Ry Cooder – Live At The Bottom Line (1974)

FrontCover1Ryland Peter “Ry” Cooder (born March 15, 1947) is an American musician, songwriter, film score composer, record producer, and writer. He is a multi-instrumentalist but is best known for his slide guitar work, his interest in traditional music, and his collaborations with traditional musicians from many countries.

Cooder’s solo work draws upon many genres. He has played with John Lee Hooker, Captain Beefheart, Taj Mahal, Gordon Lightfoot, Ali Farka Touré, Eric Clapton, The Rolling Stones, Van Morrison, Neil Young, Randy Newman, Linda Ronstadt, Vishwa Mohan Bhatt, David Lindley, The Chieftains, The Doobie Brothers, and Carla Olson and The Textones (on record and film). He formed the band Little Village, and produced the album Buena Vista Social Club (1997), which became a worldwide hit; Wim Wenders directed the documentary film of the same name (1999), which was nominated for an Academy Award in 2000.

Cooder was ranked at No. 8 on Rolling Stone magazine’s 2003 list of “The 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time”, while a 2010 list by Gibson Guitar Corporation placed him at No. 32. In 2011, he published a collection of short stories called Los Angeles Stories. (wikipedia)

Ry Cooder

Whether serving as a session musician, solo artist, or soundtrack composer, Ry Cooder’s chameleon-like guitar virtuosity, songwriting, and choice of cover material encompass an incredibly eclectic range of North American musical styles from rock & roll, blues, reggae, Tex-Mex, Hawaiian, Dixieland jazz, country, folk, R&B, gospel, and vaudeville. Cooder is also an unofficial American cultural ambassador who was partially responsible for bringing together the Cuban musicians known globally as the Buena Vista Social Club. (by Steve Huey)

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Ry Cooder, live at the Bottom Line in New York on May 16th, 1974. By 1974, Ry Cooder was firmly established as one of America’s leading guitarists and arrangers. This superb live set was broadcast on WNYU-FM, just after the release of his classic Paradise and Lunch album (1974), and finds him tackling a typically eclectic range of material.(taken from the original liner notes)

…Live At The Bottom Line” is the release of a sensational performance by Ry Cooder in NY in 1974.
He had just delivered his masterpiece “Paradise & Lunch” when the US radio station WNYU-FM asked him to come on stage for an evening solo performance. The master didn’t let himself be asked twice and told stories of Steinbeck’s dimension in duo with his Bottleneck.

Ry Cooder02Woody Guthrie and Sleepy John Estes sent their regards. Not a single weak point among the ten titles presented – all of them musical storytelling at the highest level.
With this recording, a lost treasure has clearly been retrieved from the Roots box.
Press quality of the – by the way excellent sounding – 180g LP: Impeccable, no crackles, no corrugation, so all around a success … Absolutely recommendable! (by Friedrich Wurm)

In other words: A man and his guitar: Ry Cooder !

Recorded live at the Bottom Line in New York on May 16th, 1974
excellent broadcast recording

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Personnel:
Ry Cooder (vocals, guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Too Tight Blues No.2 8Blake) 3.29
02. FDR In Trinidad (McLean) 4.53
03. The Tattler (Phillips/Cooder/Titelman) 5.47
04. Crazy About An Automobile (Emerson) 4.48
05. I Can Tell By The Way You Smell (Davis) 3.24
06. Kentucky Blues (Jones) 4,43
07. One Meatball (Singer/Zaret) 1.36
08. How Can A Poor Man Stand Such Times And Live? (Reed) 7.58
09. Preacher (Davis) 2.51
10. Vigilante Man (Guthrie) 4.04.

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More from Ry Cooder:
More

The official website:
Website

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