Guido Toffoletti´s Blues Society – Ways Back (1987)

FrontCover1Unfortunatly I can´t speak or read the Italian language, and because I found only information about in Italian Website … I can´t give you many informations about Guido Toffoletti.
He was born in 1951 Venice and 15 years later he “run away from his Venice home in search of a tumultuous myth: The music world.

In Milan, he got to know Kim Brown from England and his group “The Renegades”. managed to get taken on as their Roadie ans was thus able to pass hours and hours admiring guitarist Mick Webley´s playing.

After various musically formative experiences, determined to make his career take a decisive turn, in 1975 he went to London where he worked as a dishwasher to make Ends meet and played in his free time.

In London het met his spiritual “father”, Alexis Korner, and thanks to him managed to find his feet in what was at the time Europe´s top blues circuit.

Toffoletti came back toItaly in 1976 with the precise aim of forming the “Blues Society”, an “open” Group of some of Italy´s top blues-men.

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As well as bearing testimony to a period from 1979 to the present day with unreleased songs, covers and alternative tracks, “Ways Back” ideally gathers round Guido all his English and Italian friends; those who helped him, loved him and in some cases let him down.” (taken from the liner notes by Guiseppe Barbieri)

And you´ll hear finest Britsh blues, recorded with musicians like Paul Jones, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Zoot Money, Mel Collins, Ian Stewart and Mick Taylor.

A forgotten jewel of the British blues music, recorded by a great guy from Italy !

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SideTwo

I was too lazy, to type all these informations down …

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Italian bluesman Guido Toffoletti
Born 1951 – † 22 August 1999 (Car accident injuries)

 

 

Big Will & The Bluesmen feat. Peter Struijk – Hard Times (2011)

FrontCover1Big Will & The Bluesmen was a traditional blues band from the Netherlands inspired by great musicians as Muddy Waters, Sonny Boy Williamson and John Lee Hooker.
On this album you’ll find eleven original compositions from Big Will & the Bluesmen. Among those are four acoustic tracks. All songs are based on the Delta / Chicago tradition with true, authentic bluessounds

The band has chosen to give a prominent place on the harmonica (blues harp) and there is also – slide guitar to hear. All this for an authentic blues atmosphere. Close your eyes and imagine yourself in the Mississippi Delta, the “swamp” on a sultry evening, a bottle of Jack Daniels under your belt, life is hard and unforgiving.

They let themselves be inspired by among others: Son House, Robert Johnson, Junior Wells, Muddy Waters and John Lee Hooker.

Will has over 10 years experience playing in blues / rock bands, but would rather be back to basics, the Delta and Chicago blues.

Alex also has extensive stage experience, playing primarily in rock bands. He too has fallen in love with the authentic blues.

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Jos the drummer lets you feel the heartbeat of the blues, just goose bumps!

Traditional blues riffs on electric and upright-bass by Henk Wessels, you’ll be hearing a lot from this promising new band.

“Unplugged” The band plays not only on festivals and pubs, they also perform unplugged for receptions, restaurants and backroom shows in a (semi) acoustic setting.

Inspiration:

The band Big Will & the Bluesmen ismainly inspired by two currents of blues music: the Delta and Chicago style. Originally starting in the early twenties.

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Although slavery is abolished, the black rural population is poor and work on the land. In the evenings they usually spent time in so called juke joints, where they drink the cheap self distilled whiskey and sing simple but powerfull songs about failed love and the misery of their existence. Often the singers were accompanied by guitar and harp.

That’s how the blues was born. -(by last.fm)

Or: That´s why I love the Blues !

“Guitarist Peter Struijk delivers lowdown blues that look back to a time of rough edges and raw emotions.” (Blues Revue, USA)

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Personnel:
Wil van der Ende (harmonica)
Alex “Riverside Jr.” Konijnenburg (guitar, vocals)
Henk Wessels (bass)
Jos Waal (drums)
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Henk Heijlema (lapsteel on 09., mandolin on 06.)
Gerbrand Schoenmaker (piano on 08.)
Peter Struijk (guitar on 01., 04. – 07.)

