Gerald Garcia – Camerata Cassovia – Peter Breiner ‎– Baroque Guitar Favourites (1993)

FrontCover1“Baroque Guitar Favourites”: Arrangements for Guitar of Music by Antonio Vivaldi (Trio Sonatas RV 82 and RV 85; Lute Concerto RV 93; Violin Concerto RV 277) and by Johann Sebastian Bach (Harpsichord Concerto BWV 1052). All arrangements by Gerald Garcia. Performed by Gerald Garcia, guitar, and members of the Camerata Cassovia, directed by Peter Breiner. Recorded at the House of Arts in Kosice, Slovakia, in June 1990. Music notes by Gerald Garcia (not, as stated on the cover, by Keith Anderson). Released in 1992 as Naxos 8.550274. Total playing time: 75’23”.

Over the last 20 years, the Naxos label has done a great deal to obtain its reputation as one of the leading classical guitar labels. Its very first guitarist was Gerald Garcia, who was not slow to show the way forward by extending the rather limited guitar repertoire by making arrangements of pieces originally written for other instruments. This is what he has done here, too: None of the music on this disc was written for guitar, it is all arranged by Garcia himself, who plays a modern guitar and definitely not a baroque instrument. This rather makes the title of the disc a misnomer: no baroque guitar, no guitar music at all in the original, and certainly no guitar favourites as these arrangements were only made shortly before the disc was recorded! It would have been more to the point to entitle the whole: “Baroque Favourites arranged for Modern Guitar”, but I suppose the marketing strategists wouldn’t have liked that very much!

Gerald Garcia

What we do get to hear here is some very pleasant, tuneful, harmonic baroque melodies in which the part of the main soloist (lute, violin, harpsichord) is replaced by Garcia’s skilful and tasteful guitar-playing which is, in its turn, put very much in the forefront by the engineer. For the concertos, the necessary accompaniment is by the Camerata Cassovia, a chamber ensemble taken from members of the Slovak State Philharmonic of Kosice in Eastern Slovakia; the higher string parts sound quite acceptable, while I found the lower strings (the “basso continuo”) to be rather dull and uninspired. For the Bach, this continuo includes a harpsichord, providing a sonic background that does not let the listener forget that it is an arrangement of a harpsichord concerto that he is listening to. The Vivaldi trio sonatas were originally for violin, lute and continuo, and they are here played with the guitar as a suitable replacement for the lute, but with a viola d’amore in place of the violin, a decision which not only subordinates the string playing to the guitar, but which also sounds quite pleasing. Unfortunately, the strictures on the basso continuo apply here, too: Pavol Gimcik, cello, and Maria Lickova, modern harpsichord, provide nothing more than the absolutely necessary accompanying chords, so that it is definitely better to concentrate on Gerald Garcia’s delightful guitar playing.

Peter Breiner

This is definitely music that you can listen to for hours on end in the background. If you are not worried about historical authenticity and love the sound of the classical guitar, and if you are prepared to accept the rather lame continuo accompaniment, you will find this disc most enjoyable. Vivaldi’s and Bach’s music is so optimistic and so harmonically rich that it can bear any number of such arrangements. (by Leslie Richford)

BackCover1
Personnel:
Gerald Garcia (guitar)
Pavol Gimcik (cello)
Maria Licková (harpsichord)
Karol Petroczi (viola d’amore)
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Camerata Cassovia conducted by Peter Breiner

Booklet03A

Tracklist:

Antonio Vivaldi: Violin Concerto in E Minor, RV 277, “Il Favorito”:
01. I. Allegro 5.22
02. II. Andante 5.56
03. III. Allegro 5.22

Antonio Vivaldi: Trio Sonata in C Major, RV 82:
04. I. Allegro non molto 4.05
05. II. Larghetto – Lento 4.13
06. III. Allegro 2.33

Antonio Vivaldi: Trio Sonata in G Minor, RV 85:
07. I. Andante molto 4.14
08. II. Larghetto 2.40
09. III. Allegro 2.19

