James Taylor – Classic Songs (1987)

LPFrontCover1James Vernon Taylor (born March 12, 1948) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist. A six-time Grammy Award winner, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000. He is one of the best-selling music artists of all time, having sold more than 100 million records worldwide.

Taylor achieved his breakthrough in 1970 with the No. 3 single “Fire and Rain” and had his first No. 1 hit in 1971 with his recording of “You’ve Got a Friend”, written by Carole King in the same year. His 1976 Greatest Hits album was certified Diamond and has sold 12 million copies in the US alone. Following his 1977 album JT, he has retained a large audience over the decades. Every album that he released from 1977 to 2007 sold over 1 million copies. He enjoyed a resurgence in chart performance during the late 1990s and 2000s, when he recorded some of his most-awarded work (including Hourglass, October Road, and Covers). He achieved his first number-one album in the US in 2015 with his recording Before This World.

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Taylor is also known for his covers, such as “How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved by You)” and “Handy Man”, as well as originals such as “Sweet Baby James”. He played the leading role in Monte Hellman’s 1971 film Two-Lane Blacktop.

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Classic Songs is the second compilation album by James Taylor. Only available in Europe it was, for a long time, the only compilation album to feature original versions of Taylor’s classics. It spanned from his original work to his That’s Why I’m Here album from 1985. (wikipedia)

For a long time, Classic Songs was the only compilation to feature the original versions of all of James Taylor’s classics from his debut up through 1985’s That’s Why I’m Here. Unfortunately, it was only available in Europe, yet it long remained the best, most comprehensive collection of his work. (by Chris Woodstraby Chris Woodstra)

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Personnel:
James Taylor (vocals, guitar)
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many, many studio musicians

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Tracklist:
01. Fire And Rain (Taylor) 3.24
02, Mexico (Taylor) 3:00
03, You’ve Got a Friend (King) 4.30
04. How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved by You) (Hollan/Dozier/Holland) 3.36
05. Carolina In My Mind (Taylor) 4.00
06. Something In The Way She Moves (Taylor) 3.09
07. Shower The People (Taylor) 4.31
08. Sweet Baby James (Taylor) 2.52
09. That’s Why I’m Here (Taylor) 3.38
10. Everyday (Holly/Petty) 3.12
11. Up On The Roof (Goffin/King) 4.20
12. Your Smiling Face (Taylor) 2.43
13. Her Town Too (Souther/Taylor/Wachtel) 4.25
14. Handy Man (Blackwell/Jones) 3.17
15. Don’t Let Me Be Lonely Tonight (Taylor) 2.36
16. Only A Dream In Rio (Taylor) 4.57

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A low budget reissue from 1992:
Re-Issue

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The official website:
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Roger McGuinn – Peace On You (1974)

FrontCover1As the frontman of the Byrds, Roger McGuinn and his trademark 12-string Rickenbacker guitar pioneered folk-rock and, by extension, country-rock, influencing everyone from contemporaries like the Beatles to acolytes like Tom Petty and R.E.M. in the process. James Joseph McGuinn was born on July 13, 1942, in Chicago, where by his teenage years he was already something of a folk music prodigy. After touring with the Limelighters, in 1960 he signed on as an accompanist with the Chad Mitchell Trio, appearing on the LPs Mighty Day on Campus and At the Bitter End; frustrated with his limited role in the group, he soon joined Bobby Darin’s group when the singer moved from pop to folk.

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After appearing on sessions for Hoyt Axton, Judy Collins, and Tom & Jerry (soon to be known as Simon & Garfunkel), McGuinn began playing solo dates around the Los Angeles area, where he soon formed the Jet Set with area musicians David Crosby and Gene Clark. After a failed single under the name the Beefeaters, the group recruited bassist Chris Hillman and drummer Michael Clarke, changed their name to the Byrds, and set about crystallizing McGuinn’s vision of merging the poetic folk music of Bob Dylan with the miraculous pop sounds heard via the British Invasion. McGuinn was the only member of the Byrds to play on their landmark debut single “Mr. Tambourine Man,” but his jangly guitar work quickly became the very definition of the burgeoning folk-rock form; still, despite the Byrds’ immediate success, both commercially and critically, the group was plagued by internal strife, and following the release of their 1968 country-rock breakthrough Sweetheart of the Rodeo, McGuinn was the only founding member still in the band.

