The Spencer Davis Group – The Second Album (1966)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Second Album is the second studio album by the British band The Spencer Davis Group, released in 1966. Many of the songs were a slightly experimental blend of beat, folk, jazz and blues, but included Jackie Edwards’ “Keep on Running”, which gave the group their first U.K. number 1 single, and the R&B standard “Georgia on My Mind”. The album spent eighteen weeks on the U.K. album chart, peaking at number 3.[1] While the album was not released in the US, the single “Keep on Running” was released in February, 1966, and spent four weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 chart peaking at number 74 on March 12. (by wikipedia)

The Spencer Davis Group – The Second Album – More Blues and soul from Britain’s highly American influenced soulful blues band of sorts. Their first really big single, “Keep On Running” appears on this disc and is a soulful rock classic and I guess I call it that because there’s a fuzz tone guitar. More blues and soul fill the air with tunes like “Georgia on My Mind” “This Hammer” Strong Love” and “Since I Met You Baby”, all classic American soul songs of that particular time period. Their is also included 8 bonus tracks of some US Versions on here as well. Great album … (by Joe Eastlackon )

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Their best one. Early British group doing jazz and blues like you want to hear. Stevie on piano is soulful in the raw. Georgia on my mind for example. Look away a classic and some more. A few pop like ones but hey something for everyone and not easy to track down finally I have and its on its way. (by bodon)

The Spencer Davis Group from Birmingham is one of my most favortite bands from the British Beat Boom …  and they was much more the only a beatgroup …

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Rare French single

#Personnel:
Spencer Davis (guitar, vocals)
Muff Winwood (bass)
Steve Winwood (guitar, vocals, keyboards)
Pete York (drums, percussion)

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Tracklist:
01. Look Away (Meade/Russell) 2.46
02. Keep On Running (Edwards) 2.51
03. This Hammer (Traditional) 2.19
04. Georgia On My Mind (Carmichael/Gorrell) 4.44
05. Please Do Something (Covay) 2.28
06. Let Me Down Easy (Ford) 3.06
07. Strong Love (Malone/Silvers/Brown) 2.18
08. I Washed My Hands In Muddy Water (Babcock} 2.39
09. Since I Met You Baby (Hunter) 3.30
10. You Must Believe Me (Mayfield) 2.48
11. Hey Darling (Davis/S.Winwood) 4.50
12. Watch Your Step” (Parker) 2.57
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13. Stevie’s Blues (Davis/M.Winwood/S.Winwwod/York) 3.49
14. Trampoline (S.Winwood 2.28
15. Back Into My Life Again (Davis/M.Winwood/S.Winwwod/York) 2.26
16. Kansas City (Leiber/Stoller) 3.52
17. Oh! Pretty Woman (Williams) 3.22
18. Det war in Schöneberg / Mädel ruck ruck ruck (Kollo/Traditional) 2.42
19. Stevie’s Groove (Davis/M.Winwood/S.Winwwod/York) 2.46
20. Stevie’s Blues (US Version) (Davis/M.Winwood/S.Winwwod/York) 3.49

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Linda Hoyle – Pieces Of Me (1971)

FrontCover1A more than important jazz/blues singer from UK:

Linda Nicholas (born Linda Hoile, 13 April 1946), known by her stage name Linda Hoyle, is a singer, songwriter and art therapist. She is best known for her work with the band Affinity (1968–1971), as well as for her collaboration with Karl Jenkins on her album Pieces of Me, produced in 1971. Hoyle’s latest album, The Fetch, produced by Mo Foster, was released by Angel Air on 7 August 2015.

Linda was born and grew up in Hammersmith, London. Her mother, Marjorie (“Madge”, née Penfold), was a shorthand typist, working with the Kensington and Chelsea Police Force and CID. Her father, Gordon (“Dick”) was an accountant with Sun Life Insurance.