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Tracklist:
01. Hard Times 6.58
02. Same Old Blues 5.51
03. Waiting On A Train 3.34
04. Leave It All Behind 5.39
05. Seven days -3.25
06. Laura Song 1.26
07. On My Way 3.39
08. Big Will Theme 2.08
09. Drifting And Driving 4.15
10. Sweet Lovin Woman 4.13
11. Release My Soul 4.06

All songs written by Alex “Riverside Jr.” Konijnenburg

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Steve Marriott & The Packet Of Three – Dingwalls 6.7.84 (1991)

FrontCover1If you don’t mind hearing more rock than blues, pick up Steve Marriott – Dingwalls 6.7.84. It’s an outstanding Packet of Three set with much better recording and performances from around the same time. If you’re like me, you’ll love the entire CD. The blues tracks here are “Five Long Years”, the Ashford-Simpson-penned Ray Charles song “I Don’t Need No Doctor” and “Walkin’ the Dog” but Stevie’s rockers are great as well. (by William Sout)

This 1984 show at the North London club Dingwalls was originally broadcast live on the radio, featuring Marriott backed by his band Packet of Three; this performance has also been released under the titles of Dingwalls and Packet of Three: Live. This version has the advantage of liner notes detailing Marriott’s career. (Steve Huey)

Just like many nights at the Half Moon in Putney, this recording really captures the feel of Steve Marriott live. Although there is no Jerry Shirley on drums (as in some Packet of Three performances), this CD has a great R&B feel (soulful vocals and crunchy chords). Only regret is that there is no version of Afterglow, a highlight of most shows. (by an Amazon customer)

Listen to another album by one of my favorite musician of all time !

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Personnel:
Fallon (drums)
Jim Leverton (bass, vocals on 03., background vocals)

Steve Marriott (guitar, vocals, harmonica)

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Tracklist:
01. What’cha Gonna Do About It? (Potter/Samwell) 4.17
02. Fool For A Pretty Face (Marriott/Shirley) 5.50
03. Shame On You (Cooley) 4.06
04. Bad Moon Rising (Fogerty) 6.32
05. The Cockney Rhyme (Traditional) 0.48
06. All Shook Up (Blackwell/Presley) 3.17
07. The Fixer (Marriott/Ridley/Shirley) 7.25
08. All Or Nothing (Marriott/Lane) 5.49
09. Five Long Years (Boyd) 7.43
10.  Thirty Days In The Hole (Marriott) 10.57
11. I Don’t Need No Doctor (Armstead/Ashford/Simpson) 12.47
12.  Big Train Stop At Memphis (Traditional) 5.25
13. Walkin’ the Dog (Thomas) 4.04
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TheDingwalls

Wentus Blues Band & Dick Heckstall-Smith – Man Of Stone (2015)

FrontCover1Dick Heckstall-Smith was much more than “only” the Saxophone Player for one of the best Jazz-Rock bands, we ever had … Colosseum !
He was an extraordinary solo Artist and session Player, too. Here we can hear him with the Wentus Blues Band from Finland !

What can I say about Dick Heckstall-Smith? Brilliant jazz and blues sax player, composer and owner of the largest tea cups in history, and most importantly for me, my friend.

In 1998, I first met Dick Heckstall-Smith, at a recording session for his “Blues And Beyond” album. Soon afterwards I started running his official website, and soon after that, Dick asked me to be his manager. Dick lived to play on stage. He had semi regular gigs with The Hamburg Blues Band, then there were Colosseum tours, a jazz gig here and there, but that still left a lot of time to fill, gig wise.
In 2002, Dick wanted to put a blues based live band together. His ideal line-up would have included Clem Clempson on guitar and Gary Husband on drums. There hadn’t been much movement on this when we were contacted by Robban Hagnas of The Wentus Blues Band. They hailed from Kokkola in Finland. An accomplished blues act, they had found a unique way round the limited touring opportunities in Scandanavia by touring with classic blues artists such as Mick Taylor, centering their sets around each special guest. That way, they could tour several times a year, rather than just once.

