Radu Lupu – Beethoven- Piano Sonatas #14, 8 & 21 (1973)

FrontCover1Radu Lupu CBE (30 November 1945 – 17 April 2022) was a Romanian pianist. He was widely recognized as one of the greatest pianists of his time.[3][4][5]

Born in Galați, Romania, Lupu began studying piano at the age of six. Two of his major piano teachers were Florica Musicescu, who also taught Dinu Lipatti, and Heinrich Neuhaus, who also taught Sviatoslav Richter and Emil Gilels. From 1966 to 1969, he won three of the world’s most prestigious piano competitions: the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition (1966), the George Enescu International Piano Competition (1967), and the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition (1969). These victories launched Lupu’s international career, and he appeared with all of the major orchestras and at all of the major festivals and music capitals of the world.

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From 1970 to 1993, Lupu made over 20 recordings for Decca Records. His solo recordings, which have received considerable acclaim, include works by Beethoven, Brahms, Grieg, Mozart, Schubert, and Schumann, including all of Beethoven’s piano concertos and five piano sonatas and other solo works; the Grieg and Schumann piano concertos, as well as three major solo works of Schumann; nine piano sonatas and the Impromptus and Moments musicaux of Schubert; various major solo works and the first piano concerto of Brahms; and two piano concertos of Mozart. His chamber music recordings for Decca include all of Mozart’s sonatas for violin and piano with Szymon Goldberg; the violin sonatas of Debussy and Franck with Kyung Wha Chung; and various works by Schubert for violin and piano with Goldberg.

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He additionally recorded works of Mozart and Schubert for piano four-hands and two pianos with Murray Perahia for CBS Masterworks, Schubert songs with Barbara Hendricks for EMI, and works by Schubert for piano four-hands with Daniel Barenboim for Teldec. In addition, Lupu is also noted for his performances of Bartók, Debussy, Enescu, and Janáček, among other composers.

Lupu was nominated for two Grammy Awards, winning one in 1996 for an album of two Schubert piano sonatas. In 1995, Lupu also won an Edison Award for a disc of three major piano works of Schumann. Other awards won by Lupu include the Franco Abbiati Prize in 1989 and 2006, and the 2006 Premio Internazionale Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli award. (wikipedia)

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Radu Lupu’s 1973 recital devoted to these popular “name” sonatas boasts gorgeous, roomy sonics that have not dated one iota. The performances, though full of absorbing and inspired pianism, are sometimes incongruous, stylistically speaking. The famous C-sharp minor sonata Adagio, for example, heaves, sighs, and swoons so that no dullard will miss its alleged “Moonlight” subtext. Mincing details soften the Allegretto’s woodwind-like atmosphere, while the finale erupts with violent accents and dynamic extremes. On the other hand, the grander-scaled Pathetique sonata is more conducive to Lupu’s theatrical conceits. Surprisingly, Lupu appoaches the Waldstein’s hurling brio with caution, yet turns in an inward, beautifully voiced Adagio that leads into a rather held-back finale–and do I hear some added octaves in the bass à la Backhaus? I also suspect that Lupu is cheating, playing the coda’s octaves with two hands, rather than as a glissando in one hand. Lupu might be way off base compared to more stylishly sound Beethovenians like Rudolf Serkin, Wilhelm Kempff, and Richard Goode. One thing’s for sure: Lupu’s performances are anything but faceless. (Jed Distler)

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Personnel:
Radu Lupu (piano)

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Tracklist:

Sonata In C Sharp Minor Op. 27 No. 2 ‘Moonlight’:
01. I: Adagio Sostenuto 7.05
02. II: Allegretto 2.35
03. III: Presto Agitato 7.48

Sonata In C Minor Op. 13 ‘Pathétique’:
04.
I: Grave – Allegro Molto E Con Brio 10.13
05. II: Adagio Cantabile 7.03
06. III: Rondo – Allegro 5.06

