The James Cotton Band – Live & On The Move (1976)

FrontCover1James Henry Cotton (July 1, 1935 – March 16, 2017)[1] was an American blues harmonica player, singer and songwriter, who performed and recorded with many of the great blues artists of his time and with his own band. He played drums early in his career but is famous for his harmonica playing.
Cotton began his professional career playing the blues harp in Howlin’ Wolf’s band in the early 1950s.[3] He made his first recordings in Memphis for Sun Records, under the direction of Sam Phillips. In 1955, he was recruited by Muddy Waters to come to Chicago and join his band. Cotton became Waters’s bandleader and stayed with the group until 1965.[4] In 1965 he formed the Jimmy Cotton Blues Quartet, with Otis Spann on piano, to record between gigs with Waters’s band. He eventually left Waters to form his own full-time touring group. His first full album, on Verve Records, was produced by guitarist Mike Bloomfield and vocalist and songwriter Nick Gravenites, who later were members of the band Electric Flag.
In the 1970s, Cotton played harmonica on Waters’s Grammy Award–winning 1977 album Hard Again, produced by Johnny Winter.
Born in Tunica, Mississippi, Cotton became interested in music when he first heard Sonny Boy Williamson II on the radio. He left home with his uncle and moved to West Helena, Arkansas, finding Williamson there. For many years Cotton claimed that he told JamesCotton01Williamson that he was an orphan and that Williamson took him in and raised him, a story he admitted in recent years is not true. However, Williamson did mentor Cotton during his early years. Williamson left the South to live with his estranged wife in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, leaving his band in Cotton’s hands. Cotton was quoted as saying, “He just gave it to me. But I couldn’t hold it together ’cause I was too young and crazy in those days an’ everybody in the band was grown men, so much older than me.”

Cotton played drums early in his career but is famous for his harmonica playing. He began his professional career playing the blues harp in Howlin’ Wolf’s band in the early 1950s. He made his first recordings as a solo artist for Sun Records in Memphis in 1953. In 1954, he recorded an electric blues single “Cotton Crop Blues”, which featured a heavily distorted power chord–driven electric guitar solo by Pat Hare. Cotton began working with the Muddy Waters Band around 1955. He performed songs such as “Got My Mojo Working” and “She’s Nineteen Years Old”, although he did not play on the original recordings; Little Walter, Waters’s long-time harmonica player, played for most of Waters’s recording sessions in the 1950s. Cotton’s first recording session with Waters took place in June 1957, and he alternated with Little Walter on Waters’s recording sessions until the end of the decade.
In 1965 he formed the Jimmy Cotton Blues Quartet, with Otis Spann on piano, to record between gigs with Waters’s band. Their performances were captured by producer Samuel Charters on volume two of the Vanguard recording Chicago/The Blues/Today! After leaving Waters’s band in 1966, Cotton toured with Janis Joplin while pursuing a solo career. He formed the James Cotton Blues Band in 1967. The band mainly performed its own arrangements of popular blues and R&B from the 1950s and 1960s. Cotton’s band included a horn section, like that of Bobby Bland’s. After Bland’s death, his son told news media that Bland had recently discovered that Cotton was his half-brother.

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In the 1970s, Cotton recorded several albums for Buddah Records. He played harmonica on Waters’s Grammy Award–winning 1977 album Hard Again, produced by Johnny Winter. In the 1980s he recorded for Alligator Records in Chicago; he rejoined the Alligator roster in 2010. The James Cotton Blues Band received a Grammy nomination in 1984 for Live from Chicago: Mr. Superharp Himself!, on Alligator, and a second for his 1987 album Take Me Back, on Blind Pig Records. He was awarded a Grammy for Best Traditional Blues Album for Deep in the Blues in 1996. Cotton appeared on the cover of the July–August 1987 issue of Living Blues magazine (number 76). He was featured in the same publication’s 40th anniversary issue of August–September 2010.
In 2006, Cotton was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame at a ceremony conducted by the Blues Foundation in Memphis. He has won or shared ten Blues Music Awards.
Cotton battled throat cancer in the mid-1990s, but he continued to tour, using singers or his backing band members as vocalists. On March 10, 2008, Cotton and Ben Harper performed at the induction of Little Walter into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, playing “Juke” and “My Babe” together; the induction ceremony was broadcast nationwide on VH1 Classic. On August 30, 2010, Cotton was the special guest on Larry Monroe’s farewell broadcast of Blue Monday, which he hosted on KUT in Austin, Texas, for nearly 30 years.

