Savoy Brown – Getting To The Point (1968)

lpfrontcover1Getting to the Point is the second studio album by the British blues rock band Savoy Brown. It marks the debut of a vastly different lineup, still led by Kim Simmonds but fronted by new vocalist Chris Youlden.

It was released by Decca in 1968 with catalog number SKL 4935 and finds the group taking on more of the songwriting load, as opposed to their debut, which consisted mostly of covers. One of the covers is “You Need Love” by Willie Dixon, which served as a blueprint for “Whole Lotta Love” by Led Zeppelin. Deram released the CD with three bonus tracks in 1990 with catalog number 820 922-2. (by wikipedia)

1967 saw Savoy Brown tour as backing band for Hooker’s UK tour and also open for Cream’s first London performance.
Extensive touring was followed by personnel changes after a drugs ‘bust’ which saw in new bassist Bob Brunning from Fleetwood Mac and singer Chris Youlden. Youlden was a true find, his rich, often mournful vocal harnessed to Simmond’s fluid guitar lines levered in home grown material from both men that trademarked the Savoy Brown sound, the line-up soon enriched by the arrival of bassist “Lonesome” Dave Peverett and drummer Roger Earle.
Getting to the Point followed in March 1968, the mix now reversed with just two covers and seven originals by Youlden and Simmonds. Initially something of a downer after “Shake Down”, the album picks up half way and begins to rattle along, showcasing an individual style and a growing dynamic within the band.
Winning contemporary media plaudits for the album, this chemistry was to grow to even better purpose with subsequent releases in the last gasps of the decade.(by Greville Rob)

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The first single with Chris Youlden (with the wrong line-up on the cover !)

Getting to the Point marks the debut of a vastly different lineup, still led by Simmonds but now fronted by new vocalist Chris Youlden. The pair got off to a good start by writing or co-writing most of the album. The playing is solid blues revival, and though Youlden’s vocals are often overly imitative of B.B. King and Muddy Waters, he has a confident voice and frontman persona. Originals like “Flood in Houston” and “Mr. Downchild” provide the highlights. (by by Keith Farley)

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Personnel:
Roger Earl (drums)
Bob Hall (piano)
Rivers Jobe (bass)
Dave Peverett (guitar)
Kim Simmonds (lead guitar)
Chris Youlden (vocals)
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Bob Brunning (bass on 11. + 12.)
Hughie Flint (drums 11. + 12.)

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Tracklist:
01. Flood In Houston (Simmonds/Youlden) – 4:00
02. Stay With Me Baby (Peverett/Simmonds/Youlden) 2.35
03. Honey Bee (Morganfield) 6.25
04. The Incredible Gnome Meets Jaxman (Simmonds) 3.30
05. Give Me A Penny (Traditional) 4.20
06. Mr. Downchild (Simmonds/Youlden) 5.25
07. Getting To The Point (Simmonds) 4.20
08. Big City Lights (Hall/Youlden) 3.25
09. You Need Love (Dixon) 7.40
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10. Walking by Myself (Single A side, 1967) (Rogers) 2.25
11. Taste And Try, Before You Buy (Single A side, 1967) (Youlden) 2-21
12. Someday People (Single B side, 1967) (Simmonds) 4.35

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Still alive and well: Kim Simmonds in 2016

Alexis Korner – Eat A Little Rhythm And Blues (VHS rip) (1988)

frontcoverAlexis Korner (born Alexis Andrew Nicholas Koerner, 19 April 1928 in Paris, France – died 1 January 1984 in Westminster, Central London), was an English blues musician, born to an Austrian father and Greek mother.

Korner is probably best remembered as a networker and blues historian, although he was a proficient guitarist and a distinctive (if not accomplished) vocalist. Often referred to as “the Father of British Blues”, Korner was instrumental in bringing together various English blues musicians.

