Charlie Musselwhite – Goin’ Back Down South (1975)

FrontCover1Charles Douglas Musselwhite (born January 31, 1944) is an American electric blues harmonica player and bandleader, one of the white bluesmen who came to prominence in the early 1960s, along with Mike Bloomfield and Paul Butterfield. He has often been identified as a “white bluesman”. Musselwhite was reportedly the inspiration for Elwood Blues; the character played by Dan Aykroyd in the 1980 film The Blues Brothers.

Musselwhite was born in Kosciusko, Mississippi to white parents. Originally claiming to be of partly Choctaw descent, in a 2005 interview he said his mother had told him he was of distant Cherokee descent. His family considered it natural to play music. His father played guitar and harmonica, his mother played piano, and a relative was a one-man band.

At the age of three, Musselwhite moved to Memphis, Tennessee. When he was a teenager, Memphis experienced the period when rockabilly, western swing, and electric blues were combining to give birth to rock and roll. That period featured Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, and lesser-known musicians such as Gus Cannon, Furry Lewis, Will Shade, and Johnny Burnette. Musselwhite supported himself by digging ditches, laying concrete and running moonshine in a 1950 Lincoln automobile. This environment was a school for music as well as life for Musselwhite, who eventually acquired the nickname Memphis Charlie.

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In true bluesman fashion, Musselwhite then took off in search of the rumored “big-paying factory jobs” up the “Hillbilly Highway”, Highway 51 to Chicago, where he continued his education on the South Side, making the acquaintance of even more legends, including Lew Soloff, Muddy Waters, Junior Wells, Sonny Boy Williamson, Buddy Guy, Howlin’ Wolf, Little Walter, and Big Walter Horton. Musselwhite immersed himself completely in the musical life, living in the basement of and occasionally working at Jazz Record Mart (the record store operated by Delmark Records founder Bob Koester) with Big Joe Williams and working as a driver for an exterminator, which allowed him to observe what was happening around the city’s clubs and bars. He spent his time hanging out at the Jazz Record Mart, at the corner of State and Grand, and a nearby bar, Mr. Joe’s, with the city’s blues musicians, and sitting in with Williams and others in the clubs, playing for tips. There he forged a lifelong friendship with John Lee Hooker; though Hooker lived in Detroit, Michigan, the two often visited each other, and Hooker served as best man at Musselwhite’s third marriage to Henrietta Musselwhite. Gradually Musselwhite became well known around town.

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In time, Musselwhite led his own blues band, and after Elektra Records’ success with Paul Butterfield, he released the legendary album Stand Back! Here Comes Charley Musselwhite’s Southside Band in 1966 on Vanguard Records to immediate and great success. He took advantage of the clout this album gave him to move to San Francisco, where, instead of being one of many competing blues acts, he held court as the king of the blues in the exploding countercultural music scene, an exotic and gritty figure to the flower children. Musselwhite even convinced Hooker to move to California.

Since then, Musselwhite has released over 20 albums and has been a guest performer on albums by many other musicians, such as Bonnie Raitt’s Longing in Their Hearts and the Blind Boys of Alabama’s Spirit of the Century, both winners of Grammy Awards. He also performed on Tom Waits’s Mule Variations and INXS’s Suicide Blonde. He has won 14 Blues Music Awards, has been nominated for six Grammy Awards. received Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Monterey Blues Festival and the San Javier Jazz Festival, in San Javier, Spain, and received the Mississippi Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts.

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In 1979, Musselwhite recorded The Harmonica According to Charlie Musselwhite in London for Kicking Mule Records, intended to accompany an instructional book; the album became so popular that it was released on CD. In June 2008, Blind Pig Records reissued the album on 180-gram vinyl with new cover art.

In 1990 Musselwhite signed with Alligator Records, a step that led to a resurgence of his career.

In 1998, Musselwhite appeared in the film Blues Brothers 2000. He played the harmonica in the Louisiana Gator Boys, which featured many other blues and R&B legends, such as B.B. King, Bo Diddley, Eric Clapton, Koko Taylor, Jimmie Vaughan, Dr. John, and Jack DeJohnette.

Over the years, Musselwhite has branched out in style. His 1999 recording, Continental Drifter, is accompanied by Cuarteto Patria, from Cuba’s Santiago region, the Cuban music counterpart of the Mississippi Delta. Because of political differences between Cuba and the United States, the album was recorded in Bergen, Norway, with Musselwhite’s wife handling the details.

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Musselwhite believes the key to his musical success was finding a style in which he could express himself. He said, “I only know one tune, and I play it faster or slower, or I change the key, but it’s just the one tune I’ve ever played in my life. It’s all I know.”

His past two albums, Sanctuary and Delta Hardware, were released by Real World Records.

Musselwhite played on Tom Waits’s 1999 album Mule Variations. He can be heard at the beginning of the song “Chocolate Jesus”, saying “I love it”. Waits has mentioned that this is his favorite part of the song.

In 2002, he was featured on the Bo Diddley tribute album Hey Bo Diddley: A Tribute!, performing the song “Hey Bo Diddley”.

Musselwhite lost both of his elderly parents in December 2005, in separate incidents. His mother, Ruth Maxine Musselwhite, was murdered.

Musselwhite joined the judging panel of the 10th annual Independent Music Awards, to assist independent musicians’ careers. He was also a judge for the 7th and 9th Independent Music Awards.

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Musselwhite was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 2010. The same year, he appeared on the JW-Jones recording “Midnight Memphis Sun”, along with Hubert Sumlin. Also in 2010, he released the album The Well. In the title song he credits Jessica McClure’s ordeal as a child trapped in a well for over 58 hours in 1987 for inspiring him to quit drinking, stating,

She was trapped in there with a broken arm in the dark, in a life-and-death situation she was singing nursery rhymes to herself and being brave…It made my problems seem tiny. CharlieMusselwhite01So as a prayer to her and myself, I decided I wasn’t going to drink till she got out of that well. It was like I was tricking myself, telling myself that I wasn’t going to quit for good, just until she got out. It took three days to get her out, and I haven’t had a drink since.

For the first half of 2011, Musselwhite toured with the acoustic-electric blues band Hot Tuna. In the latter half of 2011, he went on tour with Cyndi Lauper, having played harmonica on her hit album Memphis Blues. While on this tour, he appeared with Lauper on Jools Holland’s television program Hootenanny on New Year’s Eve 2011, performing a modified arrangement of Lauper’s signature song, “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun”.

