Various Artists – La France Et Les Beatles (Volume 1) (2006)

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The success of the Beatles in the Sixties was truly incredible.

And all over the world, lesser-known groups tried to copy their hits, including in France.

And here is Volume 1 of a 6-part edition with Beatles songs sung in French.

I will now present another issue of this edition every week on this blog … if I don’t forget.

Voila … here´s Volume 1: the most artists was completley unknown to me …

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So, enjoy all these rarities rom the Sixties !

And … “Il pleure dans mon cœur (Hey Jude)” is an extraordinary version !

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Tracklist:
01.I Trovatori: Tu perds ton temps (Please Please Me) (Lennon/McCartney/Cour) 1.50
02. Lynn: Tu changeras d’avis (Bad To Me) (Lennon/McCartney/Jil & Jan) 2.02
03. Jimmy Frey: Elle t’aime (She Loves You) (Lennon/McCartney/Saka) 2.12
04. Richard Anthony: Toi l’ami (All My Loving) (Lennon/McCartney/Hortis) 2.07
05. Les Lionceaux: Mais ne viens plus (Don’t Bother Me) (Harrison//Nencidi) 2.31
06. Jean-Claude Berthon: Je te veux toute à moi (I Wanna Be Your Man) (Lennon/ McCartney/Barouh) 2.28
07. Les Fizz: Si tu fais ça (You Can’t Do That) (Lennon/McCartney/Gerald) 2.40
08. Olivier Despax: Et je l’aime (And I Love Her) (Lennon/McCartney/Simille) 2.40
09. Les Kelton: Oui je reviens (When I Get Home) (Lennon/McCartney/Roblin) 1.59
10. Akim: Hummm ! Qu’elle est belle (I Feel Fine) (Lennon/McCartney/Plait) 2.22
11. François Fabrice: Les garçons sont fous (Think For Yourself) (Harrison/Gerlad) 2.21
12. Dominique: Michelle (Lennon/McCartney/Sam) 2.33
13. Les Blue Notes: Rêve (Girl) (Lennon/McCartney/X…) 2.48
14. Danielle Denin: Je lis dans tes yeux (I’m Looking Through You) (Lennon/McCartney/ Plait) 2.28
15. Erick Saint-Laurent: Eleanor Rigby (Lennon/McCartney/Saka) 2.04
16. Monique Leyrac: Dis-moi (Here, There & Everywhere) (Lennon/McCartney/Simille) 2.24
17. Jean-Marie & Raoul: Le Sous-marin vert (Yellow Submarine) (Lennon/McCartney/ Broussolle) 2.45
18. Dominique Walter: Penny Lane (Lennon/McCartney/Saka) 2.52
19. Marcel Amont: Dans 45 ans (When I’m 64) (Lennon/McCartney/Pecarrère) 2.48
20. Szabo: Il pleure dans mon cœur (Hey Jude) (Lennon/McCartney/Verlaine) 4.13
21. Gerard St. Paul: Bang bang Maxwell (Maxwell’s Silver Hammer) (Lennon/McCartney/ Simille/Delancry) 3.25

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Booklet

The Beatles – 1 (2000)

FrontCover1The Beatles were an English rock band, formed in Liverpool in 1960, that comprised John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. They are regarded as the most influential band of all time and were integral to the development of 1960s counterculture and popular music’s recognition as an art form. Rooted in skiffle, beat and 1950s rock ‘n’ roll, their sound incorporated elements of classical music and traditional pop in innovative ways; the band later explored music styles ranging from ballads and Indian music to psychedelia and hard rock. As pioneers in recording, songwriting and artistic presentation, the Beatles revolutionised many aspects of the music industry and were often publicised as leaders of the era’s youth and sociocultural movements.

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Led by primary songwriters Lennon and McCartney, the Beatles evolved from Lennon’s previous group, the Quarrymen, and built their reputation playing clubs in Liverpool and Hamburg over three years from 1960, initially with Stuart Sutcliffe playing bass. The core trio of Lennon, McCartney and Harrison, together since 1958, went through a succession of drummers, including Pete Best, before asking Starr to join them in 1962. Manager Brian Epstein moulded them into a professional act, and producer George Martin guided and developed their recordings, greatly expanding their domestic success after signing to EMI Records and achieving their first hit, “Love Me Do”, in late 1962. As their popularity grew into the intense fan frenzy dubbed “Beatlemania”, the band acquired the nickname “the Fab Four”, with Epstein, Martin and other members of the band’s entourage sometimes given the informal title of “fifth Beatle”.

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By early 1964, the Beatles were international stars and had achieved unprecedented levels of critical and commercial success. They became a leading force in Britain’s cultural resurgence, ushering in the British Invasion of the United States pop market, and soon made their film debut with A Hard Day’s Night (1964). A growing desire to refine their studio efforts, coupled with the untenable nature of their concert tours, led to the band’s retirement from live performances in 1966. At this time, they produced records of greater sophistication, including the albums Rubber Soul (1965), Revolver (1966) and Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967), and enjoyed further commercial success with The Beatles (also known as “the White Album”, 1968) and Abbey Road (1969). Heralding the album era, their success elevated the album to the dominant form of record consumption over singles; they also inspired a greater public interest in psychedelic drugs and Eastern spirituality, and furthered advancements in electronic music, album art and music videos. In 1968, they founded Apple Corps, a multi-armed multimedia corporation that continues to oversee projects related to the band’s legacy. After the group’s break-up in 1970, all principal members enjoyed success as solo artists and some partial reunions have occurred. Lennon was murdered in 1980 and Harrison died of lung cancer in 2001. McCartney and Starr remain musically active.

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The Beatles are the best-selling music act of all time, with estimated sales of 600 million units worldwide.[4][5] They hold the record for most number-one albums on the UK Albums Chart (15), most number-one hits on the Billboard Hot 100 chart (20), and most singles sold in the UK (21.9 million). The band received many accolades, including seven Grammy Awards, four Brit Awards, an Academy Award (for Best Original Song Score for the 1970 documentary film Let It Be) and fifteen Ivor Novello Awards. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1988, and each principal member was inducted individually between 1994 and 2015. In 2004 and 2011, the group topped Rolling Stone’s lists of the greatest artists in history. Time magazine named them among the 20th century’s 100 most important people.

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1 is a compilation album by the English rock band the Beatles, originally released on 13 November 2000. The album features virtually every number-one single the band achieved in the United Kingdom or United States from 1962 to 1970. Issued on the 30th anniversary of the band’s break-up, it was their first compilation available on only one CD. 1 was a commercial success and topped charts worldwide. It has sold over 31 million copies.[1]

Since Nielsen SoundScan began tracking US album sales in January 1991,[2] 1 is the fourth best-selling album in the US, the best-selling album of the 2000s decade in the US,[3] as well as the best-selling album of the decade worldwide.