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Cotton’s studio album Giant, released by Alligator Records in late September 2010, was nominated for a Grammy Award. His album Cotton Mouth Man, also on Alligator, released on May 7, 2013, was also a Grammy nominee. It includes guest appearances by Gregg Allman, Joe Bonamassa, Ruthie Foster, Delbert McClinton, Warren Haynes, Keb Mo, Chuck Leavell and Colin Linden. Cotton played harmonica on “Matches Don’t Burn Memories” on the debut album by the Dr. Izzy Band, Blind & Blues Bound, released in June 2013. In 2014, Cotton won a Blues Music Award for Traditional Male Blues Artist and was also nominated in the category Best Instrumentalist – Harmonica.
Cotton’s touring band includes guitarist and vocalist Tom Holland, vocalist Darrell Nulisch, bassist Noel Neal (brother of the blues guitarist and harmonica player Kenny Neal) and drummer Jerry Porter.

Cotton died at a medical center in Austin, Texas from pneumonia on March 16, 2017 at the age of 81.(by wikipedia)

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James Cotton, live 2015
I’m usually not a big fan of live recordings, but these mid-70’s recordings really catch the spirit of James Cotton “live & on the move”, while still in his prime! Sure, there may be sentimental reasons for my liking this disc {often caught Cotton during this period at the club where these recordings were made} but putting all sentimentality aside, I’ve gained a whole new level of appreciation for these cuts. Listening to these tracks with fresh aged ears {the first time in 20 some years} I can’t help but be impressed by Cotton and company’s tightness as a unit. A tough act to follow, there weren’t many shows rolling down the proverbial blues pike that packed as much punch as a James Cotton performance in it’s heyday, and these cuts certainly can attest to that. Cotton’s band, consisting of seasoned vets such as Matt “guitar” Murphy, know how to lay and hold down earthy funkified grooves, build energetic boogie’s, shuffle and swing without ever losing so much as a beat. If I had to criticize one thing, it would be Cotton’s choice of material. James Cotton had written some fine numbers while a recording artist for both the Sun and Vanguard labels, it’s too bad that he doesn’t showcase a few of them here. Instead, Cotton is content rekindling old chestnuts such as “Got My Mojo Working” and “Help Me”. What would a review of a James Cotton disc be without mentioning his harmonica playing? James Cotton shows why he’s earned the nickname “Mr. Superharp”, especially on tunes such as, “One More Mile”, “All Walks Of Life” and “Boogie Thang”, where the deep tonal qualities and grittiness of his harp work can be heard to full effect. A nice slice of what a James Cotton live show sounded like back in the 70’s, complimented by one of the tightest and hardest working bands in the blues biz, Recommended! (unknow amazon custiner)
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Recorded live in 1974 at the Shaboo Inn in Wlllimantic, Connecticut

Personnel:

Charles Calmese (bass)
James Cotton (harmonica, vocals)
George T. Gregory (saxophone)
Kenny Johnson (drums)
Matt Murphy (guitar)
Mike “Captain Z” Zaitchik (Keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01  Cotton Boogie (Cotton) 3.01
02. One More Mile (Cotton) 2.34
03. All Walks Of Life (Cotton) 2.22
04. Born In Missouri (Cobbs) 4.45
05. Flip Flop & Fly (Calhoun/Turner) 5.06
06  Mojo (Ervin) 4.15
07. Rocket 88 (Brenston) 2.27
08. Goodbye My Lady (Klingman/Smart II/Rundgren) 4.38
09. I Don’t Know (Mabon) 3.35
10. Caldonia (Moore) 5.11
11. Boogie Thing (Murphy) 4.50
12. Good Morning Lil’ Schoool Girl () 3.20
13  Oh Baby You Don’t Have To Go (Reed) 2.32
14. Help Me (Watson) 4.12
15. Fannie Mae () 4.03
16  Hot ‘N Cold (Toussaint) 3.59
17  Teeny Weeny Bit (Whitcomb) 2.48
18. Blow Wind Blow (Dickerson) 4.43
19. How Long Can A Fool Go Wrong (Cotton) 7.15
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20. Next Time You See Me (Forest/Harvey) 3.03
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James Henry Cotton (July 1, 1935 – March 16, 2017)

 

 

Various Artists – The Many Faces Of The Rolling Stones (2015)

FrontCover1This is a great sampler from Mexico !

The Rolling Stones have become the reincarnation of rock itself, being the representation, both musically and in terms of image and behavior, what rock & roll represents. In The Many Faces Of The Rolling Stones, we will highlight their side-projects, their roots, their favorite songs and even a brand new song, which becomes and event in itself, for all the Stones’ fans around the world. The idea sounds wonderful right?. Well, The Many Faces Of The Rolling Stones will meet the expectations of even the most demanding Stones fan. We have a lost recording by Leslie West (Mountain’s guitarist) with Mick Jagger playing guitar, a duet by Keith Richards with Ian McLagan (Faces’ keyboardist), and also the hard-to-find single versions of Bill Wyman’s solo hits.

Also we have Mick Jagger and Keith Richards all time favorite songs (handpicked by themselves), and an extremely rare track titled Catch As Catch Can, that was released only in a limited edition in France as a 7″ and never previously available on CD single, by musician and producer Robin Millar (Eric Clapton, Peter Gabriel, Sade) recorded in 1973 along with Mick Taylor, Bobby Keys and Mick Jagger!!!.

Finally, we have the originals versions of the best songs the Stones covered during his long and illustrious career. This is a marvelous project that with remastered sound, beautiful cover art extended liner notes is an essential addition to your collection. (promo text)

Yes, yes, yes … a real great and intersting Project … Listen and discover the many faces of The Rolling Stones !
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Tracklist:

CD 1:
The Adventures Of The Stones:
01. Leslie West feat. Mick Jagger:High Roller (Jagger/Richards/Laing/Palmer) 4.13
02. Ron Wood & Ian McLagan: She Stole It (McLagan) 3.45
03. Bill Wyman: Monkey Grip (single edition) (Wyman) 3.17
04. Ian McLagan & Keith Richards: Truly (McLagan) 5.58
05. Toots & The Maytals feat. Keith Richards:- Careless Ethiopians (Hibbert) 3.22
06. Ron Wood & The Jones Gang: Had Me A Real Good Time (Lane/Wood) 4.45
07. Ian McLagan feat. Bobby Keys: Somebody (McLagan) 3.00
08 .British Invasion All-Stars feat. Dick Taylor: Gimme Some Loving (Winwood) 4.15
09. Bill  Wyman: (Si Si) Je Suis Un Rock Star (single edit) (Wyman) 3.23
10. Robin Millar feat. Mick Taylor, Nicky Hopkins & Bobby Keys: Catch As Catch Can (Millar)  3.33
11. John Phillips feat. Mick Jagger, Mick Taylor & Keith Richards:- Zulu Warrior (Phillips/Jagger) 3.30
12. Ron Wood & The Jones Gang: Stay With Me (Wood/Stewart) 5.09
13. Chris Farlowe produced by Mick Jagger: Out Of Time (Jagger/Richards) 3.15
14. Johnny Winter: Jumpin’ Jack Flash (Jagger/Richards) 4.42
CD 2:
Mick & Keith’s Favourite Tracks:
01. Little Walter: I Go To Go (Walter)  2.41
02. Muddy Waters: Forty Days And Forty Nights (Roth) 2.50
03. Robert Johnson: Stones In My Passway (Johnson) 2.28
04. Ray Charles: Lonely Avenue (Pomus) 2.34
05. Z.Z. Hill: Everybody Knows About My Good Thing (Grayson /Horton) 4.57
06. Blind Willie Johnson: Dark Was The Night (Cold Was The Ground) (Johnson) 3.20
07. Howlin’ Wolf: Forty Four (Burnett) 2.48
08. Jesse Fuller: Stagolee (Traditional) 3.44
09. Bill Broonzy: When Did You Leave Heaven (Bullock/Whiting) 3.29
10. Elmore James:- It Hurts Me Too (Red/James/London)  3.19
11. Little Walter: Key To The Highway (Segar) 2.45
12. Erna Franklin: Piece Of My Heart (Ragovoy/Berns) 2.38
13. Chuck Berry: Memphis (Berry) 2.14
14. Robert Johnson: 32-20 Blues (Johnson) 2.52
CD 3:
The  Originals:
01. Chuck Berry: Around And Around (Berry) 2.40
02. Larry Williams: She Said Yeah (Jackson/Williams) 1.50
03. Nat King Cole Trio: Route  66 (Troup) 3.01
04. Muddy Waters:  Just Want To Make Love To You (Dixon) 2.51
05. Howlin’ Wolf: Little Red Rooster (Burnett/Dixon) 2.26
06. Buddy Holly: Not Fade Away (Holly/Petty) 2.23
07. Jimmy  Reed: Honest I Do (Reed/Abner) 2.42
08. Dale Hawkins: Suzie Q (Hawkins/Lewis/Broadwater)  2.19
09. The Coasters: Poison Ivy (Leiber/Stoller) 2.42
10. Jim Harpo: I’m A King Bee (Harpo) 3.04
11. Robertt Johnson: Love In Vain (Johnson) 3.20
12. Bo Diddley: Mona (McDaniel) 3.39
13. Gene Allison: You Can Make It If You Try (Jarrett) 2.09
14. Eric Donaldson: Cherry Oh, Baby (Donaldson) 3.07
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Trudy Lynn – Royal Oaks Blues Cafe (2013)

frontcover1Houston native Trudy Lynn has been singing rhythm and blues since the 60’s and has had albums issued on several labels since her Ichiban debut in 1989. In recent years she has not been prolific but, as she explains in the sleevenotes, she was searching for the right songs. The result is an album that brings together some fairly obscure songs from blues singers and writers of yesteryear with two of Trudy’s own compositions.
Trudy has a seasoned voice which has enough grit to convey the emotions of the songs, an excellent example being “Country Man Blues”, a song once covered by Candye Kane. Here Trudy’s voice really conveys the slightly risqué lyrics and both Steve and Jonn contribute significantly. The piano features on “Street Walkin’ Daddy”, a hit in 1950 for Margie Day but Jonn plays some wonderfully relaxed guitar too. Trudy’s own songs stand up well in comparison: her “Every Side Of Lonesome” has a live feel with lots of handclaps and backing vocals, Jonn on slide and Steve’s harp almost buzzing in the background, a very catchy shuffle with strong vocals from Trudy. “Down In Memphis” is Trudy’s other credit, a short tune with some striking harp leading on a rocking little number in praise of the Bluff city. Several of the songs Trudy has selected to sing here are what might be described as ‘suggestive’, trudylynn2none more so than Clara Smith’s “Whip It To A Jelly” which closes the album with Steve’s harp working very well with Trudy’s vocal, a late night piece with Jonn on acoustic guitar. Jay McShann’s “Confessin’ The Blues” provides a strong opener, a song that goes back to the 40’s, all three front line players providing strong solos.
On Don Robey’s “Play The Honky Tonks” (a hit for Marie Adams in 1951) Randy’s piano is well to the fore.
My research failed to discover anything about four other songs here. “Feel It” is credited to B Campbell, another suggestive lyric in a performance which, especially Steve’s harp, is relaxed but effective. Another relaxed performance is the fine “Effervescent Daddy” (E Bennett) on which Trudy’s voice is a little smoother than is typical of the album where she usually has more grit in her vocals. However, on this song she is much smoother, as befits the style of the song. “I’m Gonna Put You Down” (W Booze) is a slow blues on which Trudy’s expressive, deep voice is very effective and “Red Light” (V Green) is an upbeat rocker which makes use of some of the same imagery as “I Caught The Katy” and is a real toe-tapper as Jonn ramps up the pace in his solo as the piano and harp underpin Trudy’s vocals.
There is plenty to enjoy here and it is good to hear Trudy in such good voice, sounding very much like the early female pioneers that she has sought to celebrate on this Album. (by bluesblastmagazine.com)
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Personnel:
Steve Krase (harmonica, background vocals on 04.)
Eugene ‘Spare Time’ Murray  (bass)
Carl Owens (drums)
Jonn Del Toro Richardson (guitar)
Trudy Lynn (vocals)
Randy Wall  (piano)
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Richard Cholawian (drums on 07.)
Rock Romano (bass, background vocals on 04.)
Robert ‘Pee Wee’ Stephens (piano on 04. + 07., background vocals on 04.)