In 1961, Korner and Davies formed Blues Incorporated, initially a loose-knit group of musicians with a shared love of electric blues and R&B music. The group included, at various times, such influential musicians as Charlie Watts, Jack Bruce, Ginger Baker, Long John Baldry, Graham Bond, Danny Thompson and Dick Heckstall-Smith. It also attracted a wider crowd of mostly younger fans, some of whom occasionally performed with the group, including Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Brian Jones, Rod Stewart, John Mayall and Jimmy Page.

In 1970 Korner and Peter Thorup formed a big band ensemble, C.C.S. – short for The Collective Consciousness Society – which had several hit singles produced by Mickie Most, including a version of Led Zeppelin’s “Whole Lotta Love” which was used as the theme for BBC’s Top Of The Pops for several years. This was the period of Korner’s greatest commercial success in the UK.

In 1973, he formed another group, Snape, with Boz Burrell, Mel Collins, and Ian Wallace, previously together in King Crimson. Korner also played on B.B. King’s Supersession album, and cut his own, similar album, Get Off My Cloud, with Keith Richards, Peter Frampton, Nicky Hopkins, and members of Joe Cocker’s Grease Band.

In the mid 1970s, while touring Germany, he established an intensive working relationship with bassist Colin Hodgkinson who played for the support act Back Door. They would continue to collaborate until the end.

In the 1970s Korner’s main career was in broadcasting. In 1973 he presented a six part documentary for the BBC, The Rolling Stones Story, and in 1977 he established a weekly blues and soul show on Radio 1, which ran until 1981. He also used his gravelly voice to great effect as an advertising voice over artist.

In 1978, for Korner’s 50th birthday, an all-star concert was held featuring many of his friends mentioned above, as well as Eric Clapton, Paul Jones, Chris Farlowe, Zoot Money and other friends, which was later released as The Party Album, and as a video.

And here´s the video, including interviews with Alexis Korner, Paul Jones and Zoot Money.

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What a hell of a party … with such fine musicians … and I will present the official “Party” double album in this blog very soon … And please don´t forget: this is a VHS rip …

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Personnel:
Eric Clapton (guitar)
Mel Collins (saxophone)
Chris Farlowe (vocals)
Neil Ford (guitar)
Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone)
Colin Hodgkinson (bass, vocals)
Paul Jones (harmonica)
Alexis Korner (guitar, vocals)
Zoot Money (keyboards, vocals)
Dick Morrissey (saxophone)
Duffy Power (harmonica)
Stu Speer (drums)
John Surman (saxophone)
Art Themen (saxophone)
Mike Zwerin (trombone)

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Tracklist:
01. Louisiana Blues (Traditional)  4.00
02. Whole Mess Of Blues (Pomus/Shuman) 5.41
03. Linin’ Track (Traditional) 3.14
04. Blue Monday (Domino/Bartholomew) 3.02
05. Skipping (Korner) 3.10
06. Spoonful (Dixon) 6.42
07. Finkles Cafe (Korner) / Dooji Wooji (Ellington) 9.43
08. Got To Get You Off My Mind (Burke/Burke/Moore) 6.27
09. Stormy Monday (Walker) 9.00
10. Hi-Heel Sneakers (Higginbotham) 6.20

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Chicken Shack – Accept (1970)

frontcover1Accept is the fourth album by the blues band, Chicken Shack, released in 1970. Accept was Chicken Shack’s last album on the Blue Horizon label. This album was also the last for Andy Sylvester, Dave Bidwell and Paul Raymond as members of Chicken Shack. It also marks a departure from pure blues to a more progressive and psychedelic sound. (by wikipedia)

This band’s fourth album, it was released in 1970 and seems to offer a prescient blend of nascent prog and heavy blues rock, where their prior outings skewed more decisively toward the latter. That it came out in 1970 and not 1971 is a big difference considering the changes in the rock scene that the next year would bring — if one had to pinpoint a moment when “rock got heavy,” even factoring in Blue Cheer‘s prior contributions, there are solid arguments to be made for ’71 — but though Chicken Shack weren’t the first to blend blues jams and more progressive and melodic flair, what with Jethro Tull around and all, Accept Chicken Shack does it with remarkable balance between the two sounds that, over the ensuing years, would only grow more and more incongruous.