1 was remastered and reissued in September 2011.[4] It was remixed and reissued again in several different deluxe editions in November 2015, the most comprehensive of which is a three-disc set entitled 1+, which includes video discs of Beatles promotional films.

As of June 2015, 1 was the sixth best-selling album of the 21st century in the UK, having sold over 3.1 million copies.

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1 was compiled by producer George Martin and former band members Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr.[6] The album contains the 27 Beatles songs that went to number one in the United Kingdom on the Record Retailer Top 50 chart or in the United States on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Despite Harrison’s “For You Blue” charting at number 1 on Billboard, along with the A-side “The Long and Winding Road”,[7] Capitol Records treated “For You Blue” as strictly a B-side and did not promote it as an A-side. “Day Tripper” was included on 1 since it charted at number 1 in the UK as a double A-side with “We Can Work It Out”, while in the US, only “We Can Work It Out” was number 1. Two singles written by John Lennon and released in both the UK and US were omitted as they did not top either the Record Retailer chart or the Billboard Hot 100: “Please Please Me” and “Strawberry Fields Forever”. The former was the Beatles’ first UK number one single in all British charts except Record Retailer, reaching the top spot in the music magazines New Musical Express, Melody Maker and Disc. “Strawberry Fields Forever” was part of a double A-side single with “Penny Lane”, which reached the top spot in Melody Maker and peaked at number 2 in the other UK charts, behind Engelbert Humperdinck’s “Release Me”.

Liner Notes

The album is a combination of both the US and UK versions of the 1982 compilation 20 Greatest Hits, with the addition of “Something” (which was left off 20 Greatest Hits because of time constraints).[citation needed] On 1, “Hey Jude” was included in its original full-length version (slightly over seven minutes), whereas the American version of 20 Greatest Hits contained a shortened version.

Before 1, all 27 songs were mainly available on two remastered CD releases: firstly on the respective Beatles studio albums released in 1987 (as well as Past Masters, Volume One and Past Masters, Volume Two, released in 1988). The second remastering was made available on the CD versions for 1962–1966 and 1967–1970, released in 1993.

The songs on 1 were remastered specifically for the release in 2000. According to the liner notes of the album, the original analogue masters were “digitally remastered at 24 bits resolution, processed using Sonic Solutions NoNoise technology and mastered to 16-bit using Prism SNS Noise Shaping”. The remastering was overseen by Peter Mew of Abbey Road Studios and took place there.[8] In 2011, 1 was remastered and reissued on CD. In 2015 it was remastered again and remixed by Giles Martin; when Martin began to assist with fixing up the audio tracks for the 1+ video clips, he realised that his goal of making them “more immersive” should also apply to 1.[9] For the remixing project, Martin commented: “The remasters went back to these final mix tapes and remastered them. They cleaned them up and then they EQ-ed them and released them. What we’re doing is remixing. We’re going not to the final mix, we’re creating our own mixes.”[9] About his remixing approach, Martin said: “My approach was to be respectful of everything, I had sessions and sessions where I flipped between previously remastered stereos, the mono remasters, and the remixes we’ve done. I flip between everything and make sure I prefer what we’ve done.”

Beatles04The package of 1 was intended to be simplistic and ambitious at the same tme. Its cover was designed by Rick Ward, and consists of a pop art-style yellow number one on a red background. The emphasis on the 1 digit was used on many of the compilations of number-one hits by different artists that followed this album; for example, ELV1S by Elvis Presley and Number Ones by the Bee Gees. The album’s back cover features the famous photos of the Beatles taken by Richard Avedon and copyrighted on 17 August 1967. The design exclusively uses variations of the Helvetica typeface.

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Apparently, there was a gap in the Beatles’ catalog, after all — all the big hits weren’t on one tidy, single-disc compilation. It’s not the kind of gap you’d necessarily notice — it’s kind of like realizing you don’t have a pair of navy blue dress socks — but it was a gap all the same, so the group released The Beatles 1 late in 2000, coinciding with the publication of their official autobiography, the puzzlingly titled Anthology. The idea behind this compilation is to have all the number one singles the Beatles had, either in the U.K. or U.S., on one disc, and that’s pretty much what this generous 27-track collection is. It’s easy, nay, necessary, to quibble with a couple of the judgment calls — look, “Please Please Me” should be here instead of “From Me to You,” and it’s unforgivable to bypass “Strawberry Fields Forever” (kick out “Yellow Submarine” or “Eleanor Rigby”) — but there’s still no question that this is all great music, and there is a bit of a rush hearing all these dazzling songs follow one after another. If there’s any complaint, it’s that even if it’s nice to have something like this, it’s not really essential. There’s really no reason for anyone who owns all the records to get this too — if you’ve lived happily without the red or blue albums, you’ll live without this. But, if you give this to any six or seven year old, they’ll be a pop fan, even fanatic, for life. And that’s reason enough for it to exist. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
George Harrison (guitar, percussion, vocals on 24. background vocals)
John Lennon (vocals, guitar, keyboards, harmonica, bass, percussion)
Paul McCartney (vocals, bass, keyboards, guitar, drums.percussion, drums on 23.)
Ringo Starr (drums, percussion, vocals on 15., background vocals on 21.)
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Mal Evans (bass drum on 21.)
George Martin (piano on 06.,17.+ 18.)
David Mason (trumpet on 17. + 18.)
Billy Preston (organ on 24. +  26.,piano on  24. + 27.)
Ronnie Scott (saxophone solo on 20.)
Andy White (drums on 01,)

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Tracklist:
01. Love Me Do 2.22
02. From Me To You 1.58
03. She Loves You 2.23
04. I Want To Hold Your Hand 2.27
05. Can’t Buy Me Love 2.13
06. A Hard Day’s Night 2.35
07. I Feel Fine 2.20
08. Eight Days A Week 2.46
09. Ticket To Ride 3.12
10. Help! 2.20
11. Yesterday 2.07
12. Day Tripper 2.50
13. We Can Work It Out 2.17
14. Paperback Writer 2.20
15. Yellow Submarine 2.40
16. Eleanor Rigby 2.08
17. Penny Lane 3.01
18. All You Need Is Love 3.49
19. Hello, Goodbye 3.29
20. Lady Madonna 2.19
21. Hey Jude 7.05
22. Get Back 3.14
23. The Ballad Of John And Yoko 3.01
24. Something 3.03
25. Come Together 4.20
26. Let It Be 3.52
27. The Long And Winding Road 3.37

All songs written by John Lennon & Paul McCartney
except 24. written b y George Harrison

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More from The Beatles:
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The Beatles – Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967)

FrontCover1Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band is the eighth studio album by the English rock band the Beatles. Released on 26 May 1967,[nb 1] it spent 27 weeks at number one on the Record Retailer chart in the United Kingdom and 15 weeks at number one on the Billboard Top LPs chart in the United States. It was lauded by critics for its innovations in songwriting, production and graphic design, for bridging a cultural divide between popular music and high art, and for reflecting the interests of contemporary youth and the counterculture. Its release was a defining moment in 1960s pop culture, heralding the Summer of Love, while the album’s reception achieved full cultural legitimisation for pop music and recognition for the medium as a genuine art form.

