Ten Years After – Same (1967)

LPFrontCover1Ten Years After are an English blues rock band, most popular in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Between 1968 and 1973, Ten Years After scored eight Top 40 albums on the UK Albums Chart. In addition they had twelve albums enter the US Billboard 200, and are best known for tracks such as “I’m Going Home”, “Hear Me Calling”, “I’d Love to Change the World” and “Love Like a Man”. Their musical style consisted of blues rock,and hard rock (???)

 

The band’s core formed in late 1960 as Ivan Jay and the Jaycats. After several years of local success in the Nottingham/Mansfield area, known since 1962 as the Jaybirds and later as Ivan Jay and the Jaymen, Alvin Lee and Leo Lyons founded Ten Years After. Ivan Jay (born Ivan Joseph Harrison, 1939, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, died in April 2009, USA) sang lead vocals from late 1960 to 1962 and was joined by Ric Lee in August 1965, replacing drummer Dave Quickmire (born David Quickmire, 1940, Mansfield, Nottinghamshire), who had replaced Pete Evans (born Peter Evans, 1940, Mansfield, Nottinghamshire) in 1962. Ray Cooper (born 11 November 1943, Huthwaite, Nottinghamshire) played rhythm guitar, vocals from 1960 to 1962.

TenYearsAfter1968_03In 1966, The Jaybirds moved to London to back The Ivy League. In the same year, Chick Churchill joined the group as keyboard player. That November, the quartet signed a manager, Chris Wright, and changed their name to Blues Trip. Using the name Blues Yard they played one show at the Marquee Club supporting the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band. They again changed their name, to Ten Years After – in honour of Elvis Presley, an idol of Lee’s.[10] (This was ten years after Presley’s successful year, 1956). Some sources[which?] claim that the name was pulled by Leo Lyons from a magazine, advertising a book, Ten Years After The Suez (referring to the Suez Crisis).

The group was the first act booked by the soon-to-be Chrysalis Agency. It secured a residency at the Marquee, and was invited to play at the Windsor Jazz Festival in 1967. That performance led to a contract with Deram, a subsidiary of Decca — the first band Deram signed without a hit single. In October 1967 they released the self-titled debut album, Ten Years After.

Ten Years After is the debut album by the English blues rock band Ten Years After. It was one of the first blues rock albums released by British musicians. The album is also low on original material in comparison to the band’s later works which were, in most cases, entirely composed of Alvin Lee’s songs.

It features “Spoonful”, a Howlin’ Wolf song (written for him by Willie Dixon) that the British blues rock group Cream covered as well (on their albums Fresh Cream and Wheels of Fire). (by wikipedia)

TenYearsAfter1968_01

Rare pic of Alvin Lee with a fender guitar !

ReviewMelodyMaker

Melody Maker, October 21, 1967

Amazing. Where it all started. Almost completely devoid of all the blues/rock clichés of their later albums. Stylistically impressive. And dig that crazy cover. (by Emilio Gironda)

This was the start of one of the findest blues-rock groups from the late Sixties … listen to “I Can’t Keep From Crying Sometimes” and “Help me” and you will definitly know what I mean … !

TenYearsAfter1968_02

Personnel:
Chick Churchill (organ)
Alvin Lee (guitar, vocals)
Ric Lee (drums)
Leo Lyons (bass)

LPBackCover
Tracklist:
01. I Want to Know (Sheila McLeod as pseudonym Paul Jones) 2.15
02. I Can’t Keep From Crying Sometimes (Kooper) 5.25
03. Adventures Of A Young Organ (A.Lee/Churchill) 2.37
04. Spoonful (Dixon) 6.07
05. Losing The Dogs (A.Lee/Dudgeon) 3.07
06. Feel It For Me (Alvin Lee) 2.42
07. Love Until I Die (A.Lee) 2.08
08. Don’t Want You Woman (A.Lee) 2.39
09. Help Me (Bass/Dixon/Williamson) 9.51

 

LabelB1
*
**

Poster

Advertisements

Joe Bonamassa – Kassel/Germany (2016)

FrontCover1Joseph Leonard Bonamassa (born May 8, 1977) is an American blues rock guitarist, singer and songwriter.