Recorded with the lineup of founding guitarist/vocalist Stan Webb, bassist Andy Sylvester, keyboardist/vocalist Paul Raymond and drummer Dave Bidwell, it would be their final outing through Blue Horizon Records and after it came out, Webb would have to completely revamp the lineup after losing Sylvester, Raymond and Bidwell all to Savoy Brown.

chickenshack1969Chicken Shack live at the  Bath Festival 1969 (© Al By)

All the same, listening to the rolling start of “Diary of Your Life,” the gritty swing and harmonies of “Never Ever,” the complex structure and arrangement of “Some Other Time” — vaguely post-Beatles but grown outward — and the soft departure of “Andalucian Blues,” whatever friction there might’ve been in the band doesn’t show up in the compositions, which are more varied than some of what would follow in the UK (also a good deal of what preceded), but hit with no less impact when they choose to do so. At 35 minutes, Accept Chicken Shack leaves one wondering how anybody couldn’t with its niche blend of elements and confident execution, earning its place in that great dusty canon of heavy ’70s classics just waiting to be discovered by new generations of listeners in a vinyl shop or online. In this case, clearly the latter.

Webb has kept Chicken Shack going. Over the years he’s brought in nearly 50 players, but they still perform as Chicken Shack from time to time (seem like a good bet for the next installment of Psycho fest) and had releases out as recently as 2008. Accept Chicken Shack is more than a footnote in a larger career, however, and as you can hear in these songs, whatever came later, this lineup was able to come together to accomplish something special during their time. (by theobelisk.net)

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Personnel:
Dave Bidwell (drums)
Paul Raymond (keyboards, vocals)
Andy Sylvester (bass)
Stan Webb (guitar, vocals)

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Tracklist:

01. Diary Of Your Life (Webb) 3.06
02. Pocket (Webb/Raymond) 3.23
03. Never Ever (Webb/Raymond) 2.43
04. Sad Clown (Webb/Raymond) 3.41
05. Maudie (Webb/Raymond) 2.54
06. Telling Your Fortune (Webb) 4.23
07. Tired Eyes (Webb) 2.06
08. Some Other Time (Webb/Raymond) 3.06
09. Going Round (Webb/Raymond) 2.32
10. Andalucian Blues (Webb/Raymond) 2.21
11. You Knew You Did You Did (Webb) 2.26
12. She Didn’t Use Her Loaf (unknown) 4.12
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13. Maudie (single version) (Webb/Raymond) 3.01

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German single version of Maudi b/w Andalucian Blues

 

Savoy Brown – Shake Down (1967)

frontcover1Savoy Brown, originally known as the Savoy Brown Blues Band, are an English blues rock band formed in Battersea, south west London in 1965. Part of the late 1960s blues rock movement, Savoy Brown primarily achieved success in the United States, where they promoted their albums with non-stop touring.

The band was formed by guitarist Kim Simmonds and harmonica player John O’Leary, following a chance meeting at Transat Imports record shop in Lisle Street, Soho, in 1965. The initial constant line-up adjustments were attributed to the “creative accountancy” employed by the band’s manager, Harry Simmonds, brother of Kim.

The original line-up included singer Bryce Portius, keyboardist Trevor Jeavons, bassist Ray Chappell, drummer Leo Manning and harmonica player John O’Leary (O’Leary appeared on record with the band on its initial recordings for Mike Vernon’s Purdah label). Portius was one of the first black blues musicians to be a part of a British rock band.[citation needed] Jeavons was replaced by Bob Hall shortly after the band’s formation, and this was followed shortly by O’Leary’s departure and the arrival of Martin Stone on guitars. This line-up appeared on the band’s 1967 debut album, Shake Down, a collection of blues covers.