At the end of August 1966, the Beatles permanently retired from touring and pursued individual interests for the next three months. During a return flight to London in November, Paul McCartney had an idea for a song involving an Edwardian military band that formed the impetus of the Sgt. Pepper concept. Sessions began on 24 November at EMI Studios with compositions inspired by the Beatles’ youth, but after pressure from EMI, the songs “Strawberry Fields Forever” and “Penny Lane” were released as a double A-side single in February 1967 and left off the LP.

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The album was loosely conceptualised as a performance by the fictional Sgt. Pepper band, an idea that was conceived after recording the title track. A key work of British psychedelia, it incorporates a range of stylistic influences, including vaudeville, circus, music hall, avant-garde, and Western and Indian classical music. The band continued the technological experimentation marked by their previous album, Revolver, this time without an absolute deadline for completion. With producer George Martin and engineer Geoff Emerick, the group coloured much of the recordings with sound effects and tape manipulation, as exemplified on “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds”, “Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!” and “A Day in the Life”. Recording was completed on 21 April. The cover, which depicts the Beatles posing in front of a tableau of celebrities and historical figures, was designed by the pop artists Peter Blake and Jann Haworth.

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Sgt. Pepper is regarded by musicologists as an early concept album that advanced the roles of sound composition, extended form, psychedelic imagery, record sleeves, and the producer in popular music. The album had an immediate cross-generational impact and was associated with numerous touchstones of the era’s youth culture, such as fashion, drugs, mysticism, and a sense of optimism and empowerment. It is considered one of the first art rock LPs, a progenitor to progressive rock, and the start of the album era. In 1968, it won four Grammy Awards, including Album of the Year, the first rock LP to receive this honour; in 2003 it was inducted into the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress. It has topped several critics’ and listeners’ polls for the best album of all time, including those published by Rolling Stone magazine and in the book All Time Top 1000 Albums, and the UK’s “Music of the Millennium” poll. It remains one of the best-selling albums of all time and was still, in 2018, the UK’s best-selling studio album. More than 32 million copies had been sold worldwide as of 2011. (wikipedia)

Sgt. Pepper 50th anniversary billboard in London:
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With Revolver, the Beatles made the Great Leap Forward, reaching a previously unheard-of level of sophistication and fearless experimentation. Sgt. Pepper, in many ways, refines that breakthrough, as the Beatles consciously synthesized such disparate influences as psychedelia, art-song, classical music, rock & roll, and music hall, often in the course of one song. Not once does the diversity seem forced — the genius of the record is how the vaudevillian “When I’m 64” seems like a logical extension of “Within You Without You” and how it provides a gateway to the chiming guitars of “Lovely Rita.” There’s no discounting the individual contributions of each member or their producer, George Martin, but the preponderance of whimsy and self-conscious art gives the impression that Paul McCartney is the leader of the Lonely Hearts Club Band.

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He dominates the album in terms of compositions, setting the tone for the album with his unabashed melodicism and deviously clever arrangements. In comparison, Lennon’s contributions seem fewer, and a couple of them are a little slight but his major statements are stunning. “With a Little Help From My Friends” is the ideal Ringo tune, a rolling, friendly pop song that hides genuine Lennon anguish, à la “Help!”; “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” remains one of the touchstones of British psychedelia; and he’s the mastermind behind the bulk of “A Day in the Life,” a haunting number that skillfully blends Lennon’s verse and chorus with McCartney’s bridge. It’s possible to argue that there are better Beatles albums, yet no album is as historically important as this. After Sgt. Pepper, there were no rules to follow — rock and pop bands could try anything, for better or worse. Ironically, few tried to achieve the sweeping, all-encompassing embrace of music as the Beatles did here. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
George Harrison (guitar, harmonica, percussion, vocals on 08., background vocals)
John Lennon (guitar, vocals, pino, harmonica, sound effects, percussion)
Paul McCartney (bass, vocals, guitar, keyboards, soundeffects)
Ringo Starr (drums, percussion, vocls on 02., harmonica)
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Neil Aspinall (tambura, harmonica)
Mal Evans (counting, harmonica)
George Martin (sound effects; harpsichord on 05., harmonium, lowrey organ, glockenspiel on 07., organ on 02.,piano on 04.+ 10.)
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Sounds Inc. (saxophones, trombones and French horn on 11.)
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french horns on 01.
Neill Sanders – James W. Buck – John Burden -Tony Randall
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clarinet on 09.:
Robert Burns – Henry MacKenzie – Frank Reidy

… and many more …

Booklet

Tracklist:
01. Sgt. Peper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band  2.02
02. With A Little Help from My Friends 2.44
03. Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds 3.28
04. Getting Better 2.48
05. Fixing A Hole 2.36
06. She’s Leaving Home 3.35
07. Being For The Benefit Of Mr. Kite ! 2.37
08. Within You Without You 5.05
09. When I’m Sixty-Four  2.38
10. Lovely Rita 2.42
11. Good Morning Good Morning 2.41
12. Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise) 1.19
13. A Day In The Life 5.34

All songs written by John Lennon & Paul McCartney
except 08., written by George Harrison.

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Inlet

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Who´s who on the frontcover (click on the pic):
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More from The Beatles:
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VA – La France et les Beatles Vol. 1 (2006)

FrontCover1Parlez vous Lennon et McCartney en Francais? Oui! Oui! Oui! First volume of four compilations of classic Beatles cover versions recorded over the years by many of France’s top Pop artists. This set features 21 fab versions of some of the most gear Pop/Rock songs ever written, performed by artists such as Marcel Amont, Monique Leyrac, The Blue Notes, Olivier Despax, Richard Anthony and others. This collection is absolutely in Seine! Magic.

