Brian May & Friends – Star Fleet Project (1983)

FrontCover1Star Fleet Project is a project of Brian May, most famous as the guitarist from Queen, which resulted in an album with the same name. The project was released as the work of “Brian May + Friends”, consisting of May, guitarist Eddie Van Halen, drummer Alan Gratzer (of REO Speedwagon), Phil Chen (session bassist who played with Jeff Beck and Rod Stewart), and Fred Mandel (session keyboard player who also played as additional keyboard player on Queen’s Hot Space World Tour and The Works). Roger Taylor, Queen’s drummer, provided backing vocals for the title song. It was not meant for the tapes to be released and they had minimal mixing before release.

“I could have put away these tapes in a bottom drawer and kept them as a private record of one of the best experiences of my life. But the few people I’ve played them for have urged me to ‘publish’…I haven’t messed one scrap with the tracking done on the day. The rest is simply mixed ‘naked’.” (Brian May)

Recorded on 21 and 22 April 1983 at the Record Plant Studios, Los Angeles, California, it was released in October of the same year as a Mini-LP, a “challenge to the established principle that a piece of rock music must fit into either a 2×4 minute single, or a 2×20 minute LP format”. The LP consisted of three songs: “Star Fleet”, “Let Me Out”, and “Blues Breaker”.

The idea for the album came from May’s son, Jimmy.

“Star Fleet is the theme tune for a superb TV sci-fi series broadcast in England for kids of all ages; Japanese visuals and British soundtrack including music by Paul Bliss. The heroes pilot space vehicles which can assemble into a giant robot for land battles. The aliens fly fantastic insect-like craft which spawn smaller fighting machines; all intent on possession of the secret of F Zero One. Having been introduced to all this by my small boy, I became equally obsessed by it, and formed the idea of making a hard rock version of the title theme.” (Brian May)

Inlet01A

“Let Me Out” was an old Brian May song which until that point had not been committed to record. During the song Eddie Van Halen “tortures his top string to its audible death” (according to May’s liner notes) and plays the rest of the song on the remaining five.

“Blues Breaker” was dedicated to Eric Clapton, of whom both Van Halen and May were huge fans. This song, as well as “Let Me Out” were more spontaneous than “Star Fleet”, showing both guitarists enjoying a jamming session, with Brian showing off his signature sound and Van Halen using his tapping technique to great effect (although the best example of this is at the beginning of “Star Fleet”). (by wikipedia)

This near-legendary mini-album is probably infamous for the wrong reasons.  Ask a friend if they’ve heard this record.  If they haven’t, they may respond, “But that’s the one with Eddie Van Halen, right?  And they did that song for Clapton, and he hated it, right?”  That’s how the story goes anyway.

SingleFront+BackCoverCover
Single release

The fact is that Star Fleet Project is actually really good, and so is “Blues Breaker (Dedicated to E.C.)”.  And yes, this is one of Eddie Van Halen’s rare cameos outside his eponymous band.  I am a fan of both Queen and Van Halen, but my love of Van Halen trumps my love of Queen.  As a Van Halen fan, it is really exciting to hear Eddie playing outside his band’s box.  On a technical level, I don’t know exactly how Eddie is torturing his guitar strings, but I sure love the sounds that come out of it.  I’m hearing Eddie at what many people consider to be his creative peak.  This is the era of 1984, “Jump”, and “Beat It”, considered by many to be the greatest guitar solo of the decade.  It’s sheer nirvana to hear Eddie tapping over Brian May’s trademark guitar sound.  It’s two things you never pictured together.  Once you hear them together, it’s like Reece’s peanut butter cups!

Eddie throws every trick he has into the bag.  Tapping, squeals and eruptions, it’s all here.  As for Brian, he does double duty on lead vocals as well, on two tracks:  “Star Fleet” and “Let Me Out”.  “Star Fleet” (8 minutes in its album incarnation) is a theme song that Brian covered, from a Japanese show that his son was a fan of.  It’s the most commercial of the songs, but I have to say I love it.  The chorus isn’t the best, but the guitar playing blows my mind every single time.

