Andwella’s Dream – Love And Poetry (1969)

FrontCover1Andwella were a Northern Irish psychedelic rock band formed in 1968, originally as The Method and later renamed Andwellas Dream. The trio were fronted by Dave Lewis (Guitar/keyboard/vocals), with Nigel Smith (bass/vocals) and Gordon Barton (drums).[1]

Their first album, as Andwellas Dream, Love and Poetry, was recorded in London in 1968, and featured jazz musician Bob Downes on saxophone and flute, and Wilgar Campbell on drums on the track “Felix”. However, the album failed to sell, and Lewis then recorded a solo album, privately pressed, on the Ax label in 1970; which included new versions of some of the Andwella’s Dream songs. Then in 1970 David Lewis wrote the music for and produced poet David Baxter’s “Goodbye Dave” album, for which he was backed by Andwella.

With the addition of Dave McDougall on guitar and vocals, the band was renamed Andwella. This line-up issued World’s End, before Dave Struthers replaced Nigel Smith on bass and Jack McCullock joined as drummer. This lineup recorded the bands’ last album, People’s People, in 1971, after which the band broke up in 1972.

Lewis later went on to write “Happy to Be on an Island in the Sun”, recorded in the 1970s by Demis Roussos.

Love and Poetry is the first studio album by British psychedelic band Andwella’s Dream. It was released in 1969 on CBS Records.

Love and Poetry was composed entirely by band member Dave Lewis. It captures the true original sounds of Irish psychedelic rock. Relatively unknown, this album has achieved certain cult status after 40 years and is eagerly sought after by collectors of the genre.

It is featured in Record Collector’s Top 100 British Psychedelic Records of the 1960s. (by wikipedia)

Andwella´s Dream

Although Andwella’s Dream were a versatile psychedelic group, they were nonetheless generic no matter what angle they were taking. On Love & Poetry, you get sustained guitar that walks the line between freakbeat and heaviness, some swirling organ and husky vocals that betray the influence of Traffic and Procol Harum, pastoral acoustic folky tunes in the Donovan style, airy-fairy dabs of phased guitars and storybook lyrics, etc. Eclecticism is to be commended, and since late-’60s British psychedelia is an interesting genre in and of itself, generic music in the subgenre is more interesting than some other generic music in other styles. Still, generic music is generic music, and being able to do a bunch of different things in an unexceptional manner does not make you exceptional. The fairly tuneful folk-rocker “Midday Sun” is the best cut; it’s also interesting to hear a song about “Cocaine” in 1969, before the drug was too well known even in the counterculture. (by Richie Unterberger)

Single

Personnel:
Gordon Barton (drums)
Bob Downes (flute, percussion)
David Lewis (vocals, guitar, keyboards)
Nigel Smith (bass, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. The Days Grew Longer For Love 3.56
02. Sunday 3.12
03. Lost A Number Found A King 6.04
04. Man Without A Name 2.42
05. Clockwork Man 2.44
06. Cocaine 5.00
07. Shades Of Grey 3.37
08. High On A Mountain 2.32
09. Andwella 3.16
10. Midday Sun 3.41
11. Take My Road 3.23
12. Felix 4.17
13. Goodbye 2.18

All songs composed by Dave Lewis

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Live at the Marquee Club, London … what a time !

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