For the first decade of Linda’s life, the family lived in a small ground-floor flat with few amenities. Nevertheless, on a Saturday, Dick would buy a new 78 rpm jazz record which was played for the family to dance to. This music consisted mostly of Fats Waller, Louis Armstrong, Mezz Mezzrow and others, with an historic backlog of Bessie Smith, Bix Beiderbeck, Mugsy Spanier and Fletcher Henderson. Oddities from 1920s and 30s jazz were the backbone of Linda’s musical experience, stirred into Madge’s attempts to introduce classical music – Vaughan Williams, Tchaikovsky, Elgar.

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Wendy + Linda Hoyle ca. 1961

Her early education was at St Peter’s, a Church school, then Chiswick County School for Girls. She was told in no uncertain terms by her music teacher, Miss Cooper, that she showed no ability. However, she happily sang Everly Brothers songs, in harmony with friends, in the echoing school toilets.

Wendy Hoile, Linda’s younger sister, was able to sing in harmony from a very young age. She played guitar and sang in a band, Blanch Carter and the Lounge Lizards, in the late 1960s and early 70s.[2] Both Linda and her sister learnt first to play the ukulele and then the guitar. They performed together often at family gatherings and parties, sometimes using the family convector heater, a Valor, as a primitive piece of echo and reverb equipment, singing into it even when it was lit.

Linda’s main vocal influence, Billie Holiday, was introduced to her at 16 by a family friend who played her “Strange Fruit”. She went immediately and spent her savings on Volume One of the CBS compilation The Billie Holiday Story, learning all the vocals note for note. After hearing Ella Fitzgerald’s recording of “I Can’t Face the Music” she began to include more modern improvisation influences: Sara Vaughan, Anita O’Day, Frank Sinatra and later Betty Carter, Cleo Laine, Karen Dalton, Laura Nyro and others.

After finishing at Chiswick County, Linda worked for a year at Hammersmith Hospital as a trainee Laboratory Technician, followed by a three-year teacher training course at Wall Hall College of Education, Hertfordshire.

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Linda Hoyle + Lynton Naiff

Through a boyfriend who was a student at Sussex University, Hoyle met the University of Sussex’s US Jazz Trio – Lynton Naiff (keyboards), Foster (drums) and Nick Nicholas (double bass) – who asked her to sing with them at a nightclub on the Sussex coast. It was during this time that a flurry of interchangeable jazz-rock bands were playing at Sussex, culminating in a decision by Naiff, Foster and Grant Serpell to pursue playing professionally. Naiff, at the time enrolled to do a MSc in Mathematics, dropped out of his course after a few months, renting a bungalow on the South Downs to organise the band. Mike Jopp was recruited as lead guitarist, and after considering male singers it was decided to take the risk of having a female front the band. Although in a previous incarnation the band had been known as “Ice”, the name Affinity was chosen. Naiff, particularly, was a huge fan of Oscar Peterson, after whose 1961 album the name was chosen.

The shift of Linda’s name from Hoile to Hoyle occurred early in her singing career. Journalists and interviewers invariably spelt it incorrectly as Hoyle, a much more common spelling.

The band quickly found work and their first live performance was in London at the Revolution on Bruton Street in 1968, which was managed by an insomniac businessman, Jim Carter-Fea, who also owned the Speakeasy and the Pheasantry in Chelsea. The Revolution was, in the late 1960s, a hot spot for celebrities. Affinity, over its many engagements there, had in their audience at various times Judy Garland, John Lennon and Stevie Wonder, the latter taking to the stage to play harmonica with the band.

LindaHoyle03Foster, in many ways the most enterprising member, introduced the band to Ronnie Scott’s management, who at the time were looking for new bands to play Upstairs at their renovated club. Almost immediately signed, they spent three years under contract, starting early in 1969. By the middle of that year, Scott’s decided that Affinity should also play Downstairs, opposite such jazz musicians as Les McCann and Stan Getz. This encouraged them to become more demanding of their own musical creativity. At the time of Affinity’s appearance opposite McCann in July 1969, Hoyle was interviewed by Melody Maker and spoke about her musical influences and her time with the band.

During this time Affinity were managed by Chips Chipperfield, who later produced The Beatles Anthology, a documentary series for television.