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Queen fans may enjoy the piano blues “Let Me Out” best, as it sounds like it would have fit right in on News of the World.  I can imagine Freddie putting his spin on it quite easily.  Brian takes the first solo, but next time he says “Help me, Edward!” and it’s Van Halen playing the blues.  You don’t get this on Van Halen albums.  Brian and Ed alternate, and then Eddie blazes the fretboard shredder style.  To hear these two guys going back and forth over a blues progression is such a monumental moment.

The final track (and all of side 2) is the infamous “Blues Breaker”.  I’m not sure what E.C. didn’t like about it (I’ll just assume he was too humble to accept such flattery).  You don’t get to hear Eddie Van Halen nor Brian May jamming very often.  This is the second such jam, and this one well over the 12 minute mark!  You’ll wonder where the time went.  As an admirer of both guitarists, I’m constantly in a state of anticipation for what they will play next. The backing band are not slouches either: Alan Gratzer – drums, Phil Chen – bass guitar, Fred Mandel – keyboards.  They captured this stuff mostly live off the floor, and that’s the way the record sounds. (by mikeladano.com)

May+Friends

Personnel:
Phil Chen (bass)
Alan Gratzer (drums)
Edward van Halen (guitar)
Fred Mandel (keyboards)
Brian May (guitar, vocals)

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. Star Fleet (Bliss) 8.11
02. Let Me Out (May) 7.18
03. Blues Breaker (Gratzer/May/v.Halen/Mandel/Chen) 12.54
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04. Starfleet (single US edit) (Bliss) 3.07
05. Son Of Starfleet (single B-side) (May) 4.33

LabelA1

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LinerNotesliner notes

Paul Butterfield Band – Rockpalast 1978 (2010)

PaulButterfieldFrontCover1Long before Blues Traveller, there was this band called The Paul Butterfield Blues Band, led by the vocal & harmonica talents of Paul Butterfield. Many aspiring blues and rock musicians passed through Butterfield’s band throughout the 1960’s & 1970’s and went on to greater fame, Mike Bloomfield being one of the most famous. Here on this 1978 concert DVD, recorded for the Rockpalast German TV show in Essen at the Grugahalle, Butterfield and his ‘non’ blues band rip it up on an all too short 45 minute set that incorporates blues and funk into a hard rockin’ set of covers and originals.

Many great guitar players have made their way through the ranks of Butterfield’s bands over the years, and this show is no exception. Hot shot player Buzz Feiten and 19 year old phenom Peter Atanasoff are the guitar duo for this show, and they lay down plenty of mean licks and wild solos. Feiten should be a stranger to no one, as he’s appeared as a session man for virtually everyone in rock, pop, jazz, and R&B over the last 40 years, as well as leading his own ensembles and creating a new tuning system for guitar players. His commanding riffs and fiery solos are all over the place here, injecting plenty of rock and fusion firepower into tunes like “Fair Enough”, ‘Goin’ Down”, “Born Under Bad Sign”, and the scorching extended wah-wah break on “Fool In Love”, perhaps one of the best wah-wah solos you’ll ever hear. Though most of this is pretty rocking stuff, the band do share a tender moment with the audience on the classic “Just When I Needed You Most”, with Butterfield adding a great vocal. For fans of wild jams, wait till you see Butterfield, Feiten, and Atanasoff dueling it out on some fiery guitar & harmonica exchanges on the raucous “Be Good to Yourself”.

PaulButterfield

Much like what John Mayall did throughout the 60’s, introducing talented young players to the world through his music, Butterfield basically did the same with his band. It’s a shame Paul passed away a decade after this show was recorded, as we all probably missed out on more hot young blues and rock players that he surely would have found to help flash out his vision. If you’ve never experienced the skills of Buzz Feiten, give this a watch and prepare to be amazed.