When he was only 12 years old, Bonamassa opened for B.B. King.[2] In the last 13 years Bonamassa has put out 15 solo albums through his independent record label J&R Adventures, of which 11 have reached number 1 on the Billboard Blues charts.

Bonamassa has played alongside such artists as Stephen Stills, Eric Clapton, Blondie Chaplin, Foreigner, Buddy Guy, Steve Winwood, Warren Haynes, and Derek Trucks among others. His career highlights include performances at the Royal Albert Hall and a Grammy Award nomination in 2013. In addition to his music career, Joe Bonamassa runs a nonprofit organization called the Keeping the Blues Alive Foundation, whose mission it is to further music education by funding scholarships and providing music education resources to schools in need.

Unlike many blues rock guitarists that came before him, Bonamassa’s influences are British and Irish blues acts rather than American artists. In an interview in Guitarist magazine he cited three albums that had the biggest influence on his playing: John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton (the Beano album), Rory Gallagher’s Irish Tour and Goodbye by Cream. He also noted that Stevie Ray Vaughan’s Texas Flood had a big influence when Bonamassa was young. Among other bands, he listed the early blues playing of Jethro Tull as an influence, and named both Martin Barre and Mick Abrahams as important musicians to him.

JoeBonamassa01

He elaborated on his influences in a 2007 interview:

“You know, my heroes were the Columbia guys – Paul Kossoff, Peter Green, Eric Clapton. There’s so many – there’s Gary Moore, Rory Gallagher – another Irish musician who played the same things, but don’t tell him that. But those guys were my guys – Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page. There’s a certain sophistication to their approach to the blues that I really like, more so than the American blues that I was listening to. B.B. King’s a big influence – he’s probably my biggest traditional influence. I love Muddy Waters, Robert Johnson and T-Bone Walker and stuff like that, but I couldn’t sit down. I was always forcing myself to listen to whole records by them, where I’d rather listen to Humble Pie do “I’m Ready” than Muddy Waters, you know? I think, the English interpretation of the blues just hit me a lot better, you know?”

In an October 2008 interview with Express & Star he said:

“When I heard Kossoff playing “Mr. Big” and when I heard Clapton playing “Crossroads” and when I heard Rory Gallagher playing “Cradle Rock”, I was like, ‘This is way cooler’…. “British blues are my thing. When I heard Rod Stewart and the Jeff Beck Group singing “Let Me Love You”, it changed my life. I knew exactly what I wanted to do. Those are my influences”. (by wikipedia)

JoeBonamassa02

And tis is a German digital broadcast from 2016. The sound is  great and Joe and his band were in great form !

Joe was on tour to promote his twelfth studio album called “Blues Of Desperation”.

What a great concert !

Recorded live at the Orangerie, Gartensaal, Kassel/Germany, March 07, 2016

AlternateFrontCover

Alternate frontcover

Personnel:
Joe Bonamassa (guitar, vocals)
Paulie Cerra (saxophone)
Anton Fig (drums)
Michael Rhodes (bass)
Lee Thorburg (trumpet)
Reese Wynans (keyboards)

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. Intro by Joe Bonamassa 3.42
02. Locomotive Breath (Anderson) 0.55
03. This Train (House/Bonamassa) 7.16
04. Mountain Climbing (Hambridge/Bonamassa) 5.52
05. Blues Of Desperation (House/Bonamassa) 8.48
06. No Good Place For The Lonely (Nicholson/Bonamassa) 8.13
07. See See Baby (King/Thompson) 3.46
08. Never Make Your Move Too Soon (Jennings/Hooper jr.) 7.09
09. Angel Of Mercy (*) (Banks/Jackson) 7.42
10. Love Ain’t A Love Song (Smokin Joe/Bonamassa) 10.51
11. Nobody Loves Me But My Mother (King) 10.14
12. I Gave Up Everything For You Except The Blues (Steele/Flowers/Bonamassa) 8.47
13. Going Down (Nix) 7.24
14. Spanish Boots (Wood/Beck/Stewart) 4.03
15. Are You Experienced (Hendrix) 7.13