In 2012, Musselewhite released the live album Juke Joint Chapel (recorded at the Shack Up Inn in Clarksdale, MS) which was nominated for a Grammy for Best Traditional Blues Album. Musselwhite also teamed with Ben Harper to record the album Get Up!, which was released in January 2013. In January 2014, it won a Grammy Award for Best Blues Album.

In 2014 and 2015, he won a Blues Music Award in the category Best Instrumentalist – Harmonicist.

At the 40th Blues Music Awards ceremony in 2019, Musselwhite’s joint composition with Ben Harper, “No Mercy In This Land”, was named as ‘Song of the Year’. (wikipedia)

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And here´s his 7th solo-album:

Combining two leftovers from Takin’ My Time with a much later session featuring Chicago pianist Lafayette Leake didn’t do much for this LP’s continuity, but it was nice to see the tracks see the light of day (especially Robben Ford’s jazz instro “Blue Stu,” a rare recorded example of him on alto sax). Musselwhite and Leake together proves a natural, especially on “On the Spot Boogie,” with Musselwhite quoting Charlie Parker’s “Now’s the Time.” Musselwhite’s guitar playing makes its first appearance on vinyl here: the primitive country blues of “Taylor, Arkansas” and a nod to Earl Hooker’s slide playing, “Blue Steel.” (by Dan Forte)

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Personnel:
Pat Ford  (drums on 01., 03.)
Robben Ford (guitar, on 01., saxophone on 03.)
Tim Kaihatsu (guitar on 02., 03., 05. – 09.)
Lafayette Leake (piano on 02., 03., 05. – 09.)
Larry Martin (drums on 02., 03., 05. – 09.)
Charlie Musselwhite (vocals, harmonica, guitar on 02. + 06.)
Gerald Pederson (bass on 01., 03.)
Skip Rose (piano on 01., 03.)
Karl Sevareid (bass on 02., 03., 05. – 09.)

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Tracklist:
01. Crazy For My Baby (Dixon) 2.53
02. Blue Steel (Musselwhite) 4.44
03. Take Me Back (Jacobs) 5.16
04. Blue Stu (R.Ford) 7.25
05. This Old Night Life (D.A.R.) 5.18
06. Taylor’s, Arkansas (Musselwhite) 2.46
07. Cut You Loose (D.A.R.) 4.14
08. If Trouble Was Money (D.A.R.) 5.17
09. On The Spot Boogie (Leake) 2-39

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T-Bone Walker – I Get So Weary (1961)

FrontCover1Aaron Thibeaux “T-Bone” Walker (May 28, 1910 – March 16, 1975) was an American blues guitarist, singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, who was a pioneer and innovator of the jump blues and electric blues sound. In 2018 Rolling Stone magazine ranked him number 37 on its list of “The 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time”.

Aaron Thibeaux Walker was born in Linden, Texas, of African-American and Cherokee descent. His parents, Movelia Jimerson and Rance Walker, were both musicians. His stepfather, Marco Washington, taught him to play the guitar, ukulele, banjo, violin, mandolin, and piano.

Walker began his career as a teenager in Dallas in the 1920s. His mother and stepfather (a member of the Dallas String Band) were musicians, and Blind Lemon Jefferson, a family friend, sometimes came over for dinner. Walker left school at the age of 10, and by 15 he was a professional performer on the blues circuit. Initially, he was Jefferson’s protégé and would guide him around town for his gigs. In 1929, Walker made his recording debut with Columbia Records, billed as Oak Cliff T-Bone, releasing the single “Wichita Falls Blues” backed with “Trinity River Blues”. Oak Cliff is the community in which he lived at the time, and T-Bone is a corruption of his middle name. The pianist Douglas Fernell played accompaniment on the record.

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Walker married Vida Lee in 1935; the couple had three children.

By the age of 25, Walker was working in clubs on Central Avenue, in Los Angeles, sometimes as the featured singer and as guitarist with Les Hite’s orchestra. In 1940 he recorded with Hite for the Varsity label, but he was featured only as a singer.

In 1942, Charlie Glenn, the owner of the Rhumboogie Café, brought T-Bone Walker to Chicago for long-time stints in his club. In 1944 and 1945, Walker recorded for the Rhumboogie label, which was tied to the club, backed up by Marl Young’s orchestra.

T-Bone Walker performed at the second famed Cavalcade of Jazz concert held at Wrigley Field in Los Angeles produced by Leon Hefflin Sr. on October 12, 1946. Jack McVea, Slim Gaillard, The Honeydrippers, Lionel Hampton and his Orchestra, and Louis Armstrong were all on the same program. He also performed for the third Cavalcade of Jazz concert held in the same location on September 7, 1947 along with Woody Herman as Emcee, The Valdez Orchestra, The Blenders, The Honeydrippers, Slim Gaillard, Johnny Otis and his Orchestra, Toni Harper, The 3 Blazers and Sarah Vaughn.

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Much of his output was recorded from 1946 to 1948 for Black & White Records, including his most famous song, “Call It Stormy Monday (But Tuesday Is Just as Bad)” (1947). Other notable songs he recorded during this period were “Bobby Sox Blues” (a number 3 R&B hit in 1947) and “West Side Baby” (number 8 on the R&B singles chart in 1948).

Throughout his career Walker worked with top-notch musicians, including the trumpeter Teddy Buckner, the pianist Lloyd Glenn, the bassist Billy Hadnott, and the tenor saxophonist Jack McVea.

He recorded from 1950 to 1954 for Imperial Records (backed by Dave Bartholomew). Walker’s only record in the next five years was T-Bone Blues, recorded during three widely separated sessions in 1955, 1956 and 1959 and released by Atlantic Records in 1959.

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By the early 1960s, Walker’s career had slowed down, in spite of an energetic performance at the American Folk Blues Festival in 1962 with the pianist Memphis Slim and the prolific writer and musician Willie Dixon, among others.[1] However, several critically acclaimed albums followed, such as I Want a Little Girl (recorded for Delmark Records in 1968). Walker recorded in his last years, from 1968 to 1975, for Robin Hemingway’s music publishing company, Jitney Jane Songs. He won a Grammy Award for Best Ethnic or Traditional Folk Recording in 1971 for Good Feelin’, while signed with Polydor Records, produced by Hemingway, followed by another album produced by Hemingway, Fly Walker Airlines, released in 1973.

Walker’s career began to wind down after he suffered a stroke in 1974. He died of bronchial pneumonia following another stroke in March 1975, at the age of 64.