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Tracklist:
01. Confessin’ The Blues (McShan) 3.51
02. Play The Honky Tonks (Robey) 4.27
03. Feel It (Campbell) 4.44
04. Every Side Of Lonesome (Lynn) 3.56
05. Country Man Blues (unknown) 3.57
06. Street Walkin’ Daddy (G.Day/M.Day) 5.35
07. Red Light (Green) 4.38
08. I’m Gonna’ Put You Down (Booze) 5.19
09. Down In Memphis (Lynn) 2.43
10. Effervescent Daddy (Bennett) 4.10
11. Whip It To A Jelly (Smith) 5.05

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stevekraseSteve Krase

Peter Guralnick – The Listener’s Guide To The Blues (1982)

frontcoverThis is another out of print book from my Collection of Music books …

By delving into the livesm influences and recordings of the great blues makers, The Listener´s Guide To The Blues provides a unique tour through the growth and development of one of America´s finest Musical forms.

“If you were to only get one book about the blues, this is it. It provides all the necessary biographical and background information in short, readable chapters, and then discusses the albums most worth checking out for every artist and every style. Indispensable” (Patrick)

Abouth the author:

Peter Guralnick is an American music critic, writer on music, and historian of US American popular music, who is also active as an author and screenwriter. He has been married for over 45 years to Alexandra. He has a son and daughter, Jacob and Nina.
Guralnick’s first two books, Almost Grown (1964) and Mister Downchild (1967), were short story collections published by Larry Stark, whose small press in Cambridge, Larry Stark Press, was devoted to stories and poems. Mona Dickson, writing in MIT’s The Tech (May 13, 1964) gave Almost Grown a favorable review.
After Guralnick graduated from Boston University in 1971 with a master’s degree in creative writing, he began writing books chronicling the history of blues, country, rock and roll and soul.
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Peter Guralnick with Chuck Berry, 2012

His two-volume biography of Elvis Presley, Last Train to Memphis in 1994, followed by Careless Love in 1999, placed the story of Presley’s career into a rise and fall arc. Encompassing more than 1,300 pages (including 1,150 pages of text), the work countered earlier biographies such as Albert Goldman’s Elvis from 1981 with an in-depth, scholarly examination of Presley’s life and music. Guralnick had previously written on Presley in the The Rolling Stone Illustrated History of Rock & Roll, starting with the first edition in 1976, said article having been reprinted for each subsequent edition.

