Wentus Blues Band & Dick Heckstall-Smith – Man Of Stone (2015)

FrontCover1Dick Heckstall-Smith was much more than “only” the Saxophone Player for one of the best Jazz-Rock bands, we ever had … Colosseum !
He was an extraordinary solo Artist and session Player, too. Here we can hear him with the Wentus Blues Band from Finland !

What can I say about Dick Heckstall-Smith? Brilliant jazz and blues sax player, composer and owner of the largest tea cups in history, and most importantly for me, my friend.

In 1998, I first met Dick Heckstall-Smith, at a recording session for his “Blues And Beyond” album. Soon afterwards I started running his official website, and soon after that, Dick asked me to be his manager. Dick lived to play on stage. He had semi regular gigs with The Hamburg Blues Band, then there were Colosseum tours, a jazz gig here and there, but that still left a lot of time to fill, gig wise.
In 2002, Dick wanted to put a blues based live band together. His ideal line-up would have included Clem Clempson on guitar and Gary Husband on drums. There hadn’t been much movement on this when we were contacted by Robban Hagnas of The Wentus Blues Band. They hailed from Kokkola in Finland. An accomplished blues act, they had found a unique way round the limited touring opportunities in Scandanavia by touring with classic blues artists such as Mick Taylor, centering their sets around each special guest. That way, they could tour several times a year, rather than just once.

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It was agreed that Dick would go out on a Scandanavian tour with them, and and he was as excited by the prospect as I had ever seen him. I remember him dragging me around pretty much every army surplus store in North London one Saturday afternoon in order to find enough cold weather clothing to combat whatever conditions might be faced on the road. I was very aware that my main role with Dick was to maintain a level of hope in the future for him, and this tour constituted the most hopeful he had been for some time.
Once Dick had travelled to Finland for rehearsals and the tour itself, I got daily updates from him by phone. He was particularly impressed by The Wentus Blues Band guitar attack which reminded him of Peter Green era Fleetwood Mac. They had tailored their set to him, with numbers associated with Blues Incorporated, Graham Bond ORGANization and The Bluesbreakers, as well as numbers from Dick’s jazz orientated solo work, such as the song that had become something of a signature for him, “Woza Nasu.” Dick enjoyed the tour immensely, and felt, (as I did when hearing the live recording) that his playing was near his best. I recall one particularly “up” call from Dick. He was staying in an isolated hotel not a million miles from the Arctic Circle, and raved about His ride there, via Reindeer and Sleigh. Dick came back from the tour as invigorated and enthused as I ever saw him in those later years, and I will always thank Robban Hagnas and his band for that.

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A few months later, I got to see Dick in action with the Wentus boys in action at a one off gig in Oxford. Dick drove myself and Pete Brown there, via Canada it seemed. Dick could be directionally challenged now and then. However, we did get there in time for the show, and it was wonderful how the band interacted with a true master of his instrument. This live album is testament to that wonderful interaction. (by Pete Grant; taken from the original liner-notes)
Such a great concert … including one of Dick Heckstall-Smith´s masterpieces … his own composition “Woza Nasu ” … Listen !

Recorded live in Helsinki at Cantina West April, 5th, 2002.

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Personnel:
Mikael Axelqvist (drums)
Robert Hagnäs (bass)
Nike Riippa (guitar)
Anders Sjöberg (vocals)
Kim Vikamn (guitar)
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Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone)
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Tracklist:
01. Key To Love (Mayall) 3.46
02. Missing You (Everton/Edward) 3.53
03. You Got Me (Where You Want Me) (Robey) 5.23
04. Suspicions – Part 2 (Mayall) 6.34
05. Woza Nasu (Heckstall-Smith) 17.04
06. Man Of Stone (Kirkland) 8.16
07. Have You Heard (Mayall) 8.41
08. Pretty Things (McDaniels) 3.06
09. Before You Accuse Me (McDaniels) 5.02
10. Looking Back (Watson) 4.25
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Fleetwood Mac – Carousel Ballroom (1968)

FrontCover1After distinguishing himself and achieving a level of recognition in Europe, like Eric Clapton before him, Peter Green departed John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, freeing himself of employment and artistic restrictions. However, unlike most of the British guitar greats, Green was never concerned with flash or becoming a guitar superstar – an attitude that made him one of the most compelling of all the British guitar players from the 1960s. Green could play incisively and cleanly, but was equally adept at ripping with tremendous power. This made listening to any of Green’s material a rewarding experience; many of his originals have a timeless quality that still sounds fresh and intriguing today.