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Shake Down is the debut studio album by the British blues rock band Savoy Brown. It was released in 1967 (on Decca SKL 4883) under the name of Savoy Brown Blues Band and is mainly an album of covers, featuring three songs penned by blues singer Willie Dixon. In addition to Dixon, the band covers John Lee Hooker and B.B. King. (by wikipedia)

This is one of the best albuzms from the British blues boom … And “Balck Night is one of the best songs, Savoy Brown ever recorded ..

And listen to “Let Me Love You Baby”, too … another highlight in the history of Kim Simmonds & Savoy Brown !

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Personnel:
Ray Chappell (bass)
Brice Portius – vocals
Kim Simmonds – lead and rhythm guitar
Martin Stone – lead and rhythm guitar

Leo Mannings – drums, percussion
Bob Hall – piano (on “I Ain’t Superstitious”, “Little Girl”, “Shake ‘Em On Down”)

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Tracklist:
01. I Ain’t Superstitious (Dixon) 3.25
02. Let Me Love You Baby (Dixon) 3.00
03. Black Night (Robinson) 4.47
04. High Rise (Bridge/Thompson/King) – 2:44
05. Rock Me Baby (King/Josea) 2.56
06. I Smell Trouble (Malone) 4.28
07. Oh! Pretty Woman (King) 2.28
08. Little Girl (Dixon) 1.38
09. The Doormouse Rides The Rails (Stone) 3.32
10. It’s My Own Fault (Hooker) 4.55
11. Shake ‘Em On Down (Traditional) 6.00

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John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers – Live in 1967 (2015)

FrontCover1The genesis of Live in 1967 came about because a staunch fan from Holland, Tom Huissen, was able to sneak a one channel reel to reel tape recorder into five London clubs (including the famed Marquee) in early 1967 and capture this exciting glimpse into music history.

For nearly 50 years these tapes remained unheard until John Mayall acquired them recently and began  restoring them with the technical assistance of Eric Corne of Forty Below Records. “While the source recording was very rough and the final result is certainly not hi-fidelity, it does succeed in allowing us to hear how spectacular these performances are,” says Corne.
“I’d known for a decade or two of the existence of these tapes and in fact Tom Huissen had sent me a CD with 50 second teasers for some of the tracks that he’d secretly recorded at our London shows,” recalls Mayall.“

Last year, Tom decided he wanted the world to hear these performances and work soon  began on restoring the already fine quality on the old reel-to-reel tapes.
”John Mayall has some fond memories about how this band came about. “ Through most Adof 1966, Peter and John were both regular members of the Bluesbreakers and Aynsley Dunbar was the drummer,” states Mayall. “
However, even though Aynsley was a great drummer, it was starting to become apparent that his jazz influenced style of playing was veering away from the blues. As I recall, Peter had been close friends with Mick Fleetwood for some time and he suggested I give
him a shot. And so for a short period of only about three months Mick became a  Bluesbreaker.”
The band’s repertoire on the tracks of Live in 1967 includes some songs that were originally recorded on The Bluesbreakers first two albums, John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers featuring Eric Clapton and A Hard Road (which featuredPeter Green), plus the soon-to-be recorded Crusade album, which featured young guitarist Mick Taylor after Peter Green left the band. Other songs on the new CD make their live debuts afterhaving be en recorded originally as singles in the UK and would later appear on Mayall’s Looking Back album. In addition, several of the songs on Live in 1967 make their first appearance in any form on a Bluesbreakers album.

Two long -time mainstay influences on John Mayall’s storied career – Freddy King and Otis  Rush – are well represented here with live versions of songs long – associated with the two blues  giants. “All Your Love,” “Double Trouble,” “So Many Roads” and “I Can’t

Tom Huissen

The young Tom Huissen

Quit You Baby” come from the Otis Rush canon of blues classics; and Freddy King’s “The Stumble,” “San-Ho-Zay” and “Someday After Awhile,” are given resounding treatments here by the quartet playing with a sense of energyand urgency.

