Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass – The Brass Are Comin'(1969)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Brass Are Comin’ is a 1969 album by Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass. It was the group’s thirteenth release and marked the first time in the group’s history that one of their albums did not certify gold. However, the album did peak at number 30 in the top 40 on the Billboard albums chart. The Brass Are Comin’ was the last album recorded by the Tijuana Brass before the group disbanded in December 1969. The album also spawned a television special with the same name that aired on NBC on October 29, 1969.  Clips from the television special can be seen on the album’s double-fold cover. Unlike the previous Warm album which featured much slower-paced songs leaning more toward a “Brazilian” sound, The Brass Are Comin’ featured a western-theme with faster-paced songs. “Good Morning, Mr. Sunshine” became one of the most recognized Tijuana Brass songs from this album and was among the last Mexican-flavored songs recorded by the group [3]. After completing this album and the subsequent television special, the group embarked on a European tour which marked the last public performances of the original TJB. (by wikipedia)

Cash Box, November 8, 1969

Coinciding with another television special, this is the unofficial “last ride” of the original TJB. Some trademark arrangements are featured on this album, including Henry Mancini’s “Moon River”, “Sunny”, and the Lennon/McCartney tune “I’ll Be Back”). “Good Morning, Mr. Sunshine” has to be one of the best TJB tracks on record, and the last truly Mexican-flavored song they would ever record. Most of the originals have a bouncy country & western flavor to them, perfect for punctuating barroom brawls and Brass riding into town. (by larrylevinerecordingengineer.com)

Another fine album by Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass with a real great cover …

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Personnel:
Herb Alpert (trumpet, vocals)
Nick Ceroli (drums)
Bob Edmondson (trombone)
Tonni Kalash (trumpet)
John Pisano (guitar)
Lou Pagani (piano)
Pat Senatore (bass)
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“Sunny” and “Good Morning, Mr. Sunshine” orchestrated by Shorty Rogers
“You Are My Life” and “Moon River” orchestrated by Dave Grusin

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Tracklist:
01. The Brass Are Comin’ (The Little Train Of Caipira) (Villa-Lobos) 2.06
02. Good Morning, Mr. Sunshine (Mills/Roth) 2.39
03. Country Lake (Lake) 2.58
04. I’ll Be Back (Lennon/McCartney) 3.19
05. Moon River (Mancini)Mercer) 2.58
06. The Maltese Melody (Kaempfert/Rehbein) 2.20
07. Sunny (Hebb) 3.09
08. I’m An Old Cowhand (From The Rio Grande) (Mercer) 2.42
09. Anna (Engvick/Vatro/Giordano) 2.39
10. Robbers And Cops (Wechter) 2.20
11. Moments (Pisano) 2.47
12. You Are My Life (Sarstedt) 3.21

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More Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass

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Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass – Por El Camino De Mexico (South Of The Border) (1964)

FrontCover1South of the Border is the third album by American easy listening brass band Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass, originally released in 1964. The name of the group, for this album, is “Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass”.South of the Border is the third album by American easy listening brass band Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass, originally released in 1964. The name of the group, for this album, is “Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass”.
Alpert’s first top ten hit, and fifth gold record, the album continued the progression of the Tijuana Brass from its mostly-Mexican sound to a more easy-listening style, with a collection of cover versions of popular songs. Included were “I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face”, originally featured in the Broadway musical My Fair Lady and The Beatles’ 1963 hit “All My Loving”. It also featured an instrumental cover of its title song, “South of the Border”, which was most famously done as a vocal by Frank Sinatra.
“Hello, Dolly!” had the band singing a couple of lines of the mostly-instrumental rendition, in what might now be considered stereotyping, using mock-Mexican accents. Alpert’s distinctive singing voice was not discernible in that portion. Also, in some versions, he can be heard whispering “Número Cinco”, effecting a Mexican accent, at the start of that song’s track.

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One number, a Sol Lake tune called “The Mexican Shuffle”, was reworked for a TV ad for a brand of chewing gum, and styled “The Teaberry Shuffle”. Bert Kaempfert, author of several songs covered by the Brass, returned the favor by issuing a cover of “The Mexican Shuffle”. The number called “El Presidente”, was a reorchestration of Sol Lake’s “Winds of Barcelona”, which had appeared on Volume 2.
The cover features Alpert and perennial HATB model Sandra Moss at the Patio del Moro apartment complex in West Hollywood.

