No To Co – So What (1970)

FrontCover1.jpgPopular Polish folk-rock band of late 60s-early 70s, No To Co was a brainchild of Piotr Janczerski (born Piotr Janik). Janczerski started musical career in 1962 as a compere for Niebiesko Czarni (->), Polish pioneering beat group. By 1964 became one of their lead singers. In 1967 founded a skiffle band with Jerzy Grunwald. Being a Niebiesko Czarni’s side project at the beginning, newly formed aggregation made it’s first own TV appearance on December 1st 1967, playing a blend of beat, skiffle and Polish folklore music. Band’s name No To Co (‘So What’) was chosen from more that 5000 ones suggested by TV viewers. Jerzy Krzeminski, Jan Stefanek, Jerzy Rybinski, Aleksander Kawecki and Bogdan Borkowski completed line-up.

Winning musical formula of Polish folklore music being arranged in beat and skiffle tradition plus suitable image made No To Co an overnight nationwide success. Within 1968 alone band played more that 200 dates, appeared in 3 movies, recorded one LP and several chart-topping singles, made 19 radio sessions! Won grand prix at national song festival in Opole. 170000 copies of their debut album were sold within 4 month of release. Enjoyed big success at festival in Montreaux, Switzerland the same year.

In 1969 toured France, Hungary, USSR, Czech Republic, Bulgaria, Romania and USA. Been pronounced ‘the most popular Polish band in the USA’ in Chicago in June same year – a rather curious fact, immortalized with the golden medal. Much more vital was the prize from Polish Ministry of Culture, July 1969.

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1970 brought more successful tours of France, Canada, USA, Britain and socialist countries. Won grand prix at the national song festival in Opole with ‘Po ten kwiat czerwony’ (‘The Red Flower’) and ‘Te opolskie dziouchy’ (‘Those Opole Girls’). However, the original line-up broke-up later that year with departure of Grunwald.

Band’s career in homeland almost folded with departure of Janczerski in 1971. Others carried on for some time with Krzeminski as the new leader. Released one album for East German ‘Amiga’ label (1972) and two LPs for ‘Melodija’ in USSR (1973) before finally calling it a day. (green-brain-krautrock.de)

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And this is their third abum, the first with english vocals (even the liner notes was in english) and it´s real crazy album … a crazy mix between tradional polish songs and some internation tunes like “See See Rider” Or “Gimme Some Lovin´” … and this old Spencer Davis Group song is a highlight of this album … we hear a real great prog-rock version including an impressive bass-solo !!!

Another prog-rock song is “Saturday To Sunday ” … sounds like a little psychedelic trip !

This is a treasure from the early days of beat and rock behind the iron curtain !

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Personnel:
Bogdan Borkowski (banjo(guitar/harmonica, vocals)
Jerzy Grunwald (guitar, vocals)
Piotr Janczerski (vocals)
Aleksander Kawecki (drums)
Jerzy Krzemiński (guitar, vocals)
Jerzy Rybiński (bass, vocals)
Jan Stefanek (saxophone, keyboards, violin)

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Tracklist:
01. Dark – Blue Water (Traditional/Wiecko) 2.46
02. Market – Place Rooster (Krzemiński/Janczerski/Zielinski) 2.30
03. So Far Away From You (Krzemiński/Kondratowicz/Bromski) 3.12
04. If You Want Me (Traditional/Wiecko) 1.31
05. See , See Rider (Traditional/Rainey) 3.58
06. Highland Melodies (Traditional/Bromski) 3.17
07. Brass Bands (Kawecki/Wiecko) 2.29
08. Farmer’s Song (Traditional/Wiecko) 1.48
09. Saturday To Sunday (Krzemiński/Kondratowicz/Zielinski) 3.16
10. Marinka (Laudan) 1.54
11. Give Me Some Of Loving (Winwood) 7.00
12. Oh, Baby Jane (Krzemiński/Wiecko) 2.25

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No To Co – still alive and well in 2018 !!!

Jokers Wild (feat. Dave Gilmour) – Same (1964)

FrontCover1.jpgJokers Wild were an English Rock band formed in Cambridge in 1964. The line-up included guitarist David Gilmour and saxophonist Dick Parry. Gilmour went on to join the band Pink Floyd and Parry went on to become a session musician, playing on three Pink Floyd studio albums and one live album. Parry also went on to join Gilmour’s 2006 solo tour.