Walker was posthumously inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1980 and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987.

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Chuck Berry named Walker and Louis Jordan as his main influences. B.B. King cited hearing Walker’s recording of “Stormy Monday” as his inspiration for getting an electric guitar. Walker was admired by Jimi Hendrix, who imitated Walker’s trick of playing the guitar with his teeth. Steve Miller stated that in 1952, when he was eight, Walker taught him how to play his guitar behind his back and also with his teeth. He was a family friend and a frequent visitor to Miller’s family home and Miller considers him a major influence on his career. “Stormy Monday” was a favorite live number of the Allman Brothers Band. The British rock band Jethro Tull covered Walker’s “Stormy Monday” in 1968 for John Peel’s “Top Gear”. Eva Cassidy performed “Stormy Monday” on her 1996 Live at Blues Alley recording.

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The legendary T-Bone Walker is a fundamental source of the modern urban style of playing and singing the blues. His single-string solos influenced giants like B.B. King and such important blues-rockers as Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughan. This quintessential release includes one his finest album for the Imperial label: I Get So Weary (1961) and Singing the Blues (1960). This album LPs consist of selections of previous Imperial singles, recorded between 1950 and 1954, with accompaniment by the outstanding Dave Bartholomew and his band (featuring impressive sidemen like saxophonist Lee Allen and bassist Frank Fields), as well as by such great musicians as Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis, Maxwell Davis and Billy Hadnott. This superb album have been remastered …

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“When I heard T-Bone Walker play the electric guitar I had to have one.”(B.B. King)

“All the things people see me do on the stage I got from T-Bone Walker.” (Chuck Berry)

“When T-Bone Walker came, I was into that. That was the sound I was looking for.”  (Albert King)

What more can be said …  ?

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Personnel:
Lee Allen (saxophone)
Dave Bartholomew (trumpet)
Cornelius Coleman (drums)
Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis (saxophone)
Maxwell Davis (saxophone)
Wendell Duconge (saxophone)
T.J. Fowler (piano)
Herb Hardesty (bass)
Walter Nelson (guitar)
T-Bone Walker (guitar, vocals)
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some more musicians

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Tracklist:
01. Here In The Dark (Anders) 2.59
02. I Miss You Baby (Simon) 2.52
03. Life Is Too Short (Hale) 2.43
04. I Get So Weary (Williams) 2.38
05. You Just Wanted To Use Me (McGlothin) 2.23
06. When The Sun Goes Down (Walker) 2.28
07. Pony Trail (Bartholomew) 2.27
08. Through With Women (White) 3.06
09. Street Walking Woman (White) 3.03
10. Party Girl (White) 2.089
11. High Society (White) 2.53
12. Lollie Lou (Hale) 2.54
13. Got No Use For You (Walker) 2.36
14. Wanderin´ Heart (unknown) 2.28

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TBoneWalker02“T-Bone” Walker (May 28, 1910 – March 16, 1975)

Peter Green Splinter Group – Soho Session (Live At Ronnie Scotts) (1999)

OriginalFrontCoverA1Peter Green (born Peter Allen Greenbaum, 29 October 1946 – 25 July 2020) was an English blues rock singer-songwriter and guitarist. As the founder of Fleetwood Mac, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998. Green’s songs, such as “Albatross”, “Black Magic Woman”, “Oh Well”, “The Green Manalishi (With the Two Prong Crown)” and “Man of the World”, appeared on singles charts, and several have been adapted by a variety of musicians.

Green was a major figure in the “second great epoch” of the British blues movement. B.B. King commented, “He has the sweetest tone I ever heard; he was the only one who gave me the cold sweats.” Eric Clapton praised his guitar playing; he was noted for his use of string bending, vibrato, and economy of style.

Rolling Stone ranked Green at number 58 in its list of the “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time”.[9] His tone on the instrumental “The Super-Natural” was rated as one of the 50 greatest of all time by Guitar Player. In June 1996, Green was voted the third-best guitarist of all time in Mojo magazine.

Soho Session is a live album by the British blues band the Peter Green Splinter Group, led by Peter Green. Released in 1999, this was their third album. Green was the founder of Fleetwood Mac and a member of that group from 1967–70, before a sporadic solo career during the late 1970s and early 1980s.

Recorded on 5 April 1998 at Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club, the double album featured new versions of various songs from the group’s previous albums, and also some of Green’s Fleetwood Mac songs. On the same night, the group’s previous drummer Cozy Powell was killed in a road accident.

This was the group’s last album to feature bass guitarist Neil Murray. (wikipedia)

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Recorded live at Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club in Soho, London, this two-disc set captures much of the essence of Green with the Splinter Group, his backing outfit for the last several years. And it’s an interesting mix of material they come out with, from blues covers, a set of Robert Johnson material, as well as a trawl through the old Fleetwood Mac songbook — which might well be the big draw here.

Alternate front+backcover:
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However, welcome as it is to have Green back as a regular performer, he’s not the man he once was, and it’s notable the guitar solos aren’t defined — you can never tell who’s playing, as colleague Nigel Watson has his tone and style down perfectly. In many ways, the most satisfying segment comes with six Robert Johnson tracks, which arrive without Green baggage or expectation, and really do satisfy, while the addition of the Street Angels, a gospel group, on vocals, strengthens the sound, which already has plenty of backbone. “The Supernatural,” once one of Green’s most incisive instrumentals, seems to have lost its bite — but that’s true of all the old material. “Green Manalishi” was heavy as lead when it originally appeared, and now it’s weightless, while the subtleties of “Albatross” have vanished, and “Black Magic Woman” seems oddly formless. This isn’t to say it’s a bad album by any means. It’s perhaps unfortunate that Green has to deal with his own history. There are moments when the old genius shines, but they’re few and far between. He’s lived the blues, but his ability to transform that into music has mostly vanished. Satisfying if you take it on its own terms and don’t expect the god-like playing that once defined Peter Green, the Soho Session is a British blues outfit with taste, chops, and occasional transcendent moments. (by Chris Nickson)

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Personnel:
Roger Cotton (keyboards)
Peter Green (guitar, vocals, harmonica)
Neil Murray (bass)
Larry Tolfree (drums)
Nigel Watson (guitar, vocals)

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Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. It Takes Time (Rush) 5.17
02. Homework (Clark/Perkins) 3.45
03. Black Magic Woman (Green) 7.07
04. Indians (Watson) 4.08
05. Hey Mama Keep Your Big Mouth Shut (McDaniel) 6.19
06. The Supernatural (Green) 3.37
07. Rattlesnake Shake (Green) 5.00
08. Shake Your Hips (Harpo) 5.16
09. Albatross (Green) 3.30