(*) taken from FM broadcast by NDR 2, 26.09.2016

JoeBonamassa03

*
**

Sy Klopps Blues Band – Walter Ego (1993)

FrontCover1Nobody knows Sy Klopps in 1993 — many people thought, this name was a pseudonym for the great Steve Miller … but … Sy Klopps is Sy Klopps:

Walter James “Herbie” Herbert II (born 5 February 1948) alias Sy Kloppd is the former manager of rock band Journey, The Storm, and a vocalist for the Sy Klopps Blues Band. Born and raised in Berkeley, Herbert is a self-proclaimed hippie and fan of the Grateful Dead.

Herbert got his start in the music business with the aid of his mentor Bill Graham. Through Graham, Herbert became a roadie for the multi-platinum-selling band Santana (where he met Neal Schon and Gregg Rolie). He managed Frumious Bandersnatch (where he met Ross Valory and George Tickner). When Santana imploded in 1973, Herbert put together the original lineup of Journey and remained its manager through 1993. Herbert was heavily involved in all business aspects of the band and traveled as their road manager. With a sharp business sense, Herbert brought everything in house under the name of Nightmare Productions and pioneered the use of large screen videos, impressive lighting and sound for arena-sized concerts. A shrewd businessman, Herbert made a fortune with Journey’s real estate holdings, Nocturne video company, and catalog management. He and Jim Welch, his art director, devised a creative marketing plan to promote the band using the Grateful Dead’s artists Stanley Mouse and Alton Kelly, thematic one-worded album titles, and exposure at point-of-purchase outlets. In 1993 Steve Perry asked that he resign from managing Journey due to personality conflicts.

In addition to his work with Journey, Herbert brought Swedish rock groups Roxette and Europe to the United States in the mid to late-1980s, and managed Mr. Big and R&B artist Tara Kemp and rock band Signal. In the late 1990s, Herbert moved from backstage into the spotlight, recording three albums as Sy Klopps and touring the San Francisco Bay Area with the Sy Klopps Band, which has included current and former Journey band members Neal Schon, Gregg Rolie, Prairie Prince, and Ross Valory. (by wikipedia)

SyKlopps

And this is his brilliant debut album …

“…Venerable blues standards performed, in not always flattering high-tech fashion, by a sort-of-supergroup including former members of Journey and the Tubes….” (
Stereo Review (4/94)

This blues rock album could be Steve Miller in a less restrained mood, getting back his blues chops. It does include a scorching version of ‘Going to Mexico’ originally featured on the Number 5 album. If you like high energy blues rock you’ll wonder why you hadn’t heard of this before. Definitely worth a listen.(by 5ash)

In otherwords: one of the finest blues-rock albums ever recorded … listen to his version of classic blues-tunes like “Born Under A Bad Sign” or “I Got My Eye On You ” … Listen to the ZZ Top classic “Jesus Just Left Chicago” …and listen to “Mercury Blues” and you´ll know what I mean …

This is high energy Blues-Rock !

BookletBackCover1
Personnel:
Norton Buffalo (harmonica)
David Denny (guitar)
Greg Errico (drums)
Sy Klopps (vocals, guitar)
Kee Marcello (guitar)
Prairie Prince (drums)
Greg Rolie (keyboards)
Neal Schon (guitar)
Bobby Scott (guitar)
Ross Valory (bass)’
Donnie Vie (guitar, harmonica, vocals)
Chris Znuff (bass, vocals)

Booklet1

Tracklist:
01. Going To Mexico (Miller/Scaggs) 3.41
02. Fanny Mae (Brown) 2.50
03. Key To The Highway (Broonzy/Segar) 4.40
04. Jesus Just Left Chicago (Gibbons/Hill/Beard) 4.30
05. Born Under A Bad Sign (Jones/Bell) 3.30
06. Going Down (Nix) 3.45
07. I Got My Eye On You (Rolie/Scott) 3.36
08. Round And Round (Vie/Znuff) 3.18
09. Mercury Blues (Douglas/Geddings) 3.58
10. You’re So Fine (Reed) 2.55
11. Baby’s Calling Me Home (Scaggs) 2.49
12. My Name Is Sy Klopps (Rolie/Scott) 3.47

CD1
*
**

Savoy Brown – Train To Nowhere (2010)

FrontCover1This is a 2 hour double CD live set from WXXI radio Rochester New York State.