I’m falling in love with France:
I can’t speak French but I love the music and the words. I’ve been listening to French music now for about a year. Garou is the best, this CD is great, there is one song that hurts my ears “Hey Jude”. I really thought that would be a lot different but they took it to a completely different level. Sort of like hearing someone here destroy the Star Spangle Banner. (Frank Kenisky)

Not really necessary …  but a real nice addition to every Beatles collection … good versions with french lyrics !

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Tracklist:
01. I Trovatori: Tu Perds Ton Temps (Please Please Me) 1.50
02. Lynn: Tu Changeras D’avis (Bad To Me) 2.02
03. Jimmy Frey: Elle T’aime (She Loves You)
04. Richard Anthony: Toi L’ami (All My Loving) 2.07
05. Les Lionceaux: Mais Ne Viens Plus (Don’t Bother Me) 2.31
06. Jean-Claude Berthon: Je Te Veux Toute A Moi (I Wanna Be Your Man) 2.28
07. Les Fizz: Si Tu Fais Ca (You Can’t Do That) 2.40
08. Olivier Despax: Et Je L’aime (And I Love Her) 2.40
09.  Les Kelton: Oui Je Reviens (When I Get Home) 1.59
10. Akim: Humm ! Qu’elle Est Belle (I Feel Fine) 2.22
11. Fabrice: Les Garçons Sont Fous (Think For Yourself) 2.21
12. Dominique: Michelle (Michelle) 2.33
13. Les Blue Notes: Rêve (Girl) 2.48
14. Danielle Denin: Je Lis Dans Tes Yeux (I’m Looking Through You) 2.28
15. Erick Saint-Laurent: Eleonor Rigby (Eleanor Rigby) 2.04
16. Monique Leyrac: Dis-moi (Here, There And Everywhere) 2.24
17. Jean-Marie et Raoul: Le Sous-marin Vert (Yellow Submarine) 2.45
18. Dominique Walter: Penny Lane 2.52
19. Marcel Amont: Dans 45 Ans (When I’m Sixty Four) 2.48
20. Szabo: Il Pleure Dans Mon Coeur (Hey Jude) 4.13
21. Gerard Saint Paul: Bang Bang Maxwell (Maxwell’s Silver Hammer) 3.25

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Various Artists – Tropical Tribute To The Beatles (1996)

FrontCover1Tropical Tribute to the Beatles is a tribute album of tropical artists released in 1996 by RMM Records (Ralph Mercado’s record company), produced by Oscar Gomez (distributed by Bellaphon & Uni Distribution).

Arrangements were made by Steve Roistein, and lyrics were adapted into Spanish by Jorge Córcega, who had previously adapted the lyrics of Salvatore Adamo.

The concert in New York City at Radio City Music Hall was released on DVD. In 1996 a tour was made through Spain (Plaza de Toros (Valencia), Madrid, La Coruña’s Coliseum, Barcelona). (by wikipedia)

On December 31, 1962, the Beatles performed the classic song “Besame Mucho” at the Star Club in Hamburg, Germany, in recognition of the highly emotive music from Latin America. Four decades later, RMM decided to bring the Beatles’ greatest hits back, this time played by some of the most prominent Latin artists in a tropical tribute to one of the most influential acts in popular music ever. After the opening track, “Hey Jude,” by Puerto Rican singer Tony Vega, Tito Nieves and the percussion virtuoso Tito Puente deliver a freewheeling “Let It Be.” The Cuban soloist Guianko performs a salsa version of “Can’t Buy Me Love,” followed by Johnny Rivera’s “Hard Day’s Night.” Latin diva Celia Cruz sings her own version of “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da,” while New York-based Ray Sepúlveda and Manny Manuel do the same on “The Fool on the Hill” and “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” respectively. Domingo Quiñones’ cover of “Day Tripper” is followed by “Lady Madonna” by Venezuelan-born Oscar D’Leon, and Jesus Enríquez joins Cuban Miles Peña on “With a Little Help From My Friends.” RMM Tropical Tribute to the Beatles comes to an end with a stylish version of “Yesterday” by Cheo Feliciano (aka José Cheo Feliciano), a bolero-inflected “And I Love Her,” and “Come Together” by Latin jazz symbol Tito Puente. A joyous 13-track record with captivating and even exuberant performances in both English and Spanish. (by Drago Bonacich)

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For its opportunism and potentially dreadful results, the mere idea of a salsa adaptation of Beatles songs is enough to make you fear for the worst. But Spain-based producer Oscar Gomez and most of the RMM roster rose to the occasion with an above-average homage that is fun, edgy and artistically serious.

Except for the elimination of harmonies in “Day Tripper” by Ray Sepulveda and a surprisingly cheesy interpretation of “And I Love Her” by Jose Alberto, the record successfully achieves its main goals, keeping the essence of the original music, adding significant arrangements and still remaining a pure salsa album. (by latimes.com)

Oh yes, this is a very special tribute ot “The Fab Four” !

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Personnel:
Ed Calle (saxophone)
Tony Concepcion (trumpet)
Oscar Gomez (percussion, background vocals)
Chema Moncillo (bass)
Sammy “Timbalon” Pagan (percussion)
Steve Roistein (keyboards, background vocals)
Dana Teboe (trombone)
Rene Luis Toledo (guitar)
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Yuni Brito (tambora on 07.)
Wilfrido Drullarpiano (bass on 07.)
Nilo Gonzalez (bass on 07.)
Rafael Rojas (percussion on 07.)
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background vocals:
Cheito Quiñones – Jose Morato – Juan Canovas – Rosa Giron

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Tracklist:
01. Tony Vega: Hey Jude 5.29
02. Tito Nieves: Let It Be 519
03. Guianko: Can’t Buy Me Love (No Puedes Comprarme) 4.37
04. Johnny Rivera: A Hard Day’s Night 5.00
05. Celia Cruz: Obladi, Oblada 4.44
06. Ray Sepulveda: The Fool On The Hill 4.29
07. Manny Manuel: I Wanna Hold Your Hand (Dame La Mano Y Ven) 4.27
08. Domingo Quiñones: Day Tripper 4.16
09. Oscar D’Leon: Lady Madonna 4.47
10. Jesus Enriquez & Miles Peña: With A Little Help From My Friends (La Ayuda De La Amistad) 5.07
11. Cheo Feliciano: Yesterday 5.52
12. Jose Alberto: And I Love Her (Mi Gran Amor Le Di) 3.16
13. All Star Ensemble(*):  Come Together (Vamos Juntos) 5.57

All songs written by Paul McCartney & John Lennon

(*) Tony Vega, Tito Nieves, Guianko, Johnny Rivera (2), Celia Cruz, Ray Sepulveda, Manny Manuel, Domingo Quiñones, Oscar D’Leon, Jesus Enriquez, Miles Peña, Cheo Feliciano & Jose Alberto “El Canario”

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The Beatles – Anthology 1 (1995)

FrontCover1.jpgAnthology 1 is a compilation album by the Beatles, released on 20 November 1995 by Apple Records as part of The Beatles Anthology series. It features rarities, outtakes and live performances from the period 1958–1964, including songs with original bass player Stuart Sutcliffe and drummer Pete Best. It is the first in a trilogy of albums with Anthology 2 and Anthology 3, all of which tie in with the televised special The Beatles Anthology. It contains “Free as a Bird”, billed as the first new Beatles song in 25 years. The album topped the Billboard 200 album chart and was certified 8x Platinum by the RIAA.

