Los Shakers – Same (1965)

LPFrontCover1Los Shakers were a popular rock band in 1960s and was a part of the Uruguayan Invasion in Latin America. They were heavily influenced by the look and sound of the Beatles.[1][2] In the late 1960s they would broaden and expand their musical direction before breaking up at the end of the decade.

The band was formed in 1964 in Montevideo, Uruguay by brothers, Hugo Fattoruso (lead guitar and keyboards) and Osvaldo Fattoruso (rhythm guitar), after watching the movie, A Hard Days Night, by the Beatles. They were modeled after The Beatles and even adopted similar haircuts and clothing, as can be seen in their record cover. The band sang many songs in English, despite their location, and gained their greatest popularity in Argentina.

They signed with the Odeon label of EMI in Argentina. The first single recorded as The Shakers was “Break it All”, in 1965, followed by self-titled album later that year. For obvious reasons, the band focused their attentions almost exclusively on Latin America, but did they did take one crack at the English-speaking market when they released the album Break it All, on the US-based Audio Fidelity label in 1966.

Los Shakers03

The record (which featured re-recorded versions of many of the songs on their original LP and even a Spanish-language version of Beatles’ “Ticket to Ride”) was little more than a curiosity in America and was not a hit, but became a collector’s item decades later, as would their second album, Shakers For You (released in 1968).

Reflecting the move towards psychedelia, their music went in a new direction. Their last studio album with the original line up, La Conferencia Secreta del Toto’s Bar, released in 1968,[12] mixed psychedelic influences with candombe and some tango sounds; the album has been described as a Latin American Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. However, their recording label (EMI) did not approve of this new sound, and left them without any promotion or support; it led to the band’s split up. In 2005, the original lineup re-united, and recorded a CD Bonus Tracks and played in Argentina and Uruguay. Los Shakers would break up shortly thereafter.

Los Shakers04

Osvaldo Fattoruso, guitarist and drummer, died on July 29, 2012 due to cancer at the age of 64.

And this is the first studio album by this Uruguayan beat band. It was released in July 1965 on the Odeon Pops label. (by wikipedia)

And we hear pretty good beat music … this time not from the Merseyside in UK, but from Uruguay … and the guys knows how to play this exciting music !

Los Shakers01.jpg

Personnel:
Roberto “Pelín” Capobianco (bass, bandoneon, background vocals)
Hugo Fattoruso (vocals, guitar, piano, harmonica)
Osvaldo Fattoruso (guitar, vocals)
Carlos “Caio” Vila (drums, backing vocals

LPBackCover

Tracklist:
01. Rompan Todo (Break It All) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.30
02. Que Amor (What A Love) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 3.05
03. Nena Si, Si (Baby Yeah, Yeah) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.21
04. No Fuimos (Forgive Me) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.29
05. Corran Todos (Everybody Shake) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.14
06. Estoy Pensando (I’m Thinking) (Vila) 2.20
07. Esta Es Mi Fiesta (It’s My Party) (Gold/Gluck Jr./Weiner/Gottlieb) 2.14
08. Sigue Buscando (Keep Searching) (Shannon) 2.00
09. Para Ti Y Para Mi (For You And Me) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.15
10. Corro Por Las Calles (Shake In The Streets) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.31
11. La Larga Noche (The Longest Night) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.12
12. Nena Baila Shake (Baby Do The Shake) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.13
13. No Me Pidas Amor (Don’t Ask Me Love) (O.Fattoruso/Capobianco) 2.03
14. Dame (Give Me) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.27
+
15. My Bonnie (Traditional/Sheridan) 2.00
16. Solo En Tus Ojos (Only In Your Eyes) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.15
17. Mas (More) (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.07
18. Boleto Para Pasear (Ticket To Ride) [sung in Spanish] (Lennon/McCartney) 2.13
19. Hasta Luego Cocodrilo (See You Later Alligator) (Guidry) 1.57
20. Solo Quiero Estar Contigo (I Only Want To Be With You) [sung in Spanish] (Hawker/Raymonde) 2.34
21. No Fuimos (Forgive Me) [Spanish version] (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.32
22. Nena Baila Shake (Baby Do The Shake) [Spanish version] (H.Fattoruso/O.Fattoruso) 2.18

LabelB1

*
**

Advertisements

Various Artists – Beat, Beat, Beat! Volume One – The Mersey Sound & Other Mop Top Rarities 1962 – 1963 (2001)

