The Allman Brothers Band – Summer Jam At Watkins Glen (1973)

FrontCover1The Allman Brothers Band were an American rock band formed in Jacksonville, Florida in 1969 by brothers Duane Allman (founder, slide guitar and lead guitar) and Gregg Allman (vocals, keyboards, songwriting), as well as Dickey Betts (lead guitar, vocals, songwriting), Berry Oakley (bass guitar), Butch Trucks (drums), and Jai Johanny “Jaimoe” Johanson (drums). Subsequently, based in Macon, Georgia, the band incorporated elements of blues, jazz, and country music, and their live shows featured jam band-style improvisation and instrumentals.

The group’s first two studio releases, The Allman Brothers Band (1969) and Idlewild South (1970) (both released by Capricorn Records), stalled commercially, but their 1971 live release, At Fillmore East, represented an artistic and commercial breakthrough. The album features extended renderings of their songs “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed” and “Whipping Post”, and is considered among the best live albums ever made.

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Group leader Duane Allman was killed in a motorcycle accident later that year – on October 29, 1971 – and the band dedicated Eat a Peach (1972) to his memory, a dual studio/live album that cemented the band’s popularity and featured Gregg Allman’s “Melissa” and Dickey Betts’s “Blue Sky”. Following the motorcycling death of bassist Berry Oakley one year and 13 days later on November 11, 1972, the group recruited keyboardist Chuck Leavell and bassist Lamar Williams for 1973’s Brothers and Sisters. This album included Betts’s hit single “Ramblin’ Man” and instrumental “Jessica”. These tunes went on to become classic rock radio staples, and placed the group at the forefront of 1970s rock music. Internal turmoil overtook them soon after; the group dissolved in 1976, reformed briefly at the end of the decade with additional personnel changes, and dissolved again in 1982.

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The band reformed once more in 1989, releasing a string of new albums and touring heavily. A series of personnel changes in the late 1990s was capped by the departure of Betts. The group found stability during the 2000s with bassist Oteil Burbridge and guitarists Warren Haynes and Derek Trucks (the nephew of their original drummer) and became renowned for their month-long string of shows at New York City’s Beacon Theatre each spring. The band retired for good in October 2014 after their final show at the Beacon Theatre.

Butch Trucks died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound on January 24, 2017, in West Palm Beach, Florida, at the age of 69. Gregg Allman died from complications arising from liver cancer on May 27, 2017, at his home in Georgia, also at the age of 69. The band has been awarded seven gold and four platinum albums, and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995. Rolling Stone ranked them 52nd on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time in 2004.

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The Summer Jam at Watkins Glen was a 1973 rock festival which once received the Guinness Book of World Records entry for “Largest audience at a pop festival.” An estimated 600,000 rock fans came to the Watkins Glen Grand Prix Raceway outside Watkins Glen, New York, on July 28, 1973, to see the Allman Brothers Band, Grateful Dead and The Band perform.

Concert Poster

The Band followed the Dead with one two-hour set. However, their set was cut in half by a drenching thunderstorm, in a scene again reminiscent of Woodstock, people were covered with mud. During the storm, keyboardist Garth Hudson performed his signature organ improvisation “The Genetic Method”; when the rain finally let up, the full Band joined Hudson on stage, and segued into their signature song “Chest Fever”.

Finally, the Allman Brothers Band performed for three hours. Their performance included songs from their soon-to-be-released album Brothers and Sisters. (wikipedia)

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Without any doubts …one of best Allman Brothers Band concerts ever !

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Personnel:
Gregg Allman (vocals, organ, guitar)
Dickey Betts (guitar, vocals)
Jai Johanny Johanson (drums)
Chuck Leavell (piano)
Butch Trucks (drums)
Lamar Williams (bass)

Alternate frontcover:
AlternateFrontCover1

Tracklist:
01. Bill Graham’s Introduction + Wasted Words (Allman) 5.30
02. Band introductio by Bill Graham 1.03
03. Done Somebody Wrong (James/Lewis/Levy) 4.12
04. Southbound (Betts) 7.44
05. Stormy Monday (Walker) 8.18
06. In Memory of Elizabeth Reed (Betts) 17.28
07. Come and Go Blues (Allman) 4.59
08. Trouble No More (Morganfield) 4.38
09. Blue Sky (Betts) 7.10
10. One Way Out (James/Sehorn) 10.55
11. Statesboro Blues (McTell) 4.17
12. Ramblin’ Man (Betts) 8.47
13. Jessica (Betts) 10.00
14. Midnight Rider (Allman) 3.11
15. You Don’t Love Me (Cobb)  / Les Brers in A Minor (Betts) 20.34
+
16. Summer Jam At Watkins Glen (uncut version) 2.09.24

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Various Artists – Midnight Rider (A Tribute To The Allman Brothers Band) (2014)

FrontCover1The Allman Brothers Band were an American rock band formed in Jacksonville, Florida in 1969[3] by brothers Duane Allman (founder, slide guitar and lead guitar) and Gregg Allman (vocals, keyboards, songwriting), as well as Dickey Betts (lead guitar, vocals, songwriting), Berry Oakley (bass guitar), Butch Trucks (drums), and Jai Johanny “Jaimoe” Johanson (drums). Subsequently, based in Macon, Georgia, the band incorporated elements of blues, jazz, and country music, and their live shows featured jam band-style improvisation and instrumentals.

The group’s first two studio releases, The Allman Brothers Band (1969) and Idlewild South (1970) (both released by Capricorn Records), stalled commercially, but their 1971 live release, At Fillmore East, represented an artistic and commercial breakthrough. The album features extended renderings of their songs “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed” and “Whipping Post”, and is considered among the best live albums ever made.

AllmanBrothersBand1969

Group leader Duane Allman was killed in a motorcycle accident later that year – on October 29, 1971 – and the band dedicated Eat a Peach (1972) to his memory, a dual studio/live album that cemented the band’s popularity and featured Gregg Allman’s “Melissa” and Dickey Betts’s “Blue Sky”. Following the motorcycling death of bassist Berry Oakley one year and 13 days later on November 11, 1972, the group recruited keyboardist Chuck Leavell and bassist Lamar Williams for 1973’s Brothers and Sisters. This album included Betts’s hit single “Ramblin’ Man” and instrumental “Jessica”. These tunes went on to become classic rock radio staples, and placed the group at the forefront of 1970s rock music. Internal turmoil overtook them soon after; the group dissolved in 1976, reformed briefly at the end of the decade with additional personnel changes, and dissolved again in 1982.