Their only releases were a privately pressed, single-sided studio album (carrying catalogue number RSLP 007) and single (RSR 0031), of which only forty or fifty copies each were made. These were recorded at Regent Sound studio in Denmark Street, London. A tape recording of the LP is held by the British Library’s British Library Sound Archive.

Together with record producer Jonathan King, they recorded what was to have been a UK cover version of Sam & Dave’s “Hold On, I’m Comin'”, but the original was released in the UK, so Jokers Wild’s version was not released.

Wills later played with, Peter Frampton, Foreigner and Bad Company. Both he and Wilson played on David Gilmour’s eponymous first solo album; Parry played on four Pink Floyd records, Dark Side of the Moon, Wish You Were Here, Division Bell and the live double album Pulse and had a career as a session musician.

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Wilson later played drums and bass on Syd Barrett’s solo albums, The Madcap Laughs and Barrett, the later sessions of which were produced by Gilmour. He also was a surrogate drummer on the live shows and soundtrack for Is There Anybody Out There? The Wall Live 1980–81 which came out in 2000. Between 1973 and 1978 he was a member of Quiver. (by wikipedia)

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David Gilmore, before getting into Pink Floyd in 1968, began to play in the Cambridge group of Jokers Wild. The group existed from 1964 to 1966., Managed to produce only a single disc in 1965 This is 11 minutes released in the form of one-sided LP.

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“…Jokers Wild never made an official record, but are remembered as a band that included David Gilmour before the guitarist joined Pink Floyd. From the scant evidence that does survive, it seems rather incredible that Gilmour could have made the transition. Jokers Wild did not entertain lofty artistic ambitions, but played covers of pop-rock material, often emphasizing harmonies in the style of the Four Seasons and the Beach Boys…” (by musicofsixties.blogspot)

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Single 1964 (private edition)

Personnel:
David Altham (vocals)
Dave Gilmour (guitar)
John Gordon (guitar)
Tony Sainty (bass)
Clive Welham (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Why Do Fools Fall In Love (Lymon/Santiago/Merchant) 1.51
02. Walk Like A Man (Crewe/Gaudio) 2.12
03. Don’t Ask Me (What I Say) (Jones) 2.58
04. Big Girls Don’t Cry (Crewe/Gaudio) 2.15
05. Beautiful Delilah (Berry) 2.01

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50 copies were pressed of this 5-track, 1-sided LP featuring David Gilmour of Pink Floyd.
Did not come with a sleeve. B-side features silent groove and a plain label.

Tommy James & The Shondells – Hanky Panky (1966)

FrontCover1Hanky Panky is the debut album of Tommy James and the Shondells and was released in 1966. It reached #46 on the Billboard 200] The album had two singles that charted. “Hanky Panky” reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and “Say I Am (What I Am)” reached #21

Other than a brief impromptu performance together onstage in Pittsburgh several days earlier, after which James invited the band to serve as his new Shondells, the first time the entire band worked together was when they went into the studio to record this album. (by wikipedia)

The debut album by Tommy James & the Shondells features a garage rock classic, “Hanky Panky,” the suggestive Jeff Barry/Ellie Greenwich title which launched the career of the charismatic and talented lead singer. Produced by Bob Mack, the “Pittsburgh teenage nightclub operator” as the liner notes refer to him, this initial project is a vintage collection of recordings and is more effective than the follow-up, It’s Only Love. Fact is, everything about this first effort displays a more authentic approach than what producer Henry Glover took when he made the band’s sound more bubblegummy the second time around. “Don’t Throw Our Love Away” is the Shondells writing and performing a decent tune, while “Say What I Am,” the Bob Mack/Tommy James original, is right on the money and actually charted higher than Ritchie Cordell’s “It’s Only Love,” which became their third hit and title track to their follow-up LP.