FrontCover1Castle Music deserves some kind of an award for their Beat, Beat, Beat series — and even more honor because it’s unique; no other label, including EMI and English Decca, would have the courage or ambition to go up through three years of the British beat and British Invasion booms, single by single, and B-sides, focused on a single label. There are about 150 minutes of eminently enjoyable, delightfully danceable British Invasion-style music on this two-CD set, filling it to overflowing, and don’t let the fact that most listeners have only heard of maybe three of the three dozen acts featured put you off. Usually, with a compilation like this, covering the complete generic output of a particular label — in this case, England’s Pye Records — for a specific period, there are lots of apologies to be made and explanations to be given about why various tracks should be tolerated. Not so here — every track on this set has value precisely as what it was in 1962-1963: eminently listenable, usually exciting and diverting rock & roll. For starters, any Dave Clark Five fans worthy of the name are probably going to have to own this set because of the two early tracks by the group, “That’s What I Said” and “I Knew It All the Time,” which open these two CDs — they’re about as good as anything else the band ever recorded, and very catchy.

RoulettesLabels

A pair of early dance cuts by the Roulettes at the outset of their career are no less compelling. Erky Grant & the Earwigs may have been a less-compelling talent, but even they had a rhythm section that could pound out a solid dance beat, and generated one solidly memorable song in “I’m a Hog for You Baby.” Nelson Keene, Bobby Shafto, and Dickie Pride, all late-’50s popsters, didn’t do a bad beat-style single in “The Kissing Had to Stop,” masquerading as the Guv’ners. Much more interesting is the harmony-based trio the Kestrels and their cover of “There’s a Place,” which attempts (successfully) to lay a more ornate and soulful vocal take on the early Lennon/McCartney original. In this company, the Searchers sound like world-class talents, but they’re not that far above, say, Danny Stormthe Viscounts (featuring future songwriter/manager Gordon Mills), who tried for a Merseybeat/harmony approach on “It’s You” and “I’ll Never Get Over You.” Johnny Sandon & the Remo Four show why both singer and band were able to endure as potential breakout talents for years on the enjoyably frantic “Lies” and the ballad “On the Horizon.” Those who are curious about the Undertakers, a top soul outfit from Liverpool who somehow never made it despite enjoying the publicly stated fandom of the Beatles, can start here, and folkish, harmony-based the Overlanders are similarly well represented. Future Graham Nash collaborator and Threshold Records artist Gregory Phillips is also here, doing the Billy J. Kramer-style “Angie,” and the disc ends with the Brian Epstein client Tommy Quickly and reliable Pye mainstays Joe Brown & the Bruvvers. Enjoyable as the first disc is, disc two is even better, showing off the label’s slightly more sophisticated later-1963 vintage efforts at emulating the Mersey sound as it became established, with serious and more compelling talents, including the Puppets (produced by Joe Meek), the Chants (superb singers who not only were based in Liverpool, but were black as well), and the Migil 4 (soon to become the Migil 5, a top bluebeat outfit).

Booklet01A

There are several examples of good early versions of songs that would later manifest themselves as hits in the hands of other bands, including Johnny Sandon & the Remo Four’s recording of “Magic Potion,” the Sundowners’ interpretation (complete with electric guitar) of “House of the Rising Sun,” and Pat Harris & the Blackjacks’ “Hippy Hippy Shake,” done in a high-energy Brenda Lee style. The sound is excellent throughout, giving good, solid, even pumped-up play to the bass and rhythm sections that will tell you why many of these groups came off so well when they played live. (by Bruce Eder)

Booklet03A.jpg

Oh boys and girls … what a great, sentimental trip in the very earlydays of British Beat …

And I will dedicate this entry to all these unknown heroes of teh times of Merseybeat:

The Roulettes – Buddy Britten & The Regents – Carter-Lewis – Joe Brown – Erkey Grant & The Eerwigs – The Guv’ners – The Kestrels – The Viscounts – Johnny Sandon & The Remo Four – The Hi-Fi’s – The Undertakers – The Overlanders – Gregory Phillips – The Bruvvers – The Puppets – The Chants – Nicky James – The Sundowners – Danny Storm & The Strollers – Pat Harris & The Blackjacks – The Migil 4 – Jeannie & The Big Guys – Dickie Rock & Miami Showband

BackCover1

Tracklist:

CD 1:

Dave Clark Five feat. Mike Smith:
01. That’s What I Said (Clark/Ryan) 2.19
02. I Knew It All The Time (Murray) 2.25