Antonio Vivaldi: Lute Concerto in D Major, RV 93:
10. I. Allegro giusto 3.45
11. II. Largo 4.38
12. III. Allegro 2.31

Johann Sebastian Bach: Harpsichord Concerto in D Minor, BWV 1052:
13. I. Allegro 9.14
14. II. Adagio 8.21
15. III. Allegro 10.10

CD1

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Maurice André – Concertos pour trompette (1987)

FrontCover1At the height of his career, the name of Maurice André, who has died at the age of 78, was synonymous with the trumpet. Not only was he largely responsible for establishing the trumpet as a popular solo instrument, but he also dominated the scene in the 1960s and 70s with a punishing schedule of concerts (an average of 180 a year) and more than 300 recordings, many made on his trademark piccolo trumpet.

As the winner of a prestigious international competition in Munich in 1963, he was sought out by the conductor Karl Richter, who needed a player with star quality for the taxing trumpet parts of such works as Bach’s B Minor Mass. Other notable conductors with whom André worked at this time included Karl Böhm, Karl Münchinger and Herbert von Karajan. He made an immensely successful recording with Karajan of a transcribed concerto by Vivaldi.

MauriceAndré01It was the lack of repertoire for the trumpet that persuaded André to make arrangements of works for violin, oboe and other instruments. He played them on the piccolo trumpet, an instrument designed to deliver the higher range with facility, and proceeded to stun audiences with a winning combination of technical brilliance and sweetness of tone.

André was a big man, with bushy eyebrows and fleshy fingers. Often the tiny instrument seemed to disappear from view beneath his hands. But he was a huge inspiration to generations of trumpeters, not least his pupils at the Paris Conservatoire, where he taught from 1967 to 1978. He continued to tour after that, first with his brother Raymond, also a trumpeter, and later with his children Nicolas and Béatrice (trumpeter and oboist respectively).

MauriceAndré02His farewell concert took place in 2008 in St Nazaire Cathedral, Béziers, in southern France, by which time André was officially in retirement. He had moved to a hilltop villa in the Basque country, where he developed his talents as a woodcarver and painter, but continued to practise the trumpet for four or five hours a day.
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Born in Alès, France, at the foot of the Cévennes mountains, André was the son of a coalminer who was also an amateur trumpet player. His father presented the 12-year-old André with a cornet and was so impressed by the boy’s potential that he sent him to study with a friend of his, Léon Barthélémy, a former student at the Paris Conservatoire.

Having taught André for four years, Barthélémy urged his father to send the boy, who had in the meantime followed his father down the mine, to study at the Conservatoire. Since the family could not afford the fees, André joined a military band, enabling him to secure a free place there. He studied with Raymond Sabarich, receiving first prize for both cornet and trumpet after his first and second years of study.

MauriceAndré03His early orchestral posts were with the Lamoureux Orchestra (1953-60), the Radio France Philharmonic Orchestra (1953-62) and the Opéra-Comique (1962-67), but his success in the Munich competition effectively launched his career as a soloist. He had in fact been invited to sit on the jury of the competition, but decided to participate himself. It was at this time that he met and married his wife, Liliane, who supported him loyally as manager and companion on his tours, not least in the early years when his career was slow to take off.

André’s eventual success was founded on a solid technique, superb breath control and seemingly inexhaustible stamina, attributed by him to his years in the coalmine: “I built myself up when working in the mine at 14 years old, when I was moving 17 tons of coal a day,” he once said.

Certainly the technique was formidable. Playing a three-valve Selmer instrument (a fourth valve was added by the manufacturer in 1967 in collaboration with André to extend the register downwards), he effortlessly negotiated the stratospheric pitch range for which the Baroque repertoire was notorious. In the virtuoso faster movements, his tone sparkled brilliantly; in the slow movements it was creamy and seductive. As Karajan once opined: “He’s undoubtedly the best trumpet player, but he’s not from our world.”
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MauriceAndré05Since the 1970s, Baroque performance practice has developed considerably, with more variety of phrasing and articulation. Both soloist and orchestral accompaniments on many of André’s recordings now sound inflexible, with dirge-like tempi for slow movements. But at the time, this style of playing was thrillingly new and original. It was his lesser-known predecessor Adolf Scherbaum who introduced the piccolo trumpet and its repertoire, but André who brought it global popularity.

