Big Mama Thornton – Stronger Than Dirt (1969)

FrontCover1This is one of my favorite albums ever. I bought it at the time because of my love for Janis Joplin & wanted to hear the woman that had had such an affect on her. The album was made on the heels of Cheap Thrills as a comeback but never achieved the success she hoped for. It includes a remake of Hound Dog Man & Ball & Chain, as well as a version of Summertime that Joplin had covered earlier. All of them are strong sets comparable to her earlier versions. The rest is material that is chosen wisely.

Her version of That Lucky Old Sun, to me, is one of the great songs of transcendent honesty. She lets you feel the truth of life & it’s burden. It was the first time, at the age of 18, that I “got” the blues. I understood & more than likely it was the first time I realized it was never going to be easy on this earth, but that it was endurable. The title of the album itself says this very thing.

Her version of I Shall Be released, has much the same feel, & is to my mind, the most interesting arrangement of the song. It’s always been the one Dylan song I found great & has been covered well by many. To me this is the best. It is the one & only time that this song swings & when she belts out “You know, Big Mama, I was framed” you know she knows exactly what he’s talking about. She expounds the universal.

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The album starts off with Born Under A Bad Sign, another song that she was born to sing. It’s material she has lived. All the songs on this album are good, not a filler in the lot & all are handled by her with ease. It’s clear it’s all material she enjoyed giving her Big Mama interpretation to, from Funky Broadway to Let’s Go Get Stoned to Rollin’ Stone to Ain’t Nothin’ You Can Do. This is her strongest outing in the studio.

There seems to be almost a contradiction in the fact that here was this big voice that came out effortlessly. Something that, no matter how good she was, Joplin did not have. It took a lot of effort & burned her out. Big Mama despite living the blues was never buried in them. She knew how to let the good times roll, specifically, because she knew how hard it could be. On this album, after years of obscurity she’s enjoying the attention that’s finally come back to her, rolling up her sleeves & saying: “This is what they’re talking about, here’s the treasure. This is what you’ve been missing.” (by Robido)

Alternate frontcover:

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Personnel:
Big Mama Thornton (vocals)
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a bunch of unknown studio musicians

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Tracklist:
01 Born Under A Bad Sign (Jones/Bell) 3.45
02. Hound Dog (Leiber/Stoller) 2.25
03. Ball And Chain (Thornton) 4.40
04. Summertime (Gershwin) 4.13
05. Rollin’ Stone (Morganfield) 3.56
06. Let’s Go Get Stoned (Armstead/Ashford/Simpson) 4.30
07. Funky Broadway (Christian) 4.16
08. That Lucky Old Sun (Smith/Gillespie) 3.35
09. Ain’t Nothin’ You Can Do (Malone/Scott) 3.39
10. I Shall Be Released (Dylan) 4.38

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Paul Butterfield Blues Band – The Resurection Of PigboyCrabshaw (1967)

FrontCover1The 1968 edition of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band featured a larger ensemble with a horn section, allowing for a jazzier feeling while retaining its Chicago blues core. They also adopted the psychedelic flower power stance of the era, as evidenced by a few selections, the rather oblique title, and the stunning pastiche art work on the cover. Butterfield himself was really coming into his own playing harmonica and singing, while his band of keyboardist Mark Naftalin, guitarist Elvin Bishop, drummer Phil Wilson, electric bassist Bugsy Maugh, and the horns featuring young alto saxophonist David Sanborn was as cohesive a unit as you’d find in this time period. Butterfield’s most well-known song “One More Heartache” kicks off the album, a definitive blues-rock radio favorite with great harmonica and an infectious beat urged on by the top-notch horns.

The band covers “Born Under a Bad Sign” at a time when Cream also did it. “Driftin’ & Driftin'” is another well-known tune, and at over nine minutes stretches out with the horns cryin’ and sighin’, including a definitive solo from Sanborn over the choruses. There’s the Otis Rush tune “Double Trouble,” and “Drivin’ Wheel” penned by Roosevelt Sykes; Butterfield wrote two tunes, including “Run Out of Time” and the somewhat psychedelic “Tollin’ Bells,” where Bishop’s guitar and Naftalin’s slow, ringing, resonant keyboard evokes a haunting feeling. This is likely the single best Butterfield album of this time period and you’d be well served to pick this one up. (by Michael G. Nastos)