This is blues rock of the highest order folks, with some of the most scorching guitar licks you are ever going to hear. Check it out. (by Pete Pardo)

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Paul Butterfield certainly had his demons. He abused alcohol, he became addicted to heroin, and he suffered from bouts of severe depression — all of which eventually made him less productive than he could have been. Butterfield wasn’t as visible or as consistent in the late ’70s as he had been in the 1960s, but even so, the singer/harmonica player had some creative triumphs during that period — and Butterfield is in very good form on this 68-minute CD, which focuses on a September 15, 1978 concert at the Grugahalle in Essen, Germany. Although Butterfield had both physical and emotional problems in 1978, he rises to the occasion during an inspired and diverse set that includes a lot of blues-rock but doesn’t focus on blues-rock exclusively. Butterfield shines as a blues-rocker on “New Walking Blues,” “One More Heartache,” “Goin’ Down,” and the Albert King-associated “Born Under a Bad Sign,” but he favors more of a hard rock/arena rock outlook on “Fool in Love” and “It’s Alright” — and there are major soul leanings on “Be Good to Yourself.” Meanwhile, “Just When I Needed You the Most” is the closest the CD comes to pop/rock. Butterfield leads a rock-solid lineup in Essen, employing Peter Atanasoff and Buzzy Feiten on guitar, Bobby Vega on bass, and Ernest Carter on drums; this isn’t the most famous lineup of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, but it’s a respectable lineup — one that obviously appreciates Butterfield’s versatility and has no problem handling a variety of songs. Although it falls short of essential and isn’t recommended to casual listeners, this CD is a pleasing document of Butterfield’s Essen performance. (by Alex Henderson)

This is one of the best live recordings by Paul Butterfield !

Recorded live at the 3rd Rockpalast night on September 15/16, 1978
at the Grugahalle, Essen, Germany

PaulButterfield

Personnel:
Peter Atanasoff (guitar)
Paul Butterfield (vocals, harmonica)
Ernest Carter (drums)
Buzzy Feiten (guitar)
Bobby Vega (bass)

Booklet01A
Tracklist:

01. Rockpalast Intro 0.29
02. Fair Enough (unknown) 4.51
03. One More Heartache (Moore/Robinson/Rogers/Tarplin/White) 4.14
04. Fool In Love (unknown) 5.30
05. New Walking Blues (Johnson) 5.28
06. It’s Alright (Butterfield) 5.17
07. Goin’ Down (Nix) 5.25
08. Born Under A Bad Sign (Jones/Bell) 3.50
09. Just When I Needed You Most (v.Warmer/Wilson) 5.06
10. Be Good To Yourself (Fraser) 10.10
11. Interview (with Alan Bangs) 13.24

CD
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Equipment

Paul´s equipment

Ten Years After – Live At The Sports Stadium, Orlando, Florida (1973)

FrontCover1On a hot summer night Alvin Lee, Leo Lyons, Chick Churchill and Ric Lee took the stage to a capacity crowd at Orlando Sports Stadium in Orlando Florida. Here is the audio of this set.
It was also broadcast on a local F.M. radio station.

Their appearance at the 1969 Woodstock Festival catapulted Ten Years After into the realm of superstardom. The subsequent release of “I’m Going Home” in the Woodstock movie and on the soundtrack album inspired countless guitar players and became a staple of FM radio throughout the next decade. Although front man Alvin Lee has publicly lamented that he missed the intimacy of smaller venues, there is no denying the impact that their Woodstock appearance made in bringing his music to a worldwide audience. The band continued releasing acclaimed albums in the early 1970s, including the 1971 release A Space In Time, and Rock And Roll Music To The World the following year, but by this point, Lee was looking to expand his musical horizons and began working outside the band, releasing the more introspective On The Road To Freedom in collaboration with Mylon Le Fevre.

TenYearsAfter02When Ten Years After hit the road again in 1973, the band retained the high-energy sound they were well known for. In January, they recorded a double-live album in Frankfurt, Germany that captured the group in full flight. When the tour hit the United States, arrangements were made to record the band again for a King Biscuit Flower Hour broadcast. Here for the first time is an expanded edition of that performance featuring all the songs featured in that original August 1973 KBFH broadcast, in addition to two songs that, due to time limitations, were not included.

