Manfred Mann – The Five Faces Of (1964)

FrontCover1The Five Faces of Manfred Mann is the first studio album by British beat/R&B group Manfred Mann. It was first released in the United Kingdom on 11 September 1964 by His Master’s Voice. In late October/early November, the album was released in Canada by Capitol Records. The Canadian track listing was almost the same as the UK version, except it included the hit “Do Wah Diddy Diddy” instead of “I’ve Got My Mojo Working”. The record has been called “one of the great blues-based British invasion albums; it’s a hot, rocking record that benefits from some virtuoso playing as well”.

The American version of the album (their second U.S. release following The Manfred Mann Album) was released in February 1965 by Ascot Records (a subsidiary of United Artists) with a very different track listing.

The songs on the original version of the Five Faces of Manfred Mann are R&B, including the band’s cover versions of Howlin’ Wolf’s “Smokestack Lightning”, Muddy Waters’ “Got My Mojo Working”, and Bo Diddley’s “Bring It to Jerome”, as well as a few of the group’s own jazzy compositions. Particularly noticeable in the instrumental sections are Manfred Mann’s keyboard work, Mike Vickers flute and saxophone work, and Mike Hugg’s vibes. The album includes the Cannonball Adderley song “Sack O’ Woe” from the R&B-influenced school of early 60s jazz .

The American release is more pop-oriented with the inclusion of the hits “Sha-La-La”, “Hubble Bubble Toil and Trouble” and “Come Tomorrow”; as well as Jones’ compositions and the American folk song “John Hardy”. It also includes a smaller selection of the band’s R&B and jazz influences. (by wikipedia)

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The debut album by Manfred Mann holds up even better 40 years on than it did in 1964. It’s also one of the longest LPs of its era, clocking in at 39 minutes, and there’s not a wasted note or a song extended too far among its 14 tracks. The Manfreds never had the reputation that the Rolling Stones enjoyed, which is a shame, because The Five Faces of Manfred Mann is one of the great blues-based British invasion albums; it’s a hot, rocking record that benefits from some virtuoso playing as well, and some of the best singing of its era, courtesy of Paul Jones, who blew most of his rivals out of the competition with his magnificently impassioned, soulful performance on “Untie Me,” and his simmering, lusty renditions of “Smokestack Lightning” and “Bring It to Jerome.” The stereo mix of the album, which never surfaced officially in England until this 1997 EMI anniversary reissue (remastered in 24-bit digital sound), holds up very nicely, with sharp separation between the channels yet — apart from a few moments on “Untie Me” — few moments of artificiality. (by Bruce Eder)

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Personnel:
Mike Hugg (drums, vibraphone)
Paul Jones (vocals, harmonica, maracas)
Manfred Mann (keyboards)
Tom McGuinness (bass)
Mike Vickers (guitar, flute, saxophone)

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Tracklist:
01. Smokestack Lightning (Burnett) 3.33
02. Don’t Ask Me What I Say (Jones) 3.02
03. Sack O’ Woe (Adderley) 2.10
04. What You Gonna Do? (Jones/Mann) 2.39
05. Hoochie Coochie (Dixon) 3.20
06. I’m Your Kingpin (Mann/Jones) 2.49
07. Down the Road Apiece (Raye) 2.27
08. Got My Mojo Working (Preston Foster; credited to Muddy Waters) 3.13
09. It’s Gonna Work Out Fine (Seneca/Lee) 2.37
10. Mr. Anello (Hugg/Jones/Mann/McGuinness/Vickers) 2.09
11. Untie Me (South) 3.39
12. Bring It To Jerome (Green) 3.27
13. Without You (Jones) 2.22
14. You’ve Got To Take It”(Jones) 2.17
+
15. Smokestack Lightning (alternate version) (Burnett) 2.54
16. What You Gonna Do? (mono version) (Jones/Mann) 2.39
17. Sack O’ Woe (instrumental version) (Adderley) 2.09
18. Mr. Anello(instrumental version) (Hugg/Jones/Mann/McGuinness/Vickers) 2.09

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The Pretty Things – Same (1965)