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CD 2:
01. Travelling Riverside Blues (Johnson) 3.58
02. Steady Rollin’ Man (Johnson) 3.13
03. Honeymoon Blues (Johnson) 3.04
04. Last Fair Deal Gone Down (Johnson) 3.19
05. Terraplane Blues (Johnson) 3.47
06. If I Had Possession Over Judgment Day (Johnson) 4.27
07. The Green Manalishi (with the Two-Prong Crown) (Green) 5.38
08. Goin’ Down (Nix) 7.36
09. Help Me (Williamson) 4.49
10. Look On Yonder Wall (James/Sehorn) 6.45
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11. Peter Green 1998 ‘Soho’ Session (uncut edition) 1.22.26

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More Peter Green:
More

 

PeterGreen03Peter Green (born Peter Allen Greenbaum, 29 October 1946 – 25 July 2020)

RIP

Hot Tuna – Historic Live (1985)

FrontCover1Hot Tuna is an American blues band formed in 1969 by former Jefferson Airplane members Jorma Kaukonen (guitarist/vocals) and Jack Casady (bassist). Although it has always been a fluid aggregation, with musicians coming and going over the years, the band’s name has essentially become a metonym for Kaukonen and Casady’s ongoing collaboration.

Historic Live Tuna is an album by the band Hot Tuna. It was released in 1985. Side A contains previously unreleased tracks from a live acoustic performance played on KSAN radio in 1971. Side B contains previously unreleased material from a live electric performance in 1971 recorded at the Fillmore West auditorium in San Francisco. The album was Hot Tuna’s second release on Relix Records, and would be their last release until after the 1989 Jefferson Airplane reunion tour and reunion album, when they were signed to Epic Records for a short time before returning to Relix.

In 1996 the A-side of Historic Live Tuna was expanded and released as the CD Classic Hot Tuna Acoustic, and the B-side was expanded and released as the CD Classic Hot Tuna Electric.

Another song from the Fillmore West concert, “Keep Your Lamps Trimmed and Burning”, was included in the album Fillmore: The Last Days. (wikipedia)

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Relix’s second Hot Tuna release was another archival work, its two sides containing two KSAN-FM radio broadcasts from the spring and summer of 1971; one side was taped at the station, the other chronicles the band’s appearance at the closing of the Fillmore West. In his liner notes, Jorma Kaukonen acknowledges that the band has encountered criticism for releasing such “so-called antique material,” but counters that “If you like it, you like it … if you don’t you don’t.” Hardcore Tuna fans will be pleased with the existence on record of these performances by a Hot Tuna that featured Kaukonen (acoustic guitar on side one, electric on side two), Jack Casady, Papa John Creach, and Sammy Piazza. Others may find that the rudimentary sound quality and the generally restrained performing level render this inessential. (by William Ruhlmann)

And I m pleased, because I´m a real Hot Tuna fan …

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Personnel:
Jack Casady (bass)
Papa John Creach (violin)
Jorma Kaukonen (guitar, vocals)
Sammy Piazza (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. New Song (for the Morning) (Kaukonen) 5.06
02. Been So Long (Kaukonen) 4.16
03. Oh Lord, Search My Heart (Davis) 4.31
04. True Religion (Traditional) 7.01
05. Space Jam (Casady/Kaukonen) 0.09
06. Intro by Bill Graham / Rock Me Baby (King/Josea) 9.24
“Want You to Know” (Bo Carter) – 4:58
“Come Back Baby” (Lightning Hopkins) – 9:14

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More from Hot Tuna:
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Lightnin´ Hopkins – Lightnin´ Strikes (1962)

LPFrontCover1Samuel John “Lightnin'” Hopkins (March 15, 1912 – January 30, 1982) was an American country blues singer, songwriter, guitarist and occasional pianist, from Centerville, Texas. Rolling Stone magazine ranked him number 71 on its list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time.

The musicologist Robert “Mack” McCormick opined that Hopkins is “the embodiment of the jazz-and-poetry spirit, representing its ancient form in the single creator whose words and music are one act”.

Hopkins was born in Centerville, Texas, and as a child was immersed in the sounds of the blues. He developed a deep appreciation for this music at the age of 8, when he met Blind Lemon Jefferson at a church picnic in Buffalo, Texas. That day, Hopkins felt the blues was “in him”. He went on to learn from his older (distant) cousin, the country blues singer Alger “Texas” Alexander. (Hopkins had another cousin, the Texas electric blues guitarist Frankie Lee Sims, with whom he later recorded.) Hopkins began accompanying Jefferson on guitar at informal church gatherings. Jefferson reputedly never let anyone play with him except young Hopkins, and Hopkins learned much from Jefferson at these gatherings.

Hopkins-Goldstar-PromoIn the mid-1930s, Hopkins was sent to Houston County Prison Farm; the offense for which he was imprisoned is unknown. In the late 1930s, he moved to Houston with Alexander in an unsuccessful attempt to break into the music scene there. By the early 1940s, he was back in Centerville, working as a farm hand.

Hopkins took a second shot at Houston in 1946. While singing on Dowling Street in Houston’s Third Ward (which would become his home base), he was discovered by Lola Anne Cullum of Aladdin Records, based in Los Angeles. She convinced Hopkins to travel to Los Angeles, where he accompanied the pianist Wilson Smith. The duo recorded twelve tracks in their first sessions in 1946. An Aladdin executive decided the pair needed more dynamism in their names and dubbed Hopkins “Lightnin'” and Wilson “Thunder”.

Hopkins recorded more sides for Aladdin in 1947. He returned to Houston and began recording for Gold Star Records. In the late 1940s and 1950s he rarely performed outside Texas, only occasionally traveling to the Midwest and the East for recording sessions and concert appearances. It has been estimated that he recorded between eight hundred and a thousand songs in his career. He performed regularly at nightclubs in and around Houston, particularly on Dowling Street, where he had been discovered by Aladdin. He recorded the hit records “T-Model Blues” and “Tim Moore’s Farm” at SugarHill Recording Studios in Houston. By the mid- to late 1950s, his prodigious output of high-quality recordings had gained him a following among African Americans and blues aficionados.[

In 1959, the blues researcher Mack McCormick contacted Hopkins, hoping to bring him to the attention of a broader musical audience engaged in the folk revival. McCormack presented Hopkins to integrated audiences first in Houston and then in California. He made his debut at Carnegie Hall on October 14, 1960, alongside Joan Baez and Pete Seeger, performing the spiritual “Mary Don’t You Weep”. In 1960, he signed with Tradition Records. The recordings which followed included his song “Mojo Hand” in 1960.