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An instrumental version of “Cleo’s Mood” is unnecessary while the Shondells beat out James & Bobby Purify by covering “Shake a Tail Feather” before that duo got it to the Top 25. Many of the songs have that McCoys guitar riff tension from their hits “Hang on Sloopy” and “Fever.” It’s certainly there on “Say I Am” as well as “Cleo’s Mood” and the rave-up “Lots of Pretty Girls” written by Paul Luka, the man behind Peppermint Rainbow and “Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye.” James was immediately in the trenches of rock and the Hanky Panky album is a brilliant start to his storied career. Longtime Shondells bassist Mike Vale sings Deon Jackson’s “Love Makes the World Go Round” and Curtis Mayfield’s “I’m So Proud,” displaying a tasteful understanding of pop’s R&B foundation. They smartly covered Mayfield’s “It’s Alright” on the follow-up LP. James is great on James Brown’s “I’ll Go Crazy” but even better covering the Young Rascals’ hit from January of 1966, “Good Lovin’.” Note all the R&B this band recorded, a blending by chance, perhaps, of garage rock with blue-eyed soul. The drum sounds may leave a lot to be desired, but they somehow got the guitars and keys to tape with that precious ’60s sound that should make for attention in collectors circles. While ? & the Mysterians and the Barbarians deserved more hits, their albums came valuable because of the near obscurity.

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Hanky Panky by James was the start of 19 chart hits (including his songs for other artists), and holds its own as a classic album from that era. The early George Magura/Mike Vale composition, “The Lover,” sung by keyboardist Ron Rosman, gave James’ sidemen their own moment in the sun and is more evidence that they were heading in a Rolling Stones-style direction. The bubblegum tag may not have been appropriate because this first effort is up there with another band who hit with a suggestive song in both sound and style, that being the Kingsmen after “Louie Louie” earned its well-deserved infamy. The big difference here is that the man who gave voice to the popular song actually stayed around to notch quite a few more. (by Joe Viglione)

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Personnel:
Tommy James (vocals, guitar)
Joseph Kessler (guitar)
George Magura (bass, saxophone, vibraphone)
Vincent Pietropaoli (drums, clarinet, saxophone)
Ron Rosman (keyboards)
Mike Vale (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Hanky Panky (Barry/Greenwich) 2.59
02. I’ll Go Crazy (Brown) 2.18
03. I’m So Proud (Mayfield) 3.31
04. The Lover (Magura/Vale) 2.05
05. Love Makes The World Go Round (Jackson) 2.25
06. Good Lovin (Clark/Resnick) 2.20
07. Say I Am (What I Am) (B,Tomsco/G,Tomsco) 2-37
08. Cleo’s Mood (Walke/Woods) 2.20
09. Don’t Throw Our Love Away (James/Kessler/Magura/Pietropaoli/Rosman/Vale) 2.40
10. Shake A Tail Feather (Hayes/Rice/Williams) 2.37
11. Soul Searchin’ Baby (James/Kessler/Magura/Pietropaoli/Rosman/Vale) 2.35
12. Lots Of Pretty Girls (Leka/Rush) 2.13

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Manfred Mann- Pretty Flamingo (1966)

FrontCover1.jpgManfred Mann were an English rock band, formed in London in 1962. The group were named after their keyboardist Manfred Mann, who later led the successful 1970s group Manfred Mann’s Earth Band. The band had two different lead vocalists during their period of success, Paul Jones from 1962 to 1966, and Mike d’Abo from 1966 to 1969.

Manfred Mann were regularly in the UK charts in the 1960s. Three of the band’s most successful singles, “Do Wah Diddy Diddy”, “Pretty Flamingo” and “Mighty Quinn”, topped the UK Singles Chart. They were the first southern-England-based group to top the US Billboard Hot 100 during the British invasion.

The Mann-Hugg Blues Brothers were formed in London by keyboard player Manfred Mann and drummer/vibes/piano player Mike Hugg, who formed a house band in Clacton-on-Sea that also featured Graham Bond.[4] Bringing a shared love of jazz to the British blues boom then sweeping London’s clubs, the band was completed by Mike Vickers on guitar, alto saxophone and flute, bassist Dave Richmond and Paul Jones as lead vocalist and harmonicist. By this time they had changed their name to Manfred Mann & the Manfreds. Gigging throughout late 1962 and early 1963, they soon attracted attention for their distinctive sound.

After changing their name to Manfred Mann at the behest of their label’s producer John Burgess, the group signed with His Master’s Voice in March 1963 and began their recorded output that July with the slow, bluesy instrumental single “Why Should We Not?”, which they performed on their first appearance on television on a New Year’s Eve show.[5] It failed to chart, as did its follow-up (with vocals), “Cock-a-Hoop”. The overdubbed instrumental soloing on woodwinds, vibes, harmonica and second keyboard lent considerable weight to the group’s sound, and demonstrated the jazz-inspired technical prowess in which they took pride.