Though André was far from a devotee of contemporary music, the sound of which, he said, reminded him of the coalmine, he did have music written for him by several composers including André Jolivet, Henri Tomasi, Boris Blacher, Antoine Tisné and Jean Langlais. A biography, Maurice André: Une Trompette pour la Renommée (A Trumpet for Fame, 2003), was written by his student Guy Touvron, and his memoirs were published under the title Le Soleil Doit Pouvoir Briller pour Tout le Monde (The Sun Has to Shine for Everybody, 2007).

This is a sampler with some of his finest recordings … he was a master of the trumpet !

MauriceAndré06Personnel:
Maurice André (trumpet)
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Orchestre de Chambre Franz Liszt (CD 1: 01 . 03., 17. + 18.)
Maxence Larrieu (flute)
Janos Rolla (violin)
Bernhard Schenkel (oboe)

Orchestre de Chambre de Wurtemberg conducted by Jörg Faerber (CD 1: 04. – 08.; CD 2: 04. – 09., 16. + 19.)

Academy of St.Martin-in-the-fields conducted by Neville Marriner (CD 1: 09. – 16.; CD 2: 10. – 12.)
Bernard Soustrot (trumpet)

London Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Jesus Lopez-Cobos (CD 1: 19. – 21.; CD: 2: 13. – 15.)

Philharmonia Orchestra conducted by Riccardo Muti (CD 2: 01. – 03.)

BackCover1Tracklist:

CD 1:

Johann Sebastian Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 in F major, BWV 1047:    
01. Allegro 5.21
02. Andante 3.53
03. Allegro assai 3.00

George Frederick Händel: Water Piece, suite for trumpet, strings & continuo in D major, HWV 341:
04. Overture 1.50
05. Gigue. Allegro 1.45
06. Air 2.01
07. Bourrée 1.06
08. Marche 1.31

Georg Philipp Telemann: Concerto for trumpet, 2 oboes, strings & continuo in D major, TWV 53:D2
09. Allegro
10. Grave 0.47
11. Arie 3.52
12. Grave 0.32
13. Vivace 2.23

Gottfried Heinrich Stölzel: Concerto for trumpet in D major:
14. Allegro 3.01
15. Andante 2.52
16. Allegro 2.42

Michael Haydn: Trumpet Concerto in D major, MH 104:
17. Adagio
18. Allegro 3.12

Franz Joseph Hadyn: Trumpet Concerto in E flat major, H. 7e/1:
19. Allegro 6.53
20. Andante 4.09
21. Allegro 4.57

CD 2:

Giuseppe Torelli; Sinfonia for trumpet, strings & continuo in D major (“Trumpet Concerto”)
01. Allegro 2.30
02. Adagio – Presto – Adagio 3.01
03. Allegro 1.48

Tomaso Albinoni: Concerto à cinque, for oboe, 2 violins, viola, cello & continuo No. 2 in D
04. minor, Op. 9/2:
04.. Allegro e non presto
05. Adagio 5.30
06. Allegro

Giuseppe Tartini: Trumpet Concerto in D major, D. 53 (arrangement of Violin Concerto in E major):
07. Allegro
08. Andante 2.49
09. Allegro grazioso 3.15

Antonio Vivaldi: Double Trumpet Concerto for 2 trumpets, strings & continuo in C major, RV 537:
10. Allegro
11. Largo 1.03
12. Allegro 3.21

Benedetto Marcello: Oboe Concerto in C minor, SF. 799 (attributed to A. Marcello)
13. Allegro moderato 4.05
14. Adagio 5.00
15. Allegro 3.26

Domenico Cimarosa: Trumpet Concerto in C major:
16. Introduction. Larghetto 3.20
17. Allegro 2.56
18. Siciliana 2.44
19. Allegro giusto 2.30

CD1A* (CD 1)
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MauriceAndré04Maurice André,  born 21 May 1933; died 25 February 2012

Jeremy Denk – J.S.Bach – Goldberg Variations (2013)

FrontCover1Seventy-five years ago, we didn’t need to ask ourselves why we might need to pay attention to the umpteenth recording of a Great Work. Now we do — and so we also need to bow deeply to musicians like Jeremy Denk, who provide us with clear reasons to rush to the store.