The recording kicks off with the classic title track to the Rock And Roll Music To The World album. A straightforward rock ‘n’ roll number, this retains the infectiousness of the studio recording, while raising the excitement level up a notch. “Slow Blues In C,” the first of the two songs not included in the original broadcast, follows this. Here, Alvin Lee gets a chance to display his blues roots while the band gets an opportunity to improvise a bit. “Spoonful,” a song more associated with Cream than Ten Years After, gets a relatively concise treatment here, with the band demonstrating their expertise at building tension, beginning slowly and modestly before Alvin Lee’s furious soloing brings it to a frenetic close.

A rare live performance of “Turned Off T.V. Blues” follows, featuring passionate vocals from Lee and extraordinary interplay between Lee and keyboard player Chick Churchill. Throughout this set, Churchill often veers away from his trademark organ to play electric piano. This adds a distinct change to the band’s sound, but is never less than impressive. The rhythm section of Leo Lyons and Ric Lee are also featured prominently in the mix and it is a delight to hear the bottom end so crystal clear and punchy. The performances aside, this recording has an outstanding mix that captures the interaction of the four band members and better represents where the group was at musically in 1973 than the live album recorded earlier that same year.

TenYearsAfter03

The other song that was never broadcast is up next. “I Woke Up This Morning” features imaginative soloing from Alvin Lee, with Churchill’s organ and the rhythm section vamping along in the bebop style that defined the band’s sound in the early years. Leo Lyon’s jazzy bass style and Alvin Lee’s lightning-fast fretwork are in abundance here.

The set ends with a frenetic romp through Chuck Berry’s “Sweet Little Sixteen” before closing with the blazing crowd-pleaser “I’m Going Home.” As can be expected, Alvin Lee’s remarkably fluid and technically proficient solos leave one gasping for breath, bringing this set to a blistering close. (by concertvault.com)

TenYearsAfter04

Personnel:
Chick Churchill (keyboards)
Alvin Lee (guitar, vocals)
Ric Lee (drums)
Leo Lyons (bass)

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. Rock & Roll Music To The World (A.Lee) 4.02
02. Slow Blues In ‘C’ (A.Lee) 7.33
03 Spoonful (Dixon) 6.33
04. Turned Off TV Blues 05:34
05. I Woke Up This Morning (A.Lee) 4.33
06. Sweet Little Sixteen (Berry) 3.45
07. I’m Going Home (A.Lee) 11.43

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TenYearsAfter01

Savoy Brown – Skin N Bone (1976)

FrontCover1With this 1976 release, the follow-up to 1975’s WIRE FIRE, the songwriting team of Kim Simmonds & Paul Raymond (later of UFO) came up with 5 great songs plus a cover of Hank Ballard’s “She’s The One”. The songs hint at a more rocking direction that the band (minus Raymond) would later take to the max on their
next release, 1978’s SAVAGE RETURN. Simmonds,Raymond & drummer
Tom Farnell are joined by newcomer Ian Ellis (replacing WIRE FIRE bassist Andy Rae). Ellis would later take over lead vocals (from the departing Raymond) on the rockin’ SAVAGE RETURN.
All in all, this ranks as one of Savoy Brown’s most accessible albums. Highlights include Erding77Athe almost UFO-like “Get On Up & Do It” & the only non-studio cut “Walkin’ & Talkin'”. This track was recorded live at the Agora Ballroom in Cleveland. Almost 13 minutes long,it features dual vocals from Simmonds & Raymond.
Besides Simmonds’ stunning guitar playing,it also features him on an impressive,extended harmonica solo. (by an amazon customer)

The title track is seven and a half minutes of impassioned mid-tempo rock, with Simmonds and keyboard master Paul Raymond turning in some wonderful soloing, while rhythm section Ian Ellis on bass and Tommy Farnell on drums keep the time impressively. Finally, Savoy Brown has always been a most formidable live act, and “Walkin’ and Talkin'” is more than thirteen minutes of delightful blues strut before a very appreciative audience. Kim and Paul share vocals on this number, proof that in lean times, the band continued to make excellent music live. (by another amazon customer)

Indeed, the titel track is full of magic and “Walkin’ And Talkin'” is one of the best live songs Savoy Brown ever recorded. That´s what I call BLUES POWER !

