The Beatles – Anthology 1 (1995)

FrontCover1.jpgAnthology 1 is a compilation album by the Beatles, released on 20 November 1995 by Apple Records as part of The Beatles Anthology series. It features rarities, outtakes and live performances from the period 1958–1964, including songs with original bass player Stuart Sutcliffe and drummer Pete Best. It is the first in a trilogy of albums with Anthology 2 and Anthology 3, all of which tie in with the televised special The Beatles Anthology. It contains “Free as a Bird”, billed as the first new Beatles song in 25 years. The album topped the Billboard 200 album chart and was certified 8x Platinum by the RIAA.

The album includes material from the Beatles’ days as the Quarrymen, through the Decca audition to sessions for the album Beatles for Sale. It is of historical interest as the only official release of performances with Best and Sutcliffe in the band. Sutcliffe, the band’s original bass player during 1960, and sporadically during the group’s second Hamburg season, appears on the disc-one tracks “Hallelujah, I Love Her So”, “You’ll Be Mine” and “Cayenne”. Best, who was the band’s drummer from just prior to the group’s first departure for Hamburg in August 1960 until 15 August 1962 when he was replaced by Ringo Starr, is on disc one, tracks 10–12, 15–19 and 21–22.

Disc one tracks 10–12 were recorded at a session in Hamburg where the Beatles served as the back-up band to the English rock and roll musician Tony Sheridan. Some songs from this session were released on the 1962 LP My Bonnie, credited to Tony Sheridan and the Beat Brothers. The song “My Bonnie” would be their introductory single in England, featuring Sheridan on lead vocal and guitar. Disc one tracks 21–22 are the only surviving recordings of the Beatles’ first EMI session. Track 22 is the original recording of “Love Me Do”, which would be re-recorded by the group four months later for their first single. Disc one track 24 features EMI session drummer Andy White in place of Starr.

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Disc two contains performances from comedy duo Morecambe and Wise’s popular television programme, Two of a Kind, as well as the opening song from their famed performance on The Ed Sullivan Show, which introduced the band to most of the US in 1964.

The flashpoint for the album came with the song “Free as a Bird” – the three remaining Beatles Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr re-working a John Lennon demo recording given to McCartney by Lennon’s widow, Yoko Ono. Produced by Harrison’s Traveling Wilburys band-mate Jeff Lynne, the three added additional music and lyrics, instrumentation and backing vocals, with McCartney and Harrison both taking a turn at a lead vocal.

The live BBC Radio recording of “Lend Me Your Comb” was held back from Live at the BBC for inclusion on this album, but it was later also included on On Air – Live at the BBC Volume 2.

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The cover of Anthology 1 is the first third of the Anthology collage made by Klaus Voormann. Various photographs and album covers are torn and collected together. Pete Best’s face was torn away from the Savage Young Beatles record jacket in the centre of the album cover, revealing the face of his successor, Ringo Starr, below. The missing piece was subsequently used on the cover of Best’s Haymans Green album in 2008.

The album was a large success throughout the world. It was the first Beatles album to enter the Billboard 200 album chart at number one. It sold 855,473 copies in its first week, the 27th largest one-week sales in the Soundscan history, succeeding Fresh Horses by Garth Brooks. In its second week, Anthology 1 sold 453,000 copies and maintained the top spot. This was repeated the following week, with 435,000 copies sold. In its fourth week, the same quantity was sold, but the album fell to number two, behind Mariah Carey’s Daydream. In the following week, the album fell to number three but with 601,000 sales. Anthology 1 was certified 3× Platinum by the RIAA after six weeks in the US market. In all, the album spent 29 weeks on the Billboard 200, reaching cumulative sales of 3,639,000 scans as of April 2001. In the UK, reaction was similar, but the album peaked at number two, behind Robson & Jerome’s eponymous album. In Australia, the album spent two weeks at number one in December 1995. (by wikipedia)