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Under the direction of McGuinn — who had changed his first name to Roger after a flirtation with the Subud religion — the Byrds soldiered on, delving further and further into country and roots music before finally dissolving in February 1973. That same year, McGuinn issued his self-titled solo debut, an ambitious, eclectic affair which explored not only folk and country but surf and even space rock. 1974’s Peace on You and 1975’s Roger McGuinn & His Band preceded a stint with Bob Dylan’s Rolling Thunder Revue, which helped revitalize his standing within the musical community. 1976’s Cardiff Rose was regarded as his best solo effort to date, but the next year’s Thunderbyrd, which featured a cover of Tom Petty’s “American Girl,” failed to connect with audiences.

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In late 1977, McGuinn reunited with Byrds mates Chris Hillman and Gene Clark; the resulting LP, 1979’s McGuinn, Clark & Hillman, notched a Top 40 pop hit with the McGuinn-penned “Don’t You Write Her Off.” Midway through recording the follow-up, 1980’s City, Clark departed, and the album was released under the name “Roger McGuinn and Chris Hillman Featuring Gene Clark.” Following another effort, 1981’s McGuinn/Hillman, they went their separate ways. After undergoing another religious conversion, this time becoming a born-again Christian, McGuinn spent the remainder of the 1980s without a recording contract and performing solo dates.

The appearance of a faux Byrds led by Michael Clarke prompted McGuinn to reform the group with Hillman and David Crosby in 1989, resulting in a series of club performances, an appearance at a Roy Orbison tribute, and a handful of new recordings for inclusion on a box set retrospective. In 1991 — the same year the Byrds were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame — McGuinn issued his first new solo recordings in over a decade, the all-star Back to Rio, which was met with great public and critical acclaim. Live From Mars, a retrospective of songs and stories, appeared in 1996. (by Jason Ankeny)

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Peace on You was Roger McGuinn’s second full-length solo album, released in 1974. The album peaked at number 92 in the US in October 1974.

The solo career of this great rock artist took a while to gather some steam; his 1976 album, Cardiff Rose, showed that with at least some consistent production and a tight backing ensemble, he could put across a powerful musical vision without having to rely totally on re-creating the sound of the Byrds. For this 1974 album his focus is as wandering as a glaucoma patient who has just gone through a two-hour field test. Many different influences come into his musical world, like strange cooks passing through a kitchen and dropping odd things into the stew. There is heavy collaborating with songwriter Jacques Levy, who like McGuinn was part of Bob Dylan’s chaotic music world during this period.

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While Levy has fans who feel he brought great riches to the kingdoms of artists such as McGuinn, the offerings from the McGuinn and Levy songwriting team on this album, such as “Together” and “The Lady,” are packed with corny images and shallow sentiments — in other words, not exactly what one is used to hearing from McGuinn in his practically angelic role as a lead vocal spokesman for the Byrds. A bit of Turtles sauce goes in courtesy of vocal contributions from Howard Kaylan and Mark Volman — it doesn’t add much, but at least doesn’t detract, which is more than can be said for the song contributions of session pro Al Kooper or the wimpy Dan Fogelberg. The title of the former artist’s tune is a gift to critics and the public alike: “(Please Not) One More Time.” One Donnie Dacus offers another pair of nothing songs, while the album’s title number, courtesy of country singer Charlie Rich and hyped to the hilt via the album’s artwork, is also pretty much a disappointment, a one-idea song that badly muddles the all-important opening track parade. (by Eugene Chadbourne)

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Personnel:
Donnie Dacus (guitar, vocals)
Dan Fogelberg (guitar, vocals)
Paul “Harry” Harris (keyboards)
Al Kooper (guitar, piano, clavinet)
Russ Kunkel (drums, percussion)
Roger McGuinn (vocals, guitar, bass)
Al Perkins (pedal steel-guitar)
Leland Sklar (bass)
Tommy Tedesco (flamenco guitar)
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background vocals:
Jorge Calderón – Brian Russell – Tim Coulter – Brooks Hunnicutt – Mark Volman – William McLeish Smith -Gwendolyn Edwards – Brenda Gordon – Howard Kaylan – Paul Stallworth

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Tracklist:
01. Peace On You (Charlie Rich) 4.02
02. Without You (McGuinn/Levy) 4.07
03. Going To The Country (Dacus) 3.16
04. (Please Not) One More Time (Kooper) 3.23
05. Same Old Sound (McGuinn) 3.31
06. Do What You Want To Do (Dacus) 3.01
07. Together (McGuinn/Levy) 3.40
08. Better Change (Fogelberg) 2.58
09. Gate Of Horn (McGuinn/Levy) 2.47
10. The Lady (McGuinn/Levy) 4.17

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More from Roger McGuinn:
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The official website:
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