The album includes material from the Beatles’ days as the Quarrymen, through the Decca audition to sessions for the album Beatles for Sale. It is of historical interest as the only official release of performances with Best and Sutcliffe in the band. Sutcliffe, the band’s original bass player during 1960, and sporadically during the group’s second Hamburg season, appears on the disc-one tracks “Hallelujah, I Love Her So”, “You’ll Be Mine” and “Cayenne”. Best, who was the band’s drummer from just prior to the group’s first departure for Hamburg in August 1960 until 15 August 1962 when he was replaced by Ringo Starr, is on disc one, tracks 10–12, 15–19 and 21–22.

Disc one tracks 10–12 were recorded at a session in Hamburg where the Beatles served as the back-up band to the English rock and roll musician Tony Sheridan. Some songs from this session were released on the 1962 LP My Bonnie, credited to Tony Sheridan and the Beat Brothers. The song “My Bonnie” would be their introductory single in England, featuring Sheridan on lead vocal and guitar. Disc one tracks 21–22 are the only surviving recordings of the Beatles’ first EMI session. Track 22 is the original recording of “Love Me Do”, which would be re-recorded by the group four months later for their first single. Disc one track 24 features EMI session drummer Andy White in place of Starr.

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Disc two contains performances from comedy duo Morecambe and Wise’s popular television programme, Two of a Kind, as well as the opening song from their famed performance on The Ed Sullivan Show, which introduced the band to most of the US in 1964.

The flashpoint for the album came with the song “Free as a Bird” – the three remaining Beatles Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr re-working a John Lennon demo recording given to McCartney by Lennon’s widow, Yoko Ono. Produced by Harrison’s Traveling Wilburys band-mate Jeff Lynne, the three added additional music and lyrics, instrumentation and backing vocals, with McCartney and Harrison both taking a turn at a lead vocal.

The live BBC Radio recording of “Lend Me Your Comb” was held back from Live at the BBC for inclusion on this album, but it was later also included on On Air – Live at the BBC Volume 2.

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The cover of Anthology 1 is the first third of the Anthology collage made by Klaus Voormann. Various photographs and album covers are torn and collected together. Pete Best’s face was torn away from the Savage Young Beatles record jacket in the centre of the album cover, revealing the face of his successor, Ringo Starr, below. The missing piece was subsequently used on the cover of Best’s Haymans Green album in 2008.

The album was a large success throughout the world. It was the first Beatles album to enter the Billboard 200 album chart at number one. It sold 855,473 copies in its first week, the 27th largest one-week sales in the Soundscan history, succeeding Fresh Horses by Garth Brooks. In its second week, Anthology 1 sold 453,000 copies and maintained the top spot. This was repeated the following week, with 435,000 copies sold. In its fourth week, the same quantity was sold, but the album fell to number two, behind Mariah Carey’s Daydream. In the following week, the album fell to number three but with 601,000 sales. Anthology 1 was certified 3× Platinum by the RIAA after six weeks in the US market. In all, the album spent 29 weeks on the Billboard 200, reaching cumulative sales of 3,639,000 scans as of April 2001. In the UK, reaction was similar, but the album peaked at number two, behind Robson & Jerome’s eponymous album. In Australia, the album spent two weeks at number one in December 1995. (by wikipedia)

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Personnel:
George Harrison (vocals, lead guitar)
John Lennon (vocals, rhythm guitar, harmonica)
Paul McCartney (vocals, bass, rhythm guitar)
Ringo Starr (vocals, drums, Percussion)
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Pete Best – drums on “My Bonnie”, “Ain’t She Sweet”, “Cry for a Shadow”, “Searchin'”, “Three Cool Cats”, “The Sheik of Araby”, “Like Dreamers Do”, “Hello Little Girl”, “Bésame Mucho”, “Love Me Do”
Stuart Sutcliffe – bass guitar on “Hallelujah, I Love Her So”, “You’ll Be Mine”, “Cayenne”Colin Hanton – drums on “That’ll Be the Day”, “In Spite of All the Danger”
John Lowe – piano on “That’ll Be the Day”, “In Spite of All the Danger”
Tony Sheridan (vocalsm guitar on 10.)
Andy White – drums on “Please Please Me”