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In 1964, the group were asked to provide a new theme tune for the ITV pop music television programme Ready Steady Go!. They responded with “5-4-3-2-1” which, with the help of weekly television exposure, rose to No. 5 in the UK Singles Chart. Shortly after “5-4-3-2-1” was recorded, Richmond left the band, though he would record with them occasionally later. He was replaced by Jones’ friend Tom McGuinness—the first of many changes. After a further self-penned hit, “Hubble Bubble (Toil And Trouble)”, the band struck gold with “Do Wah Diddy Diddy”, a cover of the Exciters’ No. 78 Hot 100 hit earlier that year. The track reached the top of the UK, Canadian, and US charts.

With the success of “Do Wah Diddy Diddy” the sound of the group’s singles moved away from the jazzy, blues-based music of their early years, to a pop hybrid that continued to make hit singles from cover material. They hit No. 3 in the UK with another girl-group cover, “Sha La La”, (originally by the Shirelles) which also reached No. 12 in the US and Canada, and followed it with the sentimental “Come Tomorrow” (originally by Marie Knight) but both were of a noticeably lighter texture than their earliest output.

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Meanwhile, “B” sides and four-song EPs showcased original material and instrumental solos. The group also returned to jazz and R&B themes on their albums: their first, 1964’s The Five Faces of Manfred Mann, included standards such as “Smokestack Lightning”[3] while the second and last with this line-up, Mann Made, offered several self-composed instrumentals and a version of “Stormy Monday Blues” alongside novelties and pop ballads. With a cover of Maxine Brown’s “Oh No Not My Baby” began a phase of new depth and sophistication in the arrangements of their singles. The group began its string of successes with Bob Dylan songs with a track on the best-selling EP The One in the Middle, “With God on Our Side”, next reaching No. 2 in the UK with “If You Gotta Go, Go Now”. The EP’s title track reached the British top ten singles, the last self-written song (by Jones) and the band’s last R’n’B workout to do so. The run climaxed with a second UK No. 1 single, “Pretty Flamingo”, produced by John Burgess.

The group had managed an initial jazz/rhythm-and-blues fusion, and then had taken chart music in their stride—but could not hope to cope with Paul Jones’ projected solo career as singer and actor, and with Mike Vickers’ orchestral and instrumental ambitions. Jones intended to go solo once a replacement could be found, but stayed with the band for another year, during which Vickers left. McGuinness moved to guitar, his original instrument, contributing the distinctive National Steel Guitar to “If You Gotta Go, Go Now” and “Pretty Flamingo”, and was replaced on bass by Jack Bruce, who had been playing for the Graham Bond Organisation for some time before a recent brief stint with John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. In his brief tenure before leaving to form Cream, Bruce played on “Pretty Flamingo” and on the EP Instrumental Asylum (for which both he, and brass players Henry Lowther and Lyn Dobson, were included in the sleeve photo of the group), which began the group’s experiments with instrumental versions of chart songs. He was replaced by Klaus Voormann.

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The band changed record companies just afterward, although EMI quickly released an EP of earlier unissued 1963–66 era songs titled As Was (a pun on the title of their then new 1966 album, As Is), a hits compilation; Mann Made Hits (1966), an instrumental compilation LP that included one unissued instrumental track; Soul of Mann (1967); and most controversially used session players to complete the unfinished track “You Gave Me Somebody To Love” (c/w ‘Poison Ivy”—both sung by Paul Jones) which made No. 36 in the UK singles chart, upsetting the group—hence McGuinness’s wry comment “Manfreds disown new single” on the sleeve of their next studio album for their new record label. (by wikipedia)

And here´s their 4th album for the US record market … And it´s again a great mixture between Beat sings and hot Rhyhtm & Blues tunes …

Listen !

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Personnel:
Paul Jones (vocals, harmonica)
Mike Hugg (drums, vibes, keyboards)
Manfred Mann (keyboards)
Tom McGuinness (guitar, bass)
Mike Vickers (guitar, saxophone, flute)
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Jack Bruce (bass on 01,)

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Tracklist:
01. Pretty Flamingo (Barkan) 2.26
02. Let’s Go Get Stoned (Simpson-Ashford/Armstead) 3.49
03. Tired Of Trying, Bored With Living, Scared Of Dying (Jones) 2.39
04. I Put A Spell On You (Hawkins) 3.35
05. It’s Getting Late (Mann/Hugg/Jones/McGuinness) 2.33
06. You’re Standing By (McGuiness) 2.45
07. Machines (Shuman) 2.24
08. Stay Around (Vickers) 2.24
09. Tennessee Waltz (King/Stewart) 3.02
10. Driva Man (Roach/Brown, Jr) 2.28
11. Do You Have To Do That (Jones) 3.30

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The Montenegro Five – Same (1969)

FrontCover1.jpgPop rock group The Montenegro Five was established in the late sixties in Montenegro (ex-Yugoslavia). They were very popular in the sixties and seventies in the former Yugoslavia, and they recorded a few albums for the European market. They split up in the late seventies.