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In 1968, Hopkins recorded the album Free Form Patterns, backed by the rhythm section of the psychedelic rock band 13th Floor Elevators. Through the 1960s and into the 1970s, he released one or sometimes two albums a year and toured, playing at major folk music festivals and at folk clubs and on college campuses in the U.S. and internationally. He toured extensively in the United States and played a six-city tour of Japan in 1978.

Hopkins was Houston’s poet-in-residence for 35 years. He recorded more albums than any other bluesman.

Hopkins died of esophageal cancer in Houston on January 30, 1982, at the age of 69. His obituary in the New York Times described him as “one of the great country blues singers and perhaps the greatest single influence on rock guitar players.”

His Gibson J-160e “hollowbox” is on display at the Rock Hall of Fame in Cleveland, and his Guild Starfire at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in DC, both on loan from the Joe Kessler collection.

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Hopkins’s style was born from spending many hours playing informally without a backing band. His distinctive fingerstyle technique often included playing, in effect, bass, rhythm, lead, and percussion at the same time. He played both “alternating” and “monotonic” bass styles incorporating imaginative, often chromatic turnarounds and single-note lead lines. Tapping or slapping the body of his guitar added rhythmic accompaniment.

Much of Hopkins’s music follows the standard 12-bar blues template, but his phrasing was free and loose. Many of his songs were in the talking blues style, but he was a powerful and confident singer.[citation needed] Lyrically, his songs expressed the problems of life in the segregated South, bad luck in love and other subjects common in the blues idiom. He dealt with these subjects with humor and good nature. Many of his songs are filled with double entendres, and he was known for his humorous introductions to songs. (wikipedia)

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Lightnin’ Strikes is an album by blues musician Lightnin’ Hopkins recorded in Texas in 1962 and released on the Vee-Jay label.

The Penguin Guide to Blues Recordings said “Creatively speaking, this is Lightnin’ on no more than good form, rising to very good indeed in “Walking Round in Circles”, but the sonic effects lend the music a strangeness that some listeners may find attractive”.[4] AllMusic reviewer Cub Coda stated: “This brings together some early-’60s sides that Hopkins recorded for the Chicago-based Vee-Jay label, although all of them were recorded in his native Houston. … two are full-band tracks produced by drummer King Ivory Lee Semiens with Lightnin’ playing electric, the band following his erratic timing as best as they can”.(wikipedia)

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Personnel:
Lightnin’ Hopkins (guitar, vocals=
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a bunch of unknown studio musicians

Original front + backcover from Verve reords:
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Tracklist:
01. Got Me A Louisiana Woman (Hopkins/Semien) 3.01
02. Want To Come Home (Quinn/Cullen) 3.57
03. Please Don’t Quit Me (Quinn/Cullen) 3.13
04. Devil Is Watching You (Quinn/Cullen) 4.01
05. Rolling And Rolling (Quinn/Cullen) 3.01
06. War Is Starting Again (Hopkins/Semien) 3.07
07. Walkin’ Round In Circles (Quinn/Cullen) 3.10
08. Mary Lou (Quinn/Cullen) 3.16
09. Heavy Snow (Quinn/Cullen) 3.35
10. Coon Is Hard To Catch (Quinn/Cullen) 4.17

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Samuel John “Lightnin'” Hopkins (March 15, 1912 – January 30, 1982)

Sandy Carroll – Memphis Rain (1997)

FrontCover1Sandy Carroll spent the early part of her career singing in venues throughout the South, and began writing songs – alone, or with a writing partner – in the early 80s, many of which were subsequently recorded by folks like Albert King, Luther Allison, Preston Shannon, and Barbara Blue. She released her debut album, Southern Woman, in 1993.

And here´s her second album:

Sandy Carroll is a throaty, Janis Joplin-style vocalist who is in fine voice on this album. James Solberg is best known as guitarist for the late Luther Allison. He produced and played guitar on this album, adding expressive guitar playing and up-front production touches that put a shine on the whole affair. Sandy has toured professionally and earned her doctorate in street music. This woman’s voice is unforgettable, Southern to the hilt, with a roughness around the edges that convinces you that she knows what she’s singing about. In true bluesmama tradition, Carroll mixes up metaphors about food, sex, and other domestic matters with wild abandon and a keen sense of humor. (dwmmusic.com)

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Memphis Blues at it´s best:
To those who have never heard Sandy Carroll LIVE on Beale Street in Memphis, this CD is one of the best alternatives! The tempo of each song flows into the next keeping even the slow dramatic tunes lively. From the opening number, “Forecast Blues,” there is a Down South funkiness that starts one’s foot to instantly tapping. With funky songs like that and “Blues Thang,” to lighthearted whimsy like “Too Many Hats” and “Honey Lovin’ Gumbo,” the entire CD soundtrack offers something for everyone. First time that I played this was like heaven. Sandy has a blues voice that truly stamps her as one of the most unique and memorable talents to come along — this is especially evident with all of the “copy cat” sameness to most of American music these days. I must have played this CD to death the first 2 weeks that I had it. But, as much as I’ve played it, it draws me back like a good hot cup of Joe on a cold winter morning! (by Anon Emus)

Oh yes, that´s what I call music !

SandyCarrollLive

Personnel:
Sandy Carroll (piano, vocals)
Steve Potts (drums)
Dave Smith (bass)
James Solberg (guitar)
Ernest Williamson (keyboards)
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Jeff Cargerman (percussion, background vocals)
Eddie Dattel (percussion, background vocals)
Richard Graham (percussion, washboard)
Wayne Jackson (trumpet)
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background vocals:
Jacqueline Johnson – Susan Marshall

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Tracklist:
01. Forecast Blues (Carroll) 3.46
02. Too Many Hats (Carroll/Solberg) 3.26
03. Memphis Rain (Dattel) 4.26
04. While You Were Up (Carroll/Solberg) 2.33
05. Help Me Bear It All (Carroll) 5.03
06. Honey Lovin’ Gumbo (Cargerman/Carroll) 2.35
07. Blues Thang (Allison/Carroll/Solberg) 3.56
08. Just As I Am (Allison/Carroll/Solberg) 4.23
09. Feels Like Love (Carroll) 2.49
10. Good Line (Bingham/Carroll/Solberg) 3.42
11. Memphis (Spiby) 4.24
12. Bad Dog Boogie (Carroll) 3.36