J.S. Bach’s Goldberg Variations, written for a two-manual harpsichord nearly three centuries ago, are musical and artistic ballbreakers on many levels that include Glenn Gould’s two iconic recordings which no one on earth has been able to ignore. The Goldbergs are incredibly addictive for the listener as much as the interpreter, which has prompted so many others to try recording them — each with utterly different results.

The 30 Variations sandwiched between the bewitchingly simple Aria are elaborate mathematical plays on the pedal point — not the melody — in the Aria. The music is filled with inner dialogue (called counterpoint) as well as all sorts of rhythmic invention related to baroque dance forms.

JeremyDenk01The interpreter has the option of playing it totally straight, giving each voice equal weight, placing the focus on the larger texture of each Variation. That comes naturally on a harpsichord, which doesn’t allow for subtle dynamic differentiation from one note to the next.

This is what Glenn Gould tried to replicate in his original recording.

Hand most other musicians a modern piano, with its seemingly infinite possibilities in dynamic modulation, and Bach’s Goldberg puzzle can literally become what the French appropriately call a casse-tête, a head-smasher.

A pianist can make each individual Variation sound interesting musically while respecting Bach’s notes (we also have to remember that Bach provided no indications for dynamics or tempo). But then he or she has to start relating one Variation to the next so that they make sense musically as well as aesthetically.

LavierUbungMost musicians spend many years learning then playing the Goldbergs in live concert before committing them to posterity on a recording. Denk is no exception. His results are remarkable in how they take full advantage of the dynamics and colours possible with a modern concert grand piano while also honouring Bach’s musical puzzle.

Denk consistently finds interesting voices to highlight and then throw into dialogue while also allowing each Variation to find its inner life force either through rhythm or melody — or both. As I mentioned earlier, it is colourful, bright, so very much alive. These Goldbergs dance from beginning to end without ever becoming too boisterous or overbearing.

I’ve had a lifelong love-hate relationship with how people approach the music of J.S. Bach. His cantatas and Passions are so deeply, intensely personal. His orchestral music is filled with life force, yet keyboard players spent the bulk of the 20th century thinking that the music must be played with robotic precision. How exactly does this fit the picture of a man who had superhuman characteristics but was still a real human being engaged in the business of bringing the eternal and the temporal together through harmony and counterpoint?

Denk is among the 21st century keyboard elect who have seen the light and made this music come alive with a human heart beating at its centre. (by John Terauds)

JeremyDenk02Personnel:
Jeremy Denk (piano)

JeremyDenkLive2015Tracklist:
01. Aria 3.46
02. Variation 1 1.49
03. Variation 2 1.24
04. Variation 3: Canon on the unison 2.11
05. Variation 4 1.07
06. Variation 5 1.19
07. Variation 6: Canon on the second 1.13
08. Variation 7 1.42
09. Variation 8 1.40
10. Variation 9: Canon on the third 1.48
11. Variation 10: Fughetta 1.29
12. Variation 11 1.46
13. Variation 12: Canon on the fourth 2.22
14. Variation 13 5.05
15. Variation 14 1.58
16. Variation 15: Canon on the fifth 4.07
17. Variation 16: Overture 2.51
18. Variation 17 1.52
19. Variation 18: Canon on the sixth 1.25
20. Variation 19 0.55
21. Variation 20 1.58
22. Variation 21: Canon on the seventh 2.54
23. Variation 22: Alla breve 1.49
24. Variation 23 2.05
25. Variation 24: Canon on the octave 2.16
26. Variation 25 6.52
27. Variation 26 1.52
28. Variation 27: Canon on the ninth 1.49
29. Variation 28 2.08
30. Variation 29 1.45
31. Variation 30: Quodlibet 1.48
32. Aria da capo 3.58

Music composed by Johann Sebastian Bach

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Various Artists – Royal Clown Classic – The Sampler (1989)

FrontCover1The Pilz Media Group (founded by Reiner E. Pilz) was a small German record label for classic music (not to be confused with Pilz Records, the legendary label for German Krautrock music.