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Personnel:
Elvin Bishop (guitar)
Paul Butterfield (harmonica, vocals)
Gene Dinwiddie (saxophone)
Keith Johnson (trumpet)
Bugsy Maugh (bass, vocals on 07.)
Mark Naftalin (keyboards)
Dave Sanborne (saxophone)
Phil Wilson (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. One More Heartache (Tarplin/Rogers/White/Robinson/Moore) 3.42
02. Driftin’ And Driftin’ (Brown/Williams/Moore) 9.10
03. Pity The Fool (Malone) 6.06
04. Born Under A Bad Sign (Jones/Bell) 4.11
05. Run Out Of Time (Dinwiddie/Peterson/Butterfield) 3.05
06. Double Trouble (Rush) 5.42
07. Drivin’ Wheel (Sykes) 5.59
08. Droppin’ Out (Butterfield/Zimmerman) 2.21
09. Tollin’ Bells (Dixon) 4.22

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Pete Haycock Band – Livin´ It (1992)

FrontCover1It´s time to celebrate the one and only Pete Haycock !!!

Peter John Haycock (4 March 1951 – 30 October 2013) was an English musician and film score composer. He began his career as lead guitarist, vocalist, and founding member of the Climax Blues Band.

Haycock was born in Stafford, and here he attended St. John’s Primary School and King Edward VI Boys Grammar School. As a child, he was impressed by the guitar solos of Hank Marvin of The Shadows. He played his first electric guitar at a miners club when he was 12. He then played guitar at school and college dances. Along with local boys, he formed a blues band, the Mason–Dixon Line.[3] In 1967, Haycock met Colin Cooper and joined his soul band The Gospel Truth.[2] In 1968, they founded a new band, the Climax Chicago Blues Band, and then they eventually changed its name to the Climax Blues Band, in 1970. The band’s original line-up consisted of Haycock (lead guitar, vocals), Cooper (harmonica, vocals), Derek Holt (guitar, vocals), Richard Jones (bass), Arthur Wood (keyboards), George Newsome (drums).

During the early 1970s, the Climax Blues Band went through a few personnel changes, before arriving at their most stable, creative, and successful line-up, which consisted of Haycock, Cooper, Holt (switched to bass guitar), and John Cuffley (drums). In 1976, the line-up with keyboardist Richard Jones wrote the band’s biggest hit “Couldn’t Get It Haycock02Right”. The song included the vocal harmonies of Haycock and Holt, behind Cooper’s lead. Haycock, an underrated vocalist, sang lead on several of the band’s tracks, particularly on the Sense of Direction (1974), Stamp Album (1975), Gold Plated (1976), Shine On (1978), and Flying The Flag (1980). albums. The band with the core line-up of Haycock, Cooper, Holt, and John Cuffley toured heavily in the 1970s and 1980s. During much of this period, Haycock played concerts with his rare trademark instrument, a gold-plated Veleno guitar, which was also on the cover of the album Gold Plated.

Holt and Cuffley left in 1983. Haycock and Cooper went their separate ways after their final Climax Blues Band album together, 1983’s Sample and Hold.

In May 2012, the Major League Productions Ltd record label released an until-then unknown vault recording of a 1976 live performance, featuring the Climax Blues Band at the top of their game: Climax Blues Band / World Tour 1976. Haycock provided some insightful liner notes for the CD’s insert, and the recording further demonstrates the tight musicianship that was found in the band’s line-up at that time.

In March 2015, a 4-CD retrospective was released entitled Live, Rare, and Raw 1973-1979, featuring the band at the height of their powers, in a variety of Live settings. This release would parallel the ferocity and acclaim of Climax Blues Band’s 1973 album, FM/Live. The band produced more than 15 successful albums in their heyday.

Though another group of musicians, which at one time was led by late former bandmate Colin Cooper, is currently calling themselves “Climax Blues Band”, their lineup does not consist of any founding members, and has not found the commercial success or following that the original, “true” Climax Blues Band enjoyed during Haycock’s years with the band. Cooper died in 2008.