Sonata In C Major Op. 53 ‘Waldstein’:
07. I: Allegro Con Brio 10.58
08. II: Introduzione – Molto Adagio 4.35
09. III: Rondo; Allegretto Moderato – Prestissimo 10.34

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Leonard Bernstein- Ode To Freedom (Ode an die Freiheit) (Beethoven) (1990)

FrontCover1Leonard Bernstein ( August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, pianist, music educator, author, and humanitarian. Considered to be one of the most important conductors of his time, he was the first American conductor to receive international acclaim. According to music critic Donal Henahan, he was “one of the most prodigiously talented and successful musicians in American history”. Bernstein was the recipient of many honors, including seven Emmy Awards, two Tony Awards, sixteen Grammy Awards including the Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Kennedy Center Honor.

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As a composer he wrote in many genres, including symphonic and orchestral music, ballet, film and theatre music, choral works, opera, chamber music and works for the piano. His best-known work is the Broadway musical West Side Story, which continues to be regularly performed worldwide, and has been adapted into two (1961 and 2021) feature films. His works include three symphonies, Chichester Psalms, Serenade after Plato’s “Symposium”, the original score for the film On the Waterfront, and theater works including On the Town, Wonderful Town, Candide, and his MASS.

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Bernstein was the first American-born conductor to lead a major American symphony orchestra. He was music director of the New York Philharmonic and conducted the world’s major orchestras, generating a significant legacy of audio and video recordings. He was also a critical figure in the modern revival of the music of Gustav Mahler, in whose music he was most passionately interested. A skilled pianist, he often conducted piano concertos from the keyboard. He was the first conductor to share and explore music on television with a mass audience. Through dozens of national and international broadcasts, including the Emmy Award–winning Young People’s Concerts with the New York Philharmonic, he made even the most rigorous elements of classical music an adventure in which everyone could join. Through his educational efforts, including several books and the creation of two major international music festivals, he influenced several generations of young musicians.

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A lifelong humanitarian, Bernstein worked in support of civil rights; protested against the Vietnam War; advocated nuclear disarmament; raised money for HIV/AIDS research and awareness; and engaged in multiple international initiatives for human rights and world peace. Near the end of his life, he conducted an historic performance of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 in Berlin to celebrate the fall of the Berlin Wall. The concert was televised live, worldwide, on Christmas Day, 1989 (wikipedia)

The fall of the Berlin Wall 30 years ago, on 9 November 1989, changed the world. Leonard Bernstein’s legendary live recording of Beethoven’s Ode To Freedom (Symphony No. 9) captured not only the elation of the moment but conveyed a celebration of and a longing for freedom which extended far beyond the occasion. To mark the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall a special 180g vinyl release, presenting Bernstein’s historic recording of Ode To Freedom on two LPs instead of one for improved fidelity, and a CD accompanied with a DVD of the live concert have been released for the first time.

On Christmas Day December 1989 Leonard Bernstein conducted Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony featuring an international cast in the Konzerthaus at Gendarmenmark, Berlin, following the historical fall of the Berlin Wall. Significantly the words from Schiller’s Ode An Die Freude (Ode To Joy) were changed: the word “Freude” (Joy) became “Freiheit” (Freedom) – an intention that was said to have been in mind of Schiller and Beethoven already.

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Four soloists, three choirs and members of six top orchestras, representing the two German States and the four Occupying Power States of post-war Berlin, participated: musicians from orchestras of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, from Dresden, Leningrad (St Petersburg), London, New York and Paris. Three choirs supported Bernstein at his great Berlin Ode To Freedom concert: the Bavarian Radio Chorus; members of the Radio Chorus of what had been East Berlin; and the Children’s Choir of the Dresden Philharmonie. The solo quartet featured June Anderson, soprano; Sarah Walker, mezzo-soprano; Klaus König, tenor; and Jan-Hendrik Rootering, bass. When the musicians gathered in Berlin for the concert residents were chiselling away at the hated Berlin Wall. Leonard Bernstein also carved a chunk of the wall and sent it to his family in New York.