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“I have been playing, writing and singing music forever!” says singer/songwriter/pianist Sandy Carroll. “I am originally from McNairy County in West Tennessee (home of legendary sheriff Buford Pusser of Walking Tall fame), in a little town where our studio (her husband is Grammy-winning producer Jim Gaines) is now located. It is two hours east of Memphis, but I consider my musical home as Memphis.” (bessieblues.com)

Mill Valley Bunch (Mike Bloomfield & Nick Gravenites) – Casting Pearls (1972)

FrontCover1In 1972 a group of American musicians united by friendship & a common passion for good music (blues, in particular), came together in Mill Valley to give life to these amazing jam sessions … a typical early 70s set by Bloomfield and assorted friends:

Mike Bloomfield performs here with some of his long-time collaborators, including Mark Naftalin and Barry Goldberg, as well as some stellar Bay Area soul and rock artists such as the Pointer Sisters and Spencer Dryden. The music sometimes sounds a lot like a cross between his first solo effort, the disappointing “It’s Not Killing Me,” and the also disappointing re-grouped Electric Flag’s “The Band Kept Playing.” Some of the songs on this album, however, plainly out-rock those other efforts, making this a worthwhile listen. Probably the weakest part of the album are the vocals by the men singers, especially Bloomfield. Too bad Jellyroll Troy wasn’t along on this one! (by Rex Chickeneater)

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This album’s got it all! Blues, R&B, Country, Gospel, Blues-Rock, and Ballads are all featured here. I bought this cd on a whim and the music floored me – though it took a few listens to fully appreciate it.

While Michael Bloomfield seems to be the creative force throughout, as well as, the glue that makes the concept work, there are many notable musicians featured here: Nick Gravenites, Barry Goldberg, Michael Shrieve, Lee Michaels, Mark Naftalin, John Kahn, The Ace of Cups, and The Pointer Sisters, among many others – though its hard to tell who is playing and singing when, as the individual songs are uncredited. The song writing on this album is exceptional, the singing is awesome, and the musicianship, which features a wailing (unlike much of his later stuff) electric guitar from Mike Bloomfield, is great.

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This is truely energetic and inspired music. It’s hard to believe these various musicians, many of whom didn’t normally play together, just threw these songs together in the studio. It’s also hard to understand why this album is so obscure.

Its difficult to describe this eclectic compilation, it’s that unique. If you like what I was able to put into words, buy this cd, I doubt you will be disappointed. (by Dire Wolf)

In other words: A San Francisco Super Session !!!

Alternate frontcovers:
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Personnel:
Dino Andino (percussion)
Mike Bloomfield (guitar, vocals, bass, piano)
Ron Cimille (guitar)
Russel Dashiel (guitar, vocals)
Rick Dey (bass, guitar, vocals)
Spencer Dryden (drums)
Barry Goldberg (piano)
Nick Gravenites (guitar, vocals)
Rich Jagger (drums)
Jeffrey James (drums)
Jeanette Jones (vocals)
John Kahn (bass, piano)
Ira Kamin (keyboards)
Lee Michaels (keyboards)
Mark Naftalin (keyboards)
Fred Olsen (guitar)
Tom Richards (guitar)
Mark Ryan (bass)
Michael Shrieve (drums)
Ron “Rev” Stallings (vocals)
Craig Tarwater (guitar)
Chicken Billy Thorton (vocals),
Bill Vitt (drums)
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background vocals:
The Ace Of Cups – The Pointer Sisters

Booklet01+02
Tracklist:
01. Honky-Tonk Blues (Williams) 2.02
02. Betty & Dupree (Bloomfield) 3.40
04. Ooh-Ooh-Ooh,La,La,La (Bloomfield) 3.24
05. Run For Cover (Dey) 3.36
06 What Would I Do Without My Baby (Bloomfield) 5.23
07. Mellow Mountain Wine (Bloomfield) 4.49
08. Let Me Down Easy (Bloomfield) 6.32
09. Jimmy’s Blues (Bloomfield) 2.59
10. Young Girl’s Blues (Bloomfield) 3.46
11. Letting Go Ain’t Easy (Bonura/Ceroni) 4.23
12. Bye Bye , I’m Goin’ (Bloomfield) 2.20
13. Bells Are Going To Ring  (Gravenites) 3.59
14. I’ve Had It (Bloomfield) 3.33
15. Bedroom Blues (Gravenites) 7.14
16. Your Hollywood Blues (Bloomfield)
17. Go Home Blues (Gravenites) 5.05

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More Mike Bloomfield:
MoreBloomfield

More Nick Gravenites:
MoreGravenites

 

Nina Simone – I Put A Spell On You (1965)

FrontCover1Eunice Kathleen Waymon (February 21, 1933 – April 21, 2003), known professionally as Nina Simone, was an American singer, songwriter, musician, arranger, and civil rights activist. Her music spanned a broad range of musical styles including classical, jazz, blues, folk, R&B, gospel, and pop.

The sixth of eight children born to a poor family in Tryon, North Carolina, Simone initially aspired to be a concert pianist. With the help of a few supporters in her hometown, she enrolled in the Juilliard School of Music in New York City. She then applied for a scholarship to study at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, where she was denied admission despite a well-received audition, which she attributed to racial discrimination. In 2003, just days before her death, the Institute awarded her an honorary degree.

To make a living, Simone started playing piano at a nightclub in Atlantic City. She changed her name to “Nina Simone” to disguise herself from family members, having chosen to play “the devil’s music” or so-called “cocktail piano”. She was told in the nightclub that she would have to sing to her own accompaniment, which effectively launched her career as a jazz vocalist. She went on to record more than 40 albums between 1958 and 1974, making her debut with Little Girl Blue. She had a hit single in the United States in 1958 with “I Loves You, Porgy”. Her musical style fused gospel and pop with classical music, in particular Johann Sebastian Bach, and accompanied expressive, jazz-like singing in her contralto voice.

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I Put a Spell on You is a studio album by American jazz singer, songwriter, and pianist Nina Simone. Recorded in 1964 and 1965 in New York City, it was released by Philips Records in 1965. It peaked at number 99 on the Billboard 200 chart[3] and number 9 on the UK Albums Chart.[4] The title track, “I Put a Spell on You,” peaked at number 23 on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart[5] and number 28 on the UK Singles Chart.