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In 1984, the bandmembers went their separate ways, and Haycock went on to record several solo projects, the first of which was the album Total Climax (1986) recorded with his new band, Pete Haycock’s Climax. Pete Haycock’s Climax toured extensively in Europe, including Communist East Germany, as well as a well-received tour in Australia, also releasing The Soft Spot (1987). During this period, Haycock was asked by former Climax Blues Band manager, Miles Copeland, to record an instrumental album for I.R.S. No Speak, Guitar and Son, and Night of the Guitars, a live album from the tour of the same name.[9] After that tour, in 1989, Haycock teamed up with Holt and guitarist Steve Hunter to record an album under the name H Factor. The Pete Haycock Band consisted of the musicians from the Total Climax lineup, and went on to record a live album entitled Livin’ It in 1992. Copeland also signed Gary Numan to I.R.S. with whom Haycock collaborated with in the 1988 album Metal Rhythm.

Haycock was approached by Bev Bevan, formerly of Electric Light Orchestra, to join the newly formed Electric Light Orchestra Part II. The group toured and recorded with Haycock in the early 1990s, releasing both a live CD and video of their performance with the Moscow Symphony Orchestra. They recorded and toured together until 1993.

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In the early 1990s, Haycock was asked by Hans Zimmer to collaborate on film scores for K2 (1991), and Toys (1992). Other film scores they worked on were for Drop Zone (1994), and The Dilemma (2011), among others. Haycock’s slide guitar contributed to Thunderbird, the theme music for the 1991 film, Thelma & Louise.[2] Haycock was asked by Zimmer to re-create his performance, with a live symphony orchestra for the recording of Wings of a Film, which was a compilation album of Zimmer’s successful film scores.[citation needed]

Haycock began composing music of his own for film and television. Along with Holt, he composed music for the 1992 film One False Move. More scores would follow, and Haycock helped produce recordings for other artists.

Haycock05.jpgIn 2005, Haycock supplied all the music for the Hollister Independence Motorcycle Rally DVD charity project, for producer Jeff Byler, with proceeds benefiting Emmaus House, a shelter for battered women and children. When the DVD’s producer suggested a follow-up soundtrack to the project, Haycock went back into the studio to complete the album that became Bikers’ Dozen, which featured a vocal performance by John Fiddler (Medicine Head).

Haycock signed on as a major contributor to the LovePower and Peace[ charity CD project in 2009, which was spearheaded by fellow musician Robin George, and was built around George’s hit song, “LovePower and Peace”. Haycock contributed many trademark slide guitar tracks and donated studio time to the project, a charity effort to benefit children with cancer and other terminal diseases.

This collaboration, which included the donated talents of scores of veteran musicians,[14] also resulted in the forming a “super group” called The LovePower Band, which landed a major record deal and completed its first album, which was released in 2011.

After an absence from the stage and live performances, Haycock formed a new band, Pete Haycock’s True Blues (featuring Glen Turner). In 2008, they toured Europe and released their first recording together: Pete Haycock’s True Blues Live (featuring Glen Turner).[16][17] In April 2009, Haycock, in an interview talked about the early days with the Climax Blues Band, the transition to studio work (with and without Hans Zimmer), and his return to the stage with his new band, after an absence from live performances of fourteen years.

Haycock continued to record, and perform live, and had been a featured guest performer with the Siggi Schwarz’ band, and was on the same bill with ZZ Top and Johnny Winter in 2012.

Haycock012013 found Haycock coming full-circle with the formation of a super-group recording and scheduled for touring as Pete Haycock’s Climax Blues Band featuring Robin George, with Haycock being joined by a lineup of musicians including George, with whom he had collaborated on the LovePower Band, and other projects. Haycock envisioned this project as a return to the “true” Climax Blues Band, and he had just completed the new album, Broke Heart Blues, before his death.

Haycock built a recording studio in Frankfurt, Germany where he lived for several years until his death. He died of a heart attack on 30 October 2013 in Frankfurt. The news was posted on the group’s official website. He was 62. (by wikipedia)

And this is one of his rarest album, only released in Germany. It was recorded live at a samll club called “Die Neue Kulisse”, Pirmasens / Germany in June 1992 and when I wrote it´s time to celebrate the one and only Pete Haycock … you will undertand me … after listening thiis album.

Pete Haycock … one of the most underrated musician in the history of Rock & Blues !

Listen and enjoy !