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Personnel:
George Harrison (vocals, lead guitar)
John Lennon (vocals, rhythm guitar, harmonica)
Paul McCartney (vocals, bass, rhythm guitar)
Ringo Starr (vocals, drums, Percussion)
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Pete Best – drums on “My Bonnie”, “Ain’t She Sweet”, “Cry for a Shadow”, “Searchin'”, “Three Cool Cats”, “The Sheik of Araby”, “Like Dreamers Do”, “Hello Little Girl”, “Bésame Mucho”, “Love Me Do”
Stuart Sutcliffe – bass guitar on “Hallelujah, I Love Her So”, “You’ll Be Mine”, “Cayenne”Colin Hanton – drums on “That’ll Be the Day”, “In Spite of All the Danger”
John Lowe – piano on “That’ll Be the Day”, “In Spite of All the Danger”
Tony Sheridan (vocalsm guitar on 10.)
Andy White – drums on “Please Please Me”

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Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. Free As A Bird (Lennon/McCartney/Harrison/Starr ) 4.25
02. We were four guys … that’s all (Lennon speaking to Jann Wenner of Rolling Stone) 8 December 1970, New York City 0.12
03. That’ll Be The Day (by the Quarrymen) (Allison/Holly(Petty) 2.08
04. In Spite of All The Danger (by the Quarrymen) (McCartney/Harrison) 2.45
05. Sometimes I’d borrow … those still exist (McCartney speaking to Mark Lewisohn – 3 November 1994 London, UK) 0.18
06. Hallelujah, I Love Her So (home demo, 1960) (Charles) 1.13
07. You’ll Be Mine (home demo, 1960) (Lennon/McCartney) 1.39
08. Cayenne (home demo, 1960) (McCartney) 1.14
09. First of all … it didn’t do a thing here (McCartney speaking to Malcom Threadgill – 27 October 1962)0.07
10. My Bonnie (by Tony Sheridan and the Beat Brothers – 22 June 1961
Friedrich-Ebert-Halle, Hamburg, Germany) (Traditional) 2.42
11. Ain’t She Sweet (by the Beat Brothers) Milton Ager, Jack Yellen 22 June 1961
Friedrich-Ebert-Halle( (Ager/Yellen) 2:13
12. Cry For A Shadow (by the Beat Brothers – 22 June 1961
Friedrich-Ebert-Halle) (Lennon/Harrison)  2.22
13. Brian was a beautiful guy … he presented us well (Lennon speaking to David Wigg for BBC Radio 1’s Scene and Heard – October 1971 New York City) 0.10
14. I secured them … a Beatle drink even then (Brian Epstein reading from A Cellarful of Noise) Brian Epstein 13 October 1964) 0.18
15. Searchin’ (Decca Audition – 1 January 1962 Decca Studios, London ) (Leiber/Stoller) 3.00
16. Three Cool Cats (Decca Audition – 1 January 1962 Decca Studios, London) (Leiber/Stoller) 2.25
17. The Sheik Of Araby” (Decca Audition – 1 January 1962 Decca Studios, London) (Smith,/Wheeler/Snyder) 1.43
18. Like Dreamers Do (Decca Audition – 1 January 1962 Decca Studios, London)  (Lennon/McCartney) 2.36
19. Hello Little Girl (Decca Audition – 1 January 1962 Decca Studios, London(Lennon/McCartney)1 1.40
20. Well, the recording test … by my artists” (Epstein reading from A Cellarful of Noise – Epstein 13 October 1964) 0.32
21. Besame Mucho (6 June 1962 EMI Studios) (Velázquez/Skylar) 2.37
22. Love Me Do (Lennon/McCartney) 2.32
23. How Do You Do It (Murray) 1.57
24. Please Please Me (Lennon/McCartney) 1.59
25. One After 909 (sequence) (Takes 3, 4 & 5 – 5 March 1963 (Lennon/McCartney) 2.23
26. One After 909 (complete) (Takes 4 & 5 – 5 March 1963) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.56
27. Lend Me Your Comb (live at the BBC for Pop Go the Beatles – 2 July 1963, Maida Vale Studios, London) (Twomey/Wise/Weisman) 1.50
28. I’ll Get You (live on Sunday Night at the London Palladium – 13 October 1963
The London Palladium, London) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.08
29. We were performers … in Britain (Lennon speaking to Wenner – 8 December 1970
New York City) 0.12
30. I Saw Her Standing There (live for The Beatles, Pop Group from Liverpool Visiting Stockholm, The Karlaplansstudion, Stockholm, Sweden – 24 October 1963) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.49
31. From Me To You (live for The Beatles, Pop Group from Liverpool Visiting Stockholm, The Karlaplansstudion, Stockholm, Sweden – 24 October 1963) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.05
32. Money (That’s What I Want) (live for The Beatles, Pop Group from Liverpool Visiting Stockholm, The Karlaplansstudion, Stockholm, Sweden – 24 October 1963) /Bradford/Gordy) 2.52
33. You Really Got A Hold On Me (live for The Beatles, Pop Group from Liverpool Visiting Stockholm, The Karlaplansstudion, Stockholm, Sweden – 24 October 1963) (Robinson) 2.58
34. Roll Over Beethoven (live for The Beatles, Pop Group from Liverpool Visiting Stockholm, The Karlaplansstudion, Stockholm, Sweden – 24 October 1963) (Berry) 24 2.22