In 2017, NPR placed it at number 3 on the “150 Greatest Albums Made by Women” list. Writing for NPR, Audie Cornish called it “the closest you’ll ever hear her come to pop.” (wikipedia)

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One of her most pop-oriented albums, but also one of her best and most consistent. Most of the songs feature dramatic, swinging large-band orchestration, with the accent on the brass and strings. Simone didn’t write any of the material, turning to popular European songsmiths Charles Aznavour, Jacques Brel, and Anthony Newley, as well as her husband, Andy Stroud, and her guitarist, Rudy Stevenson, for bluesier fare. There are really fine tunes and interpretations, on which Simone gives an edge to the potentially fey pop songs, taking a sudden (but not uncharacteristic) break for a straight jazz instrumental with “Blues on Purpose.” The title track, a jazzy string ballad version of the Screamin’ Jay Hawkins classic, gave the Beatles the inspiration for the phrasing on the bridge of “Michelle.” (by Richie Unterberger)

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Personnel:
Nina Simone (piano, vocals)
Rudy Stevenson (guitar)
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unknown orchestra, conducted by Hal Mooney &  Horace Ott

SingleLabels

Tracklist:
01. I Put A Spell On You (Hawkins) 2.39
02. Tomorrow Is My Turn (Aznavour/Stellman/Stéphane) 2.55
03. Ne me quitte pas (Brel) 3.40
04. Marriage Is for Old Folks (Carr/Shuman) 3.36
05. July Tree (Jurist/Merriam) 2:41
06. Gimme Some (Stroud) 3.04
07. Feeling Good (Bricusse/Newley) 2.59
08. One September Day (Stevenson) 2.53
09. Blues On Purpose (Stevenson) 3.20
10. Beautiful Land (Bricusse/Newley) 2.00
11. You’ve Got To Learn (Aznavour/Stellman) 2.46
12. Take Care Of Business (Stroud) 2.05

LabelB1

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Big Apple Blues – Live At O’Flaherty’s (2012)

FrontCover1Big Apple Blues is a New York City-based collective of NYC-blues scene veterans. Band members have shared the stage with some of the all time blues & roots greats: Hugh Pool, NYC-Blues-of-Famer (Chris Whitley, Government Mule, Levon Helm, The Fabulous Thunderbirds, Canned Heat), guitarist Zach Zunis (Lester Butler & Red Devils, William Clark, Rick Holmstrom, Ronnie Earl, Janiva Magness), harmonica wizard Anthony Kane (Muddy Waters, Junior Wells, Kane Brothers), drummer Barry “Baron of the Blues” Harrison (Johny and Shamekia Copeland, Saron Cranshaw, Steve Guyger), bassist Admir “Dr Blues” Hadzic (NY Blues of Famer Hugh Pool, Mason Casey, James Wormorth, Sim Cain, Jason Ricci) and Hammond B3 master himself – James Alfredson.

If you want to hear how Big Apple Blues really sounds live and uninhibited, this is a must have album. Recorded in a small NYC club using only a stereo microphone into 1970’s Ampegs half-inch tape recorder by one of the most revered NYC studio engineers, Hugh Pool, no overdubs or additional takes. If you were at O’Flaherty’s that night this is the energy you would have heard. Tracks range from Chicago blues grinders to Texas shuffles to jump swing propelled by time machine, Barry Harrison, and flavored by the incredible harmonica master, Anthony Kane. Zach Zunis’ signature guitar playing behind Kane’s harmonica should be made obligatory listening for all budding blues guitarists.

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Fourth album by New York’s TOP blues cats whose previous album (Big Apple Blues: “Brooklyn Blues”, StoneToneRecords, Inc) was voted # 10 out of 100 best recent blues releases by Real Blues Magazine. “Live at O’Flaherty’s” captures raucous, sweltering, energy-oozing live performance of Big Apple Blues in a NYC club. To top it off, the CD was recorded unlike any other album in the last 3 decades – using old school, brutally revealing ½” vintage 70’s stereo Ampex tape recorder with virtually no postproduction. The result is – Blues like it is meant to be – true to the bone and free of studio tricks! Turn up loud and enjoy!

Outstanding blues band in such a great record music quality! Inspiring photos not only from their gigs. That’s a must and a master of the eternal blues sound! Unmissable !!! (Sixcilian Mzwel)

Oh yes … a must for every Blues-Rock fan …  !!!

BackCover1

Personnel:
Admir  “Dr. Blues” (*) Hadžić (bass)
Baron Harrison (drums, vocals on 10.)
Anthony Kane (vocals, harmonica)
Zach Zunis (guitar)

BookletFrontCover1
Tracklist:
01. Slammer (Hadžić/Harrison/Kane/Zunis) 5.17
02. How Long Can A Bell Ring (Murphy) 6.05
03. Brooklyn Swamp (Hadžić/Harrison/Kane/Zunis) 6.02
04. Zach’s Mood (Hadžić/Harrison/Kane/Zunis) 5.31
05. Black Night (Fulson) 7.14
06. Chitlins Con Carne (Burrell) 5.55
07. Cleo’s Mood (Walker) 4.18
08. Come Back Baby (I Wish You Would) (Arnold) 5.31
09. Midtown Blowout (Hadžić/Harrison/Kane/Zunis) 5.19
10. Walk Right Up To Me Baby (Brown) 4.27

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(*) Admir  “Dr. Blues” Hadžić is a  real doctor …

Doctor

… and a real good bass player, too:

Bassplayer

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The Rolling Stones – Blue & Lonesome (2016)

FrontCover1Blue & Lonesome is a cover album by the Rolling Stones—their 23rd British and 25th American studio album—released on 2 December 2016. It is the band’s first album to feature only cover songs, and their first studio release since 2005’s A Bigger Bang, with its eleven-year gap being the longest between two albums from the band. Despite the short time length of just around 43 minutes, the album was released as a double LP. “Just Your Fool”, a Buddy Johnson cover (though the Rolling Stones version is based on Little Walter’s arrangement) was released as the first single from the album on 6 October. The name of the album is from a song which Little Walter wrote, “Blue and Lonesome”.

Though there had been an eleven-year gap between albums, the Rolling Stones kept the same basic production and musician team as A Bigger Bang. Joining vocalist Mick Jagger and guitarist Keith Richards as producers was Don Was, who had been working with the group for most of the prior two decades. In the studio were band members Ronnie Wood (guitar) and Charlie Watts (drums), alongside contract players Darryl Jones (bass), Chuck Leavell (keyboards) and Matt Clifford (multi-instrumentalist). Eric Clapton contributed guitar on two tracks and drummer Jim Keltner plays percussion on another.