Bernstein’s biographer (and producer) Humphrey Burton noted the festive Berlin performances were to mark the absolute climax in the public life of the world citizen Leonard Bernstein. He was truly more than a conductor: he shook people awake from the rostrum, surrendering to Beethoven’s music and yet rendering it with all his heart and soul at the same time.

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Leonard Bernstein observed, “I feel this is a heaven-sent moment to sing “Freiheit” wherever the score indicates the word “Freude”. If ever there was a historic time to take an academic risk in the name of human joy, this is it, and I am sure we have Beethoven’s blessing. “Es lebe die Freiheit!”

Justus Frantz, the organizer of the concert, declared, “May this performance of the Ninth Symphony – the Harmony of the World resounding in Berlin – play a part in ensuring that this joy, ‘bright spark of divinity’, will never end.”

Leonard Bernstein lit a torch for the love of freedom and the longing for freedom that extended far beyond the occasion and is as relevant today as it was thirty years ago.
Craig Urquhart Remembers Bernstein’s Ode To Freedom in Berlin 1989

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Composer and pianist Craig Urquhart was Leonard Bernstein’s personal assistant for the last five years of his life. He recalled, “It was late December when Leonard Bernstein and I arrived in Berlin. Berlin was an excited city; historic change was taking place there. It was just weeks before that the government of East Germany had allowed its citizens to visit West Germany; the decades-long division of the city was literally crumbling. The thrill of this new-found freedom was electric in the air. Bernstein knew that this was a time for a grand musical gesture: he would conduct an international orchestra.

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It was made up of members of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra supplemented by musicians from the New York Philharmonic, London Symphony Orchestra, Orchestre de Paris, Staatskapelle Dresden and the Orchestra of the Kirov Theater, as well as the the Bavarian Radio Choir, Children’s Choir of the Dresden Philharmonic and the Radio Choir of East Berlin – not to mention a stellar cast of soloists – in a historic performance of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9. It is common knowledge that Bernstein, had been a lifelong advocate for freedom, he took the liberty of changing the Schiller text from “Freude” to “Freiheit.” He said at the time, smiling, “I’m sure that Beethoven would have given us his blessing.”

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Under the grey winter skies the muted sound of hammers chiseling at the Berlin Wall became the soundtrack of the city. During the rehearsal period, Bernstein took pleasure in walking through the now opened Brandenburg Gate, mingling with the citizens of a reunited Berlin. The moment weighed heavily on his heart as he remembered all the suffering the city’s bifurcation had caused.

On Christmas Eve Bernstein and his musicians presented the first “Freiheit Concert” in West Berlin’s Philharmonie. It was also presented by a live feed onto a large screen, for a freezing but appreciative audience on the plaza of the Gedänkniskirche in West Berlin. But it was the concert on Christmas morning in the Schauspielhaus (now the Konzerthaus) in East Berlin that caught everyone’s imagination, not only among the public who watched on the big screen on the Gendarmenmarkt, but also of those who watched the live broadcast – over 100 million television viewers worldwide.

German vinly edition:
German Vinly Edition

All were moved by the magic of hearing the word “Freiheit” sung from the rafters. No words can describe the reverent energy, happiness and grave responsibility that was felt in the hall. Even as I write my eyes well up with tears, for we all felt a great divide had been healed. Lenny did not believe in division, and here was a dream come true. Everyone gave their all, and the performance was a historic moment captured forever on film and recording.

As a final gesture after the concerts and receptions, Lenny and I, with a couple of friends drove to the western side of the wall behind the Reichstag: no television, no reporters, just us private citizens of the world. Lenny borrowed a hammer from a young boy, and he took his turn at tearing down, at least this wall, among all those he’d so worked so hard to dismantle in the hearts and minds of man.”(Sharon Kelly)

Recorded live at the Schauspielhaus, Berlin, 25 December 1989

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Personnel:
Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra conducted by Leonard Bernstein
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members ofOrchestra Of The Kirov Theatre, Leningrad, Orchestre De Paris, Dresden Staatskapelle, London Symphony Orchestra, New York Philharmonic
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June Anderson (Sopran)
Klaus König (Tenor)
Jan-Hendrik Rootering (Bass)
Sarah Walker (Mezzo Sopran)
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The Berlin Radio Chorus
Dresden Philharmonic Children’s Chorus
Bavarian Radio Chorus conducted by Wolfgang Seeliger

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Tracklist.