The Roulettes:
03. Hully Gully Slip ‘N’ Slide (Vandyke) 2.09
04. La Bamba (Traditional) 2.31

Buddy Britten & The Regents:
05. My Pride, My Joy (Britten) 1.54

Carter-Lewis:
06. Here’s Hopin’ (Reed/Stephens) 1.59

Joe Brown:
07. What’s The Name Of The Game (Westlake/Subotsky) 2.34

Erkey Grant & The Eerwigs:
08. I Can’t Get Enough Of You (Mills)  2:22
09. I’m A Hog For You Baby (Leiber/Stoller) 2.08

The Guv’ners:
10. Lat’s Make A Habit Of This (Reed/Murray) 2.02
11. The Kissing Had To Stop (Howard/John) 2.00

The Kestrels:
12. There’s A Place (Lennon/McCartney) 2.16

The Searchers:
13. Sweets For My Sweet (Pomus/Shuman) 2.28
14. It’s All Been A Dream (Crummy) 1.50

The Viscounts:
15. It’s You (Mills/Paul/Wells) 2.11
16. I’ll Never Get Over You (Mills) 1.55

Johnny Sandon & The Remo Four:
17. Lies (Manley) 2.08
18. On The Horizon (Leiber/Stoller) 2:23

The Hi-Fi’s:
19, Take Me Or Leave Me (Bennett/Higgins) 2.01
20. I’m Struck (Bennett/Higgins) 2:51

The Undertakers:
21. (Do The) Mashed Potatoes (Rozier) 2.14
22. Everybody Loves A Lover (AdlerAllen) 2.17

The Overlanders:
23. Summer Skies & Golden Sands (Mason/Friswell/Bartholomew) 2.32
24. Call Of The Wild (Mason/Friswell/Bartholomew) 3.07

Gregory Phillips:
25. Angie (Springfield/Slater) 2.00
26. Please Believe Me (Beveridge/Oakman) 1.52

Tommy Quickly:
27. Tip Of My Tongue (Lennon/McCartney) 2.09
28. Heaven Only Knows (Rapaport/Murray) 2.21

Joe Brown & The Bruvvers;
29. Sally Ann (Klein) 1.57
30. There’s Only One Of You (Klein/Brown) 2:35

Inlet1

CD 2:

The Puppets:
01. Everybody’s Talking (Cap) 2.01
02. Poison Ivy (Leiber/Stoller) 2.09

The Chants:
03. I Don’t Care (Amoo) 1.57
04. Come Go With Me (Quick) 2.32

Johnny Sandon & Remo Four:
05. Yes (Leiber/Stoller) 2.35
06. Magic Potion (Bacharach/David) 2.19

Nicky James:
07. My Colour Is Blue (James) 2.18

The Undertakers:
08. What About Us (Leiber/Stoller) 2.40
09. Money (That’s What I Want) (Bradfod/Gordy) 2.53

The Sundowners:
10. Baby, Baby (Takes) 2.12
11. House Of The Rising Sun (Traditional) 2:54

Danny Storm & The Strollers:
12. Say You Do (Storm/Pritchard) 2.10
13. Let The Sun Shine In (Barberis/Weinstein/Randazzo) 2.27

Pat Harris & The Blackjacks:
14. Hippy, Hippy Shake (Romero) 2.25
15. You Gotta See Your Mama Ev’ry Night (Rose/Conrad) 2.10

The Overlanders:
16. Movin’  (Mason/Friswell/Bartholomew) 2.31
17. Rainbow (Mason/Friswell/Bartholomew) 2.30

The Migil 4;
18. Maybe (Flynn/Madden) 2.24
19. Can’t I ? (Lovett) 2.29

The Searchers:
20. Sugar & Spice (Nightingale) 2.16
21. Saints & Searchers (Traditional) 3.18

Jeannie & The Big Guys:
22. Don’t Lie To Me (Dawson/Ford/Hiller) 2.19
23. Boys (Farrell) 2.06

Tommy Quickly & Remo Four:
24. Kiss Me Now (Martin) 1.55
25. No Other Love (Could Ever Be The Same) (Leonard) 2.00

The Chants:
26. I Could Write A Book (Rodgers/Hart) 2.02
27. A Thousand Stars (Pearson) 1.56

Dickie Rock & Miami Showband:
28. Boys (Farrell) 2.40

The Searchers:
29. Needles & Pins (Nitzsche/Bone) 2.14
30. Saturday Night Out (Anthony/Richards) 1.47

CD2A

*
**

Ca. 1963 excerpt from Mersey documentary on the music scene, featuring The Undertakers (Jackie Lomax, Chris Huston, Geoff Nugent, Brian Jones, Bugs Pemberton) at the Iron Door Club in Liverpool.