Naiff’s father, himself a musician, owned a music shop and business in Soho. The band initially used his own brand of amplifiers and speakers, called ‘Impact’. However, the quality was poor and Hoyle, pressing hard for vocal volume during live performances, damaged her vocal cords. Surgery became necessary to remove nodes, and she was unable to sing for some months. She decided to seek vocal training from a professional singing teacher.

The album Affinity was released in 1970. Affinity’s contract with Vertigo, a branch of Philips Records, included an advance payment, which allowed them to buy new equipment and a more comfortable six-wheel vehicle, and to employ a roadie. The band were busy with TV appearances, and touring in the UK and Europe; even so they were finding it hard to live on their earnings. In her interview with Jackie magazine in December 1970, Hoyle talked about the upsides and downsides of life on the road.

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Linda Hoyle in Germany with Affinity, ca. 1970

The same year Hoyle recorded the jingle for a Shredded Wheat television commercial “There are two men in my life” with Foster and Mike Jopp, both playing acoustic guitars. The commercial achieved much attention in the UK and Hoyle performed the song on the Michael Parkinson Show.

Annie Nightingale, a pioneering BBC presenter, travelled with the band in January 1971, making a film about their life on the road for TV. However, at this time Hoyle’s three-year relationship with Naiff was coming to an end and she was ready to quit the band.

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Affinity reunion at a private party in 2006 (L to R: Linda Hoyle, Mike Jopp, Mo Foster, Grant Serpell and Geoff Castle, replacing Lynton Naiff)

In 1971 Ronnie Scott suggested that Hoyle work with Karl Jenkins on a solo album. They wrote many of the songs together and Jenkins invited Chris Spedding, John Marshall, and Jeff Clyne, all from Nucleus, among others to play on the album. Only 300 copies of the album, Pieces of Me, were pressed. It is one of Vertigo’s rarest albums.

Hoyle emigrated to Canada in 1972, where she continued to sing, mostly jazz, with various musicians. During a sabbatical year in England in 1980, Hoyle performed and sang with the People Show. People Show No 84 (The Bridge), was staged at the Royal Court Theatre, London and the Crucible, Sheffield. Since 1984, Hoyle has sung and worked with Oliver Whitehead. Hoyle’s return to writing and recording was sparked by an Affinity reunion at a private party in 2006. After performing again with Foster at Sussex University’s 50th anniversary celebration in 2011 (this performance released as The Baskervilles Reunion 2011), work on The Fetch began. The songs on this album are all original, composed by Foster or Whitehead, with lyrics by Hoyle. The musicians include Ray Russell, Gary Husband, B. J. Cole, Peter Van Hooke and Julian Littman.

Hoyle received an Honours BA in Psychology in 1975, and a Master’s degree in Biomedical Ethics in 1982, both from the University of Western Ontario. She worked as a therapist in various agencies, and trained in Art Therapy with Irene Dewdney (1914–1999). They remained colleagues and co-workers for the rest of Dewdney’s life. With Dewdney and others, she started The Ontario Art Therapy Association in 1979. In 1988 Hoyle was invited to establish the Post Graduate Diploma in Art Therapy at the University of Western Ontario, running the programme and teaching. She co-authored, with Dewdney an art therapy textbook, Drawing Out The Self: The Objective Approach in Art Therapy, which was published in 2011, together with an accompanying Web site.

In 1972 Hoyle married John “Nick” Nicholas, the original bass player with the University of Sussex Jazz Trio. Nicholas is a historian of philosophy and science. Their daughter, Emily, was born in 1982. (by wikipedia)

And this is her extremly rare first solo album:

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It probably isn’t surprising to learn that Hoyle’s solo debut, cut following the final dissolution of Affinity in 1971, does not deviate too far from that band’s jazz-rock modus operandi. However, in seeking to trim the instrumental fat from Affinity’s sometimes gruelling work-outs, and concentrate the attention on the songs (and lyrics) themselves, it rises far above its role model, to showcase Hoyle as a far more exciting figure than her footnotes in history would have you believe. Reminiscent in places of the best of Julie Driscoll’s late 1960s work — a role model that Hoyle was singularly well-placed to succeed — Pieces of Me likewise borrows from several of Driscoll’s own influences.

