3.45
06. Henry´s Time (Quittenton) 0.32
07. Maggie May (Stewart/Quittenton) 5.18
08. Mandolin Wind (Stewart) 5.33
09. (I Know) I’m Losing You (Whitfield/Holland/Grant) 5.23
10. (Find AA) ReasoT to Believe (Hardin) 4.08

LabelB1

*
**

More from Rod Stewart:
More

1 thought on “Rod Stewart – Every Picture Tells A Story (1971)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.