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Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. Free As A Bird (Lennon/McCartney/Harrison/Starr ) 4.25
02. We were four guys … that’s all (Lennon speaking to Jann Wenner of Rolling Stone) 8 December 1970, New York City 0.12
03. That’ll Be The Day (by the Quarrymen) (Allison/Holly(Petty) 2.08
04. In Spite of All The Danger (by the Quarrymen) (McCartney/Harrison) 2.45
05. Sometimes I’d borrow … those still exist (McCartney speaking to Mark Lewisohn – 3 November 1994 London, UK) 0.18
06. Hallelujah, I Love Her So (home demo, 1960) (Charles) 1.13
07. You’ll Be Mine (home demo, 1960) (Lennon/McCartney) 1.39
08. Cayenne (home demo, 1960) (McCartney) 1.14
09. First of all … it didn’t do a thing here (McCartney speaking to Malcom Threadgill – 27 October 1962)0.07
10. My Bonnie (by Tony Sheridan and the Beat Brothers – 22 June 1961
Friedrich-Ebert-Halle, Hamburg, Germany) (Traditional) 2.42
11. Ain’t She Sweet (by the Beat Brothers) Milton Ager, Jack Yellen 22 June 1961
Friedrich-Ebert-Halle( (Ager/Yellen) 2:13
12. Cry For A Shadow (by the Beat Brothers – 22 June 1961
Friedrich-Ebert-Halle) (Lennon/Harrison)  2.22
13. Brian was a beautiful guy … he presented us well (Lennon speaking to David Wigg for BBC Radio 1’s Scene and Heard – October 1971 New York City) 0.10
14. I secured them … a Beatle drink even then (Brian Epstein reading from A Cellarful of Noise) Brian Epstein 13 October 1964) 0.18
15. Searchin’ (Decca Audition – 1 January 1962 Decca Studios, London ) (Leiber/Stoller) 3.00
16. Three Cool Cats (Decca Audition – 1 January 1962 Decca Studios, London) (Leiber/Stoller) 2.25
17. The Sheik Of Araby” (Decca Audition – 1 January 1962 Decca Studios, London) (Smith,/Wheeler/Snyder) 1.43
18. Like Dreamers Do (Decca Audition – 1 January 1962 Decca Studios, London)  (Lennon/McCartney) 2.36
19. Hello Little Girl (Decca Audition – 1 January 1962 Decca Studios, London(Lennon/McCartney)1 1.40
20. Well, the recording test … by my artists” (Epstein reading from A Cellarful of Noise – Epstein 13 October 1964) 0.32
21. Besame Mucho (6 June 1962 EMI Studios) (Velázquez/Skylar) 2.37
22. Love Me Do (Lennon/McCartney) 2.32
23. How Do You Do It (Murray) 1.57
24. Please Please Me (Lennon/McCartney) 1.59
25. One After 909 (sequence) (Takes 3, 4 & 5 – 5 March 1963 (Lennon/McCartney) 2.23
26. One After 909 (complete) (Takes 4 & 5 – 5 March 1963) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.56
27. Lend Me Your Comb (live at the BBC for Pop Go the Beatles – 2 July 1963, Maida Vale Studios, London) (Twomey/Wise/Weisman) 1.50
28. I’ll Get You (live on Sunday Night at the London Palladium – 13 October 1963
The London Palladium, London) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.08
29. We were performers … in Britain (Lennon speaking to Wenner – 8 December 1970
New York City) 0.12
30. I Saw Her Standing There (live for The Beatles, Pop Group from Liverpool Visiting Stockholm, The Karlaplansstudion, Stockholm, Sweden – 24 October 1963) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.49
31. From Me To You (live for The Beatles, Pop Group from Liverpool Visiting Stockholm, The Karlaplansstudion, Stockholm, Sweden – 24 October 1963) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.05
32. Money (That’s What I Want) (live for The Beatles, Pop Group from Liverpool Visiting Stockholm, The Karlaplansstudion, Stockholm, Sweden – 24 October 1963) /Bradford/Gordy) 2.52
33. You Really Got A Hold On Me (live for The Beatles, Pop Group from Liverpool Visiting Stockholm, The Karlaplansstudion, Stockholm, Sweden – 24 October 1963) (Robinson) 2.58
34. Roll Over Beethoven (live for The Beatles, Pop Group from Liverpool Visiting Stockholm, The Karlaplansstudion, Stockholm, Sweden – 24 October 1963) (Berry) 24 2.22

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CD 2:
01. She Loves You (live on the Royal Variety Performance – The Prince of Wales Theatre, London, 4 November 1963) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.50
02. Till There Was You (live on the Royal Variety Performance – The Prince of Wales Theatre, London, 4 November 1963) (Willson) 2.54
03. Twist And Shout (live on the Royal Variety Performance – The Prince of Wales Theatre, London, 4 November 1963) (Russell/Medley) 3:05
04. This Boy (live on Two of a Kind; ATV Studios, London, 2 December 1963)(Lennon/McCartney) 2.22
05. I Want To Hold Your Hand (live on Two of a Kind; ATV Studios, London, 2 December 1963) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.37
06. Boys, what I was thinking… (Eric Morecambe and Ernie Wise speaking to the Beatles live on Two of a Kind – ATV Studios, 2 December 1963) 2.06
07. Moonlight Bay (live on Two of a Kind; ATV Studios, London, 2 December 1963) (Lennon/McCartney) 0.50
08. Can’t Buy Me Love (Takes 1 & 2 – 29 January 1964 Pathé Marconi, Paris, France) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.10
09. All My Loving (live on The Ed Sullivan Show –CBS-TV Studio 50, New York City, 9 February 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.19
10. You Can’t Do That (Take 6) (EMI Studios – 25 February 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.42
11. And I Love Her (Take 2) (EMI Studios – 25 February 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 1.52
12. A Hard Day’s Night (Take 1) (EMI Studios – 25 February 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.44
13. I Wanna Be Your Man (live for Around the Beatles – IBC Studios, London, 19 April 1964) (Lennon/McCartney)  1.48
14. Long Tall Sally (live for Around the Beatles – IBC Studios, London, 19 April 1964)  (Johnson/Penniman/Blackwell) 1.45
15. Boys (live for Around the Beatles – IBC Studios, London, 19 April 1964) (Dixon/Farrell) 1:50
16. Shout (live for Around the Beatles – IBC Studios, London, 19 April 1964) (R.Isley/R.Isley(K.Isley) 1.31
17. I’ll Be Back (Take 2) (EMI Studios – 1 June 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 1.13
18. I’ll Be Back (Take 3) (EMI Studios – 1 June 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 1.58
19. You Know What To Do (demo) (EMI Studios, 3 June 1964) (Harrison) 1.59
20. No Reply (demo) (EMI Studios, 3 June 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 1.46
21. Mr. Moonlight (Takes 1 & 4) (EMI Studios, 14 August 1964) (Johnson) 2.47
22. Leave My Kitten Alone (Take 5) (EMI Studios, 14 August 1964) (John(Turner/McDougal) 2.57
23. No Reply (Take 2) (EMI Studios, 30 September 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.29
24. Eight Days A Week (sequence) (Takes 1, 2 & 4) (EMI Studios, 6 October 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 1.25
25. Eight Days A Week (complete) (Take 5) (EMI Studios, 6 October 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.48
26. Kansas City / Hey-Hey-Hey-Hey! (Take 2) (EMI Studios, 18 October 1964) (Leiber/Stoller/Penniman) 2.44

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Beatles Monthly – Nr. 1 August 1963

FrontCoverThe Beatles Book (also known as Beatles Monthly) was founded in 1963. It was first published in August 1963 and continued for 77 editions until it stopped publication after the December 1969 edition. It was revived in 1976, and ceased publication in 2003.

In early 1963 a publisher, Sean O’Mahony, (who already published a magazine about the music scene called Beat Instrumental) heard Please Please Me and asked Brian Epstein if he could publish a magazine devoted to The Beatles. Epstein and the group agreed and the title launched in August 1963 with a print run of 80,000. By the end of the year circulation had grown to 330,000 copies per month. O’Mahony edited the magazine under the name of Johnny Dean.