Karl Jenkins

Karl Jenkins

The Nina Simone and Laura Nyro songbooks both contribute to the proceedings, with the latter’s “Lonely Woman” standing among the best tracks on the entire album. But Hoyle’s own work, largely written in tandem with keyboard player Karl Jenkins, is equally powerful, with the eerie “Hymn to Valerie Solanis” (titled for, but never mentioning the woman who shot Andy Warhol), and the regretful “Journey’s End” ranking among the other highlights. The intriguing “Ballad of Marty Mole,” meanwhile, reads like a cross between Bob Dylan and Beatrix Potter, and could well give children nightmares for days. (by Dave Thompson)

This is one of the most fascinating albums I ever heard  … it starts with one of the best Blues songs ever recorded …

And then you´ll hear very intensive and intimate songs … this album is a must !

And it ends with another great blues song from 1936, written by Willard Robison  … :

Down in Alabama, in the Revenue Mountains,
Laughing water comes out of strange fountains!
And when the evenin’ sun goes down,
Come ye’s on down to Barrelhouse Town.

There’s a dim lighted tavern,
Known as Mammy’s Rest;
Folks down in ‘Bam will tell you
That it’s Mammy’s place that they love the best.

Theres a sweet tone piano,
Worn by many thumbs,
And there’s a fellow that plays it
That uses his pedal for drums.

If you come down to Birmingham
With nary a place to go,
Fond a man called Cactus Sam,
Tell him you wanna go barrelhouse,
That’s all he needs to know!

Be there for supper
Or a plate of barbecue,
And this, along with the music,
Will make a barrelhouse man of you;
What I mean is,
You will have that lowdown feelin’ too!

If you find yourself in Birmingham
without a place to go,
Come on down to my house,
Make a palette on the floor.

I’ll have you meet some southern gal,
A-gentle sweet and kind;
There, words for your music
And music for your mind!

Let’s go barrelhouse,
All night long!

I would like to dedicate this entry to a very special woman !

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Personnel:
Jeff Clyne (bass)
Linda Hoyle (vocals)
Karl Jenkins (piano, oboe)
John Marshall (drums, percussion)
Chris Spedding (guitar)
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Colin Purbrook (piano (on 11.)

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Tracklist:
01. Backlash Blues (Simone) 5.54
02. Paper Tulips (Hoyle/Jenkins) 3.32
03. Black Crow (Hoyle/Jenkins) 3.16
04. For My Darling (Hoyle/Jenkins) 3.57
05. Pieces Of Me (Hoyle/Jenkins) 4.07
06. Lonely Women (Nyro) 4.05
07. Hymn To Valerie Solanas (Hoyle/Jenkins) 4.02
08. The Ballad Of Morty Mole (Hoyle/Jenkins) 4.32
09. Journey’s End (Hoyle/Jenkins) 3.14
10. Morning For One (Hoyle/Jenkins) 4.22
11. Barrel House Music (Bailey) 2.44

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Linda Hoyle in 2015

Teeny Tucker – Voodoo To Do You (2013)

FrontCover1Upon checking out the title, along with the track list, which includes song titles such as “Voodoo Woman”, “Voodoo Voodoo”, “It’s Your Voodoo Working” , and “Love Spell”, one might be able to identify the recurring theme of Teeny Tucker’s latest album, if hard-pressed. That being said, Teeny Tucker doesn’t need voodoo to get anyone to love this recording, Voodoo To Do You! She’s got it covered with powerful vocals, down-home blues, choice song selections and a great band which includes guitarist Robert Hughes, bassist Robert Blackburn, drummer Darrell Jumper, David Gastel on harmonica and keyboards.