AllmanBrothersBand1969_02

The band reformed once more in 1989, releasing a string of new albums and touring heavily. A series of personnel changes in the late 1990s was capped by the departure of Betts. The group found stability during the 2000s with bassist Oteil Burbridge and guitarists Warren Haynes and Derek Trucks (the nephew of their original drummer) and became renowned for their month-long string of shows at New York City’s Beacon Theatre each spring. The band retired for good in October 2014 after their final show at the Beacon Theatre.

AllmanBrothersBand1990

Butch Trucks died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound on January 24, 2017, in West Palm Beach, Florida, at the age of 69. Gregg Allman died from complications arising from liver cancer on May 27, 2017, at his home in Georgia, also at the age of 69. The band has been awarded seven gold and four platinum albums,[4] and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995. Rolling Stone ranked them 52nd on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time in 2004. (wikipedia)

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And here´s a fine “tribute album”:

This 12-song collection, helmed and herded by Florida guitarist John Wesley, features new performances of some of the band’s classic songs, including “Midnight Rider,” “Statesboro Blues,” “Ramblin’ Man,” and “Whippin’ Post” done by a host of guitarists and singers, Ronnie Earl, Debbie Davies, Eli Cook, Eric Gales, Pat Travers, among them. It’s fine as a tribute, but only underscores how influential and unique the Allman Brothers Band always was. Nothing tops the ABB versions of these songs, which really should come as no big surprise to anybody. (allmusicguide.com)

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Tracklist:
01. Pat Travers: Midnight Rider (Allman) 3.20
02. The Oak Ridge Boys, Tinsley Ellis, Kevin McKendree: Ramblin` Man (Betts) 4.54
03. Molly Hatchet: Melissa (Allman) 4.39
04. Artimus Pyle Band: Blue Sky (Betts) 4.25
05. Jimmy Hall & Steve Morse: Whipping Post (Allman) 5.21
06. Jim Eshelman, Roy Rogers & John Wesley: Jessica (Betts) 7.30
07. Robben Ford & Martin Gerschwitz: One Way Out (Sehorn/James) 4.46
08. Debbie Davis & Melvin Seals: Soulshine (Haynes) 6.42
09. Eli Cook: Statesboro Blues (McTell) 3.40
10. Eric Gales: In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed (Betts) 7.01
11. Commander Cody & Sonny Landreth: Southbound (Betts) 5.13
12. Ronnie Earl, Leon Russell & Reese Wynans: I’m No Angel (Allman) 3.42

CD1

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Booklet

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Allman Brothers Band – Academy Of Music, New York (1972)

FrontCover1The Allman Brothers Band was an American rock band formed in Jacksonville, Florida in 1969 by brothers Duane Allman (founder, slide guitar and lead guitar) and Gregg Allman (vocals, keyboards, songwriting), as well as Dickey Betts (lead guitar, vocals, songwriting), Berry Oakley (bass guitar), Butch Trucks (drums), and Jai Johanny “Jaimoe” Johanson (drums). The band incorporated elements of blues, jazz, and country music, and their live shows featured jam band-style improvisation and instrumentals.

The group’s first two studio releases, The Allman Brothers Band (1969) and Idlewild South (1970) (both released by Capricorn Records), stalled commercially, but their 1971 live release, At Fillmore East, represented an artistic and commercial breakthrough. The album features extended renderings of their songs “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed” and “Whipping Post”, and is considered among the best live albums ever made.

Group leader Duane Allman was killed in a motorcycle accident later that year – on October 29, 1971 …  (wikipedia)

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And here´s a pretty good bootleg (a soundboard recording) of the Allman Brothers after the death of Duane Allman.

A few month later, Berry Oakley was involved in a motorcycle accident in Macon, Georgia, just three blocks from where Duane Allman had his fatal motorcycle accident the year before. Oakley was driving around a sharp right bend of the road on Napier Avenue at Inverness when he crossed the line and collided at an angle with a city bus making the bend from the opposite direction. After striking the front and then the back of the bus, Oakley was thrown from his bike, just as Allman had been, and struck his head.

Berry Oakley

Oakley said he was okay after the accident, declined medical treatment, and caught a ride home. Three hours later, he was rushed back to the hospital, delirious and in pain, and died of cerebral swelling caused by a fractured skull. Attending doctors stated that even if Oakley had gone straight to the hospital from the scene of the accident, he could not have been saved. He was 24 years old when he died, the same age as Allman. (by wikipedia)

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Personnel:
Gregg Allman  (keyboards, vocals)
Dickey Betts (guitar)
Jai Johanny Johanson (drums, percussion)
Berry Oakley (bass)
Butch Trucks (drums)

Alternate frontcovers:
AlternateFrontCovers

Tracklist:
01. Statesboro Blues (McTell) 4.26
02. Done Somebody Wrong (Lewis/Robinson/James) 4.06
03. Ain’t Wastin’ Time No More (Allman) 5.19
04. One Way Out (Sehorn/James) 6.58
05. Stormy Monday (Walker) 8.22
06. Trouble No More (Morganfield) 3.46
07 You Don’t Love Me (Cobbs) 13.13
08. Whipping Post (Allman) 13.28

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Allman Brothers Band – Peakin’ At The Beacon (2000)

FrontCover1Peakin’ at the Beacon is a live album by the rock group the Allman Brothers Band. It was recorded at the Beacon Theatre in New York City in March, 2000, and released later that year.

Peakin’ at the Beacon was the first Allman Brothers Band album to include Derek Trucks on guitar and Oteil Burbridge on bass, and the last to include founding member Dickey Betts. (by wikipedia)

When Gregg Allman was asked why Dickey Betts was kicked out of the Allman Brothers Band in the spring of 2000, he is reported to have suggested the answer lay in the tapes from the group’s two-week stand at the Beacon Theatre in New York. That makes it surprising that the Allmans would turn to those tapes to assemble their first new album release in five and a half years, Peakin’ at the Beacon. Happily, however, there is no evidence of Betts’ alleged shortcomings on the disc, though it must be admitted that, since he is one of two lead guitarists (the other being Derek Trucks, making his recorded debut with the band), it isn’t always easy to tell who is playing. There is plenty of guitar work, and it is up to the Allmans’ usual standard.