They were first marketed in the USA in a gigantic mail order package of 100 CDs at a cost of about $5 per disk, offering the “Vienna Master Series” of major symphonic, chamber, and piano repertoire. Lately they have been turning up on single disks and even in double disk sets at the cost of only $3.99 or even less for 2 CDs, or $1 to $2 per single disk, at dealers like Blockbuster Music.

They released at the end of the Eighties this sampler with music from their Catalog.

Booklet01AAnd so you can hear some of the finest pieces of classical musc. The booklet is their catalog for the years 1989/90 … (black + white pictures only !)

Unfortunately they didn´t give us any informations about the musicians and orchestras we can hear on this beautiful record.

But … even this mistake … it´s a sampler with very fine examples of classic music, including “Vltava (The Moldau) ” (one of my favorite classic composition)

Booklet03ATracklist:

Franz von Suppé:
01. Ouvertüre “Dichter Und Bauer” 9.34

Johann Strauss:
02. Wiener Blut Op. 354 9.26

Frederic Chopin:
03. Walzer Cis-moll Op. 64/2 3.31

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart:
04. Symphonie Nr. 40 G-moll Kv 550, Molto Allegro 6.35

Antonio Vivaldi:
05. Concerto Grosso A-moll Allegro 3.57

Johann Sebastian Bach:
06. Toccata und Fuge D-moll  8.28

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky:
07. Swan-Lake Suite 3.10

Bedřich Smetana:
08. Vltava (The Moldau)  12.52

Richard Wagner:
09. Ouvertüre zu Tannhäuser 14.39

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Jiřina Pokorná – JS Bach (1993)

FrontCover1Jiřina Pokorná ranks alongside leading contemporary Czech organist. A native of Prague, she devolped her musical talent from early childhood. She obtained formal education in the class of the Prague Conservatory, under professor Kampelsheimer, and subsequently, under professor Milan Slechta at Praqgue´s Academy Of Music. She attracted of the musical public while still a student, and embarked on a full-time career as a concert artist in the 1960s.

Since then she has sucessfully represented the Czech organ school on concert tours, covering Germany, Austria, Belgium and Italy. Apart from that, she appeared in the former Soviet Union and Yugoslavia, and made a highly suscessful tour of Japan in 1991.

Miss Pokorná has combined her solo career with joints projects involving other prominent instrumentalists, including noteable trumpet player of the Czech Philharmonic Miroslav Kejmar and violinist Pavel Hula, as well as working with serveral leader chamber ensembles. Her art has been made available to record collectors on a number of titles released by various record labels. (taken from the original liner-notes)

Enjoy the beautiful organ music composed by one of the greatest compers in music history, Johann Sebastian Bach.

BookletBackCover1Personnel:
Jiřina Pokorná (organ)

Booklet02ATracklist:

Fantasia and Fugue in g minor, BWV 542:
01. Fantasia 7.27
02. Fugue 7.32

03. Partita “Sei Gegrüsset, Jeus gütig“ BWV 768 21.50

Fantasia and Fugue in c minor, BWV 537:
04. Fantasia 5.32
05. Fugue 4.49

06. Passacaglia in c minor, BWV 582 15.22

Composed by Johann Sebastian Bach

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Mischa Maisky – Cellissimo (2012)

FrontCover1Mischa Maisky (Latvian: Miša Maiskis; born January 10, 1948 in Riga) is a Latvian-born Jewish cellist.

Maisky is the younger brother of organist and harpsichordist Valery Maisky (1942-1981).