This outstanding early performance by Fleetwood Mac occurred only a week into their first visit to the United States, when Peter Green was only 21 years old. Falling right between the release of their self-titled debut album and their follow-up, Mr. Wonderful, this show captures the band in its early incarnation, when they were still a quartet – and one of the Crusaders of the late ’60s English blues movement. Peter Green was the chief architect of the band’s sound at this point, and was providing the bulk of their original material. Green was beginning to explore music outside traditional blues, and his playing could be wonderfully restrained one minute and powerfully explosive the next, marked by a distinctive vibrato and economy of style. His haunting, sweet-yet-melancholy tone was very distinctive, and was blessed with an inherently human quality that other British guitarists often struggled for.

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At this early stage, Jeremy Spencer comprised the band’s other creative force. Spencer could authentically recreate Elmore James onstage, and this novel ability, along with a ribald sense of humor (shared by the entire band), helped fuel the band’s early stage shows. Spencer could also create dead-on parodies of 1950s rock ‘n’ roll songs, often of the teen idol variety, giving the band an onstage theatrical element that was both funny and entertaining. The band’s overt sense of humor, in addition to their accomplished musicianship, certainly endeared them to many of the San Francisco music elite.

The set begins in fine fashion with Elmore James’ “Madison Blues,” and Green and Spencer trading relatively simple licks over a relaxed shuffle to warm things up. “My Baby’s Skinny” provides the audience their first taste of Peter Green’s delicious guitar tone. The number is a great early vehicle for Green, who takes lead vocal and peals off biting leads that display his innate ability to play with both penetrating directness and tensioned restraint. Riley King’s “Worried Dream” follows; a lengthy, slow blues number, the tune demonstrates Green at his best, delivering heartfelt vocals and delicious guitar work with great nuance and style.

Two more Elmore James classics are up next, showcasing Jeremy Spencer, and proving just how well he had mastered James’ feel for slide guitar. Both “Dust My Broom” and “Got To Move” feature distinctly different facets of James’ best work and Spencer has a strong handle on both. The group keeps a relaxed groove going underneath that lets Spencer shine. “Trying So Hard To Forget” is an early Peter Green original that has more of a vocal than an instrumental focus, but fits right in with the band’s early repertoire nonetheless.

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The most fascinating number of this set comes next, and again, clearly demonstrates Green’s greatest strengths as a performer. His take on Freddy King’s “Have You Ever Loved A Woman,” a song that would eventually become synonymous with Eric Clapton, is equally as virtuosic, and in some ways even more refined. This is the stuff that made B.B. King himself refer to Peter Green as “the only man to ever make me sweat.” The band increases the tempo and the set speeds to a close with one of Green’s original numbers from their forthcoming second album, Lazy Poker Blues. This new (at the time) number stays close to the studio arrangement, featuring tight ensemble playing and a sizzling guitar solo from Green. (by Alan Bershaw)

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 Personnel:
Mick Fleetwood (drums)
Peter Green (guitar, vocals)
John McVie (bass)
Jeremy Spencer (guitar, vocals)
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Paul Butterfield (harmonica on 11. – 15.)

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Tracklist:
CD1: June 9, 1968 first set
01. Madison Blues (James) 4.31
02. My Baby’s Gone (Edwards) 6.00
03. My Baby’s Skinny (Green) 4.48
04. Worried Dream (King) 9.57
05. Dust My Broom (James) 4.32
06. Got To Move (Williamson) 3.00
07. Worried Mind (Bennett 4.41
08. Instrumental (unknown) 10.29
09. Have You Ever Loved A Woman? (Myles) 7.58
10. Lazy Poker Blues (Green/Adams) 4.49