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Herb Alpert was still using an array of SoCal studio all-stars as his Tijuana Brass when South of the Border (1964) began to restore the combo’s good name after the modest Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass, Vol. 2 (1963) failed to ignite a fire in listener’s ears. Alpert later commented that the Sol Lake composition “Mexican Shuffle” “opened a new door for me.” That passageway meant the loss of the Tijuana Brass’ practically forced mariachi style and the rise of Alpert’s approach in arranging familiar melodies in fresh, creative settings. Nowhere would this stylistic progression be as pronounced as in the horn-driven updates of several then-concurrent chart hits. For instance, the mod sonic wrinkle in “Girl from Ipanema” emits a darkness veiled in mystery, directly contrasting the light buoyancy of “Hello! Dolly” or the footloose feel of the Beatles’ “All My Loving.” They seamlessly fit in with Sol Lake’s “Salud, Amor y Dinero” and a cover of Julius Wechter’s playful, midtempo “Up Cherry Street” — which Wechter’s own Baja Marimba Band had just recorded for their 1964 self-titled debut.

The ballads “I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face,” “Angelito,” and “Adios, Mi Corazon” provide contrasts with Alpert’s sensitive scores never seeming maudlin or unnecessarily over the top. If the regal “El Presidente” sounds particularly familiar, it may well be due to Alpert’s slight renovation of the “Winds of Barcelona” from the Tijuana Brass’ previous effort, the less than impressive Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass, Vol. 2. It was renamed “El Presidente,” presumably to honor the then-recent memory of the slain U.S. leader John Fitzgerald Kennedy. (by Lindsay Planer)

In other word: Another pretty good album by Herb Alpert ! My copy was especially produced for the Spanisch record market …

The EP:

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Personnel:
Herb Alpert (trumpet, vovals)
Nick Ceroli (drums)
Bob Edmondson (trombone)
Tonni Kalash (trumpet)
Lou Pagani (piano)
John Pisano (guitar)
Pat Senatore (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Al Sur De La Frontera (South Of The Border) (Kennedy/Carr) 2.07
02. La Chica De Ipanema (The Girl from Ipanema) (Gimbel/Jobim)de Moraes) 2.39
03. Hello, Dolly! (Herman) 1.57
04. Me Acostumbre A Ti (‘ve Grown Accustomed To Her Face (Lerner/Loewe) 2.27
05. En La Calle Del Cerezo (Up Cherry Street) (Wechter) 2.19
06. Mexican Shuffle (Lake) 2.10
07. El Presidente (Lake) 2.40
08. Todo Mi Amor (All My Loving) (Lennon/McCartney) 1.57
09. Angelito (Herrera/Ornelas) 2.23
10. Salud, Amor y Dinero (Health, Love and Money) (Lake) 2.06
11. Número Cinco (Number Five) (Coleman) 2.18
12. Adiós, Mi Corazón (Goodbye, My Heart) (Lake) 2.40

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The original US front cover:

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Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass – The Beat Of The Brass (1968)

FrontCover1The Beat of the Brass is the tenth album release by the popular 1960s instrumental group Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass. The album was released on the heels of a television special by the same title (telecast April 22, 1968 over CBS). Tom Mankiewicz, who wrote the special, also provided two paragraphs of liner notes for the album. Explaining the concept behind the album, Mankiewicz writes, “The beat of America is more than a musical experience. It finds its pulse and rhythms in the very life of the country: the crack of a bat against a baseball, the spinning wheels and pounding machinery of a modern factory, a swinging crowd in New Orleans at Mardi Gras, a saddle twisting desperately against his rider…”[2]

It includes Alpert’s only major vocal hit, “This Guy’s In Love With You”, which became an overnight success due to its inclusion during the special, in a sequence featuring Herb and his (first) wife, Sharon. (by wikipedia)

Meant as the companion album to a Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass television special of the same name and packaged in a fancy double-fold LP jacket, The Beat of the Brass came out amid signs that Alpert’s hot streak was finally beginning to run out. Not quite. Viewer requests for a new Burt Bacharach song, “This Guy’s in Love with You” — featuring an Alpert vocal — were so strong that A&M released it as a single, which shot up to number one and took The Beat of the Brass with it to the top.

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Herb’s vocal is touching in its strained naïveté; he sounds sincere, and that overrides the lush, overbearing Bacharach orchestral arrangement. The rest of the album generated an often nostalgic quality then and now; the tunes by John Pisano and Sol Lake are exquisite, and Alpert’s arrangements of songs like “Thanks for the Memory” seem autumnal in quality, as if an era were about to close. The band still has the ability to groove; the vamp on Julius Wechter’s bossa nova “Panama,” with Wechter’s jazzy vibes and Pisano’s strong rhythm guitar, could have been stretched to half an hour. Yet Alpert’s trumpet sounds a bit withered at times, and the band vocals and cloying children’s chorus on “Talk to the Animals” could be done without. (by Richard S. Ginell)