FrontCover1The Pretty Things is the self-titled 1965 release by The Pretty Things, which features mostly R&B and rock and roll cover versions.
The liner notes were written by Jimmy Duncan and Bryan Morrison.
The Pretty Things’ debut LP was a legendary exercise in anarchy — 30 minutes into the two days’ worth of sessions, their original producer, Jack Baverstock (the head of the label, no less), walked out, and was eventually replaced by a slightly more sympathetic personality in the hopes of salvaging something from the efforts of the band, who, whatever their shortcomings in decorum or sobriety, were on their third successive charting single. The resulting album, made under the coordination (if not control) of drummer-turned-producer Bobby Graham, made the early work of the Rolling Stones — rivals and one-time bandmates to the Pretty Things’ Dick Taylor — sound more like the work of the Beatles: very calculated, lightweight, and…genteel. The Pretty Things is recorded with practically every song and instrument pushing the needle into the red (i.e., overload). Normally, that would be a problem, except for the fact that a third of the repertory was written by Bo Diddley and most of the other two-thirds was inspired by him (even their version of Chuck Berry’s “Oh Baby Doll” sounds like it was lifted from the Two Great Guitars sessions where the two legends crossed swords) — and Bo spent most of his career with his amplifiers set on “11” in a world where ten was the max.

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“Roadrunner” is about as raw and loud as British rock & roll ever got up to that time, and it’s just the beginning — “Judgement Day” has a lead guitar buried somewhere in there, beneath rhythm instruments that sound like metal being ground up, and “13 Chester Street” is, strangely enough, an homage to the house the band once shared with the Stones’ Brian Jones; appropriately enough, it mixes the band’s crunchy rhythm guitar-centered sound with a Slim Harpo-style lead (all of the stuff that Jones was identified with musically), in a group “composition” that shimmers and pulses around Phil May’s dissolute vocals. “Big City” takes them back to Chess Records territory, from which they never stray — “Mama, Keep Your Big Mouth Shut” even sounds like a Chess outtake, what Leonard Chess would’ve said needed one more pass to get right (and he’d have been wrong). And just to show that there is some justice in the world,
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The Pretty Things did reach number ten on the U.K. charts, bewildering all of the more “professional” hands at Fontana Records by grabbing the ears of that harder, more intense part of the Stones’ larger audience and throwing them the sonic equivalent of raw meat to chew on. Phil May reveals himself as a fairly powerful singer, though lacking some of the charisma that Mick Jagger projected, but the group’s own raw power made for quirky appeal all of its own that would carry them for many years beyond this roaring start. And in the meantime, records like this would point the way not only toward the work of such American garage band icons as the MC5, but blast a path through the wilderness that the likes of Billy Childish and his band the Milkshakes and their successors would traverse. (by Bruce Eder)
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Personnel:
Phil May (vocals)
Brian Pendleton (guitar)
Viv Prince (drums)
Dick Taylor (guitar)
John Stax (bass)
+
Bobby Graham (drums)
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Tracklist:
01. Road Runner(McDaniel) 3.12
02. Judgement Day (Morrison) 2.47
03. 13 Chester Street (May/Taylor/Pendleton/Stax/Prince) 2.22
04. Big City (Duncan/Klein) 2.02
05. Unknown Blues (May/Taylor/Pendleton/Stax/Prince) 3.48
06. Mama, Keep Your Big Mouth Shut (McDaniel) 3.04
07. Honey, I Need (Taylor/Warburton/Smith/Stirling) 2.00
08. Oh, Baby Doll (Berry) 3.01
09. She’s Fine, She’s Mine (McDaniel) 4.24
10. Don’t Lie To Me (Red) 3.53
11. The Moon Is Rising (Reed) 2.33
12. Pretty Thing (Dixon) 1.39
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Supercharge – Between Music And Madness (1974)