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CD 2:
01. She Loves You (live on the Royal Variety Performance – The Prince of Wales Theatre, London, 4 November 1963) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.50
02. Till There Was You (live on the Royal Variety Performance – The Prince of Wales Theatre, London, 4 November 1963) (Willson) 2.54
03. Twist And Shout (live on the Royal Variety Performance – The Prince of Wales Theatre, London, 4 November 1963) (Russell/Medley) 3:05
04. This Boy (live on Two of a Kind; ATV Studios, London, 2 December 1963)(Lennon/McCartney) 2.22
05. I Want To Hold Your Hand (live on Two of a Kind; ATV Studios, London, 2 December 1963) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.37
06. Boys, what I was thinking… (Eric Morecambe and Ernie Wise speaking to the Beatles live on Two of a Kind – ATV Studios, 2 December 1963) 2.06
07. Moonlight Bay (live on Two of a Kind; ATV Studios, London, 2 December 1963) (Lennon/McCartney) 0.50
08. Can’t Buy Me Love (Takes 1 & 2 – 29 January 1964 Pathé Marconi, Paris, France) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.10
09. All My Loving (live on The Ed Sullivan Show –CBS-TV Studio 50, New York City, 9 February 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.19
10. You Can’t Do That (Take 6) (EMI Studios – 25 February 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.42
11. And I Love Her (Take 2) (EMI Studios – 25 February 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 1.52
12. A Hard Day’s Night (Take 1) (EMI Studios – 25 February 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.44
13. I Wanna Be Your Man (live for Around the Beatles – IBC Studios, London, 19 April 1964) (Lennon/McCartney)  1.48
14. Long Tall Sally (live for Around the Beatles – IBC Studios, London, 19 April 1964)  (Johnson/Penniman/Blackwell) 1.45
15. Boys (live for Around the Beatles – IBC Studios, London, 19 April 1964) (Dixon/Farrell) 1:50
16. Shout (live for Around the Beatles – IBC Studios, London, 19 April 1964) (R.Isley/R.Isley(K.Isley) 1.31
17. I’ll Be Back (Take 2) (EMI Studios – 1 June 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 1.13
18. I’ll Be Back (Take 3) (EMI Studios – 1 June 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 1.58
19. You Know What To Do (demo) (EMI Studios, 3 June 1964) (Harrison) 1.59
20. No Reply (demo) (EMI Studios, 3 June 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 1.46
21. Mr. Moonlight (Takes 1 & 4) (EMI Studios, 14 August 1964) (Johnson) 2.47
22. Leave My Kitten Alone (Take 5) (EMI Studios, 14 August 1964) (John(Turner/McDougal) 2.57
23. No Reply (Take 2) (EMI Studios, 30 September 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.29
24. Eight Days A Week (sequence) (Takes 1, 2 & 4) (EMI Studios, 6 October 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 1.25
25. Eight Days A Week (complete) (Take 5) (EMI Studios, 6 October 1964) (Lennon/McCartney) 2.48
26. Kansas City / Hey-Hey-Hey-Hey! (Take 2) (EMI Studios, 18 October 1964) (Leiber/Stoller/Penniman) 2.44

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Beatles Monthly – Nr. 1 August 1963

FrontCoverThe Beatles Book (also known as Beatles Monthly) was founded in 1963. It was first published in August 1963 and continued for 77 editions until it stopped publication after the December 1969 edition. It was revived in 1976, and ceased publication in 2003.