“Ever since Eric Clapton joined the band,we both had a great interest in the recorded work of Otis Rush and Freddy King and many of their classic songs became part of our live performing catalogue,” Mayall says about the two blues icons.“
Their guitar work was always an inspiration for Eric, Peter Green and Mick Taylor in those early years.” The music on John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers – Live in 1967 showcases a band that although only together for a short time, was incredibly tight and in- the -pocket while still allowing room for improvisation, none more so than Peter Green, whose guitar work on this CD will stand as some of his best-ever on record. All of Green’s guitar trademarks – the stop time signatures, his incredible sustain and a hair-raising powerful
tone – are presented here in all their glory, highlighting a musician who was more than able to assume the mantle as the guitar player following in Eric Clapton’s well-trod footsteps as a member of one of blues music’s all-time aggregations, John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. (take from the press release)

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Peter Green, 1967

Name the great guitarists of the British Invasion of the sixties, Jack Bruce, Eric Clapton, Mick Taylor, Peter Green John McVie, Jimmy Page and so many more who went on to fame in such groups as Cream, The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, Canned Heat and Fleetwood Mac and they had their initial major exposure as members of or contributors to the famed John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. Back when Reel to Reel was considered high end recording, a fan snuck in a one channel reel to reel tape recorder to tape John Mayall’s group over a period of five London club gigs. How John Mayall got his hands on this fan’s recording is a mystery to me, but I am grateful that he did. While in no way is this recording ‘high fidelity’ the audio puts you right in that smokey club atmosphere, the same atmosphere I spent my teen years every weekend at the Filmore East and other clubs in New York City. The recording was clearly cleaned up removing any white noise, hiss and other audio disparities, but retains the club ambience that makes this CD so invaluable to both music historians and those with an affinity for the blues. None of these recordings have been released anywhere else on either released CDs or bootlegs.
This specific recording features John Mayall, Peter Green, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood before they moved on to other groups. Trust me when I say this, this was before the blues was pasteurized by the heavy influence of pure rock and yet you can still hear what these blues influences would lead to. John Mayall had yet to become a household name in the U.S. and he is in fine voice when he is not blowing that unique harp sound that would eventually would become so well recognized. On other numbers included on this CD, Mayall’s organ fills in and elevates songs such as ‘Double Trouble’ and ‘I Can’t Quit You Baby’ with the organ playing call and response against Peter Green’s soulful but powerful as all get out lead guitar.

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At almost every blues jam I have ever attended or when listening to most any blues based cover band, the performing of ‘Stormy Monday’ can always be expected. If you want to really feel the down-home blues of this song as it was intended, the Bluesbreakers give it what it should always be given, terrific and heartfelt guitar leads, strong but basic rhythm provided by Mick Fleetwood and John McVie and vocals that reach out and grab you by the lapels.
Crowd ambience sneaks into these recordings simply adding to that smokey club feel I referred to previously. It doesn’t distract or take away, but puts you front and center for what must have been an enviable front seat at these club dates. With ‘Live in 1967’ you are transported back in time and have your very own front and center seat. A darn fine album. (by Steve Douglas)

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Personnel:
Mick Fleetwood (drums)
Peter Green (guitar)
Jihn Mayall (vocals, guitar, keyboards, harmonica)
John McVie (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. All Your Love (Rush) 3.56
02. Brand New Start (Mayall) 4.51
03. Double Trouble (Rush) 6.33
04. Streamline (Mayall) 4.02
05. Have You Ever Loved a Woman (Myles) 8.16
06. Looking Back (Watson) 2.35
07. So Many Roads (Marshall) 5.53
08. Hi Heel Sneakers (Higginbotham) 6.49
09. I Can’t Quit You Baby (Dixon) 4.28
10. The Stumble (King/Thompson) 6.48
11. Someday After Awhile (King/Thompson) 5.13
12. San-Ho-Zay (King/Thompson) 8.11
13. Stormy Monday (Walker) 8.54

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Tom Huissen + John Mayall

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Various Artists – Raw Blues (1967)

FrontCover1From this modest beginning Mike Vernon was eventually able to lure several ‘name’ Stateside blues men to ‘The Supreme Record Company’s’ then head offices on London’s Albert Embankment, for the purpose of inking a recording contract, and thereafter driving them to West Hampstead — Decca’s studio complex. Simultaneously, his was the influence which convinced some of Britain’s finest home-grown exponents of the genre to follow a similar course.