originalfrontcover1Supercharge were a 1970s English rock band from Liverpool, founded by singer/saxophonist Albie Donnelly and drummer Dave Irving. They had a number three hit single in Australia with “You’ve Gotta Get Up and Dance” in 1977.
Founded in early 1974, by Liverpool tenor-saxophonist, Albie Donnelly (born Albert Edward Donnelly, 12 August 1947, Huyton, Liverpool), and drummer Dave Irving (born David Geddes Irving, 18 November 1946, Crosby, Liverpool) after they had both left the ‘In Crowd’ cabaret band, Supercharge soon built up quite a cult following in Liverpool at ‘The Sportsman’, a popular city-centre pub on Sunday and later Monday nights and also at the ‘Dove and Olive’ at Speke.
Original members included Donnelly (bandleader, vocalist, and tenor saxophonist), Ozzie Yue (guitar/vocals) (born Austin J Yue, 12 August 1947, Liverpool), Allen ‘Gaz’ Gaskell (tenor sax, guitar, harmonica, and vocals), Alan Peters (trumpet), Bob Robertson (baritone sax), Pete Newton (bass guitar), Tony Dunmore (bass) and Dave Irving (drums).
Supercharge also quickly established themselves as a major player on the UK college / university circuit. Their first album Between Music and Madness, which was locally produced, soon followed.
Around 1975, in an attempt to attract a major record label offer, Supercharge began to gig regularly on the London live circuit at venues such as the Hope and Anchor, Islington, the Nashville Rooms, and the Marquee Club. As a result, Supercharge were soon signed by Supercharge02Virgin Records, and with the company’s new record producer, Robert “Mutt” Lange, they had a number three hit in Australia with their 1976 single “You’ve Gotta Get Up and Dance”. Personnel on these recordings also included organist Iain Bradshaw. It was also in Australia that their first album, Local Lads Make Good went gold – resulting in a number of successful major tours with a version of the band that included Les Karski on guitar.
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These live UK gigs often featured celebrated live sound engineer Chrys Lindop, and included the infamous comedy track ‘She Moved The Dishes First’, which Donnelly claims they wrote so they could mess about a bit while the band were replacing broken guitar strings. This track also achieved notoriety when it was picked up and played regularly by Radio Caroline.
Meanwhile, back in the UK, although their record sales were disappointing, Supercharge still managed to achieve a reputation as one of the UK’s best live bands. This included Supercharge’s opening set for Queen at the 1976 Hyde Park Festival. However, it was becoming clear to Donnelly that Virgin did not really know what to do with them, and they eventually parted company sometime during the punk era.
Despite their reputation as a killer band live, Richard Branson decided that after two albums without major success that he would only offer Donnelly / Karski a continuous deal. The rest of the band became redundant, and ironically months later the ‘Local lads’ album went gold in Australia. However, the deed had been done, and Donnelly resorted to taking a scratch band to do the hit tour in Australia much to the chagrin of the original guys who had put all the hard studio and roadwork in to get the band where it was.
Success in Europe.(by Wikipedia)
And this is their phenomenal debut Album … a timeless classic ! Feel the power and the energy of Supercharge !
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Personnel:
Albie Donnelly (Saxophone, vocals)
Tony Dunmore (bass)
Dave Irving (drums)
Alan Peters (trumpet, flugelhorn, vocals)
Bob Robertson Saxophone, guitar, vocals)
Ozzie Yue (guitar, vocals)
+
Vinnie Parker (piano on 06. + 11.)
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Tracklist:

01. Tune, Gap, Clap, Fig (Donnelly) 1.15
02. Still Alive And Well (Derringer) 3.21
03. Doggone (Tarplin/Robinson/Moore) 4.29
04. Give It Up (Kool And The Gang) 4.54
05. Midnight (Donnelly/Irving/Yue) 5.02
06. Lazy Lady (Peters) 4.46
07. Superstition (Wonder) 4.32
08. New York (Dreams) 5.59
09. Blessed Relief (Zappa) 5.08
10. Troubled Soul (Peters) 5.20
11. Wine, Wine, Wine (Donnelly/Yue) 4.06
12  Fig, Chat, Feet, Slam, Bang (Donnelly) 1.13
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Eric Burdon And The Animals – Roadrunners! Rare Live And Studio Recordings (1990)