Unfortunately I have no more informations about The Montenegro Five …

But here´s their first and last original longplayer. This album was released on a Swiss label called “Star Record”.

“La Bostella” and “Soul Finger” (from the Barkays) recorded on a Revox tape recorder in the dancing club “See Restaurant”, Rorschasch, Switzerland featuring friends, family members and guests.
“Flute Soul” and “Going On The Blues” were not actually performed by Montenegro 5, but by unknown session players (I guess this group was called “The 4 Camillo”) and included on the record on the initiative of the producer.

And it´s a crazy mix between popular sounds of the Sixties (Beat, Soul, Traditionals and more) … and this means … a lot of fun, because the boys did a real good job !

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Personnel:
Milan Kovacevic (saxophone, xylophone)
Djordje Kraljevic (vocals)
Slobodan Novovic (guitar)
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2 two more unknown musicians

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Tracklist:
01. Heya (Light) 4.17
02. Oh Baby Baby (Braseur) 2.49
03. Svadamo Se (Korac) 3.43
04. Flute Soul (Cartolari/Bestgen) 2.16
05. Guantanamera (Angulo/Marti/Seeger) 2.40
06. The Last Waltz (Mason/Reed) 1.51
07. La Bostella (Traditional) 2.52
08. Na Na Hey Hey (Frashuer/De Carlo/Leka) 3.22
09. Jakobshorn (Novović) 2.37
10. Volim Te (Novović) 3.06
11. Going On The Blues (Cartolari/Bestgen) 2.02
12. Pretty Kathy (Body Now, Bestgen) 3.42
13. Lara’s Theme (Jarre/Webster) 2.48
14. Soul Finger (Barkays) 2.16

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Rob Hoeke R & B Group – Celsius 232,8 (1968)

FrontCover1.jpgPianist Rob Hoeke started his first band in 1957 with his brother Paul (d) and Ed Heck (upright bass). In 1959, they became the Rob Hoeke Boogie Woogie Quartet, adding guitarist Wim Bitter. By the time they got a recording contract with Phonogram’s Philips label, Ed Heck had been replaced by a bass guitarist, Kees Kuypers. In October 1963, they released their first record (an EP), followed in 1964 by an LP, “Boogie Hoogie”. Early 1965, the band did a stint in Sweden. Upon their return, they recorded the single, “Down South”, which would become Hoeke’s signature tune. After a second trip to Sweden and sitting in on the piano with The Rolling Stones, Hoeke switched to R&B, renaming his band Rob Hoeke R&B Group and adding cousin Frans Hoeke (v, g). Late 1965, Wim Bitter was replaced by John Schuursma (later in Brainbox). The band had their first hit with “Margio” in mid-1966, after which they were joined by Willem Schoone (b, v, ex-Marks). Schoone sang lead on the next hit, “When People Talk”. Shortly after that, Rob’s brother Paul Hoeke quit and was replaced by drummer Martin Rüdelsheim. This line-up recorded the successful album, “Save Our Souls”. The band had two more hits in 1967 and by 1968’s “Drinking On My Bed” (the last hit of the R&B Group), Schuursma had been replaced with Will de Meyer (g, ex-Alleycats). Not long afterwards, Frans Hoeke quit to pursue a solo career, which would turn out to be quite unsuccessful. For a while he was not replaced. As the single “Down South” from 1965 was still very popular, Rob was asked to do a new boogie-woogie album.