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It was agreed that Dick would go out on a Scandanavian tour with them, and and he was as excited by the prospect as I had ever seen him. I remember him dragging me around pretty much every army surplus store in North London one Saturday afternoon in order to find enough cold weather clothing to combat whatever conditions might be faced on the road. I was very aware that my main role with Dick was to maintain a level of hope in the future for him, and this tour constituted the most hopeful he had been for some time.
Once Dick had travelled to Finland for rehearsals and the tour itself, I got daily updates from him by phone. He was particularly impressed by The Wentus Blues Band guitar attack which reminded him of Peter Green era Fleetwood Mac. They had tailored their set to him, with numbers associated with Blues Incorporated, Graham Bond ORGANization and The Bluesbreakers, as well as numbers from Dick’s jazz orientated solo work, such as the song that had become something of a signature for him, “Woza Nasu.” Dick enjoyed the tour immensely, and felt, (as I did when hearing the live recording) that his playing was near his best. I recall one particularly “up” call from Dick. He was staying in an isolated hotel not a million miles from the Arctic Circle, and raved about His ride there, via Reindeer and Sleigh. Dick came back from the tour as invigorated and enthused as I ever saw him in those later years, and I will always thank Robban Hagnas and his band for that.

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A few months later, I got to see Dick in action with the Wentus boys in action at a one off gig in Oxford. Dick drove myself and Pete Brown there, via Canada it seemed. Dick could be directionally challenged now and then. However, we did get there in time for the show, and it was wonderful how the band interacted with a true master of his instrument. This live album is testament to that wonderful interaction. (by Pete Grant; taken from the original liner-notes)
Such a great concert … including one of Dick Heckstall-Smith´s masterpieces … his own composition “Woza Nasu ” … Listen !

Recorded live in Helsinki at Cantina West April, 5th, 2002.

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Personnel:
Mikael Axelqvist (drums)
Robert Hagnäs (bass)
Nike Riippa (guitar)
Anders Sjöberg (vocals)
Kim Vikamn (guitar)
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Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone)
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Tracklist:
01. Key To Love (Mayall) 3.46
02. Missing You (Everton/Edward) 3.53
03. You Got Me (Where You Want Me) (Robey) 5.23
04. Suspicions – Part 2 (Mayall) 6.34
05. Woza Nasu (Heckstall-Smith) 17.04
06. Man Of Stone (Kirkland) 8.16
07. Have You Heard (Mayall) 8.41
08. Pretty Things (McDaniels) 3.06
09. Before You Accuse Me (McDaniels) 5.02
10. Looking Back (Watson) 4.25
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The James Cotton Band – Live & On The Move (1976)

FrontCover1James Henry Cotton (July 1, 1935 – March 16, 2017)[1] was an American blues harmonica player, singer and songwriter, who performed and recorded with many of the great blues artists of his time and with his own band. He played drums early in his career but is famous for his harmonica playing.
Cotton began his professional career playing the blues harp in Howlin’ Wolf’s band in the early 1950s.[3] He made his first recordings in Memphis for Sun Records, under the direction of Sam Phillips. In 1955, he was recruited by Muddy Waters to come to Chicago and join his band. Cotton became Waters’s bandleader and stayed with the group until 1965.[4] In 1965 he formed the Jimmy Cotton Blues Quartet, with Otis Spann on piano, to record between gigs with Waters’s band. He eventually left Waters to form his own full-time touring group. His first full album, on Verve Records, was produced by guitarist Mike Bloomfield and vocalist and songwriter Nick Gravenites, who later were members of the band Electric Flag.
In the 1970s, Cotton played harmonica on Waters’s Grammy Award–winning 1977 album Hard Again, produced by Johnny Winter.
Born in Tunica, Mississippi, Cotton became interested in music when he first heard Sonny Boy Williamson II on the radio. He left home with his uncle and moved to West Helena, Arkansas, finding Williamson there. For many years Cotton claimed that he told JamesCotton01Williamson that he was an orphan and that Williamson took him in and raised him, a story he admitted in recent years is not true. However, Williamson did mentor Cotton during his early years. Williamson left the South to live with his estranged wife in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, leaving his band in Cotton’s hands. Cotton was quoted as saying, “He just gave it to me. But I couldn’t hold it together ’cause I was too young and crazy in those days an’ everybody in the band was grown men, so much older than me.”