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Following the instrumental opener, Gregg Allman sings lead on seven straight songs, all of which come from the band’s first three studio albums. Betts finally appears as a vocalist on the ninth track, the 1990 folk-country tune “Seven Turns.” Finally, there is a 27-and-a-half-minute version of the 1975 Betts instrumental “High Falls,” a typical extended workout complete with jazzy interludes and a lengthy percussion section. The Allmans may not have been due for another live album (two of their last three releases being concert recordings), but the series of Beacon shows has become an annual event, and the disc serves as a souvenir from the March 2000 shows. Fans who attended those shows, or who just want to be reassured that the Allmans sound much the same as ever, may enjoy the album; less devoted listeners probably shouldn’t bother. (by William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
Gregg Allman (keyboards, guitar, vocals)
Dickey Betts (guitar, vocals)
Oteil Burbridge (bass)
Jaimoe (drums, percussion)
Marc Quiñones (percussion, vocals)
Butch Trucks (drums, percussion)
Derek Trucks (guitar)

Booklet

Tracklist:
01. Don’t Want You No More (Davis/Hardin) 3.06
02. It’s Not My Cross To Bear (Allman) 5.13
03. Ain’t Wastin’ Time No More (Allman) 5.46
04. Every Hungry Woman (Allman) 5.57
05. Please Call Home (Allman) 4.31
06. Stand Back (Allman/Oakley) 5.45
07. Black Hearted Woman (Allman) 6.30
08. Leave My Blues At Home (Allman) 5.07
09. Seven Turns (Betts) 4.49
10. High Falls (Betts) 27.28

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The Allman Brothers Band – The Final Show (2014)

FrontCover1The only note of sentiment during the Allman Brothers Band’s October 28th concert at New York’s Beacon Theatre – their last at that venue and anywhere else, at least for the foreseeable future – came after more than four hours of music: three sets and an inevitable encore, “Whipping Post.” The seven members of the group – the surviving trio of founders, singer-organist Gregg Allman and drummers Butch Trucks and Jaimoe; the long-serving guitar team of Warren Haynes and Derek Trucks; and often overlooked veterans Oteil Burbridge on bass and percussionist Marc Quinones – lined up onstage and took a bow: a first at any Allmans-Beacon show I’d ever attended.
Then Gregg, pressed forward by the others, gave a short speech, another first, recalling the day 45 years ago that he first sang with the original Allmans lineup – led by his late brother, guitarist Duane Allman, and including guitarist Dickey Betts and the late bassist Berry Oakley – at a jam session in Jacksonville, Florida. Gregg cited the precise date, March, 26th, 1969, then said, in a low, worn voice, “Never did I have any idea it could come to this.” He gazed gratefully at the crowd, still on its feet, clapping and cheering, at nearly 1:30 a.m. “Now,” Gregg added, “We’re gonna do the first song we ever played.”
The Allmans got back in position and tore into “Trouble No More,” the Muddy Waters rumble from Side One of the group’s 1969 debut album, The Allman Brothers Band. It sounded nothing like goodbye: tight and gnarly, Derek and Haynes riding the triple-drum-kit surf with avenging poise. But it was.

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Until that late acknowledgement of the occasion, the show was most remarkable for what didnt’t happen. There were no special guests – a signature feature of the Alllmans’ Beacon shows over the last decade – and the group did not throw in any of the extended-family covers (the Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Dr.John, Derek and the Dominos) that came, often in medleys without warning, during the Allmans’ annual spring runs at the Beacon. The closest they got to the latter: an elegaic swerve, at the end of the first set, through King Curtis’s “Soul Serenade” in “You Don’t Love Me,” quoting a segue I’ve got on an August, 1971 live-radio bootleg; and the chase-scene extension of “Black Hearted Woman” in the second set, when the rhythm section switched accents and Derek and Haynes hit the chattering riff of the Grateful Dead’s “The Other One.”

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Otherwise, the Allmans – who announced their retirement from touring after Derek and Haynes issued a statement earlier this year that they were leaving to concentrate on their own careers – made sure they performed as much of their classic catalog, from the five albums made between that ’69 bow and 1973’s Brothers and Sisters, as could be fit in one night. The end of the road actually began with a poetic rewind of Duane-time flashbacks: An introductory flourish of the guitarist’s last composition, the acoustic “Little Martha” played by Derek and Haynes in electric harmony, quickly broke into “Mountain Jam,” the guitarists citing Donovan’s source melody, “There Is a Mountain,” in languid, treble sighs. It was a literal replication of the closing sequence, on Sides Three and Four, of 1972’s Eat a Peach, the album the Allmans were making when Duane died the previous October. That coupling erupted into another: the one-two punch of the Spencer Davis Group’s “Don’t Want You No More” and Gregg’s eerily prophetic blues “It’s Not My Cross to Bear” at the beginning of The Allman Brothers Band.

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The Allmans’ recurring cycles of ascension, tragedy, crash, recovery and determined performing triumph, in every era, were directly addressed in a first-set reading of “The High Cost of Low Living,” from 2003’s Hittin’ the Note, the only Allmans studio album to feature Derek and Haynes. The third set was a loosely narrative charge through pilgrimage and celebration – “Revival,” “Southbound” and more “Mountain Jam.” The last gently dissolved into the Carter Family hymn “Will the Circle Be Unbroken,” sung by Gregg as ragged pleading with Haynes riding shotgun, in decisively sunny harmony. But the finish extended the circle, taking everyone back to psychedelic church with another flash of “Mountain Jam” at “The Other One” velocity.