Larry Stark Press published Peter Guralnick’s second book in 1967. A first edition is currently valued at $200.
In contrast to contemporaries such as Lester Bangs, Ian Penman and Nick Tosches, whose music writings are marked by idiosyncratic, self-referential and highly personal styles, Guralnick’s writing is characterized by a colloquial approach that is clean and understated by comparison. In his best passages, he has an ability to simultaneously empathize and remain objective. Writing as a music fan, his enthusiasm powers his writing but doesn’t overpower it.
Guralnick wrote the script for A&E’s documentary, Sam Phillips: The Man Who Invented Rock ‘n’ Roll, narrated by Billy Bob Thornton, and he also scripted Sam Cooke – Legend, narrated by Jeffrey Wright. (by goodreads.com)
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This is an essential book about the blues and about all These great blues recordings through the last century
Here are some pics from the good … before you can read the book:
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Papa George Lightfoot – Natchez Trace (1969)

originalfrontcover1Thanks to a handful of terrific 1950s sides, the name of Papa Lightfoot was spoken in hushed and reverent tones by 1960s blues aficionados. Then, producer Steve LaVere tracked down the elusive harp master in Natchez, cutting an album for Vault in 1969 that announced to the world that Lightfoot was still wailing like a wildman on the mouth organ. Alas, his comeback was short-lived; he died in 1971 of respiratory failure and cardiac arrest.

Sessions for Peacock in 1949 (unissued), Sultan in 1950, and Aladdin in 1952 preceded an amazing 1954 date for Imperial in New Orleans that produced Lightfoot’s “Mean Old Train,” “Wine Women Whiskey” (comprising his lone single for the firm) and an astonishing “When the Saints Go Marching In.” Lightfoot’s habit of singing through his harp microphone further coarsened his already rough-hewn vocals, while his harp playing was simply shot through with endless invention. Singles for Savoy in 1955 and Excello the next year (the latter billed him as “Ole Sonny Boy”) closed out Lightfoot’s ’50s recording activities, setting the stage for his regrettably brief comeback in 1969. (by Bill Dahl)

One of the finest of southern juke joint bluesmen, Papa George Lightfoot’s music was totally untainted by the folk and blues revivals of the late 50s and mid-60s. Born Alexander Lightfoot in Natchez on March 2, 1924, the Deep South harmonica player and singer recorded for Peacock, Aladdin, Imperial and Savoy. His 1954 Imperial side papageorgelightfoot01Wine,Women,Whiskey was later issued in England in 1969 as a single on Liberty. Later that same year, Lightfoot was tracked down by Steve La Vere and recorded at the new Malaco studio in Jackson, Mississippi on 21st July 1969. The session was originally released as “Natchez Trace” by Vault Records of California and saw almost simultaneous release in the UK on Liberty Records. Among the sides is New Mean Old Train, an updated version of Mean Old Train, a song Lightfoot recorded earlier for both Imperial and Savoy. “Goin’ Back To The Natchez Trace” presents the earlier LP together with 5 previously unissued tracks and an extended spoken monologue. The recordings have been completely restored from original analogue master tapes, the sound quality vastly improved upon and the music totally remixed by Vie Keary at Chiswick Reach Studio, London, on valve equipment. If you previously knew this LP when it was available on either Vault, Liberty or Crosscut, you are in for a big (and pleasant) surprise. Papa George is accompanied by a fine little group including soul man Tommy Tate on drums, Carson Whitsett on piano, Jerry Puckett on guitar and Ron Johnson on bass. Following the album’s release he appeared at the famous Ann Arbor, Michigan Blues Festival in 1970 but, before he could capitalise on his turn of fortune, he died suddenly on 28th November, 1971 at Natchez Charity Hospital. “Goin’ Back To The Natchez Trace” stands as a testament to his music and to the kind of Deep South blues now long gone.

This is one of the blues harmonica Albums I´ve ever heard ! A real forgotten hero of the Blues !