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Personnel:
Livingstone Brown (bass, keyboards, vocals on 5)
Pete Haycock (guitar, vocals)
Clive Mayuyu (drums)
Mike Stevens (saxophone, flute, keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01. Liberty (Haycock) 3.29
02. So Many Roads (Marshall) 11.11
03. Communication (Haycock) 6.47
04. Medley: 6.48
04.1. Come On In My Kitchen (Johnson)
04.2. Country Hat (Haycock)
05. The Thrill Is Gone /Hawkins/Darnell) 13.09
06. Lucienne (Haycock) 10.41
07. Dr. Brown, I Presume (Haycock) 6.00
08. Blackjack And Me (Haycock) 5.32

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Spencer Bohren – Karlstorbahnhof, Heidelberg (2007)

FrontCover1Spencer Ward Bohren (born 1950, Casper, Wyoming) is an American roots musician, singer, songwriter, teacher, and visual artist. He plays guitar, lap steel guitar, banjo, and percussion, and utilizes the roots of American traditional music to write songs in blues, country, gospel and folk styles. He has released fourteen albums since 1984.

Bohren’s maternal ancestry is Scots-Irish, and his father’s family came from Alsace-Lorraine. He grew up in a Baptist family in Wyoming and spent time in Denver and Boulder, Colorado, southern Oregon, and Seattle, Washington in the early part of his career. In 1976 he began raising a family with his wife, Marilyn, in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Bohren has performed throughout the United States as well as in Canada, England, Ireland, Scotland, France, Italy, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Switzerland, Spain, Mexico, and Japan. He has performed on the A Prairie Home Companion radio program and at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. He has also taught at the Fur Peace Ranch. In the late 1970s and early 1980s he hosted a weekly Monday-night jam session at the Tipitina’s music club in New Orleans.

SpencerBohren01Although he most often works as a soloist, he has performed in several bands, including the Funston Brothers, the Eagle-Ridin’ Papa, Butterfat, Rufus Krisp, the Earthtones, and Gone Johnson. He has collaborated with folk blues performer Judy Roderick, diesel-billy guitarist Bill Kirchen, opera singer Karen Clift, Dr. John, the Blind Boys of Alabama, and the vocal duo The Tremors.

In the academic world, Bohren presents a musical overview of American roots music, a lecture-performance entitled Down the Dirt Road Blues, which traces the journey of a single song, “Dirt Road Blues,” from Africa to the days of slavery in the American South, through the modern age. He uses appropriate vintage instruments to orchestrate the story as the song evolves from a simple vocal melody to a blues song, a dance number, a hillbilly banjo piece, a country hit, and into the age of rock ‘n’ roll.

His CD Carry the Word was named “Best CD of the Year 2000 by a Louisiana Artist” by The Times-Picayune of New Orleans, and he has won the New Orleans Gambit Weekly’s “Big Easy Award for Best Folk Artist” several times.

He has recorded for the Virgin, Sony/France, Valve, Zephyr, Public Road, Last Call, Loft, Alpha, Great Southern, and New Blues labels.

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Also a visual artist, Bohren creates artworks that he calls “Reliquaries” and shares his philosophy and techniques with interested students of all ages.

Spencer Bohren and his wife Marilyn live in New Orleans and have home-schooled their four children. The family home suffered significant damage during Hurricane Katrina and Bohren wrote the song “Long Black Line” about the experience. (by wikipedia)

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And here´s an excellent soundboard recording from his concert in Heidelberg in 2007.

And it was a magical night !!! A blend of 60´s Folk,Singer Songwriter,Blues,Country Folk,Dylan,New Orleans,History…….

THINGS,YOU CAN`T GET ON THE BIG STAGE ANYMORE – !!!

Spencer is a real Master…..he did set the place on fire that night,again !!!

This concert was a part of the “For the sake of the song” Concert series…the 1st night.

It´s time to discoverSpencer Bohren !

Spencer Bohren… a musician, educator, artist, guitarist and storyteller !