Symphony No. 9 In D Minor, Op. 125:
01. Allegro Ma Non Troppo, Un Poco Maestoso 18.04
02. Molto Vivace 10.44
03.  Adagio Molto E Cantabile 20.13
04. Presto – Allegro Assai 28.55

Music: Ludwig van Beethoven
Lyrics: Friedrich von Schiller

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East German students sit on the Berlin Wall at the Brandenburg Gate in front of border guards in November 1989:
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More from Leonard Bernstein:
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Leonard Bernstein & The Boston Symphony Orchestra – The Final Concert (1992)

.FrontCover1Leonard Bernstein ( August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, pianist, music educator, author, and humanitarian. Considered to be one of the most important conductors of his time, he was the first American conductor to receive international acclaim. According to music critic Donal Henahan, he was “one of the most prodigiously talented and successful musicians in American history”. Bernstein was the recipient of many honors, including seven Emmy Awards, two Tony Awards, sixteen Grammy Awards including the Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Kennedy Center Honor.

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As a composer he wrote in many genres, including symphonic and orchestral music, ballet, film and theatre music, choral works, opera, chamber music and works for the piano. His best-known work is the Broadway musical West Side Story, which continues to be regularly performed worldwide, and has been adapted into two (1961 and 2021) feature films. His works include three symphonies, Chichester Psalms, Serenade after Plato’s “Symposium”, the original score for the film On the Waterfront, and theater works including On the Town, Wonderful Town, Candide, and his MASS.

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Bernstein was the first American-born conductor to lead a major American symphony orchestra. He was music director of the New York Philharmonic and conducted the world’s major orchestras, generating a significant legacy of audio and video recordings. He was also a critical figure in the modern revival of the music of Gustav Mahler, in whose music he was most passionately interested. A skilled pianist, he often conducted piano concertos from the keyboard. He was the first conductor to share and explore music on television with a mass audience. Through dozens of national and international broadcasts, including the Emmy Award–winning Young People’s Concerts with the New York Philharmonic, he made even the most rigorous elements of classical music an adventure in which everyone could join. Through his educational efforts, including several books and the creation of two major international music festivals, he influenced several generations of young musicians.

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A lifelong humanitarian, Bernstein worked in support of civil rights; protested against the Vietnam War; advocated nuclear disarmament; raised money for HIV/AIDS research and awareness; and engaged in multiple international initiatives for human rights and world peace. Near the end of his life, he conducted an historic performance of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 in Berlin to celebrate the fall of the Berlin Wall. The concert was televised live, worldwide, on Christmas Day, 1989 (wikipedia)

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While for obvious reasons this wasn’t billed as ”The Final Concert” at the time, there must have been quite a few members of the Tanglewood audience who realized what was happening. In places Tim Page’s notes read like a horror story: the fatally ill Bernstein ”cautious, reined-in, measuring his every motion with gravity and care”, nearly breaking down in the Beethoven, and conducting most of the scherzo ”leaning against the back of the podium, gasping for breath.” I’m glad I wasn’t there.

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Painful as all this detail is though, it doesn’t really have much bearing on the central question: what kind of performances are these? In the case of the Four Sea Interludes the answer is, decidedly odd. There’s a strong emotional current running through much of this, but it clogs in too many places, especially in the heavy slurring and dogged tempos of most of ”Storm”—a clear case of emotional overload. The big brass groundswell in ”Dawn” is impressive—as though Britten has (uncharacteristically) been taking lessons from Sibelius—but the similar massive cresendo towards the end of ”Sunday Morning” is out of scale: bell sounds more appropriate to Mussorgsky’s Kremlin than to Britten’s tiny Suffolk fishing village.