Tucker kicks this thirteen track album off with a fantastic cover of Koko Taylor’s “Voodoo Woman”. It’s fast paced Blues, buttered on one side with her cool raspy vocals, and on the other side, with Hughes’ killer electric riffs. Linda Dachtyl, sitting in on this one with her B3, adds a cohesive bonding that nicely pulls the song together. Then without skipping a beat, the intro to Howlin’ Wolf’s “Commit a Crime” gently rolls in. Hughes scores big points on this one as he nicely sets the song in motion. Introducing new lyrics, Tucker tackles this one from a woman’s point of view. “Tough Lover” is another cover, with a little modification. This one isn’t your Etta James’ version. Tucker takes the original and slows it down a bit, which I think is a great decision. Interestingly, as the tempo increases, Hughes briefly steers the song from Blues to Rockabilly before bringing it back home again.

One of my favorite tracks on the album is Tucker’s rendition of “Death Don’t Have No Mercy”, originally by Gary Davis, and covered later by the Grateful Dead. I love the guitar licks Hughes lays down on this dark and sullen song. I can feel the emotion pouring off his guitar strings as he plays. This is probably the coolest song on the album.

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Tucker must have had her mojo working double time when she got the idea for the closer song, “Sun Room”. This upbeat original, about the history and spirit of the legendary Sun Studios in Memphis, Tennessee, coincidentally was recorded at the Sun Studios. When this song plays, I feel momentarily transported to the studio itself. Tucker makes it easy to envision the iconic building at 706 Union Avenue, with her crafted lyrics. (by Phillip Smith)

Teeny Tucker comes honestly to the blues. Her father Tommy Tucker was the first to have a hit with “Hi-Heel Sneakers”. Her earliest musical experiences were in church in Dayton, Ohio but in her teens, Teeny discovered her true calling: deep, down-home blues. Since then she has paid her dues and gained national recognition as an independent recording artist, singer and songwriter. “Voodoo To Do You” is her fourth disc on TeBo Records. The fourth time may be the “charm” to catapult Ms. Tucker to worldwide fame. She tells great stories, struts her tough stuff, rocks with her band, delivers fresh covers of classics such as “I’m A Woman”, laughs at herself and croons tender blues ballads such as “Death Don’t Have No Mercy”. Many of the songs revolve around the mystique of “voodoo” from working it on a miscreant lover to the spells cast by a new love interest. Many CDs today are not worthy of listening from start to finish, but “Voodoo To Do You” by Teeny Tucker is one terrific tune after another. (by Linda Yohn)

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Personnel:
Robert Blackburn (bass)
David Gastel (harmonica, keyboards)
Robert Hughes (guitar)
Darrell Juper (drums)
Teeny Tucker (vocals)
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background vocals:
Mary Lusco-Ashley – Paula Brown . Teeny Tucker
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Linda Dachtyl (organ, piano on 01., 03., 06. + 09.)

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Tracklist:
01. Voodoo Woman (Taylor/Eyebell) 3.27
02. Commit a Crime (Burnett) 3.26
03. Love Spell (Hughes/Tucker) 3.59
04. Voodoo Voodoo (Coleman/Avril) 2.26
05. Tuff Lover (James) 2.22
06. Can Do All That (Hughes/Tucker) 3.18
07. Shoes (Tucker) 2.48
08. It’s Your Voodoo Workin’ (Sheffield) 2.28
09. Muddier Things Get (Hughes/Tucker) 2.47
10. I’m a Woman (Leiber/Stoller) 2.57
11. Hard Time Killing Floor Blues (Curtis) 2.51
12. Death Don’t Have No Mercy (Davis) 3.12
13. Sun Room (Hughes/Tucker) 3.12

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The Pretty Things – Balboa Island (2007)

3227 - CD Covers AWBalboa Island, released in 2007, is the eleventh studio album by the English rock band The Pretty Things.

A problem with bands that have been on the scene for over 40 years (count ’em) is that they can sometimes still write songs with titles like “The Beat Goes On” and “Buried Alive,” as if those tropes hadn’t lost their edge several decades ago. On the other hand, when a band has played together for four decades its members have often learned one of rock & roll’s great lessons: how to create maximum groove with minimal ingredients. So when the Pretty Things lay down a song as thunderous as “Livin’ in My Skin,” they do so with the ponderous grace and inexorable momentum of an elephant walking to water. They’ve also been around long enough to have heard some of their source material at the source, which means that they can deliver an ancient Delta blues like “Feel Like Going Home” with a certain arch authority.