RobHoeke02.jpgSo in mid-1968, two Rob Hoeke albums hit the shops: “Celsius 232.8” by The Rob Hoeke R&B Group (Hoeke, Schoone, Rüdelsheim & de Meyer) and the instrumental “Robby’s Saloon” by the revived Rob Hoeke Boogie Woogie Quartet (Rob Hoeke, Paul Hoeke, Will de Meyer and Kees Kuypers). Then some more changes took place: shortly after the release of “Celsius” in late 1968, Jan Vennik (o, s, ex-Motions) came in as a fifth member. In the Spring of 1969, Jaap Jan Schermer became the new drummer. After the success of “Robby’s Saloon”, Hoeke recorded another boogie-woogie album, “Racing The Boogie”, in early 1970 (and Phonogram included the 1965 track “Down South” on it to boost sales). This move didn’t do Hoeke’s reputation much good as there was confusion over what to expect from him: psychedelic bluesy rock or boogie-woogie. The situation would not be helped by “Down South” being re-released as a single and hitting the charts. It effectively RobHoeke01meant the end of the Rob Hoeke R&B Group. In March 1970, Schoone left to be replaced by Guus Willlemse (ex-Truce, later in Solution), but the writing was on the wall, especially since Rob Hoeke didn’t even play on the next single, “Next World War” (Vennik played the keyboards). The following single, “Everybody Tries”, hit the lower regions of the charts, but after that the R&B Group and the Boogie Woogie Quartet would be interchangeable.

In 1971, Hoeke recorded a piano duo album with old friend Hein van der Gaag, assisted by Ben de Bruin (g), Paul Lagaay (d) and Will de Meijer (b). Pim van der Linden (ex-Het and Pocomania) then came in on bass with de Meyer reverting to guitar. The 1972 album, “Full Speed/Ten Years From Countdown”, was recorded with Ben de Bruijn, Paul Lagaay and bassist Herman Deinum (ex-Cuby + Blizzards). Hoeke then started fulfilling his contracts with the returned Martin Rüdelsheim and Martin Schoon (b). In the meantime, he started rehearsing with Eelco Gelling and Harry Muskee of the disbanded Cuby + Blizzards, but the project didn’t work out. Hoeke then decided to get back his cousin Frans and guitarist Ben de Bruijn, plus the C+B rhythm section – Herman Deinum (b) and Hans Lafaille (d). This line-up recorded the 1973 album (credited to “Rob Hoeke”), “Rockin’ The Boogie”. Early 1974, Hoeke’s band comprised de Bruijn, the returned Pim van der Linden (b, replaced by Ed Swanenberg, ex-Unit Gloria), Will Baltus (d) and Brenny van Rosmalen (v, g). Then tragedy struck: while trying to fix his car, Hoeke injured his left hand (hit by a fan), losing most of his left pinky and ring finger. The days of playing piano seemed to be over.

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Yet in 1975 he managed to record another duo album with Hein van der Gaag, called “Fingerprints”. Slowly Hoeke managed to get used to playing with “less hand” than before. Later that year, he started touring again with Ben de Bruijn (replacing Eef Albers), Ab de Jong (d, ex-Mantra Energy), Chiel Pos (ex-Beehive, g, s, v) and Fred Snel (b, ex-Solar). In early 1976, Hoeke reverted back to a trio with Pos (now on bass) and (again) Martin Rüdelsheim (d), and the next year – with John Schuursma (b) and Maarten van de Valk (d). In the Summer of 1977, Hoeke recorded an album with Alan Price. In early 1978, he chose bluesers Railway as his backing band, comprised of Rob Goedkoop (g, v), Jacques Groen (d) and Doewe Munk (b). For the next album, “Boogie Woogie Explosion”, Hoeke picked ex-Focus-drummer Pierre van der Linden, plus former members Will de Meijer (g, b), John Schuursma (g, b) and Jan Vennik (s). On the 1981 album, “Home Made”, Hoeke kept van der Linden and Vennik, adding former members Willlem Schoone (b) and Ben de Bruijn (g). In 1983, Hoeke started playing with a band again as The Rob Hoeke Group (keeping a label in the middle, whether it was R&B or Boogie Woogie). In the 1980s, Hoeke used a kind of floating line-up with interchangeable drummers (Paul Lagaay, Rini Roukema) and bass players (Fred Snel, Jan de Jong, Gerard Biersteker, Willbert de Gooijer) and alternating between trio and quartet line-ups. From mid-1984 on, old soldier Will de Meyer (g, v) was mainly there when the four-piece played, but many guests and old band members appeared in the line-up from time to time, like John Schuursma and Pierre van der Linden. And from 1987 on, he played under the band name of Rob Hoeke’s Boogie & Blues Band, while keeping his flexible line-ups. Highlights were four concerts at the North Sea Jazz festival within the space of 10 years.