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Personnel:
Ron Johnson (bass)
Papa George Lightfoot (vocals, harmonica
Jerry Puckett (guitar)
Tommy Tate (drums)
Carson Whitsett (piano)

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Tracklist:
01  My Woman Is Tired Of Me Lyin’ (Lightfoot) 7.08
02. New Mean Old Train (Lightfoot) 3.30
03. Love Me Baby (Lightfoot) 5.15
04. Goin’ Down That Muddy Road (Lightfoot/LaVere) 4.17
05. Ah, Come On Honey (Lightfoot) 4.08
06. I Heard Somebody Cryin’ (Lightfoot) 4.21
07. Take It Witcha (Lightfoot) 4.11
08. Nighttime (Lightfoot) 6.05

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Jon Chappell – Blues Guitar For Dummies (2006)

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Do you wish you could play your favorite blues music on guitar? Even if you don’t read music, it’s not difficult with Blues Guitar for Dummies.
With this hands-on guide, you’ll pick up the fundamentals instantly and start jamming like your favorite blues artists!
Blues Guitar for Dummies covers all aspects of blues guitar, showing you how to play scales, chords, progressions, riffs, solos, and more!
It’s packed with musical examples, chords charts, and photos that let you explore the genre and play the songs of the great blues musicians. This accessible guide will give you the skills you need to:

Choose the right guitar, equipment, and strings
Hold, tune, and get situated with your guitar
Play barre chords and strum to the rhythm
Recognize the structure of a blues song
Tackle musical riffs
Master melodies and solos
Make your guitar sing, cry, and wail
Jam to any type of blues

Jon Chappell is a multistyle guitarist, arranger, and author. He grew up in Chicago, attended Carnegie-Mellon University, and earned his master’s degree in composition from DePaul University. He was Editor-in-Chief of Guitar magazine and played and recorded with artists such as Big Walter Horton, Billy Branch, Pat Benatar, Judy Collins, Graham Nash, and Gunther Schuller. Jon has also contributed numerous musical pieces to TV and film.
Jon served as Associate Music Director of Cherry Lane Music, where he transcribed, edited, and arranged the music of Joe Satriani, Steve Vai, Steve Morse, Bonnie Raitt, and Eddie Van Halen, among others. He has more than a dozen method books to his name and is the author of Guitar For Dummies, 2nd Edition, and Rock Guitar For Dummies (both published by Wiley), Blues Rock Riffs for Guitar (Cherry Lane), as well as the textbook The Recording Guitarist — A Guide for Home and Studio (Hal Leonard).
Table of Contents:
Introduction.
Part I: You Got a Right to Play the Blues.
Chapter 1: Every Day I Have the Blues . . . Hallelujah!
Chapter 2: Blues Meets Guitar: A Match Made in Musical Heaven.
Chapter 3: Grab Hold, Tune Up, Play On!
Part II: Setting Up to Play the Blues.
Chapter 4: Getting a Grip on Left-Hand Chords.
Chapter 5: Positioning the Right Hand for Rhythm and Lead.
Chapter 6: Blues Progressions, Song Forms, and Moves.
Chapter 7: Musical Riffs: Bedrock of the Blues.
Part III: Beyond the Basics: Playing Like a Pro.
Chapter 8: Playing Lead: Soaring Melodies and Searing Solos.
Chapter 9: Playing Up the Neck.
Chapter 10: Express Yourself: Making the Guitar Sing, Cry, and Wail.
Part IV: Sounding Like the Masters: Blues Styles through the Ages.
Chapter 11: Acoustic Roots: Delta Blues and Its Country Cousins.
Chapter 12: The Birth and Growth of Classic Electric Blues.
Chapter 13: Blues Rock: The Infusion of Ol’ Rock ’n’ Roll.
Part V: Gearing Up: Outfitting Your Arsenal.
Chapter 14: Shop Till You Drop: Buying the Right Guitar for You.
Chapter 15: Choosing Your Amp and Effects.
Chapter 16: Changing Strings.
Part VI: The Part of Tens.
Chapter 17: Ten Blues Guitar Giants.
Chapter 18: Ten Great Blues Guitars.
Chapter 19: Ten (Plus One) Must-Have Blues Guitar Albums.
Part VII: Appendixes.
Appendix A: How to Read Music.
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Eric Burdon And The Animals – Roadrunners! Rare Live And Studio Recordings (1990)