In early 1963 a publisher, Sean O’Mahony, (who already published a magazine about the music scene called Beat Instrumental) heard Please Please Me and asked Brian Epstein if he could publish a magazine devoted to The Beatles. Epstein and the group agreed and the title launched in August 1963 with a print run of 80,000. By the end of the year circulation had grown to 330,000 copies per month. O’Mahony edited the magazine under the name of Johnny Dean.

The magazine’s photographer, Leslie Bryce, had unrivalled access to the group throughout the 1960s, travelling the world and taking thousands of photographs. In addition, Beatles roadies Neil Aspinall and Mal Evans wrote many of the articles, and artist Bob Gibson created numerous cartoons and caricatures of the fab four on a regular basis. (He eventually did the cartoons for the Beatles’ 1967 Magical Mystery Tour EP-set/US-album booklet.)

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In May 1976 O’Mahony revived the publication and republished all 77 original issues surrounded by eight (later sixteen) pages of new Beatles news and articles. The reissue programme was completed in September 1982, coincidentally at a time when interest in the band was high due to the impending twentieth anniversary of “Love Me Do”. Consequently, the decision was taken to continue the magazine with all new content. Publication continued until January 2003 (Issue 321) when it once again ceased.(by wikipedia)

Enjoy this sentimental trip in the early days of the fab four …

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The Beatles – Yellow Submarine (1969)

FrontCover1And here´s the soundtrack to the comic book (*smile*)

Yellow Submarine is the tenth studio album by English rock band the Beatles, released on 13 January 1969 in the United States and on 17 January 1969 in the United Kingdom. It was issued as the soundtrack to the animated film of the same name, which premiered in London in July 1968. The album contains six songs by the Beatles, including four new songs and the previously released “Yellow Submarine” (1966) and “All You Need Is Love” (1967). The remainder of the album was a re-recording of the film’s orchestral soundtrack by the band’s producer, George Martin.

The project was regarded as a contractual obligation by the Beatles, who were asked to supply four new songs for the film. Some songs were written and recorded specifically for the soundtrack, while others were unreleased tracks from other projects. The album was issued two months after the band’s self-titled double LP (also known as the “White Album”) and was therefore not viewed by the band as a significant release. Yellow Submarine has since been afforded a mixed reception from music critics, some of whom consider that it falls short of the high standard generally associated with the Beatles’ work. It reached the top 5 in the UK and the US, and has been reissued on compact disc several times.

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The album arose from contractual obligations for the Beatles to supply new songs to the soundtrack to United Artists’ animated film Yellow Submarine.[1] Having recently completed their album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band in April 1967,[2] the group showed minimal enthusiasm for the project.[3] Along with the music for their Magical Mystery Tour TV film, the Yellow Submarine soundtrack was part of a period that author Ian MacDonald later described as the band’s “regime of continuous low-intensity recording … it had a workaday quality about it – an intrinsic lack of tension which was bound to colour the resulting material.”

There was a commitment for The Beatles to do four songs for the film. Apparently, they would say, this is a lousy song, let’s give it to Brodax.

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Only one side of the album contains songs performed by the Beatles; of the six, four were previously unreleased. “Yellow Submarine” had been issued in August 1966 as a single, topping the UK chart for four weeks,[6] and had also been released on the album Revolver. Following the Beatles’ performance of the song on the Our World international television broadcast, “All You Need Is Love” had also been issued as a single, in July 1967.

Of the unreleased tracks, the first to be recorded was George Harrison’s “Only a Northern Song”, taped in February 1967 but rejected for inclusion on Sgt. Pepper. The group performed overdubs on this basic track in April, immediately after completing the stereo mixes for that album. Among the sounds added during what Beatles historian Mark Lewisohn describes as “a curious session”, were trumpet, glockenspiel and spoken voices. Harrison’s lyrics reflect his displeasure at being merely a contracted songwriter to the Beatles’ publishing company, Northern Songs.

“All Together Now” was recorded in a single session on 12 May 1967, specifically for the film project. The title came from a phrase Paul McCartney had heard as a child, to encourage everyone to sing music hall songs. He later described the song as “a throwaway”.