front-cover1Eric’s at his wild best in these rare recordings-many never heard by even the most ardent Animals collector! Four tracks are British radio broadcasts from ’66, one is from German TV in ’67; the rest are all live, from Monterey in ’67, London in ’67 (including Inside Looking Out ) and Stockholm in ’68 ( San Franciscan Nights; Monterey , and more). And the rarest of the rare: six live cuts from Melbourne, Australia in ’67, including See See Rider and When I Was Young .
This is a mixed bag of live and BBC recordings from both the post-Alan Price edition of the original band, and the later New Animals of “San Franciscan Nights” fame. Sound quality varies, but the obscurity of these tracks more than compensates. The Beeb tracks include one Price number, a faithful rendition of “Heartbreak Hotel.” Other highlights include gritty takes on “Inside Looking Out” and “Maudie” plus a fantastic version of “Jailhouse Rock” that comes within shouting distance of Elvis (honestly!). Barry Jenkins almost steals the show with his knockout drumming, and Zoot Money’s organ washes are utterly scintillating. There’s also a raw set culled from the New Animals’ tour of Australia, highlighted by spirited versions of standards like “Shake Rattle and Roll” and “See See Rider.” The version of “When I Was Young” is also strong and the groovy radio announcer at the end is a trip. Burdon’s Monterey appearance is showcased in a pair of freakout versions of “Ginhouse Blues” and “Hey Gyp”, both of which are way too long and too self-indulgent. This is the weakest part of the album by far. New Animals fans will adore the 1968 tracks from Stockholm which feature the band at its psychedelic apex. As goofy as it sounds on WINDS OF CHANGE, “Yes I’m Experienced” really rocks on stage (especially the killer feedback rave up—and Eric’s rap at the end is hilarious), and the other tracks (“Paint It Black”, “San Franciscan Nights” and “Monterey”) are faithful, though edgier recreations of the group’s studio versions. Vic Briggs always claims the band was much better on stage than in the studio and this set backs him up, mainly because Burdon’s often wearying improvisations are kept to a reasonable minimum. Grab it if you dig Burdon’s post-1966 work (although Glen A. Baker’s liner notes are so fawning they’re worthless).(by an amazon customer

booklet01aPersonnel:
Various Animals line-ups

booklet03aTracklist:

Broadcasts:
BBC 1966:

01. Heartbreak Hotel (Axton/Durden) 2.40
02. The Work Song (Adderley/Brown) 2.52
03. Corrina Corrina (Traditional) 2.46
04. Jailhouse Rock (Leiber/Stoller) 2.52

German TV 1967:
05. Roadrunner (McDaniel) 2.53

Concerts:
Monterey 1967:
06. Gin House Blues (Troy/Henderson) 5.51
07. Hey Gyp (Dig The Slowness) (Leitch) 8.24

Festival Hall, Melbourne, 1967:
08. Shake, Rattle & Roll (Calhoun) 4.25
09. When I Was Young (Burdon/Briggs/Weider/Jenkins/McCulloch) 3.15
10. See See Rider (Rainey) 4.02
11. Rock Me Baby (King/Josea) 2.36
12. Tobacco Road (Loudermilk) 5.37
13. So Long (Burdon/Briggs/Weider/Jenkins/McCulloch) 3.46

Live London, 1967:
14. Inside Looking Out (L.Lomax/A.Lomax/Burdon/Chandler) 3.04
15. Maudie (Hooker) 4.15

Live Stockholm, 1968:
16. San Franciscan Nights (Burdon/Briggs/Weider/Jenkins/McCulloch) 4.33
17. Monterey (Burdon/Briggs/Weider/Jenkins/McCulloch) 6.16
18. Paint It Black (Jagger/Richards) 6.28

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Supercharge – Full Power (1990)

FrontCover1Supercharge were a 1970s English rock band from Liverpool, founded by singer/saxophonist Albie Donnelly and drummer Dave Irving. They had a number three hit single in Australia with “You’ve Gotta Get Up and Dance” in 1977.