Stunning live set from veteran British Blues man Kim Simmonds and Savoy Brown. Featuring Train to Nowhere, Little Red Rooster and a 22 minute version of Louisiana Blues, recorded in 1997 and 1998.

Formed in 1967 and anchored around guitarist Kim Simmonds, Savoy Brown’s U.K. take on boogie blues paved the way for the heavier breakthough of British blues-based bands like Cream and Led Zeppelin, and while Savoy Brown don’t have the same critical reputation as these, they were still a bread-and-butter little rocking band. (by Steve Leggett)

So sit back and enjoy the smooth blues that is Savoy Brown, one of the finest blues bands ever !

Disc 1 Track 1 and Disc 2 Track 2 & 3 Recorded Live 9th March 1998 Tampa, FL, USA
Disc 1 Tracks 2-7 and Disc 2 Tracks 1, 4 & 5 Recorded Live 14th August 1997 Rochester, NY, USA

BookletBackCover1

Personnel:
Al Cash (drums, CD 1 – #2-7; CD 2 – #1, 4, 5)
Nathaniel Peterson (bass, vocals)
Kim Simmonds (guitar, vocals)
‘T’ Xiques (drums, CD 1 -#1; CD 2 -# 2, 3)TracklistCD 1:01)

Booklet1

Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. Too Much Of A Good Thing (Simmonds) 6.15
02. Let It Rock (Simmonds/Raymond) 5.33
03. Train To Nowhere (Youlden) 5.12
04. Bad Shape (Simmonds) 9.06
05. Mr. Browns Boogie (Simmonds) 8.46
06. Stay While The Night Is Young (Youlden) 12.18
07. Savoy Brown Medley: 12.16
07.1. She’s Got A Ring In His Nose And A Ring On Her Hand (Youlden)
07.2 Street Corner Talking (Simmonds/Raymond)
07.3. Hellbound Train (Simmonds/Silvester)
07.4. Wang Dang Doodle (Dixon)
07.5. Tell Mama (Simmonds/Raymond)

CD 2:
01. Little Red Rooster (Dixon) 13.06
02. Mississippi Steam Boat (unknown) 8.30
03. Lookin’ In (Simmonds/Peverett) 8:05
04.Louisiana Blues (Morgenfield) 21.27
05. Little Wheel (Bracken/Hooker)

CD2A*
**

Inlet1

Chicken Shack – Imagination Lady (1972)

FrontCover1Imagination Lady is the fifth studio album by the blues band Chicken Shack, released in 1972 on the Deram record Label.

Imagination Lady is much in the same tradition as the great British bluesmen Alexis Korner and John Mayall, Webb’s revolving-door personnel landed the band several notable members, including: John Almond (tenor/alto sax), Hughie Flint (drums), and Christine Perfect (keyboards/vocals). For this album, Webb (guitar/vocals) gathered a trio consisting of himself, future Gods and Jethro Tull member John Glascock (bass), and Paul Hancox (drums). Enthusiasts of the more traditional 40 Blue Fingers, Freshly Packed and Ready to Serve and OK Ken albums have been quick to dismiss the latter-era band, often citing the whole over amplified power metal trip as detracting from their blues origins.