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(And if you want more cowbell, these guys can deliver that with authority as well — check out the raunchy period piece “Mimi.”) On the downside, they sometimes abuse their elder-statesmen status to impose eight minutes of two-chord vamp on their hapless listeners (“[Blues For] Robert Johnson”), and the title track, which closes the album, does so with much more of a whimper than a bang. Not bad at all, but unless you’re a die-hard fan you’ll want to be a little selective. (by Rick Anderson)

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Personnel:
Skip Alan (drums, percussion)
Frank Holland (guitar, vocals)
Phil May (vocals)
Jon Povey (keyboards, vocals)
Dick Taylor (guitar)
Wally Waller (bass, guitar, vocals)
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James Cheetham (keyboards)
Rupert Cobb (trumpet)
Mark St. John (drums, vocals)
Duncan Taylor-Jones (vocals on 11.)
Scarlett Wrench (vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. The Beat Goes On (May/St. John) 4.14
02. Livin’ In My Skin (May/Holland) 3.57
03. Buried Alive (May/Holland) 3.36
04. (Blues For) Robert Johnson (May/Holland) 8.00
05. Mimi (Taylor) 2.35
06. Pretty Beat (May/Taylor/St. John) 2.52
07. The Ballad Of Hollis Brown (Dylan) 6.30
08. In The Beginning (May/Holland) 4.42
09. Feel Like Goin’ Home (Morgenfield) 2.39
10. Freedom Song (Traditional) 4.46
11. Dearly Beloved (May/Povey) 4.59
12. All Light Up (May/Holland/St. John) 4.30
13. Balboa Island (Holland) 4.42

 

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Twelve Bar Blues Band – Key To Your Heart (2010)

FrontCover1From the moment the TBBB started in 2005, they have been considered the surprise of the Dutch blues scene. In fact, they won many “Blues CD of The Month” and “Blues CD of The Year” awards with their first two CDs.

This CD consists of eight originals and two covers, which starts by getting the heart of this blues fan pounding. There’s plenty of “edge” here with quieter moments too. The vocals of J.J. Scherpenzeel are very soulful and rich, while the guitar of Kees Dusink is tasteful beyond question, demonstrating a clear understanding of blues stylings and a rare ability to pull the listener into the song.

Add a cool harp and you’ve got a strong blues CD. (by dwmmusic.com)

I love this blues since the late Sixities … and it´s such a great feeling … that this kind of music is still live and well …

The Blues will never die …

Lisen and enjoy !

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Personnel:
Marcel Bakker (drums)
Kees Dusink (leadguitar)
Patrick Obrist (bass)
Randy Pears (guitar)
Jan J. Scherpenzeel (vocals, harmonica)

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Tracklist:
01. Can You Hear Me Howlin’ (Scherpenzeel/Dusink) 5.11
02. Love That Burns (Green) 7.01
03. Let’s Talk About It (Scherpenzeel/Dusink) 6.11
04 I’m Losing You (Scherpenzeel/Dusink) 6.26
05. Talk Of The Town (Scherpenzeel/Dusink) 5.15
06. Key To You Heart (Scherpenzeel) 6.55
07. Saturday Night (Scherpenzeel/Dusink) 4.32
08. Marian (Scherpenzeel/Dusink) 5.51
09. I Ain’t Born In Chicago (Scherpenzeel/Dusink) 8.44
10. Big Legged Woman (Tolbert) 4.44

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Lucky Peterson – Triple Play (1990)

FrontCover1Lucky Peterson (born Judge Kenneth Peterson, December 13, 1964, Buffalo, New York) is an American musician who plays contemporary blues, fusing soul, R&B, gospel and rock and roll. He plays guitar and keyboards. Music journalist Tony Russell, in his book The Blues – From Robert Johnson to Robert Cray has said, “he may be the only blues musician to have had national television exposure in short pants.”Lucky Peterson (born Judge Kenneth Peterson, December 13, 1964, Buffalo, New York) is an American musician who plays contemporary blues, fusing soul, R&B, gospel and rock and roll. He plays guitar and keyboards. Music journalist Tony Russell, in his book The Blues – From Robert Johnson to Robert Cray has said, “he may be the only blues musician to have had national television exposure in short pants.”