Manfred Mann – My Little Red Book Of Winners (1965)

LPFrontCoverA1The Mann-Hugg Blues Brothers were formed in London[3] by keyboard player Manfred Mann and drummer/vibes/piano player Mike Hugg, who formed a house band in Clacton-on-Sea that also featured Graham Bond. Bringing a shared love of jazz to the British blues boom, then sweeping London’s clubs (which also spawned Alexis Korner, the Rolling Stones and the Yardbirds), the band was completed by Mike Vickers on guitar, alto saxophone and flute, bassist Dave Richmond and Paul Jones as lead vocalist and harmonicist.[1] By this time they had changed their name to Manfred Mann & the Manfreds. Gigging throughout late 1962 and early 1963 the band soon attracted attention for their distinctive sound.

After changing their name to Manfred Mann at the behest of their label’s producer John Burgess, the group signed with His Master’s Voice in March 1963 and began their recorded output that July with the slow, bluesy instrumental single “Why Should We Not?”, which they performed on their first appearance on television on a New Year’s Eve show.[5] It failed to chart, as did its follow-up (with vocals), “Cock-a-Hoop.”[1] The overdubbed instrumental soloing on woodwinds, vibes, harmonica and second keyboard lent considerable weight to the group’s sound and demonstrated the jazz-inspired technical prowess in which they took pride.

ManfredMann01.jpg

In 1964 the group was asked to provide a new theme tune for the ITV pop music television programme Ready Steady Go!.[3] They responded with “5-4-3-2-1” which, with the help of weekly television exposure, rose to No. 5 in the UK Singles Chart.[2] Shortly after “5-4-3-2-1” was recorded, Richmond left the band,[6] though he would record with them occasionally later. He was replaced by Jones’ friend Tom McGuinness—the first of many changes. After a further self-penned hit, “Hubble Bubble (Toil And Trouble),” the band struck gold with “Do Wah Diddy Diddy”, a cover of the Exciters’ No. 78 Hot 100 hit earlier that year.[3] The track reached the top of each of the UK, Canadian, and US charts.

With the success of “Do Wah Diddy Diddy” the sound of the group’s singles moved away from the jazzy, blues-based music of their early years to a pop hybrid that continued to make hit singles from cover material. They hit No. 3 in the UK with another girl-group cover “Sha La La”, (originally by the Shirelles) which also reached No. 12 in the US and Canada and followed with the sentimental “Come Tomorrow” (originally by Marie Knight) but both were of a noticeably lighter texture than their earliest output.

ManfredMann02

Meanwhile, “B” sides and four-song EPs showcased original material and instrumental solos. The group also returned to jazz and R&B themes on their albums: their first, 1964’s The Five Faces of Manfred Mann, included standards such as “Smokestack Lightning”[3] while the second and last with this line-up, Mann Made, offered several self-composed instrumentals and a version of “Stormy Monday Blues” alongside novelties and pop ballads. With a cover of Maxine Brown’s “Oh No Not My Baby” began a phase of new depth and sophistication in the arrangements of their singles. The group began its string of successes with Bob Dylan songs with a track on the best-selling EP The One in the Middle, “With God on Our Side”, next reaching No. 2 in the UK with “If You Gotta Go, Go Now”.[2] The EP’s title track reached the British top ten singles, the last self-written song (by Jones) and the band’s last R’n’B workout to do so. The run climaxed with a second UK No. 1 single, “Pretty Flamingo” produced by John Burgess. (ny wikipedia)

ManfredMann03

And this is the third album fir the US record market:
The big song off of the 1965 album “My Little Red Book of Winners” was the title song, written by Bacharach and David, which made it into the hit film “What’s New Pussycat.” Again, Jones has a nice original song with “The One in the Middle,” and there is a solid cover with “Oh No, Not My Baby.” The Beatles were cute, the Rolling Stones were dangerous, and Manfred Mann was staking out the intellectual field of rock ‘n’ roll. Of course, the Stones were into R&B as well, but without as much sophistication as Manfred Mann, mainly because the emphasis was more on keyboards than guitars. The band managed to stay true to its roots by only touring the United States oncein 1964 and continuing to record in Britain while establishing a large and faithful following in the Eastern Bloc by touring there instead.
Manfred Mann is an all or nothing group, especially since their pop hits are atypical compared to the rest of the songs on most of their albums. A lot of people can survive with “Do Wah Diddy Diddy” on a hits collection, but if you like Manfred Mann then they are going to end up wanting to get all of their albums from their myriad instantiations in the 1960s and beyond. This would be the first CD chronologically and would be one of the very best you can find (the soundrack for “Up the Junction” would probably be the first choice). Note: the band went with the name Manfred Mann despite the wishes of the South African board keyboardist who was originally born Manfred Lubowitz. (by Lawrance Bernabo)