While certainly valid assessments, the power trio featured on Imagination Lady brings more than sheer volume to this release. As with the previous Chicken Shack long-players, this disc features several Webb originals augmented with some well-chosen cover tunes. The album opens with a ferocious cover of B.B. King’s “Crying Won’t Help You.” This version is highlighted by Glascock’s thrashing basslines and Webb’s wah-wah driven lead guitar and gin-soaked vocals. In a style akin to the Faces or even some of the rowdier moments from the Peter Green-led Fleetwood Mac, this trio grinds out the blues with a decidedly English edge. The folkie “If I Were a Carpenter” is speared with searing electric guitar leads that rip throughout the likewise spirited contributions from Glascock and Hancox. The tune is also afforded an unexpected sensitivity that contrasts well between the all-out sonic onslaught of the chorus and the restrained polyrhythms of the verses. In regards to original material, “Daughter of the Hillside” is without a doubt Webb’s most impressive contribution to the album. It is arguably the strongest side on the disc. This straight-ahead rocker is an ideal trio effort with equal contributions from all three recalling the intense instrumentality of Cream or early Led Zeppelin. With so much potential, it’s unfortunate that the 11-minute epic “Telling Your Fortune” — which is nothing more than a 12-bar blues platform for solos from Webb and Hancox — is so erratic. In an ironic contrast, the closing number “The Loser” is upbeat and almost pop-oriented, again displaying the immense strength of this short-lived incarnation of Chicken Shack. (by Lindsay Planer)

StanWebb2

Chicken Shack were chief beneficiaries of the 1968 Brit blues boom, but the sales graph was flatlining by the time of 1972’s Imagination Lady. Shame, really: some of us will strip to the waist, grease up and wrestle for the right to proclaim it the worthiest thing they ever did. Wildcard guitarist and sole constant Stan Webb had commandeered drummer Paul Hancox and bassist John Glascock to create a brawny blues-rock trio with the pedal constantly to the metal – and the transfusion of new blood duly created a rampaging ogre.

Listen to them, positively steaming in with Crying Won’t Help You Now: lack of blues feel is more than compensated for with unruly, unpolished, first-take excitement. Hancox in particular – recommended by John Bonham – is a flailing Tasmanian devil in the Philthy Animal Taylor mould. The insane phased drum solo in Telling Your Fortune perhaps indulges the man a tad too far – but you try stopping him.
Thrillingly, the band lunge at If I Were A Carpenter like pub drunks: it’s a Vanilla Fudge-style, taste-free disembowelment, and all the better for it. Truthfully, Imagination Lady is closer in spirit and execution to May Blitz than Fleetwood Mac, in the grand tradition of fractious, E-major wah-wah sludge-rock. (by record collector)

For me is this album a masterpiece of heavy blues rock !

StanWebb

Personnel:
John Glascock (bass)
Paul Hancox (drums)
Stan Webb (guitar, vocals)

Booklet.JPG

Tracklist:
01. Crying Won’t Help You Now (King) 5.10
02. Daughter Of The Hillside (Webb) 3.53
03. If I Were A Carpenter (Hardin) 6.35
04. Going Down (Nix) 3.33
05. Poor Boy (Webb) 5.11
06. Telling Your Fortune (Webb) 11.11
07. The Loser (Webb) 2.32

LabelB1*
**

Alexander’s Timeless Bloozband – Same (1967)

FrontCover1The information about the band is rather scarce, various sources mention Charles Lamont, Carl Lockhart and Larry Marks as founders, although, when they recorded their self-titled debut LP (1967) for private label “Smack”, they were five.

Their debut album (rather raw, “home-made” sounding) featured classic “Killing Floor” and unusual instrumental version of “My Favourite Things” (from 1959 musical “The Sounds Of Music”) (by Golovanov Alexey)

I guess, this is one of the rarest psychedelic blues Album ever … and I will  dedicate this entry to all These unknown bands from this period of music …  it was not the worst period of music … really not !

Recorded Live At The Brother’s Gallery in Goleta – August 1967

Alexander's Timeless Bloozband

Personnel:
Spencer Conway (drums)
Dennis Geaney (guitar, bass)
Charles Lamont (Keyboards, bass, guitar, french horn, harmonica, vocals)
Reed Lockhart (saxphone, keyboards, vocals)
Larry Marks (harmonica, trombone, vocals)

BackCover

Tracklist: 
01. Help Me (Williamson/Bass) 5.27
02. Killing Floor (Burnett) 3.02
03. Guitar Song (Lamont) 2.46
04. Favorite Things (Rodgers/Hammerstein) 5.13
05. Sloopy Drunk (Rogers) 4.09
06. #1 (unknown) 4.57
07. Swannoa Tunnel (unkown) 4.19
08. Sweet Little Angel  (King/Taub) 2.37