Booklet1

Personnel:
Ian Ellis (bass, background vocals)
Tom Farnell (drums)
Raul Raymond (keyboards, guitar, vocals)
Kim Simmonds (guitar, vocals, harmonica)

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. Get On Up And Do It (Raymond/Simmonds) 3.13
02. Part Time Lady (Raymond/Simmonds)     5:00
03. This Day Is Gonna Be Our Last (Raymond/Simmonds)     5:21
04. She’s The One (Ballard) 3.36
05. Skin ‘N’ Bone (Raymond/Simmonds) 7.42
06. Walkin’ And Talkin’ (Raymond/Simmonds) 12.14

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Downchild Blues Band with Spencer Davis – Blood Run Hot (1982)

FrontCover1dopting their name from the Sonny Boy Williamson song “Mr Downchild,” Downchild Blues Band’s roots run deep, first planted in the Toronto jungle in 1963. Singer Mike Smith, guitarists Don Walsh, Tom Extence, and Gary Stodolak, John Lamb on bass and drummer John Tanti got together playing mostly for fun while attending Northern Secondary School at Mount Pleasant and Eginton in Toronto.

By ’68, a new version that had Walsh and his brother Rick, bassist Jim Milne, Tanti, and Dave Woodward became the house band at Grossman’s Tavern. But after a couple of years, they outgrew the nest and flew the coop.They doubled the horns attack by adding Ron Jacobs, and their gigs across Canada and into the Chicago and Detroit areas became more frequent.

They released their independent debut, BOOTLEG, in 1971, starting a career of albums that traditionally featured a few originals mixed in with covers, such as their copies of Taj Mahal’s “Change My Way of Livin'” and Jimmie Rogers’ “That’s All Right.”

DownchildBluesBand01After signing with GRT Records, their first single was “Flip Flop Fly” from their sophomore album in ’73, STRAIGHT UP. The song spent time in the top 40 pop list, and made them the first homegrown blues act with a gold single, (50,000 copies). As they continued a relentless tour schedule on both sides of the border for the next few years, and the Walsh Brothers’ “I’ve Got Everything I Need (Almost)” was released as the second single,” also spending time in the top 40. Also included was “Shotgun Blues,” another tune pegged by the Walsh Brothers, which would be covered later by The Blues Brothers during their movie and subsequent soundtrack.

They added Jane Vasey and Tony Flaim replaced Rick Walsh for the next album, 1974’s DANCING. Vasey was a classically trained pianist converted into a boogie woogie rockin’ machine. Walsh’s instantly recognizeable raspy textured vocals soon became trademark, such as in the Elmore James cover, “Madison Blues” and Otis Spann’s “Must Have Been The Devil.”

With new drummer Bill Bryans, next up was READY TO GO a year later, which featured the top 40 single, “Old Ma Bell.” Other tracks like the covers of Andy Kim’s “Rock Me Baby” and BB King’s “Caledonia” showcased the band’s versatility as they became mainstays across Canada, and regulars throughout the New Orleans, Kansas City, and St. Louis scenes.

DownchildBluesBand02But the rigours of touring and recording got the best of the band, and taking a break turned into a full-fledged breakup by 1977. While SO FAR; A COLLECTION OF OUR BEST, the first of what would become several compilation albums, was released, Walsh was out doing his own thing, and as a favour to friend Dan Ackroyd, helped The Blues Brothers by writing a pair of tracks for the BRIEFCASE FULL OF BLUES album in ’78. The other members were also out doing other projects, and Woodward moved to the west coast and joined Powder Blues.

That same year, Walsh reunited with Vasey and Flaim, along with Gary Kendall on bass, drummer Frank Russell, and Tony Rondolone on sax. After signing a deal with Attic Records, they released a pair of albums in 1980 – WE DELIVER and ROAD FEVER. Both produced hits, with Vasey’s “Tryin’ To Keep Her 88s Straight” and “I’ve Been A Fool.”