This package, aptly titled Raw Blues, was assembled by Mike and issued on Decca’s subsidiary ‘Ace Of Clubs’ label in January 1967 (ACL (Mono)/SCL (Stereo) 1220). An intriguing collection of artifacts, its wetter of big name participants may now be appreciated through the sophisticated medium of sound which is a compact disc. The technology may be smoother these days, but the blues remain as raw as ever…

A few details about the contents and its protagonists wouldn’t go amiss: Bom Jackson, Mississippi, on 21 st March 1930, Otis Spann shared his parents affections with two brothers and two sisters. Product of a musically inclined family, his father Frank Euston Spann played piano and mother Josephine was formerly a guitarist with Memphis Minnie, a top vocalist who knew a good picker when she heard one, having married another Jackson six-string resident, Joe McCoy (Kansas Joe). Mot surprisingly, Otis took to music like a duck to water, adopting piano as his chosen Instrument Largely self-taught, in later life he always acknowledged the influence Big Maceo Merriweather had upon his style. Gaining confidence as a result of forming a small band with some other local juveniles, when he heard about a neighbourhood talent competition happening at the Alamo Theatre he entered and won — as a singer — performing Coot Davis’ Four O’clock Blues.

CurtisJonesCurtis Jones

With the passing years he pursued medical studies at Jackson’s Campbell College in the hope of becoming a doctor. When not buried in textbooks, he displayed a sporting prowess at boxing and football, briefly even turning professional at the latter. Between 1946 and ’51 the U.S. Army called upon his time, but after discharge he relinquished all thoughts of any other occupation than music and moved to Chicago. The rest of the family had domiciled themselves there two years earlier, when mother died. Swiftly contacted by Muddy Waters, Otis joined the great guitarist/vocalist and stayed with his outfit for many years thereafter, although between 1952 and the time of this recording he’d also supplied studio accompaniment for such legends as Chuck Berry, Howlin’ Wolf, Bo Diddley and Lowell Fulson.

Visiting Britain in May 1964 for a tour, our subject recorded an acclaimed Decca LP: The Blues Of Otis Spann (LK 4615). Included here are the four additional cuts from that London session of May 4th: Pretty Girls Everywhere (a), My Home In The Desert and the McKinley Morganfield (alias Muddy Waters) duo Country Boy and You’re Gonna Need My Help. Personnel: Otis Spann (Vocal, Piano); ‘Brother’ (Guitar); Ransom K nowli ng (Bass); Little Willie Smith (Drums); add Eric Clapton (Gtr.) on (a) only. Further south in New Orleans, seaport metropolis of Louisiana, on Independence Day 1910, was bom William Thomas ‘Champion Jack’ Dupree. His father was French, while mother was a descendant of the Cherokee Indian tribe.

Tragically, both were killed when the family home burnt down during his seventh year. After spending the next seven cooped up in an institution he ran away, but not before he’d mastered the basics of singing and playing piano. Thereafter he maintained his existence by thumping the untuned pianos of seedy dubs and houses of ill-repute, acquiring the technique known as’ Barrelhouse’ playing thanks to prominent exponent of the art Willie Hall, otherwise billed as Drive ’em Down.

ChampionJackDupreeChampion Jack Dupree

The Depression found our subject attempting to make ends meet by taking up boxing—whence ‘Champion Jack’ — but by the mid-Thirties he’d joined forces with Cotton Club keyboarder Leroy Carr. Upon the tatter’s early death Jack was offered the unfortunate vacancy, which he accepted. In 1940 the Okeh label added him to their roster; it was the first of a multitude of labels great and small to do so over the next thirty years, including King — where he notched a big hit on the R ‘ n’ B charts, Walkingthe Blues, in 1955-and Atlantic.