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The band recorded Harrison’s “It’s All Too Much” in late May 1967 at De Lane Lea Studios in central London.[18] Inspired by its author’s experimentation with the drug LSD, and originally running to over eight minutes in length, the song reflects the Summer of Love philosophy of 1967 and makes extensive use of guitar feedback.[20] As with the later recorded “All You Need Is Love”, the track includes musical and lyrical quotations from other works – in this case, a trumpet passage from Jeremiah Clarke’s “Prince of Denmark’s March” and a lyric from the Merseys’ 1966 hit “Sorrow”.

John Lennon’s “Hey Bulldog” was recorded on 11 February 1968 and evolved from an initial intent to shoot a promotional film for the single “Lady Madonna”. Like “All Together Now”, it was specifically recorded with the film soundtrack in mind. The track’s ending featured a jam session after the point where a fade-out was intended in the final mix, which was kept in the finished version. Lennon later described the song as “a good-sounding record that means nothing”.

Side two of the album contained George Martin’s orchestral score for the film, leading with “Pepperland”.

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Side two features a re-recording of the symphonic film score composed by the Beatles’ producer, George Martin, specifically for the album. The recording took place with a 41-piece orchestra over two three-hour sessions on 22 and 23 October 1968 in Abbey Road, and edited down to the length on the LP on 22 November.

In some of his arrangements, Martin referenced his past work with the Beatles; for example, “Sea of Time” includes what MacDonald terms “an affectionate quotation” from the Indian-styled “Within You Without You”, from Sgt. Pepper, and “Yellow Submarine in Pepperland” reprises the film’s title track. In “Sea of Monsters”, Martin adapted part of Bach’s Air on the G String, while in other selections he parodies works by Stravinsky. MacDonald also detects the influence of Mozart and Webern among the “classical allusions” in Martin’s score. (by wikipedia)

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The only Beatles album that could really be classified as inessential, mostly because it wasn’t really a proper album at all, but a soundtrack that only utilized four new Beatles songs. (The rest of the album was filled out with “Yellow Submarine,” “All You Need Is Love,” and a George Martin score.) What’s more, two of the four new tracks were little more than pleasant throwaways that had been recorded during 1967 and early 1968. These aren’t all that bad; “All Together Now” is a cute, kiddie-ish McCartney singalong, while “Hey Bulldog” has some mild Lennon nastiness and a great beat and central piano riff, with some fine playing all around — each is memorable in its way, and the inclusion of the Lennon song here was all the more important, as the sequence from the movie in which it was used was deleted from the original U.S. release of the movie (which had no success whatever in the U.K. and quickly disappeared, thus making the U.S. version the established cut of the film for decades. George Harrison’s two contributions were the more striking of the new entries — “Only a Northern Song” was a leftover from the Sgt. Pepper’s sessions, generated from a period in which the guitarist became increasingly fascinated with keyboards, especially the organ and the Mellotron (and, later, the synthesizer). It’s an odd piece of psychedelic ersatz, mixing trippiness and some personal comments. Its lyrics (and title) on the one hand express the guitarist/singer/composer’s displeasure at being tied in his publishing to Northern Songs, a company in which John Lennon and Paul McCartney were the majority shareholders; and, on the other, they present Harrison’s vision of how music and recording sounded, from the inside-out and the outside-in, during the psychedelic era — the song thus provided a rare glimpse inside the doors of perception of being a Beatle (or, at least, one aspect of being this particular Beatle) circa 1967. And then there was the jewel of the new songs, “It’s All Too Much.” Coming from the second half of 1967, the song — resplendent in swirling Mellotron, larger-than-life percussion, and tidal waves of feedback guitar — was a virtuoso excursion into otherwise hazy psychedelia, and was actually superior in some respects to “Blue Jay Way,” Harrison’s songwriting contribution to The Magical Mystery Tour; the song also later rated a dazzling cover by Steve Hillage in the middle of the following decade.

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The very fact that George Harrison was afforded two song slots and a relatively uncompetitive canvas for his music shows how little the project meant to Lennon and McCartney — as did the cutting of the “Hey Bulldog” sequence from the movie, apparently with no resistance from Lennon, who had other, more important artistic fish to fry in 1968. What is here, however, is a good enough reason for owning the record, though nothing rates it as anything near a high-priority purchase. The album would have been far better value if it had been released as a four-song EP (an idea the Beatles even considered at one point, with the addition of a bonus track in “Across the Universe” but ultimately discarded). (by Richie Unterberger)

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Personnel:
George Harrison (vocals, guitar, organ, percussion, handclaps, violin)
John Lennon (vocals, guitars, piano, handclaps
Paul McCartney (vocals, bass, guitars, trumpet, handclaps, percussion)
Ringo Starr (drums, percussion, handclaps, background vocals, vocals on 01.)