LabelA1
*
**

 

 

 

Rory Gallagher – Live In Europe (1972)

frontcover1Live in Europe is the third album by Irish blues guitarist Rory Gallagher, released in 1972. It is a series of live recordings made by Gallagher during his European tour. Unusual for a live album it contains only two previously released songs (“Laundromat” and “In Your Town”). All the other songs are either new Gallagher songs or Gallagher’s interpretation of traditional blues songs.

Live in Europe was released at the end of the British “blues boom” that began in the 1960s. Sparked by bands such as the Rolling Stones, Yardbirds, and Cream fans and musicians were fascinated by authentic Chicago blues artists such as Muddy Waters. Gallagher had an extensive knowledge of this kind of music. Although he tended to play down arguments about what was “pure” blues. In an interview at the time he said:

“If there was one fault with the boom in the 1960s, it was that it was very straight-faced and very pontificatory, or whatever the word is. It used to annoy me that there was an attitude of ‘Thou shalt not play the blues unless you know who played second acoustic guitar behind Sonny Boy Williamson the first on the B-side of whatever.’ That kind of thing gets music nowhere, it’s like collecting stamps. I mean, I buy books on the blues and I check out the B-sides and I know who plays on what records and that’s fine. But then you’ve got to open that up to the rest of the people. Because that kind of snobbery defeats the purpose; it kills the music.”

Rather than live versions of his most popular songs there are only two songs on the album that were previously recorded by Gallagher in the studio, “Laundromat” from his first album and “In Your Town” from his Deuce album. All the other songs are Gallagher’s versions of classic blues songs. The album starts with what was to become a signature song for Gallagher, Junior Wells’ “Messin’ With the Kid”. The song “I Could’ve Had Religion” was Gallagher’s salute to what he called the “redemption style blues” of the Robert Wilkins and Gary Davis. After hearing the song on this album Bob Dylan expressed interest in recording it and assumed it was a traditional blues number rather than an original song by Gallagher.

inlet01

Blind Boy Fuller’s “Pistol Slapper Blues” is next. Gallagher then shows his versatility, swapping his Stratocaster for a mandolin and performing the song “Going to My Home Town” with the audience stomping their feet and cheering in response as Gallagher sings “do you want to go?”. The finale is the straight ahead hard rocking “Bullfrog Blues” written by William Harris. Gallagher switches back to the electric guitar and the full band and gives bassist Gerry McAvoy and drummer Wilgar Campbell, a chance to solo. With the CD release two additional blues songs were added: “What in the World” and “Hoodoo Man”.

Most critics agree that Live in Europe is one of Gallagher’s finest albums. It was his highest charting album to date reaching 101 in the Billboard 200 for 1972. The album was his first major commercial success and provided his first solo top ten album. It won him his first Gold Disc. In the same year of 1972 he was Melody Maker’s Guitarist/Musician of the Year, winning out over Eric Clapton.

inlet02a

The live album Live in Europe/Stage Struck captures Rory Gallagher at his finest, as he tears his way through many of his very best songs. Though the performance quality is a little uneven, there are gems scattered throughout the record, including smoking versions of “Messin’ with the Kid” and “Laundromat.” (by Thom Owens)

gallagherlive1972

Personnel:
Wilgar Campbell (drums)
Rory Gallagher (guitar, harmonica, mandolin, vocals)
Gerry McAvoy (bass)

originalbackcover
Tracklist:
01. Messin’ With The Kid (Wells) 6.25
02. Laundromat (Gallagher) 5.12
03. I Could’ve Had Religion (Traditional) 8.35
04. Pistol Slapper Blues (Fuller) 2.54
05. Going To My Hometown (Traditional) 5.46
06. In Your Town (Gallagher) 10.03
07. Bullfrog Blues (Traditional) 6.47
+
08. What In The World (Traditional) 7.40
09. Hoodoo Man (Traditional) 6.02

labela1

*
**