CD 2: June 9, 1968 second set:
11. Stop Messin’ ‘Round (Green) 2.12
02. I Loved Another Woman (Green) 7.03
03. I Believe (Spencer) 5.17
04. The Sun Is Shining (James) 6.2705. Long Tall Sally (Penniman/Blackwell/Johnson)  4.53
06. Willie & The Hand Jive (Otis) 4.04
07. Tutti Frutti (Penniman/LaBostrie) 3.02
08. Thanks by Peter Green, announcer band intros + crowd noise before encore  0.32
09. Ready Teddy (Marascalco/Blackwell) 3.16

CD 2: June 7 or 8, 1968 S.F. Carousel Ballroom
10. I Need Your Love So Bad (John) 1.46
11. I Believe (James) 4.59
12. Shake Your Moneymaker (James) 9.12
13. Ready Teddy (Marascalco/Blackwell) 2.30
14 Peter Green says thanks, announcer outro + crowd noise 0.19

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John Mayall´s Bluesbreakers – With Paul Butterfield (1967)

FrontCover1This 4 track EP is probably one of the rarest John Mayall records ever.

On November 26, 1966, Paul Butterfield, leader of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, was touring England. He met up with John Mayall, one of England’s pre-eminent blues bandleaders, his band the Bluesbreakers an incubator for talent ranging from Eric Clapton, Peter Green and Mick Taylor to Jack Bruce, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood. The Butterfield band, at that very moment, had two guitar greats in its ranks: Mike Bloomfield and Elvin Bishop.
Butterfield, a powerful singer who learned his trade sitting in with black blues bands (including Muddy Waters) on Chicago’s South Side, was a virtuoso harmonica player whose lyrical style owed plenty to Little Walter. Mayall played keyboard, his own custom built guitars, piano and organ.
Butterfield and Mayall recorded four songs, but in deference to the Butterfield Blues Band’s Elektra recording contract, British Decca released the EP only in England. The Bluesbreakers lineup at this point was Peter Green, John McVie and drummer Aynsley Dunbar. (by Rich Kienzle)

A summit meeting of the leading U.S. and U.K. blues-rock bandleaders of their time resulted in this four-song, seven-inch EP, which, like most such projects, didn’t add up to the sum of its parts. By either man’s standards, it’s routine, if unobjectionable. Mayall takes a much stronger role than Butterfield; “Riding on the L&N” is about the best cut on a disc that also has a version of Junior Wells’ “Little By Little” and one Mayall original, “Eagle Eye.” Personnel is not listed on this rarity; one could reasonably assume from the date of release that it features the Peter Green version of the Bluesbreakers, but rock reference books are in conflict as to whether Mick Fleetwood and/or Peter Green appear on the disc or not. (by Richie Unterberger)

So … listen to two masters of what we call “white Boy blues”

 

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John McVie + Peter Green with Paul Butterfield, 1966

 

Personnel:
Aynsley Dunbar (drums)
Peter Green (guitar)
John Mayall (voclas, harmonica)
John McVie (bass)
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Paul Butterfield (vocals, harmonica)

 

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Backcover, autographed by John Mayall himself

 

Tracklist:
01. All My Life (Robinson) 4.22
02. Riding On The L. And N. (Burley/Hampton) 2.26
01. Little By Little (Wells/London) 2.43
04. Eagle Eye (Mayall) 2.49

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Savoy Brown – Blue Matter (1969)

FrontCover1Blue Matter is the third album by the band Savoy Brown. Teaming up once again with producer Mike Vernon, it finds them experimenting even more within the blues framework. Several tracks feature piano (played by Bob Hall, guitarist Kim Simmonds, and vocalist Chris Youlden, who even plays guitar here) as well as trombone.
This album featured a mix of live and studio recordings. The live tracks were recorded on December 6, 1968 at the now defunct City of Leicester College of Education because the band was scheduled to tour the USA and needed additional tracks to complete the album in time for the tour. The booking at the college represented their only chance to record the extra tracks in a live venue before embarking on the tour. An offer to perform the concert free of charge was accepted by Chris Green, the college Social Secretary, who had made the original booking, and the concert was duly recorded, a number of the live tracks being added to the album.
Because Chris Youlden was suffering from tonsillitis, Dave Peverett stood in as lead vocalist on the live tracks.
The album track “Vicksburg Blues” had first appeared as the B-side of Decca single F 12797 (released June 1968), fronted by “Walking by Myself”. (by wikipedia)
The third release by Kim Simmonds and company, but the first to feature the most memorable lineup of the group: Simmonds, “Lonesome” Dave Peverett, Tony “Tone” Stevens, Roger Earl, and charismatic singer Chris Youlden. This one serves up a nice mixture of blues covers and originals, with the first side devoted to studio cuts and the second a live club date recording. Certainly the standout track, indeed a signature song by the band, is the tour de force “Train to Nowhere,” with its patient, insistent buildup and pounding train-whistle climax. Additionally, David Anstey’s detailed, imaginative sleeve art further boosts this a notch above most other British blues efforts.(by Peter Kurtz)