George Martin (piano on 06.)
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Unknown orchestra conducted by George Martin

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Tracklist:
01. Yellow Submarine (Lennon/McCartney) 2.35
02. Only A Northern Song (Harrison) 3.20
03. All Together Now (Lennon/McCartney) 2.08
04. Hey Bulldog (Lennon/McCartney) 3.09
05. It’s All Too Much (Harrison) 6.17
06. All You Need Is Love (Lennon/McCartney) 3.42
07. Pepperland (Martin) 2.18
08. Sea Of Time (Martin) 2.59
09. Sea Of Holes (Martin) 2.15
10. Sea Of Monsters (Martin) 3.34
11. March Of The Meanies (Martin) 2.16
12. Pepperland Laid Waste (Martin) 2.08
13. Yellow Submarine In Pepperland (Lennon/McCartney) 2.09

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The Beatles – Yellow Submarine (Comic) (1968)

FrontCoverThere had been a Yellow Submarine comic published by Gold Key Comics in 1968, produced in advance of the movie. It included passages not found in the film, and character designs made prior to the final designs were okayed for the film. (wogew.blogspot)

In 1968, a comic book based on the movie Yellow Submarine was made. It was published by Gold Key comics. It doesn’t quite follow the storyline of the whole movie, it has seas that are not in the movie such as:

The Sea of Consumer Products

The Sea of Cinema

The Sea of Time looked different

The Sea of Holes looked almost the same

It has songs that are not in the movie such as:

Lovely Rita (from the Sgt Pepper album)

Getting Better (from the Sgt Pepper album)

Mary Had a Little Lamb is not a Beatles song, but it was sung to distract the Blue Meanies (by yellowsubmarine.wikia.com)

So, here´s this comic … a really nice, crazy and funny trip in the golden days of pop art …

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The poster from this comic book

The Beatles – Live In Paris 1965 (1988)

FrontCover1This bootleg features the integrity of the 2 concerts performed during their second (and last) visit in Paris (they had performed during 3 weeks at the Olympia the previous year). This day, The Beatles played two shows (afternoon & evening) with the same songs, only shifting the order of the songs. It’s quite funny to hear Paul trying to speak french in between songs.As always with “Swingin Pig”, the packaging is excellent as well as the sound quality. (by rateyourmusic.com)

Some comments on bootlegzone.com:

This is an excellent live boot. The sound quality is great, and so are the Beatles’ performances. It is interesting to compare the crowd reactions during these performances with the crowd reactions that are heard on the tapes of their January, 1964 appearances. It looks as though the French caught up to the rest of the world, in terms of screaming, by this time.

Funny to hear Paul struggle with his then awful French. Great sound.

Of all the live boots available, I like this one best. As was stated by the previous post, Paul trying to speak french is priceless (he really sucks at it).

In other words: A real funny abum from the early days of British Beat … and, of course, The Beatles … long time ago …

Recorded live at Palais Des Sports, Paris, 20 June 1965
(and not 1 Aug 1965 as stated)

And … on the 20th June 1965, I celebrate my 10th birthday !

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Personnel:
George Harrison (guitar, vocals)
Paul McCartney (bass, vocals)
John Lennon (guitar, vocals, harmonica)
Ringo Starr (drums)

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Tracklist:

Palais Des Sports – 20th June 1965 – Afternoon Show:
01. Twist And Shout (Russell/Medley) 1.41
02. She’s A Woman (Lennon/McCartney) 2.43
03. Can’t Buy Me Love (Lennon/McCartney) 2.29
04. I’m A Loser (Lennon/McCartney) 3.25
05. I Wanna Be Your Man (Lennon/McCartney) 2.25
06. A Hard Day’s Night (Lennon/McCartney) 2.47
07. Baby’s In Black (Lennon/McCartney) 2.40
08. Rock And Roll Music (Berry) 2.15
09. Everybody’s Trying To Be My Baby (Perkins) 2.30
10. I Feel Fine (Lennon/McCartney) 2.29
11. Ticket To Ride (Lennon/McCartney) 3.56
12. Long Tall Sally (Johnson/Penniman/Blackwell) 2.38