SingleThey streamlined their name to just ‘Downchild,’ and hooked up with legendary artist Spencer Davis for 1981’s BLOOD RUN HOT. their first album after shortening their name to just ‘Downchild.’ Along with the title track and “Hey Hey Little Girl” released as singles, the band had also picked up the touring schedule to include most major blues festivals throughout Canada and the US, as well as studio accolodates from the critics for their choice in covers, like Eddie Cochran’s “Summertime Blues,” “Natural Ball” by Albert King, and Sonny Boy Williamson’s “Nine Below Zero.”

And this is their album with Spencer Davis as the producer. Not the best album by the Downchild Blues Band, but a pretty fine album including powerful blues-rock. Listen to the titeltrack and you´ll know what I mean.

DownchildBluesBand03Personnel:
Larry Bodner (saxophone)
Tony Flaim (vocals)
Bob Heslin (trumpet)
Craig Kaleal (drums)
Gary Kendall (bass)
Jane Vasey (piano, background vocals)
Don Walsh (guitar, harmonica, vocals)
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Spencer Davis (percussion on 01., background vocals on 06.+ 08., vocals on 08.)
Rabbit (keyboards on 06.

BackCover1Tracklist:
01. Hey Hey Little Girl (McGuiness/Stonebridge) 2.07
02. Rocket 88 (Brenston) 2.56
03. Could Have Had All Your Lovin’ (Walsh) 4.23
04. Natural Ball (King) 3.13
05. Drivin’ Blues (Walsh) 2.45
06. Blood Run Hot (Samsel) 3.55
07. Nine Below Zero (Williamson) 4.20
08. Shot Full Of Love (McDill) 3.08
09. Let’s Get High (Gordon) 3.15
10. They Were Rockin’ (Walsh) 2.18

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DownchildBluesBand04

Snowy White’s Blues Agency – Blues On Me (1989)

FrontCover1Terence Charles “Snowy” White (born 3 March 1948, Barnstaple, Devon) is an English guitarist, known for having played with Thin Lizzy (permanent member from 1980 to 1982) and with Pink Floyd (as a backing guitarist; he was first invited to tour with the band through Europe and the United States in 1977, and during The Wall shows in 1980) and, more recently, for Roger Waters’ band. He is also known for his 1983 solo effort “Bird of Paradise”, which became a UK Singles Chart Top 10 hit single.

White grew up on the Isle of Wight, self-taught as a guitarist, having received his first guitar from his parents at the age of ten. He moved to Stockholm in 1965 at the age of seventeen, spending more than a year there playing in a trio called The Train. In 1968 he purchased his signature guitar, the Gibson Les Paul Goldtop. By 1970 he made his way to London and found work as a session player and as a member of Heavy Heart. During this time he met Peter Green and the two began a lifelong friendship (White later appeared on Green’s album In the Skies).

White had been recommended to Pink Floyd by Kate Bush’s former manager Hilary Walker, as they were looking for an additional guitarist for the live band on the Animals tour in 1977. White’s solo on “Pigs on the Wing” (it appears on the 8-track version), was his first time playing for the band. During the tour, White started off the show himself by playing bass guitar on the song “Sheep”, as well as soloing during “Have a Cigar” and “Shine on You Crazy Diamond Part VIII”.

SnowyWhite01In 1979 Thin Lizzy guitarist Scott Gorham, having seen White play with Pink Floyd in New York City during the Animals tour, approached him about joining Thin Lizzy.

The collaboration with these two bands was very complicated; the invitation to rehearse the live show of The Wall for Pink Floyd, happened at the same time he was invited to become a full-time member of Thin Lizzy, with whom he recorded/co-wrote their Chinatown and Renegade albums. White left Thin Lizzy in August 1982.

White’s connection to Pink Floyd continued in later decades. White was invited by the former Pink Floyd bassist Roger Waters to perform in another take of The Wall, in 1990, by the ruins of the Berlin Wall, along with other guest artists. Waters also called on White in 1991 for the ‘Guitar Legends’ concert, in Seville. David Gilmour was the guest on White’s 1994 album Highway to the Sun, appearing on the track “Love, Pain and Sorrow”, with Gilmour playing his Digitech Whammy pedal-induced Fender Stratocaster, which was recorded at Gilmour’s houseboat studio, The Astoria.