Side One is marked “Studio”; Side Two is marked “Live” and was recorded at The City of Leicester College of Education, Friday 6th December 1968.

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Savoy Brown, live in 1969
Personnel:
Roger Earl (drums, percussion)
Bob Hall (piano)
“Lonesome” Dave Peverett (guitar, vocals)
Kim Simmonds (guitar, harmonica, piano)
Tone Stevens (bass)
Chris Youlden (vocals, guitar, piano)
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Rivers Jobe (bass on 01., 02. + 04.)
Mike Vernon (percussion on 01.)
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trombones on 01:
Terry Flannery – Keith Martin – Alan Moore – Brian Perrin – Derek Wadsworth

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Tracklist:
01. Train To Nowhere (Simmonds/Youlden) 4.12
02. Tolling Bells (Simmonds/Youlden) 6.33
03. She’s Got A Ring In His Nose And A Ring On Her Hand (Youlden) 3.07
04. Vicksburg Blues (Hall/Youlden) 4.00
05. Don’t Turn Me From Your Door (Hooker) 5.4
06. Grits Ain’t Groceries (All Around Te World) (bonus track) (Turner) 2.46
07. May Be Wrong (Peverett) 7.56

08. Louisiana Blues (Morganfield) 9.05
09. It Hurts Me Too (London) 6.51
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Alternate frontcover from Australia

Savoy Brown – Getting To The Point (1968)

lpfrontcover1Getting to the Point is the second studio album by the British blues rock band Savoy Brown. It marks the debut of a vastly different lineup, still led by Kim Simmonds but fronted by new vocalist Chris Youlden.

It was released by Decca in 1968 with catalog number SKL 4935 and finds the group taking on more of the songwriting load, as opposed to their debut, which consisted mostly of covers. One of the covers is “You Need Love” by Willie Dixon, which served as a blueprint for “Whole Lotta Love” by Led Zeppelin. Deram released the CD with three bonus tracks in 1990 with catalog number 820 922-2. (by wikipedia)

1967 saw Savoy Brown tour as backing band for Hooker’s UK tour and also open for Cream’s first London performance.
Extensive touring was followed by personnel changes after a drugs ‘bust’ which saw in new bassist Bob Brunning from Fleetwood Mac and singer Chris Youlden. Youlden was a true find, his rich, often mournful vocal harnessed to Simmond’s fluid guitar lines levered in home grown material from both men that trademarked the Savoy Brown sound, the line-up soon enriched by the arrival of bassist “Lonesome” Dave Peverett and drummer Roger Earle.
Getting to the Point followed in March 1968, the mix now reversed with just two covers and seven originals by Youlden and Simmonds. Initially something of a downer after “Shake Down”, the album picks up half way and begins to rattle along, showcasing an individual style and a growing dynamic within the band.
Winning contemporary media plaudits for the album, this chemistry was to grow to even better purpose with subsequent releases in the last gasps of the decade.(by Greville Rob)

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The first single with Chris Youlden (with the wrong line-up on the cover !)

Getting to the Point marks the debut of a vastly different lineup, still led by Simmonds but now fronted by new vocalist Chris Youlden. The pair got off to a good start by writing or co-writing most of the album. The playing is solid blues revival, and though Youlden’s vocals are often overly imitative of B.B. King and Muddy Waters, he has a confident voice and frontman persona. Originals like “Flood in Houston” and “Mr. Downchild” provide the highlights. (by by Keith Farley)

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Personnel:
Roger Earl (drums)
Bob Hall (piano)
Rivers Jobe (bass)
Dave Peverett (guitar)
Kim Simmonds (lead guitar)
Chris Youlden (vocals)
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Bob Brunning (bass on 11. + 12.)
Hughie Flint (drums 11. + 12.)