Founded in early 1974, by Liverpool tenor-saxophonist, Albie Donnelly (born Albert Edward Donnelly, 12 August 1947, Huyton, Liverpool), and drummer Dave Irving (born David Geddes Irving, 18 November 1946, Crosby, Liverpool) after they had both left the ‘In Crowd’ cabaret band, Supercharge soon built up quite a cult following in Liverpool at ‘The Sportsman’, a popular city-centre pub on Sunday and later Monday nights and also at the ‘Dove and Olive’ at Speke.

Original members included Donnelly (bandleader, vocalist, and tenor saxophonist), Ozzie Yue (guitar/vocals) (born Austin J Yue, 12 August 1947, Liverpool), Allen ‘Gaz’ Gaskell (tenor sax, guitar, harmonica, and vocals), Alan Peters (trumpet), Bob Robertson (baritone sax), Pete Newton (bass guitar), Tony Dunmore (bass) and Dave Irving (drums).

Supercharge also quickly established themselves as a major player on the UK college / university circuit. Their first album Between Music and Madness, which was locally produced, soon followed.

Around 1975, in an attempt to attract a major record label offer, Supercharge began to gig regularly on the London live circuit at venues such as the Hope and Anchor, Islington, the Nashville Rooms, and the Marquee Club. As a result, Supercharge were soon signed by Supercharge02Virgin Records, and with the company’s new record producer, Robert “Mutt” Lange, they had a number three hit in Australia with their 1976 single “You’ve Gotta Get Up and Dance”. Personnel on these recordings also included organist Iain Bradshaw. It was also in Australia that their first album, Local Lads Make Good went gold – resulting in a number of successful major tours with a version of the band that included Les Karski on guitar.

These live UK gigs often featured celebrated live sound engineer Chrys Lindop, and included the infamous comedy track ‘She Moved The Dishes First’, which Donnelly claims they wrote so they could mess about a bit while the band were replacing broken guitar strings. This track also achieved notoriety when it was picked up and played regularly by Radio Caroline.

Meanwhile, back in the UK, although their record sales were disappointing, Supercharge still managed to achieve a reputation as one of the UK’s best live bands. This included Supercharge’s opening set for Queen at the 1976 Hyde Park Festival. However, it was becoming clear to Donnelly that Virgin did not really know what to do with them, and they eventually parted company sometime during the punk era.

Despite their reputation as a killer band live, Richard Branson decided that after two albums without major success that he would only offer Donnelly / Karski a continuous deal. The rest of the band became redundant, and ironically months later the ‘Local lads’ album went gold in Australia. However, the deed had been done, and Donnelly resorted to taking a scratch band to do the hit tour in Australia much to the chagrin of the original guys who had put all the hard studio and roadwork in to get the band where it was.
Success in Europe.

Supercharge01
The next chapter in Supercharge’s history was the invasion of Europe, which began at the end of the 1970s-early 1980s. By now the band also featured Andy Parker on vocals and saxophone. Other members (at one time or another) included Mike Snow – trumpet; Dick Hansen – trumpet; John Burke – trumpet Tony Winders – guitar; Phil Loughran – guitar; Tony Judge – piano; Steve Snow – trombone; Paul Ambrosius – bass/vocals; Dave Dover – bass; Kenny Shearer – bass; Dave ‘The Frug’ Hormbrey – drums; Tony Lunney – drums. Albums during this early period included, Now Jump, and Kingsize.

In late 1983, the Liverpool band Juke (Allen ‘Gaz’ Gaskell – tenor saxophone, guitar, harmonica, bass, vocals; Mickey Kearns – baritone sax; guitar; vocals; Bob Hardy – bandleader, keyboards, guitar, vocals; Dave Sheppley – guitar, bass, vocals; Paddy Chambers – guitar, vocals; Steve Grant – drums, vocal) struck a deal with Donnelly and his then manager, “Memo” Rhein, to work together for the next twelve months as Supercharge ’84. This version of the band was so successful that at the end of 1984, Donnelly and Rhein persuaded them to stay on for a further five months.