Cotton played drums early in his career but is famous for his harmonica playing. He began his professional career playing the blues harp in Howlin’ Wolf’s band in the early 1950s. He made his first recordings as a solo artist for Sun Records in Memphis in 1953. In 1954, he recorded an electric blues single “Cotton Crop Blues”, which featured a heavily distorted power chord–driven electric guitar solo by Pat Hare. Cotton began working with the Muddy Waters Band around 1955. He performed songs such as “Got My Mojo Working” and “She’s Nineteen Years Old”, although he did not play on the original recordings; Little Walter, Waters’s long-time harmonica player, played for most of Waters’s recording sessions in the 1950s. Cotton’s first recording session with Waters took place in June 1957, and he alternated with Little Walter on Waters’s recording sessions until the end of the decade.
In 1965 he formed the Jimmy Cotton Blues Quartet, with Otis Spann on piano, to record between gigs with Waters’s band. Their performances were captured by producer Samuel Charters on volume two of the Vanguard recording Chicago/The Blues/Today! After leaving Waters’s band in 1966, Cotton toured with Janis Joplin while pursuing a solo career. He formed the James Cotton Blues Band in 1967. The band mainly performed its own arrangements of popular blues and R&B from the 1950s and 1960s. Cotton’s band included a horn section, like that of Bobby Bland’s. After Bland’s death, his son told news media that Bland had recently discovered that Cotton was his half-brother.

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In the 1970s, Cotton recorded several albums for Buddah Records. He played harmonica on Waters’s Grammy Award–winning 1977 album Hard Again, produced by Johnny Winter. In the 1980s he recorded for Alligator Records in Chicago; he rejoined the Alligator roster in 2010. The James Cotton Blues Band received a Grammy nomination in 1984 for Live from Chicago: Mr. Superharp Himself!, on Alligator, and a second for his 1987 album Take Me Back, on Blind Pig Records. He was awarded a Grammy for Best Traditional Blues Album for Deep in the Blues in 1996. Cotton appeared on the cover of the July–August 1987 issue of Living Blues magazine (number 76). He was featured in the same publication’s 40th anniversary issue of August–September 2010.
In 2006, Cotton was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame at a ceremony conducted by the Blues Foundation in Memphis. He has won or shared ten Blues Music Awards.
Cotton battled throat cancer in the mid-1990s, but he continued to tour, using singers or his backing band members as vocalists. On March 10, 2008, Cotton and Ben Harper performed at the induction of Little Walter into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, playing “Juke” and “My Babe” together; the induction ceremony was broadcast nationwide on VH1 Classic. On August 30, 2010, Cotton was the special guest on Larry Monroe’s farewell broadcast of Blue Monday, which he hosted on KUT in Austin, Texas, for nearly 30 years.

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Cotton’s studio album Giant, released by Alligator Records in late September 2010, was nominated for a Grammy Award. His album Cotton Mouth Man, also on Alligator, released on May 7, 2013, was also a Grammy nominee. It includes guest appearances by Gregg Allman, Joe Bonamassa, Ruthie Foster, Delbert McClinton, Warren Haynes, Keb Mo, Chuck Leavell and Colin Linden. Cotton played harmonica on “Matches Don’t Burn Memories” on the debut album by the Dr. Izzy Band, Blind & Blues Bound, released in June 2013. In 2014, Cotton won a Blues Music Award for Traditional Male Blues Artist and was also nominated in the category Best Instrumentalist – Harmonica.
Cotton’s touring band includes guitarist and vocalist Tom Holland, vocalist Darrell Nulisch, bassist Noel Neal (brother of the blues guitarist and harmonica player Kenny Neal) and drummer Jerry Porter.