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Personnel:
Spencer Bohren (guitar, vocals, percussion, lap steel guitar)

Handbill

Tracklist:
01. People Get Ready (Mayfield) 7.04
02. Beulah Land (Traditional) 6.30
03. Cairo Blues (Urban) 7.16
04. Hey Hey Daddy Blues (Blake) +Maple Leaf Rag (Joplin) 9.18
05. Somebody On Your Bond (Traditional) 7.00
06. Wings Of An Angel (Bohren) 5.14
07. Darkness (Bohren) 6.13
08. Deportees (Guthrie/Hoffman) 8.48
09. The Long Black Line (Bohren)
10. Ode To Billy Jo (Gentry)
11. Ain´t Nobodys Business (Grainger/Robbins) 5.48
12. Weary Blues (Williams) 4.25
13. I´ll Be Your Baby Tonight (Dylan) 4.57
14. Watermelon (
15. Ring Them Bells……. (In Memoriam Of Sven) (Dylan) 8.00
16. Natchez Blues (Traditional) 5.16
17. Bound For Glory (Traditional) 6.23
18. Working On A Building (Traditional) 6.59
19. Deep Ellum Blues (Traditional) 6.34
20. Night Is Falling (Bohren) 7.18
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Sy Klopps Blues Band – Walter Ego (1993)

FrontCover1Nobody knows Sy Klopps in 1993 — many people thought, this name was a pseudonym for the great Steve Miller … but … Sy Klopps is Sy Klopps:

Walter James “Herbie” Herbert II (born 5 February 1948) alias Sy Kloppd is the former manager of rock band Journey, The Storm, and a vocalist for the Sy Klopps Blues Band. Born and raised in Berkeley, Herbert is a self-proclaimed hippie and fan of the Grateful Dead.

Herbert got his start in the music business with the aid of his mentor Bill Graham. Through Graham, Herbert became a roadie for the multi-platinum-selling band Santana (where he met Neal Schon and Gregg Rolie). He managed Frumious Bandersnatch (where he met Ross Valory and George Tickner). When Santana imploded in 1973, Herbert put together the original lineup of Journey and remained its manager through 1993. Herbert was heavily involved in all business aspects of the band and traveled as their road manager. With a sharp business sense, Herbert brought everything in house under the name of Nightmare Productions and pioneered the use of large screen videos, impressive lighting and sound for arena-sized concerts. A shrewd businessman, Herbert made a fortune with Journey’s real estate holdings, Nocturne video company, and catalog management. He and Jim Welch, his art director, devised a creative marketing plan to promote the band using the Grateful Dead’s artists Stanley Mouse and Alton Kelly, thematic one-worded album titles, and exposure at point-of-purchase outlets. In 1993 Steve Perry asked that he resign from managing Journey due to personality conflicts.

In addition to his work with Journey, Herbert brought Swedish rock groups Roxette and Europe to the United States in the mid to late-1980s, and managed Mr. Big and R&B artist Tara Kemp and rock band Signal. In the late 1990s, Herbert moved from backstage into the spotlight, recording three albums as Sy Klopps and touring the San Francisco Bay Area with the Sy Klopps Band, which has included current and former Journey band members Neal Schon, Gregg Rolie, Prairie Prince, and Ross Valory. (by wikipedia)

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And this is his brilliant debut album …

“…Venerable blues standards performed, in not always flattering high-tech fashion, by a sort-of-supergroup including former members of Journey and the Tubes….” (
Stereo Review (4/94)

This blues rock album could be Steve Miller in a less restrained mood, getting back his blues chops. It does include a scorching version of ‘Going to Mexico’ originally featured on the Number 5 album. If you like high energy blues rock you’ll wonder why you hadn’t heard of this before. Definitely worth a listen.(by 5ash)

In otherwords: one of the finest blues-rock albums ever recorded … listen to his version of classic blues-tunes like “Born Under A Bad Sign” or “I Got My Eye On You ” … Listen to the ZZ Top classic “Jesus Just Left Chicago” …and listen to “Mercury Blues” and you´ll know what I mean …

This is high energy Blues-Rock !

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Personnel:
Norton Buffalo (harmonica)
David Denny (guitar)
Greg Errico (drums)
Sy Klopps (vocals, guitar)
Kee Marcello (guitar)
Prairie Prince (drums)
Greg Rolie (keyboards)
Neal Schon (guitar)
Bobby Scott (guitar)
Ross Valory (bass)’
Donnie Vie (guitar, harmonica, vocals)
Chris Znuff (bass, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Going To Mexico (Miller/Scaggs) 3.41
02. Fanny Mae (Brown) 2.50
03. Key To The Highway (Broonzy/Segar) 4.40
04. Jesus Just Left Chicago (Gibbons/Hill/Beard) 4.30
05. Born Under A Bad Sign (Jones/Bell) 3.30
06. Going Down (Nix) 3.45
07. I Got My Eye On You (Rolie/Scott) 3.36
08. Round And Round (Vie/Znuff) 3.18
09. Mercury Blues (Douglas/Geddings) 3.58
10. You’re So Fine (Reed) 2.55
11. Baby’s Calling Me Home (Scaggs) 2.49
12. My Name Is Sy Klopps (Rolie/Scott) 3.47

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Savoy Brown – Train To Nowhere (2010)

FrontCover1This is a 2 hour double CD live set from WXXI radio Rochester New York State.