During the time that Juke and Donnelly were together they managed to clock up well over 200 gigs. Many of these were for Europe’s ‘Jet-Set’, and included the wedding of Tina Onassis (which resulted in the 1984 album Groovers In Paris – which is still Supercharge’s top selling rhythm and blues album). Gigs also included parties for Gunter Sachs at the Dracula’ Club in St. Moritz; and a New Year’s Eve party in Marbella for Adnan Khashoggi.
Mid 1980s

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The next version of Supercharge began performing live in mid-1985, and moved away from the successful horn driven ‘Rhythm and Blues-Maximum Show’ format of Supercharge ’84, and instead featured material written mainly by guitarist/vocalist Colin Frost and pianist Tony Judge. This version of the band also included bassist Brendan O’Connor.

In 1986/7, guitarist Dave Shepley (who had been a member of Juke and had switched to bass in Supercharge ’84) and guitarist/vocalist John “Fat Ted” Lewis, helped Donnelly to once again convert Supercharge into a major player on the late 1980s and early 1990s European Jazz and Rhythm and Blues live-scene.

This powerhouse rhythm and blues version of Supercharge (which at various times included: Andy Parker – vocal and tenor saxophone; Steve Snow – trombone; Dick Hansen – trumpet Tony Peers – trumpet; Paul Latham – trombone; Graham Price – bass; John “Fat Ted” Lewis – guitar and vocal; Roy “The Boy” Herrington – guitar; Dave Sheppley- guitar; Lenni Zaksen – tenor saxophone; Terry Kennaugh – guitar; Mal Bowers – keyboards; Paul Hetherington – bass; Tony Lunney – drums) quickly began to pick up a number of major tours with artists such as Chuck Berry and B.B. King, and this soon took the band back to stadiums and bigger concert hall gigs, where they still perform.

Nashville keyboard-player and vocalist Greg Barrett joined in the late 1980s and demonstrated a more soulful side of Supercharge. This version of the band usually included Greg Barrett – keyboards, vocal; Albie Donnelly – tenor saxophone; Paul Owens – baritone saxophone; Dick Hansen – trumpet; Roy “The Boy” Herrington – guitar; Wolfgang “Bolle” Diekmann – bass; Tony Lunney – drums.

Donnelly also began experimenting with smaller outfits around this time, the most popular being Albie Donnelly’s Big Three which included Gregory Gaynair on piano and Wolfgang Diekmann on bass.

From 2000 to date, Donnelly is still fronting a R&B band – with a version of Supercharge that now consists mainly of a number of top German R&B musicians, including Juergen Wieching on saxophone, and Mike Rafalczyk on trombone and Wolfgang Diekmann on bass..

Donnelly also featured on a CD, Return Cargo. In addition to Supercharge regulars, the recording also features the original Supercharge drummer, Dave Irving.

Over the years Donnelly has been an official endorser for a number of saxophone companies, including Keilwerth and Yamaha; he has also provided a great deal of regular work for a number of Liverpool’s top musicians.

Supercharge06
Since 2010 the band line-up has been Albie Donnelly – alto and tenor saxophones, lead vocals; Roy Herrington – guitar, vocals; Jürgen Wieching – baritone and alto saxophones; Mike Rafalcyk – trombone, harmonica; Sascha Kühn – keyboards; Wolfgang Diekmann – bass; Uwe Petersen – drums.

Allen ‘Gaz’ Gaskell has since gone on to form Merseyside-based sextet “Jazz Junction”.(by wikipedia)

And this is one of these great R & B albumy by Suoercharge including a very strong hornsection … hot, hot hot … but with some sentimentals songs (like “That Says A Lot About You”), too …

Listen …. and you will hear some hot and dirty stuff !

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Personnel:
Steve Crane (trombone)
Albie ‘Elvis’ Donnelly (saxophone, vocals)
john ‘Fat Ted’ Lewis (guitar, vocals)
Tony Lunney (drums)
Mal Melling (trumpet, flugelhorn)
Paul Owens (saxophone, background vocals. strings on 06.)
Graham Prince (bass)
Dave B. Shepley (guitar, vocals)
+
Mal ‘Big Boy’ Bowers (accordion)
Dave ‘The Dwarf In My Dungerees’ Dover (harmonica on 05. + 06.)
‘Count’ John McCormack (bass on 06. + 13.)