front-cover1Eric’s at his wild best in these rare recordings-many never heard by even the most ardent Animals collector! Four tracks are British radio broadcasts from ’66, one is from German TV in ’67; the rest are all live, from Monterey in ’67, London in ’67 (including Inside Looking Out ) and Stockholm in ’68 ( San Franciscan Nights; Monterey , and more). And the rarest of the rare: six live cuts from Melbourne, Australia in ’67, including See See Rider and When I Was Young .
This is a mixed bag of live and BBC recordings from both the post-Alan Price edition of the original band, and the later New Animals of “San Franciscan Nights” fame. Sound quality varies, but the obscurity of these tracks more than compensates. The Beeb tracks include one Price number, a faithful rendition of “Heartbreak Hotel.” Other highlights include gritty takes on “Inside Looking Out” and “Maudie” plus a fantastic version of “Jailhouse Rock” that comes within shouting distance of Elvis (honestly!). Barry Jenkins almost steals the show with his knockout drumming, and Zoot Money’s organ washes are utterly scintillating. There’s also a raw set culled from the New Animals’ tour of Australia, highlighted by spirited versions of standards like “Shake Rattle and Roll” and “See See Rider.” The version of “When I Was Young” is also strong and the groovy radio announcer at the end is a trip. Burdon’s Monterey appearance is showcased in a pair of freakout versions of “Ginhouse Blues” and “Hey Gyp”, both of which are way too long and too self-indulgent. This is the weakest part of the album by far. New Animals fans will adore the 1968 tracks from Stockholm which feature the band at its psychedelic apex. As goofy as it sounds on WINDS OF CHANGE, “Yes I’m Experienced” really rocks on stage (especially the killer feedback rave up—and Eric’s rap at the end is hilarious), and the other tracks (“Paint It Black”, “San Franciscan Nights” and “Monterey”) are faithful, though edgier recreations of the group’s studio versions. Vic Briggs always claims the band was much better on stage than in the studio and this set backs him up, mainly because Burdon’s often wearying improvisations are kept to a reasonable minimum. Grab it if you dig Burdon’s post-1966 work (although Glen A. Baker’s liner notes are so fawning they’re worthless).(by an amazon customer

booklet01aPersonnel:
Various Animals line-ups

booklet03aTracklist:

Broadcasts:
BBC 1966:

01. Heartbreak Hotel (Axton/Durden) 2.40
02. The Work Song (Adderley/Brown) 2.52
03. Corrina Corrina (Traditional) 2.46
04. Jailhouse Rock (Leiber/Stoller) 2.52

German TV 1967:
05. Roadrunner (McDaniel) 2.53

Concerts:
Monterey 1967:
06. Gin House Blues (Troy/Henderson) 5.51
07. Hey Gyp (Dig The Slowness) (Leitch) 8.24

Festival Hall, Melbourne, 1967:
08. Shake, Rattle & Roll (Calhoun) 4.25
09. When I Was Young (Burdon/Briggs/Weider/Jenkins/McCulloch) 3.15
10. See See Rider (Rainey) 4.02
11. Rock Me Baby (King/Josea) 2.36
12. Tobacco Road (Loudermilk) 5.37
13. So Long (Burdon/Briggs/Weider/Jenkins/McCulloch) 3.46

Live London, 1967:
14. Inside Looking Out (L.Lomax/A.Lomax/Burdon/Chandler) 3.04
15. Maudie (Hooker) 4.15

Live Stockholm, 1968:
16. San Franciscan Nights (Burdon/Briggs/Weider/Jenkins/McCulloch) 4.33
17. Monterey (Burdon/Briggs/Weider/Jenkins/McCulloch) 6.16
18. Paint It Black (Jagger/Richards) 6.28

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bookletbackcover