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Tracklist:
01. Flood In Houston (Simmonds/Youlden) – 4:00
02. Stay With Me Baby (Peverett/Simmonds/Youlden) 2.35
03. Honey Bee (Morganfield) 6.25
04. The Incredible Gnome Meets Jaxman (Simmonds) 3.30
05. Give Me A Penny (Traditional) 4.20
06. Mr. Downchild (Simmonds/Youlden) 5.25
07. Getting To The Point (Simmonds) 4.20
08. Big City Lights (Hall/Youlden) 3.25
09. You Need Love (Dixon) 7.40
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10. Walking by Myself (Single A side, 1967) (Rogers) 2.25
11. Taste And Try, Before You Buy (Single A side, 1967) (Youlden) 2-21
12. Someday People (Single B side, 1967) (Simmonds) 4.35

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Still alive and well: Kim Simmonds in 2016

Alexis Korner – Eat A Little Rhythm And Blues (VHS rip) (1988)

frontcoverAlexis Korner (born Alexis Andrew Nicholas Koerner, 19 April 1928 in Paris, France – died 1 January 1984 in Westminster, Central London), was an English blues musician, born to an Austrian father and Greek mother.

Korner is probably best remembered as a networker and blues historian, although he was a proficient guitarist and a distinctive (if not accomplished) vocalist. Often referred to as “the Father of British Blues”, Korner was instrumental in bringing together various English blues musicians.

In 1961, Korner and Davies formed Blues Incorporated, initially a loose-knit group of musicians with a shared love of electric blues and R&B music. The group included, at various times, such influential musicians as Charlie Watts, Jack Bruce, Ginger Baker, Long John Baldry, Graham Bond, Danny Thompson and Dick Heckstall-Smith. It also attracted a wider crowd of mostly younger fans, some of whom occasionally performed with the group, including Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Brian Jones, Rod Stewart, John Mayall and Jimmy Page.

In 1970 Korner and Peter Thorup formed a big band ensemble, C.C.S. – short for The Collective Consciousness Society – which had several hit singles produced by Mickie Most, including a version of Led Zeppelin’s “Whole Lotta Love” which was used as the theme for BBC’s Top Of The Pops for several years. This was the period of Korner’s greatest commercial success in the UK.

In 1973, he formed another group, Snape, with Boz Burrell, Mel Collins, and Ian Wallace, previously together in King Crimson. Korner also played on B.B. King’s Supersession album, and cut his own, similar album, Get Off My Cloud, with Keith Richards, Peter Frampton, Nicky Hopkins, and members of Joe Cocker’s Grease Band.

In the mid 1970s, while touring Germany, he established an intensive working relationship with bassist Colin Hodgkinson who played for the support act Back Door. They would continue to collaborate until the end.

In the 1970s Korner’s main career was in broadcasting. In 1973 he presented a six part documentary for the BBC, The Rolling Stones Story, and in 1977 he established a weekly blues and soul show on Radio 1, which ran until 1981. He also used his gravelly voice to great effect as an advertising voice over artist.

In 1978, for Korner’s 50th birthday, an all-star concert was held featuring many of his friends mentioned above, as well as Eric Clapton, Paul Jones, Chris Farlowe, Zoot Money and other friends, which was later released as The Party Album, and as a video.

And here´s the video, including interviews with Alexis Korner, Paul Jones and Zoot Money.

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What a hell of a party … with such fine musicians … and I will present the official “Party” double album in this blog very soon … And please don´t forget: this is a VHS rip …

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Personnel:
Eric Clapton (guitar)
Mel Collins (saxophone)
Chris Farlowe (vocals)
Neil Ford (guitar)
Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone)
Colin Hodgkinson (bass, vocals)
Paul Jones (harmonica)
Alexis Korner (guitar, vocals)
Zoot Money (keyboards, vocals)
Dick Morrissey (saxophone)
Duffy Power (harmonica)
Stu Speer (drums)
John Surman (saxophone)
Art Themen (saxophone)
Mike Zwerin (trombone)