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The talk in the balcony, before the show and during the breaks, was of Betts, who was fired in 2000: Was there a chance he would come out and play, completing one more circle on the last possible night? He didn’t but was present in the songs – “Blue Sky,” “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed” – and in Derek and Haynes’ ties, through their harmonies and soloing, to the standards of fraternal lock and empathic dialogue set by Duane, with Betts, right out of the gate, in 1969. As he did on other nights in this October run, Derek played Duane’s own gold-top Les Paul – in the first set during Elmore James’ “One Way Out” and Sonny Boy Williamson’s “Good Morning Little Schoolgirl.”
But there was a lot of blues-power Dickey cutting through the Duane in both Derek’s raga-panic breaks and Haynes’ modal skids during “Elizabeth Reed” and in that “Whipping Post.” The younger men both played with Betts at different times in the Allmans, then together in the band for nearly fifteen years, five times longer than Betts and Duane did. There was never a suggestion – when Derek joined in 1999 and Haynes came back after Betts’ dismissal – that either player had replaced the elders. The lightning, frenzy and swan dives in “Hot ‘Lanta,” “Statesboro Blues” And “Dreams,” tonight as at every other Beacon show I saw, were acts of acknowledgement and summation, charged with pursuit of the unfinished.

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That work, it seems, will stay undone. During the intermissions, a curious message appeared on the large video screen behind the band: “The road indeed goes on forever. So stay calm, eat a peach and carry on . . .” The individual members of the Allmans will certainly continue to play in some form and combinations. There may even be reunions. As for the guitarists, Derek’s R&B juggernaut with his wife Susan Tedeschi, the Tedeschi Trucks Band, recently played a transcendant Beacon run in September, and Haynes’ group Gov’t Mule will make their traditional holiday stop at that stage on December 30th and 31st. I went to the former; I don’t want to miss the latter.
But it will take more than a peach to get me through next March. It was never spring, I always said, until I saw the Allmans peakin’ at the Beacon. Tonight was a generous, continually thrilling farewell. It will make the leaving that much harder to bear. (Rolling Stone on Facebook, 2014)

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The Allman Brothers Band could have wrapped up their farewell concert with any number of songs. They could have gone with an epic, jammed-out “Whipping Post,” which they did for the second last song at New York’s Beacon Theater on October 28th, 2014. They could have gone with a classic like “Mountain Jam,” “Midnight Rider” or “Melissa,” but they did those earlier in the night during the four hour blowout. Instead, they went with Muddy Waters’ “Trouble No More,” from their first side of their 1969 debut LP. An emotional Gregg Allman told the crowd that night it was the first song played at the group’s first rehearsal. “This was at about 3:30 in the afternoon, on March 26th, 1969,” he said. “Never did I have any idea it would come to this.”

It came to this after 45 amazing years that saw more tragedy and heartbreak than just about any group in rock history. They endured the deaths of guitarist Duane Allman and bassist Berry Oakley in separate motorcycle accidents just a few years after the group began, two breakups, a bitter split with founding guitarist Dickey Betts after years of acrimony and numerous health problems for Gregg Allman that threatened their existence time and time again. Throughout it all they kept gigging, helped in no small part by the addition of guitarists Warren Haynes in 1989 and guitarist Derek Trucks (nephew of drummer Butch Trucks) a decade later.

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When the time came to call it quits in 2014 there was no other place to end it than the Beacon Theater. They first played a residency at the Upper West Side theater in 1989 and three years later they turned it into an annual tradition. Fans from around the country descended on New York City every March for a chance to catch the shows, which featured a steady stream of surprise guest stars, amazing covers and unforgettable nights.

Demand for tickets was never higher than the October 28th, 2014 show. Days after it ended, Derek Trucks told Rolling Stone they ended at the right time. “If we’d gone on much longer, we wouldn’t have been able to summon that [last] show,” he said. “Almost any other time there’s a huge send-off, it’s a star-studded thing. This was just the band showing up and playing, the way they always did. There’s something honest and proud, dignified and beautiful about the way it ended.”

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From nearly the minute it ended rumors began spreading that the band was going to reform. “I would never rule anything out,” Haynes told Rolling Stone in 2015. “There’s no talk of that, but you know, I think the door’s always open.” That door began closing in January when Butch Trucks committed suicide, and it permanently closed on May 27th when Gregg Allman died after a long battle with liver cancer. Thankfully, the group had the opportunity to meticulously plan their final show and go out on an incredibly high note. (by Rolling Stone, May 30, 2017)

And the last song of this fanstastic show, was the first song, The Allman Brothers Band ever played  back in summer of 69 in Jacksonville, Forida.

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Personnel:
Gregg Allman (keyboards, vocals, guitar)
Oteil Burbridge (bass, vocals)
Warren Haynes (guitar, slide guitar)
Jaimoe (drums, percussion)
Marc Quinones (percussion, vocals)
Butch Trucks (drums, percussion)
Derek Trucks (guitar, slide guitar)

Allman Brothers Band In Concert - New York, NY

Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. Little Martha (D.Allman) 0.51
02. Mountain Jam (Leitch/D.Allman/Betts/Oakley/Johansen/Trucks/G.Allman) 4.01
03. Don’t Want You No More (Davis/Hardin) 2.35
04. It’s Not My Cross To Bear (G.Allman) 5.04
05. One Way Out (Sehorn/James) 6.25
06. Good Morning, Little Schoolgirl (Williamson) 10.54
07. Midnight Rider (G.Allman) 3.35
08. The High Cost Of Low Living (Allman/Haynes/Anders/Burgin) 8.39
09. Hot ‘Lanta (D.Allman/Betts/Oakley/Johansen/Trucks/G.Allman) 5.38
10. Blue Sky (Betts) 9.55
11. You Don’t Love Me (Cobbs) 13.30

CD 2:
01. Statesboro Blues (McTell) 4.52
02. Ain’t Wastin’ Time No More (G.Allman) 7.43
03. Black Hearted Woman (G.Allman) 13.08
04. The Sky Is Crying (James) 9.10
05. Dreams (G.Allman) 11.41
06. Don’t Keep Me Wondering (G.Allman) 4.16
07. Stage banter 1 0.18
08. In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed (Betts) 15.28
09. JaMaBuBu (Trucks/Jaimoe) 10.27
10. In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed (Betts) 2.34

CD 3:
01. Melissa (G.Allman) 5.39
02. Revival (Betts) 4.18
03. Stage banter 2 0.13
04. Southbound (Betts) 5.20
05. Mountain Jam (Leitch/D.Allman/Betts/Oakley/Johansen/Trucks/G.Allman) 8.06
06. Will The Circle Be Unbroken (Gabriel/Habershon) 10.51
07. Mountain Jam (reprise) (Leitch/D.Allman/Betts/Oakley/Johansen/Trucks/G.Allman) 3.07
08. Crowd noise 1 4.10
09. Whipping Post (G.Allman) 14.30
10. Crowd noise 2 1.48
11. Farewell
12. Trouble No More (Morganfield/Estes) 4.29

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Various Artists – Endless Highway -The Music Of The Band (2007)

FrontCover1Endless Highway: The Music of The Band, a tribute to The Band, was released on January 30, 2007.