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Peterson’s father, bluesman James Peterson, owned a nightclub in Buffalo called The Governor’s Inn. The club was a regular stop for fellow bluesmen such as Willie Dixon. Dixon saw a five-year-old Lucky Peterson performing at the club and, in Peterson’s words, “Took me under his wing.” Months later, Peterson performed on The Tonight Show, The Ed Sullivan Show and What’s My Line?. Millions of people watched Peterson sing “1-2-3-4”, a cover version of “Please, Please, Please” by James Brown. At the time, Peterson said “his father wrote it”. Around this time he recorded his first album, Our Future: 5 Year Old Lucky Peterson, for Today/Perception Records and appeared on the public television show, Soul!.

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As a teen, Peterson studied at the Buffalo Academy for Visual and Performing Arts, where he played the French horn with the school symphony. Soon, he was playing backup guitar and keyboards for Etta James, Bobby “Blue” Bland, and Little Milton.[2]
The 1990s were a prolific period for Peterson. Two solo Bob Greenlee produced albums for the Chicago-based Alligator Records (1989’s Lucky Strikes! and the following year’s Triple Play) remain his finest recorded offerings. He then released four more for the record label, Verve Records (I’m Ready, Beyond Cool, Lifetime and Move). While with Verve, Peterson collaborated with Mavis Staples on a tribute to gospel singer Mahalia Jackson, called Spirituals & Gospel. Peterson played electronic organ behind Staples’ singing.

More albums from Peterson came after 2000. He recorded two for Blue Thumb Records (Lucky Peterson and Double Dealin’), and one for Disques Dreyfus entitled, Black Midnight Sun. In 2007, he released Tete a Tete on JSP Records.
In 2013, the Blackbird Music/55 Arts Club DVD of Live At The 55 Arts Club Berlin was nominated for a Blues Music Award.[4]Lucky Peterson in 1984.Current work and lifestyle
Today, Peterson lives in Dallas, Texas, and maintains a rigorous tour schedule performing all over the world.
Peterson has four children. (by wikipedia)

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Even more impressive than his previous Alligator set, thanks to top-flight material like “Don’t Cloud Up on Me,” “Let the Chips Fall Where They May,” and “Locked Out of Love,” the fine house band at Greenlee’s King Snake studios, and Peterson’s own rapidly developing attack on two instruments. (by Bill Dahl)

It’s a shame that Lucky Peterson has still not been discovered by some blues fans; they don’t know what they’re missing. This collection, recorded at Kingsnake Studios in Sanford, FL and released on Alligator Records in 1990, offers some great music from start to finish. Of the ten songs, I could start naming favorites such as “Six O’Clock Blues”, “Let the Chips Fall Where They May”, and the classic “I Found A Love”, but there isn’t a bad track on this disc. While it was originally released many years ago, it still sounds fresh. All in all, “Triple Play” is one well-done album. (by Blue Ox)

Lucky Peterson is a natural born musician and entertainer. He first exposed his bewildering talent during session work for Florida’s King Snake Records. Then, he progressed to holding stints with Little Milton and Bobby `Blue’ Bland. Given the number of artists and CDs that I see and hear annually, Lucky Peterson consistently rates at the top. Unlike the name of this 42-minute album, Peterson is more than a triple threat. He is an exhilarating multi-instrumentalist (capable of playing organ, guitar, bass, drums and trumpet), flamboyant songwriter, passionate singer, and a radiant live entertainer. If you haven’t had the pleasure of experiencing his multiple talents, check out “Let The Chips Fall Where They May” with its slick and funky arrangement. Here, and throughout Peterson plays explosive lead guitar while backed by his sleek organ and vocals. Just 27-years-old at the time this album was released, Peterson shows infinite potential. (by Tim Holek)

In other words: a brilliant album !