Cotton died at a medical center in Austin, Texas from pneumonia on March 16, 2017 at the age of 81.(by wikipedia)

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James Cotton, live 2015
I’m usually not a big fan of live recordings, but these mid-70’s recordings really catch the spirit of James Cotton “live & on the move”, while still in his prime! Sure, there may be sentimental reasons for my liking this disc {often caught Cotton during this period at the club where these recordings were made} but putting all sentimentality aside, I’ve gained a whole new level of appreciation for these cuts. Listening to these tracks with fresh aged ears {the first time in 20 some years} I can’t help but be impressed by Cotton and company’s tightness as a unit. A tough act to follow, there weren’t many shows rolling down the proverbial blues pike that packed as much punch as a James Cotton performance in it’s heyday, and these cuts certainly can attest to that. Cotton’s band, consisting of seasoned vets such as Matt “guitar” Murphy, know how to lay and hold down earthy funkified grooves, build energetic boogie’s, shuffle and swing without ever losing so much as a beat. If I had to criticize one thing, it would be Cotton’s choice of material. James Cotton had written some fine numbers while a recording artist for both the Sun and Vanguard labels, it’s too bad that he doesn’t showcase a few of them here. Instead, Cotton is content rekindling old chestnuts such as “Got My Mojo Working” and “Help Me”. What would a review of a James Cotton disc be without mentioning his harmonica playing? James Cotton shows why he’s earned the nickname “Mr. Superharp”, especially on tunes such as, “One More Mile”, “All Walks Of Life” and “Boogie Thang”, where the deep tonal qualities and grittiness of his harp work can be heard to full effect. A nice slice of what a James Cotton live show sounded like back in the 70’s, complimented by one of the tightest and hardest working bands in the blues biz, Recommended! (unknow amazon custiner)
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Recorded live in 1974 at the Shaboo Inn in Wlllimantic, Connecticut

Personnel:

Charles Calmese (bass)
James Cotton (harmonica, vocals)
George T. Gregory (saxophone)
Kenny Johnson (drums)
Matt Murphy (guitar)
Mike “Captain Z” Zaitchik (Keyboards)

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Tracklist:
01  Cotton Boogie (Cotton) 3.01
02. One More Mile (Cotton) 2.34
03. All Walks Of Life (Cotton) 2.22
04. Born In Missouri (Cobbs) 4.45
05. Flip Flop & Fly (Calhoun/Turner) 5.06
06  Mojo (Ervin) 4.15
07. Rocket 88 (Brenston) 2.27
08. Goodbye My Lady (Klingman/Smart II/Rundgren) 4.38
09. I Don’t Know (Mabon) 3.35
10. Caldonia (Moore) 5.11
11. Boogie Thing (Murphy) 4.50
12. Good Morning Lil’ Schoool Girl () 3.20
13  Oh Baby You Don’t Have To Go (Reed) 2.32
14. Help Me (Watson) 4.12
15. Fannie Mae () 4.03
16  Hot ‘N Cold (Toussaint) 3.59
17  Teeny Weeny Bit (Whitcomb) 2.48
18. Blow Wind Blow (Dickerson) 4.43
19. How Long Can A Fool Go Wrong (Cotton) 7.15
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20. Next Time You See Me (Forest/Harvey) 3.03
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James Henry Cotton (July 1, 1935 – March 16, 2017)

 

 

Various Artists – The Many Faces Of The Rolling Stones (2015)

FrontCover1This is a great sampler from Mexico !

The Rolling Stones have become the reincarnation of rock itself, being the representation, both musically and in terms of image and behavior, what rock & roll represents. In The Many Faces Of The Rolling Stones, we will highlight their side-projects, their roots, their favorite songs and even a brand new song, which becomes and event in itself, for all the Stones’ fans around the world. The idea sounds wonderful right?. Well, The Many Faces Of The Rolling Stones will meet the expectations of even the most demanding Stones fan. We have a lost recording by Leslie West (Mountain’s guitarist) with Mick Jagger playing guitar, a duet by Keith Richards with Ian McLagan (Faces’ keyboardist), and also the hard-to-find single versions of Bill Wyman’s solo hits.