Leonard Bernstein06As for the Beethoven—well, in spite of what Page tells us I find it quite impressive. Tempos can be on the deliberate side, sound can be overbearing (the recording gives the timpani a fuzzy edge), but there’s surprisingly little pulling-about of pulse, and the expression—more contained than in a normal Lenny performance—has warmth and fluency. The finale, on the other hand, is a struggle in the positive sense (I emphasize that I made my notes before reading the booklet). The huge timpani crescendos aren’t to my taste, but there’s no denying the feeling behind them, or the will within the heroic tonal stuggle of the coda. It doesn’t all work: going through trio repeats both times at Bernstein’s portentous tread is a bit of an ordeal (what it must have been for Bernstein himself defies speculation). I certainly wouldn’t put it at, or even near the top of any list of recommended Sevenths. But I am glad I heard it. Even in such appalling circumstances, Leonard Bernstein was still capable of enriching our understanding of Beethoven. (gramophone.co.uk)

Recorded live at Tanglewood, Lenox, Massachusetts./USA , August 19, 1990

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Personnel:
Boston Symphony Orchestra conducted by Leonard Bernstein

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Tracklist:

Benjamin Britten: Four Sea Interludes From The Opera “Peter Grimes” Op. 33:
01. Dawn 3.41
02. Sunday Morning 4.01
03. Moonlight 5.00
04. Storm 5.32

Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony No. 7 Op. 92:
05. Poco Sostenuto – Vivace 16.17
06. Allegretto 9.47
07. Presto 10.25
08. Allegro Con Brio 8.39

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The official website:
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Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (Kurt Mazur) – Beethoven Triple Concerto (1974)

FrontCover1Ludwig van Beethoven’s Concerto for Violin, Cello, and Piano in C major, Op. 56, commonly known as the Triple Concerto, was composed in 1803 and published in 1804 by Breitkopf & Härtel. The choice of the three solo instruments effectively makes this a concerto for piano trio, and it is the only concerto Beethoven ever completed for more than one solo instrument. A typical performance takes approximately thirty-seven minutes.

Beethoven’s early biographer Anton Schindler claimed that the Triple Concerto was written for Beethoven’s royal pupil, the Archduke Rudolf of Austria. The Archduke, who became an accomplished pianist and composer under Beethoven’s tutelage, was only in his mid-teens at this time, and it seems plausible that Beethoven’s strategy was to create a showy but relatively easy piano part that would be backed up by two more mature and skilled soloists. However, there is no record of Rudolf ever performing the work.

The Triple Concerto was publicly premiered in 1808, at the summer Augarten concerts in Vienna. The violinist in the premiere was Carl August Seidler,and the cellist was Nikolaus Kraft,[3] who was known for “technical mastery” and a “clear, rich tone”.: 162  The concerto was Beethoven’s first work to use advanced cello techniques.

In the published version, the concerto bore a dedication to a different patron: Prince Lobkowitz.

Portrait of Ludwig van Beethoven (1803):
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The first movement is broadly scaled and cast in a moderate march tempo, and includes decorative solo passage-work and leisurely repetitions, variations, and extensions of assorted themes. A common feature is a dotted rhythm (short-long, short-long) that lends an air of graciousness and pomp that is not exactly “heroic,” but would have conveyed a character of fashionable dignity to contemporary listeners—and perhaps a hint of the noble “chivalric” manner that was becoming a popular element of novels, plays, operas, and pictures. The jogging triplets that figure in much of the accompaniment also contribute to this effect. In this movement, as in the other two, the cello enters solo with the first subject. Unusual for a concerto of this scale, the first movement begins quietly, with a gradual crescendo into the exposition, with the main theme later introduced by the soloists. Also unusually, the exposition modulates to A minor instead of the expected G major. (Beethoven’s friend Ferdinand Ries later did the same mediant transition in his sixth concerto.) This movement takes sixteen to nineteen minutes.

The slow movement, in A-flat major, is a large-scale introduction to the finale, which follows it without pause. The cello and violin share the melodic material of the movement between them while the piano provides a discreet accompaniment. This movement takes about five to six minutes.