As a rule, tribute records are problematic; there are some tunes that shine, others that are interpreted as if the performer has no idea what the original artist was about. Amazingly, that’s not so on Endless Highway: The Music of The Band, despite a wider ranging roster than is usually proffered. This is also a celebration of the 30th Anniversary of Martin Scorsese’s brilliant film The Last Waltz commemorating the Band’s farewell concerts in San Francisco. The array here is simply dazzling. Recordings artists from across the popular music spectrum participate: there are the jam bands like the Allman Brothers, Widespread Panic and Blues Traveler; there are indie rockers like Guster, My Morning Jacket, and Death Cab for Cutie; big modern country names like Josh Turner and Lee Ann Womack; modern adult alternative popsters like Rosanne Cash, Bruce Hornsby and Jack Johnson; unclassifiable rockers like Gomez; and modern-day folkies like Jackie Greene and Steve Reynolds, with the Roches on the set, too. And while Bob Dylan isn’t here, Jakob is, in duet with Liz Wright on a gorgeous reading of “Whispering Pines.”

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But then, this whole thing works. Guster’s reverent and moving read of “This Wheel’s on Fire,” opens the set; it’s a beautiful place to start because it’s followed in true Band fashion by Hornsby’s swinging, funky rendition of “King Harvest,” only to be underscored by My Morning Jacket’s “It Makes No Difference.” It’s true that nobody could sing this song like Rick Danko, but it’s played with such understated passion and tension that it’s as necessary a cover as there ever has been. While everybody refers to the Staple Singers cover of “The Weight,” Lee Ann Womack brings the song back to its country roots with a vengeance It’s still a back porch gospel tune, but Womack underscores the rural grit in the tune.

Wow! Gomez count the Band among their many influences and have been playing its songs for over a decade. Their version of “Up on Cripple Creek” is a testament to this. It’s not radically re-interpreted, but as an English band, these cats get the hip and greasy funkiness in the original and bring it out. The live version of “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down,” sung by Gregg Allman, is slow, ragged, and close to stunning. One would have to say that the Roches have been destined by God to cover “Acadian Driftwood.” While it is inextricably linked to the Band’s drummer Levon Helm, the Roches add a completely different spin on this with their wistful, female take on the dislocation, exile, and regret.

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Rosanne Cash’s “Unfaithful Servant” is one of the finest moments here and shows a great empathy for Robbie Robertson’s lyric writing. Yeah, Josh Turner’s deep hillbilly reading of Bob Dylan’s “When I Paint My Masterpiece,” which the Band incomparably covered, is wonderful and nails the simplicity in Dylan’s narrative as well as having a backing band that idles up to the Band’s instrumental acumen. The set closes with a darkly interpreted version of “Rockin’ Chair” by Death Cab for Cutie. The sense of loss, reverie, and loneliness underscores Robertson’s intent, and the understated horns evoke the longing for Dixieland emphatically. In fact, there is only one cut here that doesn’t work — Jack Johnson’s — his utter lack of feeling in “I Shall Be Released” is unforgivable for one of the greatest prison songs ever penned by Dylanand definitively recorded by the Band. Johnson’s lack of lyricism and forced innocence do not ring true for the material. Otherwise, Endless Highway is not only a fitting tribute to the Band, but a necessary one and a blueprint for how it should be done. (by Thom Jurek)

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Tracklist:
01. Guster: This Wheel’s On Fire (Dylan/Danko) 3.25
02. Bruce Hornsby and the Noisemakers; King Harvest (Has Surely Come)” (Robertson) 4.03
03. My Morning Jacket: It Makes No Difference (Robertson) 6.18
04. Jack Johnson with Animal Liberation Orchestra: I Shall Be Released (Dylan) 4.12
05. Lee Ann Womack: The Weight (Robrtson) 4.48
05. Gomez: Up On Cripple Creek (Robertson) 4.38
06. The Allman Brothers Band: The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down (Robertson) 5.04
07. Blues Traveler: Rag Mama Rag (Robertson) 3.19
08. John Hiatt & North Mississippi Allstars: Ain’t No More Cane (Robertson) 4.16
09. Jakob Dylan: Whispering Pines (Manuel/Robertson) 4.04
10. Animal Liberation Orchestra: Ophelia (Robertson) 3.40
11. Joe Henry: Bessie Smith (Robertson) 3.55
12. Jackie Greene: Look Out Cleveland (Robertson) 3.13
13. Death Cab for Cutie: Rockin’ Chair (Robertson) 5.26
14. Gov’t Mule: The Shape I’m In (Robertson) 7.48
15. Steve Reynolds: Stage Fright (Robertson) 3.44
16. Rosanne Cash: The Unfaithful Servant (Robertson) 4.56
17. Widespread Panic: Chest Fever (Robertson) 6.33
18. Josh Turner: When I Paint My Masterpiece (Dylan) 5.03
19. The Roches: Acadian Driftwood (Robertson) 5.22

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The Band, 1969

Allman Brothers Band – Brothers Of The Road (VHS rip) (1982)

FrontCoverIn 1978, Gregg Allman and Walden first approached Betts with the idea of a reunion. Their first public appearance together came at a Great Southern show in New York’s Central Park that summer, when Allman, Trucks, and Jaimoe joined the band for a few songs. Williams and Leavell declined to leave Sea Level, so the Allman Brothers Band hired two new members: guitarist Dan Toler and bassist David Goldflies. The band reunited with Tom Dowd at Criteria Studios in Miami to cut their reunion album, which was released in February 1979 as Enlightened Rogues, a term Duane had used to describe the band. While the band “tried to make it happen,” they later concluded that the chemistry was not there; the album was a minor commercial success, which was credited to the production work from Dowd. Betts filed a lawsuit against Walden for nonpayment of record and publishing royalties, and Betts’s lawyer, Steve Massarsky, began managing the group. Betts won the lawsuit, and the rest of the band filed suit while Capricorn declared bankruptcy that October. Massarsky led the successful effort to sign the band with Arista, which pushed the band to “modernize” their Sound. “[Arista founder] Clive Davis destroyed any hope that we had that we could make the thing work again,” said Trucks later. “He wanted us to be a Southern American version of Led Zeppelin and brought in outside producers and it just kept getting worse.”