The magazine’s photographer, Leslie Bryce, had unrivalled access to the group throughout the 1960s, travelling the world and taking thousands of photographs. In addition, Beatles roadies Neil Aspinall and Mal Evans wrote many of the articles, and artist Bob Gibson created numerous cartoons and caricatures of the fab four on a regular basis. (He eventually did the cartoons for the Beatles’ 1967 Magical Mystery Tour EP-set/US-album booklet.)

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In May 1976 O’Mahony revived the publication and republished all 77 original issues surrounded by eight (later sixteen) pages of new Beatles news and articles. The reissue programme was completed in September 1982, coincidentally at a time when interest in the band was high due to the impending twentieth anniversary of “Love Me Do”. Consequently, the decision was taken to continue the magazine with all new content. Publication continued until January 2003 (Issue 321) when it once again ceased.(by wikipedia)

Enjoy this sentimental trip in the early days of the fab four …

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The Beatles – Yellow Submarine (1969)

FrontCover1And here´s the soundtrack to the comic book (*smile*)

Yellow Submarine is the tenth studio album by English rock band the Beatles, released on 13 January 1969 in the United States and on 17 January 1969 in the United Kingdom. It was issued as the soundtrack to the animated film of the same name, which premiered in London in July 1968. The album contains six songs by the Beatles, including four new songs and the previously released “Yellow Submarine” (1966) and “All You Need Is Love” (1967). The remainder of the album was a re-recording of the film’s orchestral soundtrack by the band’s producer, George Martin.

The project was regarded as a contractual obligation by the Beatles, who were asked to supply four new songs for the film. Some songs were written and recorded specifically for the soundtrack, while others were unreleased tracks from other projects. The album was issued two months after the band’s self-titled double LP (also known as the “White Album”) and was therefore not viewed by the band as a significant release. Yellow Submarine has since been afforded a mixed reception from music critics, some of whom consider that it falls short of the high standard generally associated with the Beatles’ work. It reached the top 5 in the UK and the US, and has been reissued on compact disc several times.

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The album arose from contractual obligations for the Beatles to supply new songs to the soundtrack to United Artists’ animated film Yellow Submarine.[1] Having recently completed their album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band in April 1967,[2] the group showed minimal enthusiasm for the project.[3] Along with the music for their Magical Mystery Tour TV film, the Yellow Submarine soundtrack was part of a period that author Ian MacDonald later described as the band’s “regime of continuous low-intensity recording … it had a workaday quality about it – an intrinsic lack of tension which was bound to colour the resulting material.”

There was a commitment for The Beatles to do four songs for the film. Apparently, they would say, this is a lousy song, let’s give it to Brodax.

Lego

Only one side of the album contains songs performed by the Beatles; of the six, four were previously unreleased. “Yellow Submarine” had been issued in August 1966 as a single, topping the UK chart for four weeks,[6] and had also been released on the album Revolver. Following the Beatles’ performance of the song on the Our World international television broadcast, “All You Need Is Love” had also been issued as a single, in July 1967.

Of the unreleased tracks, the first to be recorded was George Harrison’s “Only a Northern Song”, taped in February 1967 but rejected for inclusion on Sgt. Pepper. The group performed overdubs on this basic track in April, immediately after completing the stereo mixes for that album. Among the sounds added during what Beatles historian Mark Lewisohn describes as “a curious session”, were trumpet, glockenspiel and spoken voices. Harrison’s lyrics reflect his displeasure at being merely a contracted songwriter to the Beatles’ publishing company, Northern Songs.

“All Together Now” was recorded in a single session on 12 May 1967, specifically for the film project. The title came from a phrase Paul McCartney had heard as a child, to encourage everyone to sing music hall songs. He later described the song as “a throwaway”.

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The band recorded Harrison’s “It’s All Too Much” in late May 1967 at De Lane Lea Studios in central London.[18] Inspired by its author’s experimentation with the drug LSD, and originally running to over eight minutes in length, the song reflects the Summer of Love philosophy of 1967 and makes extensive use of guitar feedback.[20] As with the later recorded “All You Need Is Love”, the track includes musical and lyrical quotations from other works – in this case, a trumpet passage from Jeremiah Clarke’s “Prince of Denmark’s March” and a lyric from the Merseys’ 1966 hit “Sorrow”.

John Lennon’s “Hey Bulldog” was recorded on 11 February 1968 and evolved from an initial intent to shoot a promotional film for the single “Lady Madonna”. Like “All Together Now”, it was specifically recorded with the film soundtrack in mind. The track’s ending featured a jam session after the point where a fade-out was intended in the final mix, which was kept in the finished version. Lennon later described the song as “a good-sounding record that means nothing”.

Side two of the album contained George Martin’s orchestral score for the film, leading with “Pepperland”.

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Side two features a re-recording of the symphonic film score composed by the Beatles’ producer, George Martin, specifically for the album. The recording took place with a 41-piece orchestra over two three-hour sessions on 22 and 23 October 1968 in Abbey Road, and edited down to the length on the LP on 22 November.

In some of his arrangements, Martin referenced his past work with the Beatles; for example, “Sea of Time” includes what MacDonald terms “an affectionate quotation” from the Indian-styled “Within You Without You”, from Sgt. Pepper, and “Yellow Submarine in Pepperland” reprises the film’s title track. In “Sea of Monsters”, Martin adapted part of Bach’s Air on the G String, while in other selections he parodies works by Stravinsky. MacDonald also detects the influence of Mozart and Webern among the “classical allusions” in Martin’s score. (by wikipedia)

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The only Beatles album that could really be classified as inessential, mostly because it wasn’t really a proper album at all, but a soundtrack that only utilized four new Beatles songs. (The rest of the album was filled out with “Yellow Submarine,” “All You Need Is Love,” and a George Martin score.) What’s more, two of the four new tracks were little more than pleasant throwaways that had been recorded during 1967 and early 1968. These aren’t all that bad; “All Together Now” is a cute, kiddie-ish McCartney singalong, while “Hey Bulldog” has some mild Lennon nastiness and a great beat and central piano riff, with some fine playing all around — each is memorable in its way, and the inclusion of the Lennon song here was all the more important, as the sequence from the movie in which it was used was deleted from the original U.S. release of the movie (which had no success whatever in the U.K. and quickly disappeared, thus making the U.S. version the established cut of the film for decades. George Harrison’s two contributions were the more striking of the new entries — “Only a Northern Song” was a leftover from the Sgt. Pepper’s sessions, generated from a period in which the guitarist became increasingly fascinated with keyboards, especially the organ and the Mellotron (and, later, the synthesizer). It’s an odd piece of psychedelic ersatz, mixing trippiness and some personal comments. Its lyrics (and title) on the one hand express the guitarist/singer/composer’s displeasure at being tied in his publishing to Northern Songs, a company in which John Lennon and Paul McCartney were the majority shareholders; and, on the other, they present Harrison’s vision of how music and recording sounded, from the inside-out and the outside-in, during the psychedelic era — the song thus provided a rare glimpse inside the doors of perception of being a Beatle (or, at least, one aspect of being this particular Beatle) circa 1967. And then there was the jewel of the new songs, “It’s All Too Much.” Coming from the second half of 1967, the song — resplendent in swirling Mellotron, larger-than-life percussion, and tidal waves of feedback guitar — was a virtuoso excursion into otherwise hazy psychedelia, and was actually superior in some respects to “Blue Jay Way,” Harrison’s songwriting contribution to The Magical Mystery Tour; the song also later rated a dazzling cover by Steve Hillage in the middle of the following decade.