He began studies at the Leningrad Conservatory and later with Mstislav Rostropovich at the Moscow Conservatory whilst pursuing a concert career throughout the Soviet Union. In 1966 he won 6th Prize at the Moscow International Tchaikovsky Competition. While his debut, at 17, with the Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra earned him the nickname “Rostropovich [the late, great Russian cellist] of the future”, it was in 1966, as prize-winner of the prestigious International Tchaikovsky Competition, that he really started getting noticed. He entered the famous Moscow Conservatory to study with Rostropovich and was quickly taken under the great musician’s wing. He emigrated to Israel in 1971, where he holds citizenship. He also studied for a time with Gregor Piatigorsky in Los Angeles. He currently lives in Belgium.

Maisky01In his performing and recording career, Maisky has worked in long-standing partnerships with artists such as the pianists Martha Argerich, Radu Lupu, and Sergio Tiempo, the violinists Gidon Kremer and Janine Jansen, and the conductors Leonard Bernstein, Zubin Mehta, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Daniel Barenboim, and Giuseppe Sinopoli. Maisky’s friendship with Argerich has led to many performances together, such as the world premiere of Shchedrin’s double concerto Romantic Offering in 2011 in Lucerne, Switzerland.

As a Deutsche Grammophon artist during the last 25 years, he has made over 50 recordings, including many with such orchestras as the Vienna Philharmonic, Berlin Philharmonic, London Symphony Orchestra, Israel Philharmonic, Orchestre de Paris, Orpheus Chamber Orchestra and Chamber Orchestra of Europe. Mischa Maisky has the distinction of being the only cellist in the world to have studied with both Mstislav Rostropovich and Gregor Piatigorsky. Rostropovich has lauded Mischa Maisky as”… one of the most outstanding talents of the younger generation of cellists. His playing combines poetry and exquisite delicacy with great temperament and brilliant technique.”

In 2003, he performed at the St. Petersburg Symphony Hall with that orchestra during the celebration of 300 years of music at St. Petersburg, was warmly received to much applause, and repeatedly called back for bows with the orchestra.

Maisky’s daughter, Lily Maisky, born in Paris in 1987 and raised in Brussels, is embarking on a career as a concert pianist. Maisky’s son, Sascha Maisky, born in Brussels in 1989, is starting on a career as a concert violinist. Lily and Sascha have performed piano trios in public with their father. Maisky also has three other sons Maxim, Manuel and Mateo. (by wikipedia)

This is a sampler with some of his finest works (recorded between 1990 – 2003) … you should discover the magic of Mischa Maisky !

Maisky02Personnel:
Mischa Maisky (cello)
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Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Zubin Mehta (on 01.
Orpheus Chamber Orchestra (on 02., 04. – 10.)
Orchestre de Paris conducted by Semyon Bychkov (on 03.)
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Pavel Gililov (piano on 12. + 14.)
Daria Horova (piano on 13.)

Booklet1Tracklist:

Antonin Dvorak: Concerto for violoncello and orchestra, op 104
01. Allegro 14.29

Camille Saint-Saens:
Concert for violoncello and orchestra, op. 33:

02. Allegro non troppo 5.09

Le Carnaval des Animaux:
03 Le cygne 3.57

Robert Schumann: Concert for violoncello and orchestra, op 129
04. Langsam 3.55
05. Etwas lebhafter 8.41

Peter Tschaikowsky: Variations on a Rococo Theme,  op 33:
06 Variazione VI: Andante 3.07
07. Variazione Vii E Coda: Allegro Vivo 1.57

Luigi Boccherini:
String Quintet in E, Op.13, No.5:
08. Minuet 4.05

Cello Concerto No.7 in G major, G 480:
09. Adagio 4.58

Joseph Haydn: Concert for violoncello and orchestra No 2:
10. Rondo Allegro 4.32

Johann Sebastian Bach:
Suite For Cello Solo No.3 In C, Bwv 1009:
11. Bourrée I-II 4.03

Prelude No.1 Bwv 846:
12. Ave Maria 5.28

Franz Schubert: Schwanengesang D 957:
13. Ständchen “Leise flehen meine Lieder” 4.20

Fritz Kreisler:
14. Liebesleid 3.50

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