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Tracklist:
01. Come On (Donnelly/Lewis/Shepley) 3.00
02. Going Too Fast (Donnelly/Lewis/Shepley) 3.00
03. Natural Ball (King) 2.36
04. Can’t Get Next To You (Whitfield/Strong) 3.59
05. We Like It That Way (Donnelly/Lewis/Shepley) 3.15
06. Fools Paradise (Brown) 3.02
07. Party Party Party (Donnelly/Lewis/Shepley) 2.57
08. Full Time Man (Donnelly/Lewis/Shepley) 3.12
09. Nothing But You (Donnelly/Lewis/Shepley) 3.21
10. That Says A Lot About You (Donnelly/Lewis/Shepley) 3.35
11. Motivate Yourself (Donnelly/Lewis/Shepley) 4.20
12. Dream Angel (Donnelly/Lewis/Shepley) 2.32
13. Blues For Jack (Lewis/Owens) 1.19
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Pretty Things – Acid Burns Live 1964 – 1969

FrontCover1Last thing I got for yas is some live cuts, “Acid Burns 1964-69″……..a hodgepodge of tracks from
various sources (TV, Radio, Concert), but really, it shows off that these guys were underappereciated and BAD ASS, and could bring the goods live as well……Slip this on and marvel at their live chops, sure as hell wish I could have been there…….these guys were badass…..if history had taken a fwe different turns they might have been the Rolling Stones……they weren’t, they were the Pretty Things, and that is that…..a  goddamn great band, blending (early-on) Stonesy-blues with (later-on) tripped out Nuggets-style psychedelia…..GREAT band, not to be overlooked…….I do not have all of their albums, this is my complete collection of their stuff…..but ya know what? They were a fucking GREAT singles band, and their psych shit stands on its own as well. A Fucking Great band that deserves more credit today than they seem to receive. Here’s to the Pretty Things, TRULY  a kickass rock n roll band! (by http://growboredbigscott62.blogspot.de)

What a great bootleg … including the monster “Midnight To Six Men”

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Personnel:
Various Pretty Things line-ups

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Tracklist:

Beat Room, BBC Television, December 24, 1964:
01. Don’t Bring Me Down (Dee) 2.20
02. Mama, Keep Your Big Mouth Shut (McDaniel) 3.16
03. Johnny B. Goode (Berry) 1.50

Live on Danish Radio, Denmark, 1965:
04. Road Runner (McDaniel) 2.14
05. Big City (Duncan/Klein) 1.43
06. Sittin’ All Alone (Taylor/Stirling/May) 2.57
07. Buzz The Jerk (Taylor/May) 1.29
08. Rainin’ In My Heart (Moore/West) 2.30

Blokker, Dutch TV, April 16, 1965:
09. Introduction 1.02
10. Honey, I Need (Taylor/Warburton/Smith) 2.50
11. Big Boss Man (Smith/Dixon) 1.62
12. Midnight To Six Man (Taylor/May) 2.13

Palais des Sports, Paris, France, June 1, 1967:
13. Children (May/Taylor) 3.04
14. Road Runner (McDaniel) 3.23
15. Reincarnation (Taylor/May) 3.53

Paradiso, Amsterdam, Netherlands, March 29, 1969:
16. Renaissance Fair (Crosby/McGuinn) 2.41
17. S.F. Sorrow Is Born (May/Taylor/Waller) 3.30

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PrettyThings2

The Yardbirds – For Your Love (1965)

FrontCover1For Your Love is the second album released by English rock band The Yardbirds, and the first released in the USA.[1] Released in June 1965, the album is a mix of US-only tracks and previously released singles compiled by Yardbirds’ producer, Giorgio Gomelsky. The album, which was released as the Yardbirds were preparing for their first American tour, reached number 96 in Billboard’s Top LPs chart.