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Personnel:
Bryan Bassett (guitar)
Bob Greenlee (bass)
Dale Horton (bass)
Ernie Lancaster (guitar)
Jim Payne (drums)
Lucky Peterson (keyboards, guitar, vocals)
William Pell Pinner III (drums)
George Taylor (guitar)
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The Kingsnake Horns:
Bob Greenlee (saxophone)
Sylvester Polk (trumpet)
Bill Samuel (saxophone)
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Ray Anderson (trombone of 10.)
Ray”Bruce Staelens (trumpet on 10.)
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Funky Ray”Lester Chambers (vocals on 05.)

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Tracklist:
01. Let The Chips Fall Where They May (Greenlee) 4.11
02. Your Lies (Greenlee/Peterson/Payne) 3.11.
03. Six O’Clock Blues (Boylston/Michel) 3.44
04. Repo Man (Payne/Peterson/Boylston/Greenlee) 3.26
05. I Found A Love (Pickett/West/Scofield) 5.47
06. Jammin’ In The Jungle (Payne/Peterson/Greenlee) 3.43
07. Locked Out Of Love (Payne/Peterson/Greenlee) 3.39
08. I’m Free (Payne/Greenlee) 5.18
09. Don’t Cloud Up On Me (Greenlee/Peterson/Boylston) 3.15
10. Funky Ray (Anderson/Peterson/Payne/Greenlee) 5.29

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Mick Abrahams – All Said And Done (1991)

FrontCover1Mick Abrahams’ return album, “All Said and Done”, is as fine as anything he has ever done. This is an excellent blues album, with fourteen tracks comprised of seven tunes written by Mick (two of which were collaborations with Gordon ‘Mississippi’ Murphy), two new arrangements of traditional pieces, and five covers of older blues pieces.

The pieces written by Mick are quite good, starting with “Road Roller” which opens the album. Then there is the absolutely fantastic “All Tore Down” which is probably my favorite tune that Mick has ever done. Another noteworthy piece is “Dear Jane” which is very similar to “Dear Jill” from his days in Blodwyn Pig. Another great piece is the title song of the album “All Said and Done”, which is one of the two pieces which Gordon Murphy co-wrote.

While Mick’s pieces are very strong, one cannot ignore the cover tunes like “Black Night” by Jessie Mae Robinson, “Let Me Love You Baby” by Willie Dixon, and “I Wonder Who” by Alexis Korner. There are also two new arrangements of classic blues pieces. The first is “Billy The Kid” (originally by Reverend Andrew Jenkins), and the second is an amazing 11+ minute version of “Cat’s Squirrel” (originally by Charles Isaiah Ross) which has become Mick’s signature piece. (Dave_42)

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Personnel:
Mick Abrahams (guitar, vocals)
Bruce Boardman (piano)
Clive Bunker (drums, percussion)
Pete Fensome (bass)
Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone)
Dave Lennox (piano)
Gordon Murphy (saxophone)
Nigel Pegrum (drums, percussion)
Andy Pyle (bass)
Jim Rodford (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Road Roller (Abrahams) 3.07
02. Watch Your Step (Parker) 3.51
03. Billy The Kid (Traditional) 3.33
04. Let Me Love You Baby (Dickson) 3.12
05. Black Night (Robinson) 6.24
06. All Tore Down (Abrahams) 5.22
07. Redways Of Milton Keynes (Abrahams) 3.59
08. Long Gone (Murphy/Abrahams) 3.14
09. Rock Me Right (Abrahams) 3.25
10. So Much Trouble (McGhee) 3.25
11. Dear Jane (Abrahams) 4.00
12. I Wonder Who (Korner) 6.46
13. All Said And Done (Murphy/Abrahams) 3.16
14. Cats Squirrel (Traditional) 11.25

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