In the latter days of his career, Hoeke toured with a remarkably stable line-up comprising Paul Lagaay (d), Chiel (Michiel) Pos (v, g, s) and Toon Segers (b), who’d all played with him before. From 1998 and until the very end, Hoeke (apart from his band gigs) toured Dutch theatres with fellow boogie pianists Jaap Dekker and Rob Agerbeek as The Grand Piano Boogie Train. When it was announced Rob Hoeke was terminally ill, he did a farewell concert in August 1999 with many of his former sidemen and his sons Ruben (leader of his own blues-rock band) and Eric sitting in. Rob Hoeke died in late 1999 at the age of 60 (by Alex Gitlin)

And here´s an album from the early days of Rob Hoeke, the second album with his “R & B Group”.

And it´s a pretty good mix between Beat, R&B and some psychedelic elements (“Just Make Me A Pallet”)

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Personnel:
Rob Hoeke (keyboards, harmonica, vocals)
Will de Meyer (guitar, vocals)
Martin Rüdelsheim (drums)
Willem Schoone (bass, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Lying In The Grass 3.03
02. Purple Potatoes 3.08
03. Yellow Stone 2.31
04. Six O’ Clock Blues 2.00
05. (The Only Thing That Hasn’t Changed During The Times Is) The Rain Still
Falling From Above 2.40
06. Don’t Feel Ashamed 2.43
07. How High We Used To Go 2.58
08. Out Of Town 2.33
09. Fahrenheit 451 1.57
10. Just Make Me A Pallet 4.57

All songs written by Rob Hoeke & Will de Meyer

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Rob Hoeke (09 January 1939 – 06 November 1999)

Various Artists – Surfbeat Behind The Iron Curtain (Planetary Pebbles, Vol. 3) (1999)

FrontCover1.jpgPart one of this series got a little flak because about half the tracks were recorded by bands that were not from behind the Iron Curtain. No such problem with the follow-up; all 24 cuts were done by groups from East Germany, Russia, Hungary, Romania, Czechoslovakia, and Poland between 1963-1967. Many of them are instrumental, and despite the “Surfbeat” in the album title, it’s striking how much they’re influenced not by surf music or the Ventures, but by the Shadows. Those galloping rhythms, the tremolo-laden sound with hints of country and Hawaiian music — it’s beyond a doubt that the Shadows, through radio broadcasts or clandestine means, were getting heard in Eastern Europe. Of course the recording conditions and execution were more primitive in these socialist lands, which puts on a layer of spookiness that gives it a certain charm.

Karel Duba

There are also some vocal numbers that show the more expected British Invasion influence, like the Olympics (from Czechoslovakia) singing in very clumsy English on “Story of the Girl with the Bass Guitar”; the East German Team 4, who sound like a credible American folk-rock garage band; and Romania’s Mondial, who do a song that quite resembles Paul Revere & the Raiders’ “Just Like Me.” Oddly, the T. Schumann Combo (from East Germany) do a pretty faithful and competent cover of Booker T. & the MG’s “Hip Hug-Her.” (by Richie Unterberger)

In other words: This album means fun, fun and much more fun !

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Tracklist:
01. Singing Guitars: Torpedo 1.48
02. Singing Guitars: Perfida 2.19
03. Hungarian Ensemble: Konzerta marson 2.45
04. Satelliten; Scary night 1.51
05. Karel Duba & Guitarmen: Winnetou 2.28
06. Sputniks: So much love 1.36
07. Mefistos: I Am Coming Home Baby 2.57
08. Taifuns: The West Wind 2.33
09. Olympics: Story Of The Girl With The Bass Guitar 1.56
10. Spuzniks: Spanish Gypsy Dance 1.52
11. Karel Duba & His Big Band: Steps In The Sand 2.50
12. Theo Schumann Combo: Puszta Beat 2.21
13. Cornel Fugaru & Sincron: The Jodler From Gorj 2.32
14. Studio 6: Party Time 2.44
15. Illes: Oh mondd 2.23
16. Hungarian Ensemble: Rollin Rollin 2.23
17. Team 4: Ich hab ihr ins Gesicht gesehn 3.40
18. Sincron: Play With The Maiden 2.56
19. Olympics: Mary Mary 2.18
20. Theo Schumann Combo: Hackepeter 2.48
21. Amigos: Komm gib mir deine Hand 2.21
22. George & Beathovens: Lez blaznihevo basnika 2.35
23. Mondial: Omule 3.00
24. Mondial: Orbul 3.27

AllTracks

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Theo Schumann Combo