Their first Arista effort, Reach for the Sky (1980), was produced by Nashville songwriters Mike Lawler and Johnny Cobb.[93] Bonnie Bramlett, who toured with the band near the end of the decade, sang lead on one song. Lawler soon became a part of the band’s touring ensemble, incorporating center-stage keytar solos “that most fans consider the band’s nadir.”[93] Drugs remained a problem with the band, particularly among Betts and Allman.[96] Although the album was made with the intention of creating a hit single, the genre of Southern rock was waning considerably in the mainstream.[94] The band again grew apart, firing longtime roadie “Red Dog” and replacing Jaimoe with Toler’s brother Frankie, who had been a member of Great Southern. The main point of contention was Jaimoe’s insistence that his wife and manager, Candace Oakley (Berry’s sister), handle his business affairs. “One of the real blights on the history of the Allman Brothers Band was that Jaimoe, this gentle man, was fired from this organization,” said Allman later.[98] Not long after, “the band changed managers, hiring the promoter John Scher after Massarsky eased himself out, reportedly saying, ‘It’s a million-dollar headache and a quarter-million-dollar job.'”

For their second and final album with Arista, Brothers of the Road (1981), they collaborated with a “name producer” (John Ryan, of Styx and the Doobie Brothers), who pushed the band even harder to change their Sound. “Straight from the Heart” was the album’s single, which became a minor hit but heralded the group’s last appearance on the top 40 charts. The band, considering their post-reunion albums “embarrassing”, subsequently broke up in 1982 after clashing with Clive Davis, who rejected every producer the band suggested for a possible third album, including Tom Dowd and Johnny Sandlin. “We broke up in ’82 because we decided we better just back out or we would ruin what was left of the band’s image,” said Betts. The band’s final performance came on Saturday Night Live in January 1982, where they performed “Southbound” and “Leavin’.” (by wikipedia)

Even this was not the best period of The Allman Brothers Band … this is a real good show with many goodies from the early Seventies … a decade Southern Rock became famous … Long live this Music and enjoy the very intimate sessions in a hotel and in a studio.

Recorded live in Gainsville FL, University of Florida 10-26-1980

 

Personnel:
Gregg Allman  (keyboards, vocals, guitar)
Dickey Betts (guitar, slide-guitar, vocals)
David Goldflies (bass)
Mike Lawler (piano)
Dan Toler (guitar)
David Toler (drums)
Butch Trucks (drums)
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background vocals:
2 unknown female background singers

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Tracklist:

Gainsville FL:
01. Pony Boy (Betts)
02. Jessica (Betts)
03. You Don’t Love Me (Cobbs)
04. Blue Sky (Betts)
05. Never Knew How Much (I Need You) (G.Allman)
06. Statesboro Blues (McTell)
07. Whipping Post (G.Allman)

Hotel Jam:
08. Let Me Ride (Betts)
09. Danny Blue (unknown)
10. The Preacher (unknown)

Studio Jam:
11. Melissa (G.Allman)
12. Come & Go Blues (G.Allman)

Total time: 55.21

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Allman Brothers Band – Idlewild South (1970)

OriginalFrontCover1Idlewild South is the second album by American Southern rock band the Allman Brothers Band. Produced by Tom Dowd, the album was released on September 23, 1970, in the United States by Atco Records and Capricorn Records.
Following the release of their 1969 debut, the Allman Brothers Band toured the United States extensively to promote the album, which had little commercial success. Their performances, however, did create positive word of mouth exposure that extended to more famous musicians, such as Eric Clapton, who invited group leader Duane Allman to contribute to his 1970 album Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs.

As a result of the band’s relentless touring schedule, Idlewild South was recorded gradually over a period of five months in various cities, including New York, Miami, and Macon, Georgia, the band’s home. Tom Dowd had previously been sought to record the group’s debut but had been unavailable. The material presented on Idlewild South was written during this period and tested out on the road at shows. The album’s title comes from the band’s nickname for a rustic cabin the band rented out and used for rehearsals, as well as parties. Idlewild South contains two of the band’s best-known songs, “Midnight Rider” (later a hit for various artists) and “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed”, which became one of the band’s famous concert numbers.

The album was released in September 1970 but again failed to achieve significant success. Sales began to grow, however, due to over 300 shows the band put on in 1970, setting the stage for their artistic and commercial breakthrough with 1971’s live follow-up album, At Fillmore East.
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The Allman Brothers Band formed in March 1969, and began writing music and touring together. By that August, the group had recorded their self-titled debut album, which was released that November on Capricorn Records, a division of Atlantic Records.[1] The record received a poor commercial response, selling less than 35,000 copies upon initial release.[2] Executives suggested to the band’s manager and Capricorn president, Phil Walden, that he relocate the band to New York or Los Angeles to increase their exposure. “They wanted us to act “like a rock band” and we just told them to “fuck themselves,” remembered Trucks.[3] For their part, the members of the band remained optimistic, electing to stay in the South. “Everyone told us we’d fall by the wayside down there,” said Gregg Allman,[3] but the collaboration between the band and Capricorn Records “transformed Macon from this sleepy little town into a very hip, wild, and crazy place filled with bikers and rockers.” In March 1970, Oakley’s wife rented a large Victorian home on 2321 Vineville Avenue in Macon, which they dubbed “the Big House”.