As blues music gained European popularity through the Fifties, many big names were lured from America to tour and occasionally record as a bonus. Big Bill Broonzy was instrumental in persuading Dupree to take the plunge, and he liked it so much that by 1960 he’d married an English giri half his age and settled in Zurich, Switzerland.  From here he was able to commute around Europe, finding appreciative audiences for his set which at that time still included some dance routines — early in his career he’d worked in vaudeville performing the tap variety.

By 1965 he was living in and working out of Denmark’s capital, and the following February Mike Vernon signed him to a three album deal for Decca. The first of these, From New Orleans To Chicago (LK 4747), hit the shops in April, and included here are the two tracks from those sessions which were omitted through lack of space: Calcutta Blues (a) and the Eddie Boyd penned 24 Hours. Backed by an all-star British group, Now deservedly billed as ‘The Father Of British Blues’, John Mayall is rightly predominant on this collection. As one of the handful of pioneers responsible for popularizing the style in the U.K., his contribution cannot be overstated.

The Bluesbreakers became a veritable ‘nursery’ for so many future stars in their formative years, and amongst the home grown contingent on display here are some of the finest. Of his two solo billings, the impassioned Burn Out Your Blind Eyes and Milkman Strut, this second title prevailed, according to Vernon’s original album sleeve note, when the daily delivery to the studios saw the dairy employee wander in midway through a ‘take’, deposit his crate, and nonchalantly walk out slamming the door behind him…

OtisSpannOtis Spann

Of John’s pairing with organist Steve Anglo, it may now be revealed that for Anglo read Winwood. Owing to contractual obligations elsewhere he could not appear under his true identity when the album was published. Rhythm section duties on Long Night belonged to then Bluesbreakers’ members John McVie (Bass) and drummer Aynsley Dunbar.

The Mayall and Clapton liaisons here, John’s Lonely Years and Eric’s instrumental Bernard Jenkins, were cut at Mike’s instigation and originally issued as a back-to-back limited edition 45 on his own Purdah label. Dating from the period between the players’ joint collaborations under contract to firstly Andrew Oldhams Immediate company and then Decca, (Bluesbreakers era), both were committed through a single microphone in the middle of the capital’s Wessex Studios in Soho, hence the unusual sound.

At the time of its taping, Peter Green had recently been recruited to the Mayall ranks as Eric’s axe wielding replacement. On his own composition, Evil Woman Blues, he displayed a mature prowess at both playing and singing despite his relative lack of experience. In time, of course, he formed Fleetwood Mac, but that’s another story… Legendary purveyors of the blues from both sides of the Atlantic are gathered together in this one historical little collocation. We all owe grateful thanks to Mike Vernon for making it possible. Why wait? Just play on… (by John Tracy)

What a line-up !!!

Eric ClaptonEric Clapton, 1966

Personnel:
Eric Clapton (guitar, vocals)
Jack Fallon (bass)
Aynsley Dunbar (drums)
Champion Jack Dupree (piano, vocals)
Peter Green (guitar, vocals)
Keef Hartley (drums)
Curtis Jones (piano, vocals)
Ransom Knowling -(bass)
Alexis Korner (guitar)
John Mayall (guitar, harmonica, piano, vocals)
John Mcvie (bass)
Malcolm Pool (bass)
Little Willie Smith (drums)
Otis Spann (piano, vocals)
Eddie Taylor (drums)
Steve “Anglo” Winwood (organ)