Notes

There is no break between then second and third movements. Dramatic repeated notes launch into the third movement, a polonaise (also called “polacca”), an emblem of aristocratic fashion during the Napoleonic era, which is, thus, in keeping with the character of “polite entertainment” that characterizes this concerto as a whole. The bolero-like rhythm, also characteristic of the polonaise, can be heard in the central minor theme of the final movement. This movement takes about thirteen to fourteen minutes.

In addition to the violin, cello, and piano soloists, the concerto is scored for one flute, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani, and strings. The flute, oboes, trumpets, and timpani are tacet during the second movement. (wikipedia)

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Czech symphony orchestra. Established in 1894 as the orchestra of The National Theatre (Orchestr Národního Divadla) in Prague. First performed under its name on January 4, 1896, conducted by Antonín Dvořák. Independent orchestra since 1901.

The orchestra is ranked among the best in the world for its particular sound. The orchestra’s principal concert venue is the Rudolfinum.

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Their conducor for these recordings was Kurt Masur:

Kurt Masur (18 July 1927 – 19 December 2015) was a German conductor. Called “one of the last old-style maestros” he directed many of the principal orchestras of his era. He had a long career as the Kapellmeister of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, and also served as music director of the New York Philharmonic. He left many recordings of classical music played by major orchestras. Masur is also remembered for his actions to support peaceful demonstrations in the 1989 anti-government demonstrations in Leipzig; the protests were part of the events leading up to the fall of the Berlin wall. (wikipedia)

Enjoy these historic recordings of another masterpiece by Ludwig van Beethoven !

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Personnel:
The Czech Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Kurt Masur
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Josef Chuchro (cello)
Jan Panenka (piano)
Josef Suk (violin)

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Tracklist:

Concerto For Violin, Cello, Piano And Orchestra In C Major, Op. 56
01. Allegro 16.30
02. Largo / Rondo Alla Polacca 18.04

Music: Ludwig van Beethoven

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Various Artists – Concert Of The Century (1976)

FrontCover1.JPGI guess this was a very special night at the Carnegie Hall, New York. This concert should celebrate the 85th anniversary of this legendary concert hall.

My uncle bought this double LP as a Christmas present for my father back when it first came out. It was recorded in celebration of the 85th anniversary of Carnegie Hall. That concert night featured Leonard Bernstein and members of the NYP, Isaac Stern, Rostropovich, Yehudi Menuhin, and of course, Dieskau and Horowitz! Bach’s double violin concerto in D minor is unpolished with Stern and Menuhin and the entire cast singing Handel’s “Hallelujah” from the Massiah at the end is a bit much and over the top.

Still, it was indeed a historical night and Dieskau and Horowitz’ performance of Schumann’s Dichterliebe made it so. A must have for anyone who loves this piece or wishes to fall in love with it. (Peter Chordas)

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The performance of the slow movement of the rachmaninoff cello sonata is among the most touching recordings that have ever been made. (Joerg)

The performance of the slow movement of the rachmaninoff cello sonata is among the most touching recordings that have ever been made. (Pete)

All lovers of Lieder seem to have a certain passion and veneration for Fischer-Dieskau’s interpretation of Schumann’s Dichterliebe. It is appearant that this singer’s understanding of the music, his vocal capacity, his beautiful phrasing, clear diction, and his general (outstanding) musicianship enable him to communicate these Lieder in a way nobody else has done before (save maybe Hotter) or since.
In this live-recording he is supported by no other than Vladimir Horowitz! And the inspiration between these two artists works wonders. Horowitz’ playing in crucial moments of the cycle fx “Ich Grolle Nicht” adds a spiritual dimension to the interpretation that you do not get from Moore, Brendel or Demus. We are dealing with the best interpretation of this cycle ever conveyed to disc. (Tommy Nielsen)

And … listen to “Pater Noster” … unbelieveable music … I call this music … spiritual music, even I don´t believe in god !

What a night !