Palais Des Sports – 20th June 1965 – Evening Show:
13. Twist And Shout (Russell/Medley) 1.29
14. She’s A Woman (Lennon/McCartney) 3.03
15. I’m A Loser (Lennon/McCartney) 3.10
16. Can’t Buy Me Love (Lennon/McCartney) 2.33
17. Baby’s In Black (Lennon/McCartney) 2.45
18. I Wanna Be Your Man (Lennon/McCartney) 2.26
19. A Hard Day’s Night (Lennon/McCartney) 2.53
20. Everybody’s Trying To Be My Baby (Perkins) 2.44
21. Rock And Roll Music (Berry) 2.17
22. I Feel Fine (Lennon/McCartney) 2.38
23. Ticket To Ride (Lennon/McCartney) 3.03
24. Long Tall Sally (Johnson/Penniman/Blackwell) 2.25

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The London Jazz Four – Take A New Look At The Beatles (1967)

FrontCover1This Brit quartet made the songs of the Fab Four their own, taking a lot of risk in reinterpreting many timeless classics but also approaching lesser-known Lennon-McCartney tunes (sadly, there are no Harrison compositions on the album). The result is a collection of songs on this disc (originally released in 1967) that sound almost if they were completely new. For instance, “I Feel Fine receives a Bach-like harpsichord riff that repeats itself throughout the track, the rest of the instruments basically improvising around the song’s original melody.

John Lennon’s Dylan-esque “Rain gives a lot of space for vibes player Ron Forbes and pianist Mike McNaught alternately to showcase their visions on each song. Gone is the song’s original dark feel, which is replaced by a slow, peaceful one. The early tune “Yes It Is is barely recognizable, featuring percussion, finger cymbals, and a triangle as backdrop for the piano, which sounds as if McNaught’s fingers had a hard time moving over the keys, giving an otherwise simple song an eerie, almost ghostly feel.

The quartet swings through “Please Please Me and “Things We Said Today, but the latter has more of a Latin jazz sound with some Afro undertones. “A Hard Day’s Night turns out to be one of the best tracks on the CD. The song morphs into a jazz waltz, which is an interesting development. Also pay close attention to the playfulness and simplicity of the musicians’ take on “Yellow Submarine. (by Ernest Barteldes)

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Personnel:
Len Clarke (drums)
Ron Forbes (vibraphone)
Mike McNaught (piano)
Brian Moore (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. I Feel Fine 3.10
02. Paperback Writer 3.02
03. Rain 3.34
04. Michelle 2.58
05. Yes It Is 3.56
06. Please Please Me 3.12
07. Things We Said Today 2.51
08. From Me To You 5.23
09. A Hard Day’s Night 3.02
10. Ticket To Ride 4.07
11. Yellow Submarine 2.36

All songs written by Pul McCartney & John Lennon

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Beatles

Steve Harnell (Editor) – Vintage Rock The Beatles – The Early Years

FrontCoverHere´s an illustrated 132-page bookazine pays tribute to the early years of The Beatles.

Liverpool’s finest were quite simply the most important pop-cultural phenomenon that the 20th century and beyond has ever seen – wildly ambitious, successful, influential and groundbreaking. And all this sprang from that most British of institutions – a parish church fête, where John Lennon met Paul McCartney, 60 years ago on 6 July 1957.

In this latest Collectors Edition of Vintage Rock, we trace the band’s roots as fledgling skifflers The Quarrymen playing local gigs in Liverpool through to their hothouse development as they became The Beatles at the Cavern and in Hamburg, before moving on to inventing the mega-gig at Shea Stadium.

Inbetween, we serve up some fascinating insights into the life of their manager Brian Epstein, the astonishing rise of Beatlemania in the UK, Europe and the United States, put the band’s first five studio albums under the microscope and also go behind the scenes on their two big-screen outings, A Hard Day’s Night and Help!

It all adds up to a must-read magazine for fans of the Fab Four. The greatest that ever was and the greatest that ever will be…
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