Also we have Mick Jagger and Keith Richards all time favorite songs (handpicked by themselves), and an extremely rare track titled Catch As Catch Can, that was released only in a limited edition in France as a 7″ and never previously available on CD single, by musician and producer Robin Millar (Eric Clapton, Peter Gabriel, Sade) recorded in 1973 along with Mick Taylor, Bobby Keys and Mick Jagger!!!.

Finally, we have the originals versions of the best songs the Stones covered during his long and illustrious career. This is a marvelous project that with remastered sound, beautiful cover art extended liner notes is an essential addition to your collection. (promo text)

Yes, yes, yes … a real great and intersting Project … Listen and discover the many faces of The Rolling Stones !
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Tracklist:

CD 1:
The Adventures Of The Stones:
01. Leslie West feat. Mick Jagger:High Roller (Jagger/Richards/Laing/Palmer) 4.13
02. Ron Wood & Ian McLagan: She Stole It (McLagan) 3.45
03. Bill Wyman: Monkey Grip (single edition) (Wyman) 3.17
04. Ian McLagan & Keith Richards: Truly (McLagan) 5.58
05. Toots & The Maytals feat. Keith Richards:- Careless Ethiopians (Hibbert) 3.22
06. Ron Wood & The Jones Gang: Had Me A Real Good Time (Lane/Wood) 4.45
07. Ian McLagan feat. Bobby Keys: Somebody (McLagan) 3.00
08 .British Invasion All-Stars feat. Dick Taylor: Gimme Some Loving (Winwood) 4.15
09. Bill  Wyman: (Si Si) Je Suis Un Rock Star (single edit) (Wyman) 3.23
10. Robin Millar feat. Mick Taylor, Nicky Hopkins & Bobby Keys: Catch As Catch Can (Millar)  3.33
11. John Phillips feat. Mick Jagger, Mick Taylor & Keith Richards:- Zulu Warrior (Phillips/Jagger) 3.30
12. Ron Wood & The Jones Gang: Stay With Me (Wood/Stewart) 5.09
13. Chris Farlowe produced by Mick Jagger: Out Of Time (Jagger/Richards) 3.15
14. Johnny Winter: Jumpin’ Jack Flash (Jagger/Richards) 4.42
CD 2:
Mick & Keith’s Favourite Tracks:
01. Little Walter: I Go To Go (Walter)  2.41
02. Muddy Waters: Forty Days And Forty Nights (Roth) 2.50
03. Robert Johnson: Stones In My Passway (Johnson) 2.28
04. Ray Charles: Lonely Avenue (Pomus) 2.34
05. Z.Z. Hill: Everybody Knows About My Good Thing (Grayson /Horton) 4.57
06. Blind Willie Johnson: Dark Was The Night (Cold Was The Ground) (Johnson) 3.20
07. Howlin’ Wolf: Forty Four (Burnett) 2.48
08. Jesse Fuller: Stagolee (Traditional) 3.44
09. Bill Broonzy: When Did You Leave Heaven (Bullock/Whiting) 3.29
10. Elmore James:- It Hurts Me Too (Red/James/London)  3.19
11. Little Walter: Key To The Highway (Segar) 2.45
12. Erna Franklin: Piece Of My Heart (Ragovoy/Berns) 2.38
13. Chuck Berry: Memphis (Berry) 2.14
14. Robert Johnson: 32-20 Blues (Johnson) 2.52
CD 3:
The  Originals:
01. Chuck Berry: Around And Around (Berry) 2.40
02. Larry Williams: She Said Yeah (Jackson/Williams) 1.50
03. Nat King Cole Trio: Route  66 (Troup) 3.01
04. Muddy Waters:  Just Want To Make Love To You (Dixon) 2.51
05. Howlin’ Wolf: Little Red Rooster (Burnett/Dixon) 2.26
06. Buddy Holly: Not Fade Away (Holly/Petty) 2.23
07. Jimmy  Reed: Honest I Do (Reed/Abner) 2.42
08. Dale Hawkins: Suzie Q (Hawkins/Lewis/Broadwater)  2.19
09. The Coasters: Poison Ivy (Leiber/Stoller) 2.42
10. Jim Harpo: I’m A King Bee (Harpo) 3.04
11. Robertt Johnson: Love In Vain (Johnson) 3.20
12. Bo Diddley: Mona (McDaniel) 3.39
13. Gene Allison: You Can Make It If You Try (Jarrett) 2.09
14. Eric Donaldson: Cherry Oh, Baby (Donaldson) 3.07
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Trudy Lynn – Royal Oaks Blues Cafe (2013)