ManfredMann04

Personnel:
Tom McGuinness (bass)
Mike Hugg (drums, vibraphone)
Paul Jones (vocals, harmonica)
Manfred Mann (keyboards)
Mike Vickers (flute, guitar, saxophone)

LPBackCover1

Tracklist:
01. My Little Red Book (Bacharach/David) 2.27
02. Oh, No, Not My Baby (Goffin/King) 2.21
03. What Am I To Do (Spector/Pomus) 2.42
04. The One In The Middle (Jones) 2.40
05. You Gave Me Somebody To Love (Andreoli/Poncia) 3.02
06. You’re For Me (Vickers) 2.55
07. Poison Ivy (Leiber/Stoller) 2.50
08. Without You (Jones) 2.20
09. Brother Jack (Traditional) 2.28
10, A Love Like Yours (Don’t Come Knocking Every Day) (Holland/Dozier/Holland) 2.26
11, I Can’t Believe What You Say (Turner) 2.17
12. With God On Our Side (Dylan) 4.24

LabelB1.jpg*
**

Swinging Blue Jeans – Blue Jeans à Swinging (1964)

LPFrontCover1Blue Jeans a’Swinging is the first UK studio album by British Merseybeat band the Swinging Blue Jeans, released in November 1964 on HMV.

The Swinging Blue Jeans were near the top of Liverpool’s rock & roll bands, although Americans who’ve only heard their pile-driver-textured Top 30 version of “Hippy Hippy Shake” (utterly unrepresentative of their sound or range) might wonder at that statement. This album provides the evidence — ironically, with a little better choice of material, it would rate very close behind the With the Beatles LP as a fresh and brilliant piece of music-making, and even as it stands, it’s not too far behind. In order to fully appreciate Blue Jeans a’ Swinging, you have to put yourself back in 1964. Liverpool and the rest of the north are filled with acts that can thump away hard, or harmonize pleasingly, but only a handful that can do both, and even fewer that can do both well, and most of those, apart from the Beatles, can’t decide if they want to be the Everly Brothers or Chuck Berry. The Beatles knew that with a little care, they could be both — and based on the evidence on this album, the Swinging Blue Jeans were of the same mind and had the talent to pull it off.

SwingingBlueJeans01

Blue Jeans a’ Swinging features punchy, crunchy rhythm guitar, jangling lead guitar, some pretty raw singing by all four bandmembers alternating with decent harmonizing. There are also a few offbeat song choices, starting with the opening track, “Ol’ Man Mose.” Their cover of “Save the Last Dance for Me” is a credible rendition of a contemporary Drifters hit, and their versions of “Lawdy Miss Clawdy” and “Long Tall Sally” are solid pieces of rock & roll. Their Buddy Holly-like versions of the Hank Marvin-Bruce Welch songs “That’s the Way It Goes” and “Don’t It Make You Feel Good” have enough hooks that either could’ve been a single and a hit; the ballad “All I Want Is You,” dominated by the quartet’s harmony vocals, sounding even more like Holly.

SwingingBlueJeans03

The band reaches back further than the Shadows, covering, “It’s All Over Now,” an offbeat lament written by Wally Whyton of the Vipers Skiffle Group-this is their “Ringo Starr number, ” slightly goofy, with a vague country-ish tint. Even the one original here, a group composition called “It So Right,” is a good rock & roll number with acceptably clever wordplay. Only their version of the Boudleaux Bryant “Some Sweet Day” seems flaccid and second-rate. That flaw aside, this is one of the best rock & roll albums of its era to come out of Liverpool. (by Bruce Eder)

Many songs are from the innocent side of the early Beat music (like “Save The Last Dance For Me”)  … but on this album you can some real hightlights from this period of music like “TuttiFrutti”, a great version of “Around And Around” by Chuck Berry and of course “Long Tall Sally” … one of the est versions ever recorded …