Apart from guest appearances by Chris Rea, David Gilmour and Gary Moore, the album also introduced two new Dutch-Indonesian musicians, Juan van Emmerloot (drums) and Walter Latupeirissa (bass and rhythm guitar). Kuma Harada also played bass and rhythm guitar.

SnowyWhite02White’s next album project was entitled Goldtop, named after his Gibson Les Paul Goldtop Standard guitar. It featured material in which White has been involved from as far back as 1974 right up to 1996, including two tracks from Thin Lizzy, jams from the Peter Green In the Skies session, and the extended, 8-track tape version of the Pink Floyd song “Pigs on the Wing”, featuring White’s guitar bridge between the two parts.

White has recorded five albums with his White Flames band. The first three were No Faith Required in 1996, Little Wing in 1998 and Keep Out: We Are Toxic in 1999.

In 1999 White joined Waters for his band’s In the Flesh US tour, which was successful, and in 2000, Waters again toured the US, this time recording a live album and making a film of the show. Again, from February to July 2002 White toured the world with Roger Waters.

WatersWhiteAnother White Flames album (as a three-piece), entitled Restless, was released in May 2002. Spring 2005 saw the release of a new White Flames album, entitled The Way It Is, with a basic four-piece outfit consisting of Richard Bailey (drums/percussion), Walter Latupeirissa (bass) and Max Middleton (keyboards). A DVD, The Way It Is…Live! was completed and issued.

White toured with Waters in The Dark Side of the Moon Live tour from June 2006, having played in Europe, North America, Australia, Asia and South America. He also performed with Waters at Live Earth.

White formed a new band in 2008 named The Snowy White Blues Project. In Our Time of Living was released in April 2009. The group featured Matt Taylor: guitar/vocals, Ruud Weber: bass/vocals, Juan van Emmerloot: drums, and Snowy White: guitar/vocals.

In 2010 White toured again with Roger Waters, in The Wall Live (by wikipedia)

And this is an album from his “Blues Agency” period: And it´s a real superb album feat the legendary Graham Bell on vocals … In Germany the album was called “Open For Business” and believe me: Snowy White is a criminally underrated guitar-player (listen to his solo on “Out Of My Dreams” … maybe he´s one of he best guitar player we had !

Listen and enjoy !

TheBandPersonnel:
Jeff Allen (drums)
Graham Bell (vocals, harmonica, guitar)
Kuma Harada (bass, percussion)
Snowy White (guitar)

Open For BusinessFront+BackCoverTracklist:
01. I Can’t Help Myself (White) 4.19
02. Blues On Me (White) 4.50
03. Out Of Order (White) 3.19
04. When You Broke Your Promise (White) 3.55
05. I Want Your Love (Bell) 4.50
06. Out Of My Dreams (Bell) 4.15
07. Addicted Man (Bell) 4.13
08. Open For Business (White) 3.15
09. Walking The Streets (White) 3.44
10. Land Of Plenty (White) 5.30

CD1*
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WhiteGreenHaradaSnowyy White – Peter Green – Kuma Harada

Savoy Brown – Live And Kickin´ (1990)