frontcover1Houston native Trudy Lynn has been singing rhythm and blues since the 60’s and has had albums issued on several labels since her Ichiban debut in 1989. In recent years she has not been prolific but, as she explains in the sleevenotes, she was searching for the right songs. The result is an album that brings together some fairly obscure songs from blues singers and writers of yesteryear with two of Trudy’s own compositions.
Trudy has a seasoned voice which has enough grit to convey the emotions of the songs, an excellent example being “Country Man Blues”, a song once covered by Candye Kane. Here Trudy’s voice really conveys the slightly risqué lyrics and both Steve and Jonn contribute significantly. The piano features on “Street Walkin’ Daddy”, a hit in 1950 for Margie Day but Jonn plays some wonderfully relaxed guitar too. Trudy’s own songs stand up well in comparison: her “Every Side Of Lonesome” has a live feel with lots of handclaps and backing vocals, Jonn on slide and Steve’s harp almost buzzing in the background, a very catchy shuffle with strong vocals from Trudy. “Down In Memphis” is Trudy’s other credit, a short tune with some striking harp leading on a rocking little number in praise of the Bluff city. Several of the songs Trudy has selected to sing here are what might be described as ‘suggestive’, trudylynn2none more so than Clara Smith’s “Whip It To A Jelly” which closes the album with Steve’s harp working very well with Trudy’s vocal, a late night piece with Jonn on acoustic guitar. Jay McShann’s “Confessin’ The Blues” provides a strong opener, a song that goes back to the 40’s, all three front line players providing strong solos.
On Don Robey’s “Play The Honky Tonks” (a hit for Marie Adams in 1951) Randy’s piano is well to the fore.
My research failed to discover anything about four other songs here. “Feel It” is credited to B Campbell, another suggestive lyric in a performance which, especially Steve’s harp, is relaxed but effective. Another relaxed performance is the fine “Effervescent Daddy” (E Bennett) on which Trudy’s voice is a little smoother than is typical of the album where she usually has more grit in her vocals. However, on this song she is much smoother, as befits the style of the song. “I’m Gonna Put You Down” (W Booze) is a slow blues on which Trudy’s expressive, deep voice is very effective and “Red Light” (V Green) is an upbeat rocker which makes use of some of the same imagery as “I Caught The Katy” and is a real toe-tapper as Jonn ramps up the pace in his solo as the piano and harp underpin Trudy’s vocals.
There is plenty to enjoy here and it is good to hear Trudy in such good voice, sounding very much like the early female pioneers that she has sought to celebrate on this Album. (by bluesblastmagazine.com)
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Personnel:
Steve Krase (harmonica, background vocals on 04.)
Eugene ‘Spare Time’ Murray  (bass)
Carl Owens (drums)
Jonn Del Toro Richardson (guitar)
Trudy Lynn (vocals)
Randy Wall  (piano)
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Richard Cholawian (drums on 07.)
Rock Romano (bass, background vocals on 04.)
Robert ‘Pee Wee’ Stephens (piano on 04. + 07., background vocals on 04.)

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Tracklist:
01. Confessin’ The Blues (McShan) 3.51
02. Play The Honky Tonks (Robey) 4.27
03. Feel It (Campbell) 4.44
04. Every Side Of Lonesome (Lynn) 3.56
05. Country Man Blues (unknown) 3.57
06. Street Walkin’ Daddy (G.Day/M.Day) 5.35
07. Red Light (Green) 4.38
08. I’m Gonna’ Put You Down (Booze) 5.19
09. Down In Memphis (Lynn) 2.43
10. Effervescent Daddy (Bennett) 4.10
11. Whip It To A Jelly (Smith) 5.05

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stevekraseSteve Krase