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Idlewild South was the band’s first effort with Tom Dowd, known for his work with Cream and John Coltrane. Dowd first heard the band rehearsing while visiting Capricorn Sound Studios in Macon, asking their name and remarking to Walden, “Get them the hell out of there and give them to me in the studio. They don’t need to rehearse; they’re ready to record” Dowd was initially scheduled to work with the band on their debut album but was called away at the last minute. Initially, the band had asked friend and colleague Johnny Sandlin to produce their second album, but as recording inched closer, it became obvious they wanted him to co-produce with Dowd. In one of their first sessions, Sandlin was giving suggestions and acting as a co-producer, though no one had informed Dowd; Sandlin was embarrassed and did not return to the studio

They had to get on the road to support themselves. They were working 300 days a year. So they would just blow in and do some songs and blow out. That was it — in and out — just like that.
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The first recording sessions for Idlewild South took place in mid-February 1970 at the newly built Capricorn Sound Studios in Macon. Subsequently, the band moved to Criteria Studios in Miami in mid-March, where Dowd felt more comfortable producing albums; he viewed the then-new Capricorn studio as still a work-in-progress and unfit to record in. The band was constantly on the road while Idlewild South was developed, leading to a fractured recording process completed in fits and stops. They reconvened with Dowd during short breaks from shows. In addition, group leader Duane Allman still received invitations to play as a session musician elsewhere; on the “rare instances when [the band] could return to Macon for a short break”, Allman would hit the road for New York, Miami, or Muscle Shoals to contribute to other artists’ sessions. On days that the band would be available, manager Walden phoned Dowd to inform him; he would often catch their show and spend the rest of the night in the studio. After nearly half a year and over three different recording studios, production wrapped up by July 1970.

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Instead of using multitrack recording (which was quickly gaining popularity), the Allman Brothers Band opted to cut most of Idlewild South live, with all of the musicians performing together. On rare occasions, they would go back to overdub sections that weren’t up to standard. “The idea is that part of the thing of the Allman Brothers is the spontaneity — the elasticity. The parts and tempos vary in a way that only they are sensitive to”, said Dowd. Duane often left a song alone for more work and testing out on the road. “They would record maybe five songs. Then they might say, ‘I don’t think that song was good enough,’ or, ‘I don’t think that song was ready to record,”, remembered Dowd.[10] Joel Dorn, predominantly a jazz producer for Atlantic, stepped in to produce one song on the album, “Please Call Home”, which was recorded at Regency Sound Studios on July 14, 1970.[12] The band were in New York at the time and Dowd was unavailable.[13]
Following the recording process, Duane was invited to join Eric Clapton and his new group Derek & the Dominos on the recording of their debut album, Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs. Clapton later formally invited Allman to join the group, but he reluctantly declined, expressing loyalty to the members of the Allman Brothers and musical concept that had birthed it.
Idlewild South was issued by Atco and Capricorn Records on September 23, 1970, less than a year after the band’s debut album. It sold only “marginally better, in spite of the band’s growing national reputation, and included songs that would become staples of its repertoire—and eventually of rock radio.”[27] Jim Hawkins, engineer of the album, remembered that Walden informed him that Idlewild South opened to 50,000 copies in its first week, before settling in at 1,000 per week.[28] While the album did help boost the band’s popularity, the Allman Brothers’ name really grew in fame due to their live performances. Walden doubted the band’s future, worrying whether they would ever catch on, but word of mouth spread due to the band’s relentless touring schedule, and crowds got larger.

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Rolling Stone’s Ed Leimbacher wrote that Idlewild South “augurs well for the Allmans’ future,” calling it “a big step forward from the Allmans’ first” but considered the second side of the LP a disappointment. Robert Christgau at The Village Voice gave the album a “B+” and considered it a companion piece to Duane Allman’s work on Layla, noting that “a lot of people think that Duane Allman is already a ranking titan of the electric guitar.”[31] A retrospective five-star review from Bruce Eder at Allmusic deemed it “the best studio album in the group’s history, electric blues with an acoustic texture, virtuoso lead, slide, and organ playing, and a killer selection of songs.”

In 2014 Rolling Stone listed it among the most “groundbreaking” albums, covering its impact on Southern rock: “On their second album, the Allman Brothers transmogrified from mere blues-rockers to an assemblage creating an entirely new kind of Southern music.” (by wikipedia)
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Personnel:
Duane Allman (slide guitar, guitar)
Gregg Allman  (keyboards, vocals)
Dickey Betts (guitar)
Jai Johanny Johanson (drums, percussion congas, timbales)
Berry Oakley (bass, vocals on 05., background vocals on 03.)
Butch Trucks (drums, Timpani)

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Thom Doucette (harmonica, Percussion)
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Tracklist:
01. Revival (Betts) 4.06
02. Don’t Keep Me Wonderin’ (G.Allman) 3.30
03. Midnight Rider (Allman/Payne) 3.00
04. In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed (Betts) 6.56
05. Hoochie Coochie Man (Dixon) 4.59
06. Please Call Home (G.Allman) 4.04
07. Leave My Blues At Home (G.Allman) 4.18
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The Allman Brothers Band – Live From A&R Studios, New York, August 26, 1971 (1971)