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Tracklist:
01. Louisiana Blues (Traditional)  4.00
02. Whole Mess Of Blues (Pomus/Shuman) 5.41
03. Linin’ Track (Traditional) 3.14
04. Blue Monday (Domino/Bartholomew) 3.02
05. Skipping (Korner) 3.10
06. Spoonful (Dixon) 6.42
07. Finkles Cafe (Korner) / Dooji Wooji (Ellington) 9.43
08. Got To Get You Off My Mind (Burke/Burke/Moore) 6.27
09. Stormy Monday (Walker) 9.00
10. Hi-Heel Sneakers (Higginbotham) 6.20

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Chicken Shack – Accept (1970)

frontcover1Accept is the fourth album by the blues band, Chicken Shack, released in 1970. Accept was Chicken Shack’s last album on the Blue Horizon label. This album was also the last for Andy Sylvester, Dave Bidwell and Paul Raymond as members of Chicken Shack. It also marks a departure from pure blues to a more progressive and psychedelic sound. (by wikipedia)

This band’s fourth album, it was released in 1970 and seems to offer a prescient blend of nascent prog and heavy blues rock, where their prior outings skewed more decisively toward the latter. That it came out in 1970 and not 1971 is a big difference considering the changes in the rock scene that the next year would bring — if one had to pinpoint a moment when “rock got heavy,” even factoring in Blue Cheer‘s prior contributions, there are solid arguments to be made for ’71 — but though Chicken Shack weren’t the first to blend blues jams and more progressive and melodic flair, what with Jethro Tull around and all, Accept Chicken Shack does it with remarkable balance between the two sounds that, over the ensuing years, would only grow more and more incongruous.

Recorded with the lineup of founding guitarist/vocalist Stan Webb, bassist Andy Sylvester, keyboardist/vocalist Paul Raymond and drummer Dave Bidwell, it would be their final outing through Blue Horizon Records and after it came out, Webb would have to completely revamp the lineup after losing Sylvester, Raymond and Bidwell all to Savoy Brown.

chickenshack1969Chicken Shack live at the  Bath Festival 1969 (© Al By)

All the same, listening to the rolling start of “Diary of Your Life,” the gritty swing and harmonies of “Never Ever,” the complex structure and arrangement of “Some Other Time” — vaguely post-Beatles but grown outward — and the soft departure of “Andalucian Blues,” whatever friction there might’ve been in the band doesn’t show up in the compositions, which are more varied than some of what would follow in the UK (also a good deal of what preceded), but hit with no less impact when they choose to do so. At 35 minutes, Accept Chicken Shack leaves one wondering how anybody couldn’t with its niche blend of elements and confident execution, earning its place in that great dusty canon of heavy ’70s classics just waiting to be discovered by new generations of listeners in a vinyl shop or online. In this case, clearly the latter.

Webb has kept Chicken Shack going. Over the years he’s brought in nearly 50 players, but they still perform as Chicken Shack from time to time (seem like a good bet for the next installment of Psycho fest) and had releases out as recently as 2008. Accept Chicken Shack is more than a footnote in a larger career, however, and as you can hear in these songs, whatever came later, this lineup was able to come together to accomplish something special during their time. (by theobelisk.net)

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Personnel:
Dave Bidwell (drums)
Paul Raymond (keyboards, vocals)
Andy Sylvester (bass)
Stan Webb (guitar, vocals)

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Tracklist:

01. Diary Of Your Life (Webb) 3.06
02. Pocket (Webb/Raymond) 3.23
03. Never Ever (Webb/Raymond) 2.43
04. Sad Clown (Webb/Raymond) 3.41
05. Maudie (Webb/Raymond) 2.54
06. Telling Your Fortune (Webb) 4.23
07. Tired Eyes (Webb) 2.06
08. Some Other Time (Webb/Raymond) 3.06
09. Going Round (Webb/Raymond) 2.32
10. Andalucian Blues (Webb/Raymond) 2.21
11. You Knew You Did You Did (Webb) 2.26
12. She Didn’t Use Her Loaf (unknown) 4.12
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13. Maudie (single version) (Webb/Raymond) 3.01

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German single version of Maudi b/w Andalucian Blues