Stunning live set from veteran British Blues man Kim Simmonds and Savoy Brown. Featuring Train to Nowhere, Little Red Rooster and a 22 minute version of Louisiana Blues, recorded in 1997 and 1998.

Formed in 1967 and anchored around guitarist Kim Simmonds, Savoy Brown’s U.K. take on boogie blues paved the way for the heavier breakthough of British blues-based bands like Cream and Led Zeppelin, and while Savoy Brown don’t have the same critical reputation as these, they were still a bread-and-butter little rocking band. (by Steve Leggett)

So sit back and enjoy the smooth blues that is Savoy Brown, one of the finest blues bands ever !

Disc 1 Track 1 and Disc 2 Track 2 & 3 Recorded Live 9th March 1998 Tampa, FL, USA
Disc 1 Tracks 2-7 and Disc 2 Tracks 1, 4 & 5 Recorded Live 14th August 1997 Rochester, NY, USA

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Personnel:
Al Cash (drums, CD 1 – #2-7; CD 2 – #1, 4, 5)
Nathaniel Peterson (bass, vocals)
Kim Simmonds (guitar, vocals)
‘T’ Xiques (drums, CD 1 -#1; CD 2 -# 2, 3)TracklistCD 1:01)

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Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. Too Much Of A Good Thing (Simmonds) 6.15
02. Let It Rock (Simmonds/Raymond) 5.33
03. Train To Nowhere (Youlden) 5.12
04. Bad Shape (Simmonds) 9.06
05. Mr. Browns Boogie (Simmonds) 8.46
06. Stay While The Night Is Young (Youlden) 12.18
07. Savoy Brown Medley: 12.16
07.1. She’s Got A Ring In His Nose And A Ring On Her Hand (Youlden)
07.2 Street Corner Talking (Simmonds/Raymond)
07.3. Hellbound Train (Simmonds/Silvester)
07.4. Wang Dang Doodle (Dixon)
07.5. Tell Mama (Simmonds/Raymond)

CD 2:
01. Little Red Rooster (Dixon) 13.06
02. Mississippi Steam Boat (unknown) 8.30
03. Lookin’ In (Simmonds/Peverett) 8:05
04.Louisiana Blues (Morgenfield) 21.27
05. Little Wheel (Bracken/Hooker)

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Guido Toffoletti´s Blues Society – Ways Back (1987)

FrontCover1Unfortunatly I can´t speak or read the Italian language, and because I found only information about in Italian Website … I can´t give you many informations about Guido Toffoletti.
He was born in 1951 Venice and 15 years later he “run away from his Venice home in search of a tumultuous myth: The music world.

In Milan, he got to know Kim Brown from England and his group “The Renegades”. managed to get taken on as their Roadie ans was thus able to pass hours and hours admiring guitarist Mick Webley´s playing.

After various musically formative experiences, determined to make his career take a decisive turn, in 1975 he went to London where he worked as a dishwasher to make Ends meet and played in his free time.

In London het met his spiritual “father”, Alexis Korner, and thanks to him managed to find his feet in what was at the time Europe´s top blues circuit.

Toffoletti came back toItaly in 1976 with the precise aim of forming the “Blues Society”, an “open” Group of some of Italy´s top blues-men.

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As well as bearing testimony to a period from 1979 to the present day with unreleased songs, covers and alternative tracks, “Ways Back” ideally gathers round Guido all his English and Italian friends; those who helped him, loved him and in some cases let him down.” (taken from the liner notes by Guiseppe Barbieri)

And you´ll hear finest Britsh blues, recorded with musicians like Paul Jones, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Zoot Money, Mel Collins, Ian Stewart and Mick Taylor.

A forgotten jewel of the British blues music, recorded by a great guy from Italy !

SideOneA

SideTwo

I was too lazy, to type all these informations down …

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Italian bluesman Guido Toffoletti
Born 1951 – † 22 August 1999 (Car accident injuries)