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Tracklist:
01. Otis Spann: Pretty Girls Everywhere (Church/Williams) 2.57
02. John Mayall: Burn Out Your Blind Eyes (Mayall) 3.00
03. Champion Jack Dupree: Calcutta Blues (Unknown) 4.00
04. John Mayall & Steve Anglo: Long Night (Mayall,/Anglo) 2.04
05. Otis Spann: Country Boy (Morganfiled) 3.34
06. Curtis Jones: You Got Good Business (Jones) 3.23
07. John Mayall & Eric Clapton: Lonely Years (Mayall) 3.21
08. Peter Green & John Mayall: Evil Woman Blues (Green) 4.04
09. Otis Spann: My Home In The Desert (Unknown) 4.20
10. John Mayall: Milkman Strut (Mayall) 2.26
11. Champion Jack Dupree: 24 Hours (Boyd) 4.07
12. Curtis Jones: Roll Me Over (Jones) 2.38
13. John Mayall & Eric Clapton: Bernard Jenkins (Clapton) 3.50
14. Otis Spann: You Gonna Need My Help (Morganfield) 3.25

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Chicken Shack – OK Ken (1968)

FrontCover1O.K. Ken? is the second album by the blues band, Chicken Shack, released in February 1969. O.K Ken? reached number 9 in the UK Albums Chart, three places higher than its predecessor, 40 Blue Fingers, Freshly Packed and Ready to Serve.

This album was Christine Perfect’s last album as a member of Chicken Shack. (by wikipedia)
This is an excellent example of a band playing music they love and having a great time doing it. There’s nothing particularly new going on but it doesn’t really matter, there are some great electric blues songs with occasional vocals from the superb Christine Perfect. The strange conversational outtakes between each song can become annoying but they don’t make the album any less enjoyable. (by an amazon customer)

Anyone growing up in the progressive rock and blues era of the late 60’s early 70’s will know the Chicken Shack as a heavy blues band and regular performers on John Peels Top Gear programme. OK Ken is perhaps one of the most spontaneous with the band performing at their best and having a laugh whilst doing it. Each track is introduced by impressions of famous people at the time, such as John Peel, Hughie Greene and Prime Minister Harold Wilson. There is also what appears to be an intro by the real Steptoe and Son alias Wilfred Bramble and Harry H Corbet.

ChickenShack1968_02

Chicken Shack (with fans). Major contributors to the British Blues movement

These can make the album or detract from it depending on your viewpoint, but for me they add to its appeal. The music is heavy and blues based with some good numbers by Freddie King and tremendous vocals by Christine Perfect. It is solid, traditional electric blues with an injection of fun. If you grew up with band you will know it and love it, if not you will surely enjoy it but may find the track intro’s annoying. (by Colin Andrew)

This is a typical Britisch blues album from that “Blue Horizon” period and it´s a real good one and note the great brass section !

And their hit single “I´d Rather Go Blind” is till today a classic tune … such a movingly song !

ChickenShack1968

Personnel:
Dave Bidwell (drums)
Christine Perfect (keyboards, vocals)
Andy Sylvester (bass)
Stan Webb (guitar, vocals)
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Johnny Almond (saxophone)
Buddy Beadle (saxophone)
Don Fey (saxophone)
Steve Gregory (saxophone)
Roderick Lee (trumpet)
Terry Noonan (trumpet)
Walter Horton (harmonica)

Booklet1

Tracklist:
01. Baby’s Got Me Crying (Webb) 2.25
02. The Right Way Is My Way (Webb) 2.00
03. Get Like You Used to Be (Perfect/Webb) 3.05
04. Pony And Trap (Webb) 3.00
05. Tell Me (Burnette) 4.40
06. A Woman Is The Blues” (Perfect, Webb) 2.50
07. I Wanna See My Baby (Walker) 3.30
08. Remington Ride (Remington/Penny) 2.50
09. Fishing In Your River (Webb) 4.30
10. Mean Old World (Jacobs) 3.15
11. Sweet Sixteen (King,/Josea) 6.20
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12. Worried About My Woman (single A side) (Webb) 2.37
13. Six Nights in Seven (singe B side) (Webb) 4.59
14.  I´d Rather Go Blind (James /Jordan/Foster) 3.17
15. Night Life (single B-side) (Buskirk/Breeland/Nelson) 5.21

LabelA1*
**

PerfectWebb
Christine Perfect + Stan Webb