Oh … let´s have some fun tonight …

SwingingBlueJeans04.jpg

Personnel:
Les Braid (bass, keyboards)
Ray Ennis (lead guitar, vocals)
Ralph Ellis (guitar)
Norman Kuhlke (drums)

LPBackCover

Tracklist:
01. Ol’Man Mose (Armstrong/Randolph) 3.07
02. Save The Last Dance For Me (Pomus/Shuman) 2.53
03. That’s The Way It Goes (Marvin/Welch) 2.38
04. Around And Around (Berry) 2.09
05. It’s All Over Now (B.Womack/S.Womack) 1.58
06. Long Tall Sally (Johnson/Blackwell/Penniman) 1.45
07. Lawdy Miss Clawdy (Price) 1.42
08. Some Sweet Day (F.Bryant/B.Bryant) 2.07
09. It’s So Right (Braid/Kuhlke/Ellis/Ennis) 1.58
10. Don’t It Make You Feel Good (Welch/Marvin) 1.42
11. All I Want Is You (Ireland/Chilton) 2.11
12. Tutti Frutti (LaBostrie/Lubin/Penniman) 1.58

LabelB1.jpg

*
**

They say the joint was rocking
Going round and round
Yeah reeling and a rocking
What a crazy sound
Well they never stop a rocking
Until the moon went down

Oh it sound so sweet
Gotta take me a chance
Rose out of my seat
Just had to dance
Started moving ma feet
Well and clapping my hands

Well the joint started rocking
Going round and round
Yeah reeling and a rocking
What a crazy sound
Well they never stoped rocking
Until the moon went down

Twelve o’clock
Well the place was packed
Front doors was locked
Well the place was packed
When the police knocked
Both doors flew back

Well they kept on rocking
Going round and round
Yeah reeling and a rocking
What a crazy sound
Well you never stop rocking
Until the moon went down

SwingingBlueJeans02(2013)
The Swinging Blue Jeans, live in 2013 !!!

The Beatles – Live In Paris 1965 (1988)

FrontCover1This bootleg features the integrity of the 2 concerts performed during their second (and last) visit in Paris (they had performed during 3 weeks at the Olympia the previous year). This day, The Beatles played two shows (afternoon & evening) with the same songs, only shifting the order of the songs. It’s quite funny to hear Paul trying to speak french in between songs.As always with “Swingin Pig”, the packaging is excellent as well as the sound quality. (by rateyourmusic.com)

Some comments on bootlegzone.com:

This is an excellent live boot. The sound quality is great, and so are the Beatles’ performances. It is interesting to compare the crowd reactions during these performances with the crowd reactions that are heard on the tapes of their January, 1964 appearances. It looks as though the French caught up to the rest of the world, in terms of screaming, by this time.

Funny to hear Paul struggle with his then awful French. Great sound.

Of all the live boots available, I like this one best. As was stated by the previous post, Paul trying to speak french is priceless (he really sucks at it).

In other words: A real funny abum from the early days of British Beat … and, of course, The Beatles … long time ago …

Recorded live at Palais Des Sports, Paris, 20 June 1965
(and not 1 Aug 1965 as stated)

And … on the 20th June 1965, I celebrate my 10th birthday !

BackCover1

Personnel:
George Harrison (guitar, vocals)
Paul McCartney (bass, vocals)
John Lennon (guitar, vocals, harmonica)
Ringo Starr (drums)

Booklet

Tracklist:

Palais Des Sports – 20th June 1965 – Afternoon Show:
01. Twist And Shout (Russell/Medley) 1.41
02. She’s A Woman (Lennon/McCartney) 2.43
03. Can’t Buy Me Love (Lennon/McCartney) 2.29
04. I’m A Loser (Lennon/McCartney) 3.25
05. I Wanna Be Your Man (Lennon/McCartney) 2.25
06. A Hard Day’s Night (Lennon/McCartney) 2.47
07. Baby’s In Black (Lennon/McCartney) 2.40
08. Rock And Roll Music (Berry) 2.15
09. Everybody’s Trying To Be My Baby (Perkins) 2.30
10. I Feel Fine (Lennon/McCartney) 2.29
11. Ticket To Ride (Lennon/McCartney) 3.56
12. Long Tall Sally (Johnson/Penniman/Blackwell) 2.38