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The very fact that George Harrison was afforded two song slots and a relatively uncompetitive canvas for his music shows how little the project meant to Lennon and McCartney — as did the cutting of the “Hey Bulldog” sequence from the movie, apparently with no resistance from Lennon, who had other, more important artistic fish to fry in 1968. What is here, however, is a good enough reason for owning the record, though nothing rates it as anything near a high-priority purchase. The album would have been far better value if it had been released as a four-song EP (an idea the Beatles even considered at one point, with the addition of a bonus track in “Across the Universe” but ultimately discarded). (by Richie Unterberger)

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Personnel:
George Harrison (vocals, guitar, organ, percussion, handclaps, violin)
John Lennon (vocals, guitars, piano, handclaps
Paul McCartney (vocals, bass, guitars, trumpet, handclaps, percussion)
Ringo Starr (drums, percussion, handclaps, background vocals, vocals on 01.)

George Martin (piano on 06.)
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Unknown orchestra conducted by George Martin

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Tracklist:
01. Yellow Submarine (Lennon/McCartney) 2.35
02. Only A Northern Song (Harrison) 3.20
03. All Together Now (Lennon/McCartney) 2.08
04. Hey Bulldog (Lennon/McCartney) 3.09
05. It’s All Too Much (Harrison) 6.17
06. All You Need Is Love (Lennon/McCartney) 3.42
07. Pepperland (Martin) 2.18
08. Sea Of Time (Martin) 2.59
09. Sea Of Holes (Martin) 2.15
10. Sea Of Monsters (Martin) 3.34
11. March Of The Meanies (Martin) 2.16
12. Pepperland Laid Waste (Martin) 2.08
13. Yellow Submarine In Pepperland (Lennon/McCartney) 2.09

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The Beatles – Yellow Submarine (Comic) (1968)

FrontCoverThere had been a Yellow Submarine comic published by Gold Key Comics in 1968, produced in advance of the movie. It included passages not found in the film, and character designs made prior to the final designs were okayed for the film. (wogew.blogspot)

In 1968, a comic book based on the movie Yellow Submarine was made. It was published by Gold Key comics. It doesn’t quite follow the storyline of the whole movie, it has seas that are not in the movie such as:

The Sea of Consumer Products

The Sea of Cinema

The Sea of Time looked different

The Sea of Holes looked almost the same

It has songs that are not in the movie such as:

Lovely Rita (from the Sgt Pepper album)

Getting Better (from the Sgt Pepper album)

Mary Had a Little Lamb is not a Beatles song, but it was sung to distract the Blue Meanies (by yellowsubmarine.wikia.com)

So, here´s this comic … a really nice, crazy and funny trip in the golden days of pop art …

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The poster from this comic book

The Beatles – Live In Paris 1965 (1988)

FrontCover1This bootleg features the integrity of the 2 concerts performed during their second (and last) visit in Paris (they had performed during 3 weeks at the Olympia the previous year). This day, The Beatles played two shows (afternoon & evening) with the same songs, only shifting the order of the songs. It’s quite funny to hear Paul trying to speak french in between songs.As always with “Swingin Pig”, the packaging is excellent as well as the sound quality. (by rateyourmusic.com)

Some comments on bootlegzone.com:

This is an excellent live boot. The sound quality is great, and so are the Beatles’ performances. It is interesting to compare the crowd reactions during these performances with the crowd reactions that are heard on the tapes of their January, 1964 appearances. It looks as though the French caught up to the rest of the world, in terms of screaming, by this time.

Funny to hear Paul struggle with his then awful French. Great sound.

Of all the live boots available, I like this one best. As was stated by the previous post, Paul trying to speak french is priceless (he really sucks at it).

In other words: A real funny abum from the early days of British Beat … and, of course, The Beatles … long time ago …

Recorded live at Palais Des Sports, Paris, 20 June 1965
(and not 1 Aug 1965 as stated)

And … on the 20th June 1965, I celebrate my 10th birthday !

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Personnel:
George Harrison (guitar, vocals)
Paul McCartney (bass, vocals)
John Lennon (guitar, vocals, harmonica)
Ringo Starr (drums)

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Tracklist:

Palais Des Sports – 20th June 1965 – Afternoon Show:
01. Twist And Shout (Russell/Medley) 1.41
02. She’s A Woman (Lennon/McCartney) 2.43
03. Can’t Buy Me Love (Lennon/McCartney) 2.29
04. I’m A Loser (Lennon/McCartney) 3.25
05. I Wanna Be Your Man (Lennon/McCartney) 2.25
06. A Hard Day’s Night (Lennon/McCartney) 2.47
07. Baby’s In Black (Lennon/McCartney) 2.40
08. Rock And Roll Music (Berry) 2.15
09. Everybody’s Trying To Be My Baby (Perkins) 2.30
10. I Feel Fine (Lennon/McCartney) 2.29
11. Ticket To Ride (Lennon/McCartney) 3.56
12. Long Tall Sally (Johnson/Penniman/Blackwell) 2.38

Palais Des Sports – 20th June 1965 – Evening Show:
13. Twist And Shout (Russell/Medley) 1.29
14. She’s A Woman (Lennon/McCartney) 3.03
15. I’m A Loser (Lennon/McCartney) 3.10
16. Can’t Buy Me Love (Lennon/McCartney) 2.33
17. Baby’s In Black (Lennon/McCartney) 2.45
18. I Wanna Be Your Man (Lennon/McCartney) 2.26
19. A Hard Day’s Night (Lennon/McCartney) 2.53
20. Everybody’s Trying To Be My Baby (Perkins) 2.44
21. Rock And Roll Music (Berry) 2.17
22. I Feel Fine (Lennon/McCartney) 2.38
23. Ticket To Ride (Lennon/McCartney) 3.03
24. Long Tall Sally (Johnson/Penniman/Blackwell) 2.25

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