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Personnel:
Leonard Bernstein (harpsichord on 05.)
Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau (vocals on 04. + 07.)
Vladimir Horowitz (piano on 02. – 04. + 07.)
Yehudi Menuhin (violin on 05. + 07.)
Mstislav Rostropovich (cello on 02., 03. + 07.)
Isaac Stern (violin on 02., 05. + 07.)

Members Of The New York Philharmonic conducted by Leonard Bernstein (on 01., 05. + 07.)
The Oratorio Society Orchestra conducted by Lyndon Woodside (o6. + 07.)

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Tracklist:
01. Leonore – Overture No3/Ouvertüre Nr3/Ouverture Nº3 Op.72a (Beethoven) 14.34
02. Piano Trio In A Minor/Klaviertrio, A-moll/Trio Pour Piano En La Mineur – Op.50, I – Pezzo Elegiaco (Tchaikovsky) 18.18
03. Sonata For Cello & Piano In G Minor/Sonate Für Violoncello & Klavier G-moll/Sonate Pour Violoncelle & Piano En Sol Mineur – Op.19, III Andante (Rachmaninoff) 5.47
04. Dichterliebe, Op.48 (Schumann/Heine) 29.30
05. Concerto In D Minor For Two Violins/Konzert Für Zwei Violinen, D-moll/Concerto Pour Deux Violons En Ré-mineur BWV 1043 (Bach) 15.29
06. Pater Noster (Tchaikovsky) 3.53
07. The Messiah/Hallelujah Chorus (Händel) 4.04

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Various Artists – Pianissimo – Music For Quiet Moments (1998)

frontcover1Only in the silence can music touch a chord within us, and create a distant echo. And it is through the silence that the piano can open and blossom with it incomparable voice, and the vibration of it strings melt into melody.

Since the invention of the modern Pianoforte in the 18th century, composers have again and again been inspired by its special sensibilities, and the capacity of this Instrument to encompass the slightest expressive nuances and translate them into Sound.

On this album you will find a collection of the loveliest piano melodies in musical history: Whether the Adagio sosenuto from Beethoven´s Moonlight Sonata, or the Largo from his Piano Concerto, whether Listz´s Liebestraum, or Schumann´s Träumerei, the Adagio from Grieg´s  Piano Concerto or Chopin´s Nocturne, all show how this instrument has struck a chord in these Composers (Georg Stänzel; taken from the original liner notes)

Enjoy the sounds of silence !

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Tracklist:
01. Alfredo Perl: Adagio Sostenuto (Beethoven)  6.02
02. Jena Philharmonic Orchestra: Largo (Beethoven) 10.41
03. Ricardo Castro: Adagio (Mozart) 4.14
04. Carmen Piazzini: Adagio (Haydn) 5.00
05. Nadja Rubanenko: Sehr langsam (Schumann) 4.13
06. Alfredo Perl: Adagio (Grieg) 6.52
07. Carmen Piazzini:  Danza Del Moza Donosa (Ginastera) 3.26
08. Carmen Piazzini:  Cancion De Las Venusinas (Piazolla) 3.26
09. Arkady Sevidov: Barcarolle (Tchaikovsky) 5.16
10. Ricardo Castro: Nocturne No. 1 Op. 9/1 (Chopin)  5.35
11. Michael Krücker: Liebestraum Op. 62 No. 3/Poco Allegretto Con Affetto (Liszt) 4.40
12. Andreas Bach: Träumerei (Schumann) 2.17
13. Russian Philharmonic Orchestra + Vladimir Mishtchuk: Adagio Sostenuto (Rachmaninov) 11.38

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Another quiet moment
(I shoot this picture near Berchtesgaden (Bavarian Alps) in october 2009)

Donald Runnicles – Grand Teton Music Festival (2010)

FrontCover1The Grand Teton Music Festival (GTMF) is known for orchestral performances equaling the grandeur of our Teton Mountain setting. Hailing from great orchestras, musicians return to the Tetons each summer to perform challenging repertoire.