Palais Des Sports – 20th June 1965 – Evening Show:
13. Twist And Shout (Russell/Medley) 1.29
14. She’s A Woman (Lennon/McCartney) 3.03
15. I’m A Loser (Lennon/McCartney) 3.10
16. Can’t Buy Me Love (Lennon/McCartney) 2.33
17. Baby’s In Black (Lennon/McCartney) 2.45
18. I Wanna Be Your Man (Lennon/McCartney) 2.26
19. A Hard Day’s Night (Lennon/McCartney) 2.53
20. Everybody’s Trying To Be My Baby (Perkins) 2.44
21. Rock And Roll Music (Berry) 2.17
22. I Feel Fine (Lennon/McCartney) 2.38
23. Ticket To Ride (Lennon/McCartney) 3.03
24. Long Tall Sally (Johnson/Penniman/Blackwell) 2.25

CD1

*
**

The Easybeats – Easy (1965)

FrontCover1Easy is the debut studio album by the Australian rock band the Easybeats, released on 23 September 1965.

Most of the album was recorded at EMI Studios in Sydney in two consecutive all-night sessions. It was produced by Albert Productions founder, Ted Albert. It also features their hit single “She’s So Fine”, which was recorded at Armstrong Studios in Melbourne with further overdubs in Sydney.

It was released by Albert Productions on the Parlophone label in Australia on 23 September 1965. The front cover’s artwork features a photograph by Australian photographer Ian Morgan of the group miming on the Seven Network music television series Sing, Sing, Sing. It was only released in mono; no stereo mix was made. It was reissued by Albert Productions (this time on their own label) in the 1980s on LP and compact disc. Originally released in Australia only, it would not be available internationally until the 1990s when reissue label Repertoire Records later released the album in 1992 with eight bonus tracks.

These included b-sides, their debut single “For My Woman”/”Say That You’re Mine”, outtakes, alternate mixes from the Good Friday album and a live recording of “She’s So Fine” from 1966. (by wikipedia)

Easybeats

Their first album, not available outside Australia until the 1990s. The Vanda/Young songwriting partnership had yet to dominate the band in their early days, and most of the (entirely original) material here comes from the pens of George Young and singer Stevie Wright. It’s more Merseybeatish and less oriented toward power-pop and staccato guitar attacks than their subsequent releases, which isn’t really detrimental; it doesn’t scale the peaks the band would shortly climb, but neither does it have the overdone good-time mania that made some of their efforts hard to take in more than limited doses. A fairly consistent, if not incredibly remarkable, relic from the Beat era, with some very Beatlesque tracks, including “It’s So Easy,” “I Wonder” (on which Harry Vanda sounds a lot like a young George Harrison circa “Do You Want to Know a Secret”), and cuts that could pass for the Searchers (“I’m Gonna Tell Everybody”), Gerry & the Pacemakers (“Hey Girl,” “A Letter”), the Merseybeats (“Cry Cry Cry”), the Kinks (“You’ll Come Back Again”), and Peter & Gordon (“Girl on My Mind”). Stuck in the middle of all of those delightfully derivative treasures is the most defiantly original track off the album, and (not coincidentally) their first big Australian hit, “She’s So Fine,” which doesn’t sound like anything else here, pulsing with energy, a hot pumping bass part, and a ferocious guitar break. The Repertoire Records CD reissue enhances the original album significantly with the addition of eight bonus tracks, including five jewels from the Vanda/Young songwriting team.  (by Richie Unterberger)

Single1

Personnel:
Dick Diamonde (bass, vocals)
Snowy Fleet (drums, vocals)
Stevie Wright (percussion, vocals)
Harry Vanda (lead guitar, vocals)
George Young (guitar, vocals)

BackCover

Tracklist:
01. It’s So Easy (Wright/Young) 2:11
02. I’m A Madman  (Wright/Young) 2.52
03. I Wonder (Vanda) 1.50
04. “She Said Alright” Young 2:15
05. I’m Gonna Tell Everybody (Vanda/Fleet) 2.04
06. Hey Girl  (Wright/Young) 2.10
07. She’s So Fine  (Wright/Young) 2.08
08. You Got It Off Me  (Wright/Young) 2.28
09. Cry Cry Cry (Young) 2.02
10. A Letter (Vanda) 1.39
11. Easy Beat (Vanda) 2.39
12. You’ll Come Back Again (Young) 2.39
13. Girl On My Mind  (Wright/Young) 3.04
14. Ya Can’t Do That  (Wright/Young) 2.28
+
15. For My Woman  (Wright/Young) 3.08
16. Say That You’re Mine (Vanda/Young) 2.45
17. The Old Oak Tree (Wright/Young/Vanda/Fleet&Diamonde) 3.08
18. Friday On My Mind (alternate remix) (Vanda/Young) 2.56
19. Lisa (alternate remix) (Vanda/Young) 3.17
20. Find My Way Back Home (unused recording for Sing Sing Sing) (Lambert/Pegues) 2.46
21. No One Knows (outtake) (Wright/Young) 2.58
22. She’s So Fine (live from the First Australian National Record Awards, Melbourne. 14 March 1966)  (Wright/Young) 2.22

LabelB1.jpg
*
**

AC/DC producer and The Easybeats’ star George Young has died at the age of 70.