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Recorded over a marathon three-day session in December, 2015 the album was released a year later to robust sales; reaching number one on the album charts in the UK and over a dozen other countries, and number four in the US. It was certified gold or platinum in several countries. The first Stones album of the streaming media age, many of the songs from the album charted on several top-40 digital music charts, and the lead single “Just Your Fool” was a top-40 hit on several airplay and genre-specific charts. The album received high critical praise, receiving four- and five-star ratings from many top music journalism outlets, and accolades from jazz and blues publications. The album was awarded the Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album in 2018, the band’s first Grammy in 23 years.

Blue & Lonesome was recorded in just three days in December 2015. In April 2016, at the launch of the Rolling Stones career retrospective Exhibitionism, the band confirmed that their new album was due to be released “some time in the autumn”. Richards said the album would feature “a lot of Chicago blues”. Eric Clapton plays guitar on two tracks; he was recording his own album in the same studio as the Stones were and was asked to play on a few tracks. The album is entirely blues-based, consisting of covers of artists such as Howlin’ Wolf and Little Walter.

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This is the first album since Dirty Work (1986) to not feature any guitar playing from Jagger (who instead concentrates completely on vocals and harmonica), although he is pictured in the album’s booklet playing guitar during the album’s sessions. It is also the first album since It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (1974) to not feature a lead vocal from Richards. Likewise, it is also the first album since Dirty Work to release a lead single that was not a Jagger/Richards composition with “Just Your Fool”.

KeithRichards02

On 6 October 2016, the Rolling Stones changed their “tongue and lips” logo, which first appeared on their Sticky Fingers album, from red to blue.

On 8 November 2016, the Rolling Stones released a video for “Hate to See You Go”.

On 25 November 2016, the Stones released a one-track limited edition electric blue 10″ vinyl record of “Ride ‘Em on Down” (on the UMC label) on the occasion of the Record Store Day Black Friday 2016. The track is a cover of Eddie Taylor’s “Ride ‘Em on Down” originally recorded by Taylor in Chicago on 5 December 1955 for the Vee-Jay Label (and released as VJ 185).

On 1 December 2016, they released a video for “Ride ‘Em on Down”. The video features actress Kristen Stewart driving through Los Angeles in a blue 1968 Ford Mustang Fastback.

Ron Wood

During its first week the album moved 106,000 sales to debut at No. 1 on the UK Albums Chart, the second-highest opening sales week for an album in the UK in 2016. On 3 February 2017 it was certified Platinum there, for sales over 300,000 copies. It also debuted at No. 4 on the Billboard 200 with 123,000 album-equivalent units, of which 120,000 were pure album sales. It was also the No. 2 best selling album of the week in the US. Despite strong initial sales, the album remains to this day the only Stones’ studio album without a certification in the USA. By 17 February 2017 the album had reached global sales of 2,000,000.

Blue & Lonesome was met with positive reviews from critics noted at review aggregator Metacritic. This release received a weighted average score of 82 out of 100, based on 21 reviews. Kitty Empire from The Observer called it “a labour of love”, while Alexis Petridis of The Guardian said the Stones here are “more alive than they’ve sounded for years”. Robert Christgau was less impressed in Vice, saying the album is “a sodden thing – many old rockers have recorded sharper, spunkier, wiser music”.

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The album won Album of the Year at the 2017 Jazz FM Awards. The Rolling Stones also won the Blues Artist of the Year Award at the event, held in April 2017.

On January 28, 2018, Blue & Lonesome received a Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album of the Year at the 60th Annual Grammy Awards. The award was the Stones’ third Grammy of their career and their first win since the 1995 show. (by wikipedia)

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As Keith Richards tells it, the Rolling Stones’ first-ever all-blues album is the result of the band learning how to play in the unfamiliar surroundings of Mark Knopfler’s British Grove Studios. To ease into the new place, the Stones decided to knock out a version of Little Walter’s “Blue and Lonesome” and it sounded good enough that the band decided to cut a few more covers, winding up with a full album of Chicago blues in a few days. The Stones haven’t worked at such swift speed in decades — not since the early ’60s, when they were churning out two albums a year — and much of the appeal of Blue & Lonesome lies in its casualness: by being tossed off, the album highlights how the Stones play together as a band, blending instinct and skill. Blue & Lonesome isn’t a showcase for virtuoso playing — even Eric Clapton’s two smoldering solos are part of the tapestry — but rather a groove record, emphasizing feel and interplay while never losing sight of the song.

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Such commitment to song is one of the reasons Blue & Lonesome winds up as an unexpected triumph from Mick Jagger. A blues album from the Stones always seemed like a dream project for Keith Richards, who always championed the band’s blues roots, but it’s Jagger who dominates the album, playing searing harp and singing with nuance and power. Always a guarded performer — back in 1974, he scoffed at the notion of letting his feelings flood on the page — Jagger seems freed, pouring heart into the slow burners and uptempo shuffles alike. The rest of the Stones match his commitment and that’s what makes Blue & Lonesome something remarkable. Conceptually, it’s clever — if this winds up being the last Rolling Stones album, it provides a nice bookend to their 1964 debut — but it’s artistically satisfying because it’s the Rolling Stones allowing themselves to simply lay back and play for sheer enjoyment. It’s a rare thing that will likely seem all the more valuable over the years. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

BackCover1

Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals, harmonica)
Keith Richards (guitar)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Ronnie Wood (guitar)
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Eric Clapton (slide guitar on 06., guitar on 12.)
Matt Clifford (keyboards)
Darryl Jones (bass)
Jim Keltner (percussion on 09.)
Chuck Leavell (keyboards)

Booklet04A

Tracklist:
01. Just Your Fool (Walter) 2.16
02. Commit A Crime (Burnett) 3.38
03. Blue And Lonesome (Walter) 3.07
04. All Of Your Love (Sam) 4.46
05. I Gotta Go (Walter) 3.26
06. Everybody Knows About My Good Thing (Grayson/Horton) 4.31
07. Ride ‘Em On Down (Taylor) 2.49
08. Hate To See You Go (Walter) 3.21
09. Hoo Doo Blues (Hicks/West) 2.37
10. Little Rain (Abner Jr./Reed) 3.32
11. Just Like I Treat You (Dixon) 3.24
12. I Can’t Quit You Baby (Dixon) 5.13

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More from The Rolling Stones:
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