Maestro Donald Runnicles has led the Grand Teton Music Festival as its Music Director since 2006. Runnicles is concurrently the Music Director of the Deutsche Oper Berlin, the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra and Principal Guest Conductor of the Atlanta Symphony.

The Grand Teton Music Festival began in 1962. Concerts in the early years took place in a canvas tent at the base of Rendezvous Mountain. Through the years the Festival has grown into one of the nation’s finest, and now takes place in acoustically-acclaimed Walk Festival Hall.

Donald Runnicles is concurrently the General Music Director of the Deutsche Oper Berlin; Chief Conductor of BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra; Principal Guest Conductor of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra; and Music Director of the Grand Teton Music Festival. Maestro Runnicles’ career can be characterized by high quality of performances strongly centered in grand romantic opera and symphonic repertoire of the late 19th and 20th centuries.

DonaldRunniclesAs General Music Director of the Deutsche Oper Berlin, Mr. Runnicles has primary responsibility for the musical forces of this historic company which produces, on average, twenty five productions per season. This season, Mr. Runnicles conducted Don Carlo, Otello, Tristan und Isolde, Billy Budd, and Werther among others.

Born and raised in Edinburgh, Mr. Runnicles literally returned home to take up the post as Chief Conductor of the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra (BBC SSO). He conducts five of the BBC SSO’s main series programs in the orchestra’s Glasgow home and leads this orchestra in two programs at the London Proms each summer.

Maestro Runnicles has been Music Director of the Grand Teton Music Festival (GTMF) since 2006 and recently renewed his commitment through 2019. At GTMF he designs the repertoire; conducts four weeks; and participates as a pianist in a number of chamber concerts.

Runnicles’ commercial recording of Wagner arias with Jonas Kaufmann and the Deutsche Oper Berlin won the 2013 Gramophone prize for best vocal recording.

In March of 2015 he will, once again, conduct at the Berlin Philharmonic. Then in June of 2015 he returns to the San Francisco Opera (where he conducted for seventeen years) for a new production of Berlioz Les Troyens.

TetonVillage02Christmas time in Teton Village

And this is a very special CD:
“This recording is not for sale or broadcast. For promotional use only.”

All pieces recorded live by the Grand Teton Music Festival Orchestra in Walk Festival Hall, Teton Village, Wyoming durch the 2010 Summer Season (it was the 49th Summer Season: June 30 – August 14, 2010 !)

All you have to do is to listen and enjoy these rare recordings with wonderful compositions by classic composers like Beethoven, Ravel, Brahms, Mozart …

TetonVillage03Personnel:
The Grand Teton Music Festival Orchestra conducted by Donald Runnicles

BookletTracklist:

Ludwig van Beethoven:
01. Symphony No. 5 in C minor, op. 67 – Allegro con brio 7.41

John Adams:
02. Slominsky´s Earbox 7.43

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart:
03. Symphony No. 40 in G minor, K. 550 – Molto allegro 9.33

Johannes Brahms:
04. Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor, op. 15 – Adagio 12.41

Edward Elgar:
05. Introduction & Allegro for Strings 13.55

Maurice Ravel:
La Valse 12.25

 

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TetonVillage01Founded in the early 1960’s, Teton Village was modeled after European-style villages and has continued to evolve and progress into a mature, year-round, family-friendly retreat. Teton Village is located just 12 miles from the town of Jackson (Jackson Hole) at the base of Rendezvous Peak. Jackson Hole is a high mountain valley located along the western border of the state of Wyoming. The name “hole” derives from language used by early trappers (or mountain men) to describe a valley surrounded by mountains. These valleys contain rivers and streams which are  good habitat for beaver and other fur-bearing animals the trappers were seeking.

Jackson Hole is surrounded by the Teton mountain range on the west and the Gros Ventre mountain range on the east. With foothills and jagged peaks, the Tetons are commonly associated with Jackson Hole and are a popular sightseeing attraction for many visitors. The Gros Ventre Range contrastingly is geologically older than the Tetons and has a much broader width, encompassing huge expanses of wilderness.