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Personnel:
Herb Alpert (trumpet, vocals)
Nick Ceroli (drums)
Bob Edmondson (trombone)
Tonni Kalash (trumpet)
Lou Pagani (piano)
John Pisano (guitar)
Pat Senatore (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Monday, Monday (J.Phillips/M.Phillips) 3.08
02. A Beautiful Friend (Lake) 3.17
03. Cabaret (Ebb/Kander) 2.38
04. Panama (Wechter) 3.36
05. Belz Mein Shtetele Belz (My Home Town) (Jacobs/Olshanetsky) 2.14
06. Talk To The Animals (Bricusse) 2.14
07. Slick (Alpert/Pisano) 3.29
08. She Touched Me (Lake) 2.58
09. Thanks For The Memory (Robin/Rainger) 2.05
10. The Robin (Pisano) 2.22
11. This Guy’s In Love With You (Bacharach/David) 3.55

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Linernotes

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Much more albums from this time by A & M Records

Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass – Viva Acapulco (1968)

FrontCover1Herbert “Herb” Alpert (born March 31, 1935) is an American musician most associated with the group variously known as Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass, Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass, or TJB. Alpert is also a recording industry executive, the “A” of A&M Records, a recording label he and business partner Jerry Moss founded and eventually sold to PolyGram. Alpert also has created abstract expressionist paintings and sculpture over two decades, which are publicly displayed on occasion. Alpert and wife, Lani Hall, are substantial philanthropists through the operation of the Herb Alpert Foundation.

Alpert’s musical accomplishments include five No. 1 albums and 28 albums total on the Billboard Album chart, nine Grammy Awards, fourteen platinum albums, and fifteen gold albums.[1] As of 1996, Alpert had sold 72 million albums worldwide. Alpert is the only recording artist to hit No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 pop chart as both a vocalist (“This Guy’s in Love with You”, 1968), and an instrumentalist (“Rise”, 1979). (by wikipedia)

This is just a sampler for the German record market but it´s a real good one, because Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass were a high-class easy listening orchestra … listen to tracks like “Wade In The Water”, “Jerusalem” or “Slick” and you will know what I mean.

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Personnel:
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Tracklist:
01. I’m Getting Sentimental Over You (Bassman) 2.12
02. To Wait For Love (Bacharach/David) 2.42
03. Swinger From Seville (Alpert) 2.33
04. Lady Godiva (Mills/Leander) 2.09
05. Acapulco 1922 (Allan) 2.39
06. Wade In The Water (Edmondson/Alpert/Pisano) 3.07
07. What Now My Love (Sigman/Becaud) 2.14
08. Jerusalem (Alpert) 2.30
09. Slick (Alpert/Pisano) 3.21
10. Shades Of Blue (Wechter) 2.46
11. Mexican Shuffle (Lake) 2.09
12. Hello, Dolly! (Hermann) 1.57
13. More (Oliviero/Ortalana) 2.26
14. Mexican Road Race (Lake) 2.29

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Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass – Herb Alpert’s Ninth (1967)

FrontCover1The cover art of Herb Alpert’s Ninth is hilarious — a bust of grim old Beethoven wearing a Herb Alpert sweatshirt, a parody of the pop icon fad going around at the time and maybe a comment on the rock world’s newfound pretensions in the wake of the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper. In any case, Herb Alpert’s Ninth does introduce some highbrow pretensions of sorts to Alpert’s Ameriachi sound — some very subtly applied strands of strings on several numbers and a madcap, multi-sectioned fantasy of tunes from Bizet’s Carmen that is full of in-jokes from the opera and the TJB’s hits. Alpert is also quite aware of the brave new world around him; he does a spare, lazy, yet entirely novel-sounding cover version of Sgt. Pepper’s “With a Little Help from My Friends” and gives the Supremes’ “The Happening” a bouncy workout. There is also a touching memorial to the late Ervan Coleman (“Bud”) and another underrated contribution from the Alpert songwriting team, Sol Lake’s swinging “Cowboys and Indians.” the TJB still churns out the Latin American rhythms, but sometimes with a shade less exuberance. (by Richard S. Ginell)

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Personnel:
Herb Alpert (trumpet, vocals)
Nick Ceroli (drums)
Bob Edmondson (trombone)
Tonni Kalash (trumpet)
Lou Pagani (piano)
John Pisano (guitar)
Pat Senatore (bass)

BackCover1Tracklist:
01. A Banda (De Hollanda) 2.10
02. My Heart Belongs To Daddy (Porter) 2.00
03. The Trolley Song (Martin/Blaine) 2.39
04. The Happening (B. Holland/E. Holland/DeVol/Dozier) 2.26
05. Bud (E.Coleman/B.Coleman) 3.38
06. Love So Fine (Nichols/Asher) 2.14
07. The Love Nest (Hirsch/Harbach) 1.59
08. With A Little Help From My Friends (Lennon/McCartney) 2.38
09. Flea Bag (Wechter) 2.04
10. Cowboys And Indians (Lake) 2.52
11. Carmen (Bizet) 3.39

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