AC/DC said in a statement the band would not exist without Young’s “help and guidance”.
George Young passes away

A pioneering musician, producer and AC/DC mentor, George Young has died aged 70.

“As a musician, songwriter, producer, advisor and much, much more, you could not ask for a more dedicated and professional man,” the statement read.

“You could not ask for a finer brother. We will always remember him with gratitude and hold him close to our hearts.”

George Young.jpg

George was the eldest brother of Australian rock legends Malcolm and Angus Young. He was born in Scotland in 1946 but emigrated to Australia with his family when he was still a child.

He shot to fame in the ’60s as a guitarist for the Sydney-based rock band The Easybeats. While the band broke up in 1970, he and lead guitarist Harry Vanda were later inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame. (by smh.com.au)

TheYoungBrothers

Malcolm, George and Angus Young in 2012

The Spencer Davis Group – The Second Album (1966)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Second Album is the second studio album by the British band The Spencer Davis Group, released in 1966. Many of the songs were a slightly experimental blend of beat, folk, jazz and blues, but included Jackie Edwards’ “Keep on Running”, which gave the group their first U.K. number 1 single, and the R&B standard “Georgia on My Mind”. The album spent eighteen weeks on the U.K. album chart, peaking at number 3.[1] While the album was not released in the US, the single “Keep on Running” was released in February, 1966, and spent four weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 chart peaking at number 74 on March 12. (by wikipedia)

The Spencer Davis Group – The Second Album – More Blues and soul from Britain’s highly American influenced soulful blues band of sorts. Their first really big single, “Keep On Running” appears on this disc and is a soulful rock classic and I guess I call it that because there’s a fuzz tone guitar. More blues and soul fill the air with tunes like “Georgia on My Mind” “This Hammer” Strong Love” and “Since I Met You Baby”, all classic American soul songs of that particular time period. Their is also included 8 bonus tracks of some US Versions on here as well. Great album … (by Joe Eastlackon )

SDG1
Their best one. Early British group doing jazz and blues like you want to hear. Stevie on piano is soulful in the raw. Georgia on my mind for example. Look away a classic and some more. A few pop like ones but hey something for everyone and not easy to track down finally I have and its on its way. (by bodon)

The Spencer Davis Group from Birmingham is one of my most favortite bands from the British Beat Boom …  and they was much more the only a beatgroup …

FrenchSingle

Rare French single

#Personnel:
Spencer Davis (guitar, vocals)
Muff Winwood (bass)
Steve Winwood (guitar, vocals, keyboards)
Pete York (drums, percussion)

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. Look Away (Meade/Russell) 2.46
02. Keep On Running (Edwards) 2.51
03. This Hammer (Traditional) 2.19
04. Georgia On My Mind (Carmichael/Gorrell) 4.44
05. Please Do Something (Covay) 2.28
06. Let Me Down Easy (Ford) 3.06
07. Strong Love (Malone/Silvers/Brown) 2.18
08. I Washed My Hands In Muddy Water (Babcock} 2.39
09. Since I Met You Baby (Hunter) 3.30
10. You Must Believe Me (Mayfield) 2.48
11. Hey Darling (Davis/S.Winwood) 4.50
12. Watch Your Step” (Parker) 2.57
+
13. Stevie’s Blues (Davis/M.Winwood/S.Winwwod/York) 3.49
14. Trampoline (S.Winwood 2.28
15. Back Into My Life Again (Davis/M.Winwood/S.Winwwod/York) 2.26
16. Kansas City (Leiber/Stoller) 3.52
17. Oh! Pretty Woman (Williams) 3.22
18. Det war in Schöneberg / Mädel ruck ruck ruck (Kollo/Traditional) 2.42
19. Stevie’s Groove (Davis/M.Winwood/S.Winwwod/York) 2.46
20. Stevie’s Blues (US Version) (Davis/M.Winwood/S.Winwwod/York) 3.49

LabelB1

*
**

SDG2