frontcover1Live from A&R Studios is an album by the Allman Brothers Band. It was recorded on August 26, 1971, at A&R Studios in New York City for a live radio broadcast.
A bootleg recording of this concert had been circulated for years, and coveted by many fans. Originally, “You Don’t Love Me” / “Soul Serenade” was released on the box set Dreams.
On Jambands.com, Larson Sutton said, “The nine-song program was inspired work, showcasing the conflagration of six musicians focused as one… The A&R show, presumably taped in droves by home stereos, was widely bootlegged, and in the following decades considered quite a treasure of both performance and historical context. To have it officially released, cleaned up and remastered to a high polish from the original broadcast tapes, is to put it finally in the proper place for all to hear; the magnificence of the Allman Brothers Band in one of its finest hours of its finest year of 1971.”
In American Songwriter, Hal Horowitz wrote, “As those who already own this heavily bootlegged concert, recorded in front of a small audience at the titular studio can attest, the sextet was on fire this evening. And even though there were few surprises in the songs played (they had stayed pretty similar for about a year), the group charged through the material like they had everything to prove…. Moderate Brothers admirers can stick with the already released versions, but for those digging deeper into Duane’s sadly limited well of professionally recorded work with the band, this is absolutely essential listening.” (by wikipedia)
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We were reminded of this great show from the old European bootleg label, Gold Standard, when a fan shared his on the net earlier this month. It’s a killer show from the Allmans, at the peak of their career.
They had recorded their seminal live album, At Fillmore East, in March 1971, and continued to tour relentlessly. In July, At Fillmore East was released to critical acclaim. It was back on the road again to promote that album. One important stop was at New York’s A&R Studios. The show was broadcast live on FM.
This show was broadcast two weeks after the death of King Curtis. This article from Hittin’ The Note by Tim Hoover details Curtis’ influence on Duane Allman.
During the broadcast, Duane pauses to reflect on his fallen friend: “About King Curtis – that was one of the finest cats there ever was. He was just right on top of getting next to young people, you know? It’s a shame. If y’all get the chance, listen to that album he made out at Fillmore West… Boy, it’s incredible, it’s unbelievable, the power and the emotional stature the man had. He’s an incredible human being.
“At the funeral, boy, Aretha sang and Stevie Wonder played… they played ‘Soul Serenade.’ Duane breaks off into the melody of Curtis’ signature song, and a few in the audience respond with polite applause of recognition.
“Y’all probably a little bit young. It’s fantastic. We’ll do some of that… yeah, I know where we’ll do it…”
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“Duane and the band jump into the intro for ‘You Don’t Love Me.’ A little over eight minutes into the song, Duane slows the band, reaching an achingly slow transitional phase, gradually leading everyone into his own version of ‘Soul Serenade’. When Duane plays the melody of the song again, the audience immediately begins clapping along to the sweet melodic tune. Suddenly, Duane jumps in and absolutely cuts the melody to shreds with one of the most moving, heart-felt solos you will ever hear, taking it right up into the stratosphere. Mirroring his words for Curtis, the ‘power and emotional stature’ of Duane’s own very personal and passionate eulogy for his lost friend is delivered as only he can do it – powerfully, lovingly, and gracefully.
Tragically, the Allman Brothers Band lost their founder and leader when Duane Allman was killed in a motorcycle crash in Macon on October 29, just two months after this show.
Allman’s influences were varied as they were all-encompassing. You can hear it in his playing, spacious, inventive, intense and always entertaining. Although he was a virtuoso musician, he was also a team player and his interplay with Dickey Betts was complex and masterful. At this point, the Allmans had a superb rhythm section of Berry Oakley, Butch Trucks and Jaimoe Johanson.
Back then, a broad outlook was important. Nobody liked being typecast or placed in boxes. The music had to be interesting. It’s almost four decades since Duane passed on, so this one’s in his Memory.
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Personnel:
Duane Allman (guitar, slide guitar)
Gregg Allman  (keyboards, vocals)
Dickey Betts (guitar)
Berry Oakley (bass)
Butch Trucks (drums)
Jai Johanny Johanson (Jaimoe) (drums, percussion)
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Tracklist:
01. Statesboro Blues (McTell) 4.30
02. Trouble No More (Morganfield) 4.04
03. Don’t Keep Me Wonderin’ (G.Allman) 3.39
04. Done Somebody Wrong (Lewis/James/Levy) 3.43
05. One Way Out (Sehorn/James) 4.48
06. In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed (Betts) 11.23
07. Stormy Monday (Walker) 8.48
08. Medley:
08.1. You Don’t Love Me (Cobbs)
08.2. Soul Serenade (Ousley/Dixon) 19.32
09. Hot ‘Lanta (G.Allman/D.Allman/Betts/Trucks/Oakley,Jai Johanny Johanson) 6.46
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This is just so shocking and sad. Butch Trucks, a founding member of the legendary Allman Brothers Band, allegedly shot himself in the head on Jan. 24, 2017 as his wife watched, according to a Jan. 26 report. Here’s what we know.
Butch Trucks has died at the age of 69 after suffering from a gun shot to the head, according to police reports obtained by Daily Mail. He was in his condo in West Palm Beach, FL, and his wife Melinda allegedly witnessed Butch pull the trigger. So awful.
What a tragedy …

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Goodbye Butch … RIP !

Allman Brothers Band – Same (1969)

frontcover1The Allman Brothers Band is the debut studio album by American rock band the Allman Brothers Band. It was released in the United States by Atco Records and Capricorn Records on November 4, 1969 and produced by Adrian Barber. Formed in 1969, the Allman Brothers Band came together following various musical pursuits by each individual member. Following his session work in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, Duane Allman moved to Jacksonville, Florida where he led large jam sessions with his new band, one he had envisioned as having two guitarists and two drummers. After rounding out the lineup with the addition of his brother, Gregg Allman, the band played free shows in public parks and moved to Macon, Georgia, where they were to be one of the premiere acts on Capricorn.

The album was recorded and mixed in two weeks at Atlantic Studios in New York City. Much of the material presented was premiered live over the preceding months and combines blues, jazz and country music to varying degrees. It includes re-workings of “Trouble No More” and “Don’t Want You No More,” as well as notable originals such as “Dreams”, which highlighted the band’s jazz influence, and “Whipping Post”, which soon became a crowd favorite. Although the group was arranged to work with producer Tom Dowd (whose credits included Cream and John Coltrane), he was unavailable, and they instead recorded with house engineer Adrian Barber. The album’s artwork was photographed at various places in Macon and surrounding areas.

The record initially received a poor commercial response, charting in the lower levels of Billboard’s Top 200 Pop Albums chart. Despite this, the album received critical acclaim from publications such as Rolling Stone, who called it “consistently […] subtle, and honest, and moving.” Following the release of the album, the band remained on the road for an extended period of time. They chose to remain in Macon, despite suggestions from label executives to move to larger cities for a better shot at commercial acceptance. (by wikipedia)

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This might be the best debut album ever delivered by an American blues band, a bold, powerful, hard-edged, soulful essay in electric blues with a native Southern ambience. Some lingering elements of the psychedelic era then drawing to a close can be found in “Dreams,” along with the template for the group’s on-stage workouts with “Whipping Post,” and a solid cover of Muddy Waters’ “Trouble No More.” There isn’t a bad song here, and only the fact that the group did even better the next time out keeps this from getting the highest possible rating. (by Bruce Eder)

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Personnel:
Duane Allman (guitar, slide-guitar)
Gregg Allman (organ, vocals)
Dickey Betts (guitar)
Jai Johanny Johanson (drums, percussion)
Berry Oakley (bass, background vocals)
Butch Trucks (drums, percussion)

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Tracklist:
01. Don’t Want You No More (Davis/Hardin)  2.25
02. It’s Not My Cross to Bear (G.Allman)  5.02
03. Black Hearted Woman (G.Allman)  5.08
05. Trouble No More (Morganfield) 3.45
06. Every Hungry Woman (G.Allman)  4.13
07. Dreams (G.Allman) 7.18
08. Whipping Post (G.Allman)  5.17

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