For Your Love features three songs from Jeff Beck’s first recording sessions with the Yardbirds: “I’m Not Talking”, “I Ain’t Done Wrong”, and “My Girl Sloopy” (these songs were later released in the UK on the Five Yardbirds EP). Eric Clapton provided the guitar for the remainder of the tracks, which included the three Yardbirds singles (with B-sides) released up to that time and two demos which were not released in the UK until the 1980s (see discography for singles information). Clapton, who had left the band four months earlier, is not pictured on the album cover nor mentioned in the liner notes. (by wikipedia)

TheYardbirds01

The Yardbirds (with Eric Clapton)

Back in 1965, this album seemed like a real mess, which was understandable, because For Your Love wasn’t a “real” album, in the sense that the Yardbirds ever assembled an LP of that name or content. Rather, it was the response of their American label, Epic, to the band’s achieving a number six single with the title track, with manager Giorgio Gomelsky selecting the cuts. The quasi-progressive “For Your Love,” dominated by guest artist Brian Auger’s harpsichord, is juxtaposed with hard-rocking blues-based numbers, almost all of which featured departed lead guitarist Eric Clapton (who is mentioned nowhere on the LP), with current lead guitarist Jeff Beck on just three tracks. The Clapton cuts, although primitive next to the material he was soon to cut with John Mayall, have an intensity that’s still riveting to hear four decades later, and was some of the best blues-based rock & roll of its era. The three Beck sides show where the band was really heading, beyond the immediate success of “For Your Love” — “I’m Not Talking” and “I Ain’t Done Wrong” were hard, loud, blazing showcases for Beck’s concise blues playing, while “My Girl Sloopy” was the first extended jam to emerge on record from a band on the British blues scene; the source material isn’t ideal, but Beck and company make their point in an era where bands were seldom allowed to go more than four minutes on even an album track — these boys could play and make it count. (by Bruce Eder)

TheYardbirds02

The Yardbirds (with Jeff Beck)

Personnel:
Jeff Beck (guitar on 02., 06. + 11.)
Eric Clapton (guitar)
Chris Dreja (guitar)
Jim McCarty (drums, vocals)
Keith Relf (vocals, harmonica)
Paul Samwell-Smith (bass, vocals)
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Brian Auger – harpsichord on 01.)
Giorgio Gomelsky (background vocal on 08.)
Tom McGuinness – guitar on (09.)
Paul Jones (background vocals on 09.)
Manfred Mann (keyboards and background  vocals on 09.)
Tom McGuinness – guitar on (09.)
Denny Pierce (percussion on 01.)
Ron Prentice (bowed bass (01.)
Mike Vickers (guitar on 09.)

BackCover
Tracklist:
01. For Your Love (Gouldman) 2.31
02. I’m Not Talking  (Allison) 2.33
03. Putty (In Your Hands) (Patton/Rogers) 2.18
04. I Ain’t Got You (Carter) 2.00
05. Got To Hurry  (Gomelsky) 2.33
06. I Ain’t Done Wrong (Relf) 3.39
07. I Wish You Would (Arnold) 2.19
08. A Certain Girl”       Naomi Neville a.k.a. Allen Toussaint     2:18
09. Sweet Music (stereo) (Bowie/Cobb/Lance)  2.30
10. Good Morning Little Schoolgirl (Demarais) 2.46
11. My Girl Sloopy (Farrell/Russell) 5.38
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12. Baby, What’s Wrong (demo) (James) 2.38
13. Boom, Boom (demo) (Hooker) 2.25
14. Honey In Your Hips (demo) (Relf) 2.19
15. Talkin’ ‘Bout You (demo) (Berry) 1.56
16. I Wish You Would” (demo) (Arnold) 4.17
17. A Certain Girl (demo)     Naomi Neville a.k.a. Allen Toussaint     2:21
18. Got To Hurry (take 4) (Gomelsky) 2.35
19. Sweet Music (take 4) (Bowie/Cobb/Lance) 2.28
20. Heart Full Of Soul (demo, sitar version) (Gouldman) 1.54
10. Steeled Blues (Beck) 2.38
11. Paff Bumm (German issue) (Reverberi/Bardotti/Samwell-Smith) 2.27
12. Questa Volta (Satti/Marchetti/Mogol) 2.33
13. Paff Bum (Italian issue) (Reverberi/Bardotti/Samwell-Smith) 2.36

LabelB1* (coming soon)
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Single1