FrontCover1Never listened to Savoy brown when I was a teenager into my early twenties, 1970 – 1979. Listened to many bands of the time, The Who, Jethro Tull, Jimi Hendrix, The Doors, Jefferson Airplane, James Gang, Hot Tuna, CSNY, Allman Bros., Eric Clapton, etc. (and saw most more then once), but never got into these guys. I do remember a friends’ older brother having “Looking In” (cover caught my eye) and wondered what it was about, but never played it. Well, recently I began (again) a collection of late 60’s & 70’s music. Once I hit about 6 to 7 hundred CD’s I decided to try some other music I never listened to back then. Needless to say, I own just about every Savoy Brown album at this point, and my collection has gone passed 1000 CD’s. Had not been to a concert in about fifteen years and decided to go this past December (2009). Guess who? SAVOY BROWN in a little joint in Troy, N.Y. called Revolution Hall that holds maybe 150 people. Let me put it this way, It had to be one of the best concerts I ever saw. Maybe I was a little too blown-out during those earlier years to enjoy a show (not that I did’nt), but this was unbelievable! A 45 minute warm-up band and then over 3 hours of music from SB. Never saw anything like it, in a bar no less. Many of the old songs (which are, as I said, new to me) were played. The main thing that really impressed me was the fact that this guy Kim Simmonds was REALLY enjoying himself. DaveWalker1989Even though it was this tiny venue the guy put his whole heart and soul into this show. Missed it back then, but so glad to see it now. Simply outstanding! Just got this 3 CD box set “Savoy Brown Collection” for a great price and I think that the “Live and Kickin'” CD is the best. They are all good, but that one seems to be the best. Maybe it’s because of my recent live experience, who knows? Just great music. (by Old Book Reader)

The “Gentleman” who introduces this band as the Kings Of British Boogie just might know his stuff. Clapton may be a god, Humble Pie may be smokin’, but Savoy Brown and the ageless and unstoppable Kim Simmonds not so quietly continue to push the British interpretation of American Blues into the bland and boring techno-future. I’ve heard a number of Savoy Browns over the years and to be honest, this line-up does some serious aural damage. (That’s a good thing) The lead track “Heartbreaks Make You Strong” nicely sets the pace for the rest of the show with it’s driving beat and lyrics about lost love and hope of redemption. Throughout this performance the band alternates between Blues rockers and even more Bluesy rockers.(Another good thing) I normally have no interest in medleys, BUT…this album offers up the exception. They call it “The Greatest Hits Medley” and it serves up “I’m Tired”, “Hard Way To Go”, “Louisiana Blues”, “Street Corner Talkin'” and a full blown “Hellbound Train” followed by a hot Blues jam. The whole wonderful ordeal blends seamlessly and lasts about 20 glorious minutes. Dave Walker belts out “I Can’t Get Next To You”, “All I Can Do Is Cry”, “Wang Dang Doodle” and every other song on this disc in a voice that should be familiar to fans of Savoy Browns’s early 70s work. The sound is excellent and you can actually hear the drums and cymbals clearly.(yet another good thing) I admit that I had my doubts about a latter day Savoy Brown when I bought this CD. Instead of disappointing me, this live recording prompted me to take in a 2011 show that left me sold on Kim Simmond’s ability to assemble a band that matches his own musical prowess. Give this one a few listens and you might not take it out of your CD player for a while. (by R. Krieger)

Recorded live at The Lone Star Roadhouse, New York, New York

SavoyBrownPersonnel:
Lou Kaplan (bass)
Pete Mendillo (drums)
Rick Jewett (keyboards, vocals)
Kim Simmonds (guitar, vocals)
Dave Walker (vocals)

Booklet01ATracklist:
01, Heartbreaks Make You Strong (Simmonds) 3.43
02. I Can’t Get Next To You (Whitfield/Strong) 6.53
03. 15 Miles To Go (Simmonds) 3.56
04. Raise Some Thunder (Simmonds) 2.33
05. Since You’ve Been Gone (Simmonds) 5.22
06. Medley (Greatest Hits) 20.45
06a. I’m Tired (Youlden)
06b. Hard Way To Go (Youlden)
06c. Louisiana Blues (Morganfield)
06d. Street Corner Talkin’ (Simmonds)
06e. Hellbound Train (Simmonds/Sylvester)
06f. Guitar Solo (Simmonds)
07. Bad Intentions (Simmonds)     4:49
08. Poor Girl (Stevens) 4.11
09. Wang Dang Doodle (Dixon) 5.02
10. All I Can Do Is Cry (Simmonds/Raymond) 10.26
11. Boogie (Hey Hey Mama) (Simmonds/Walker/Macomber/Dagnesi) 6.44

CD1*
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Booklet02+03