The Pretty Things – Get The Picture (1965)

LPFrontCover1.jpgGet the Picture? is the second album by the English rock group The Pretty Things, released in 1965.

Recording began on The Pretty Things’ second album in around September 1965, just months after the release of their debut. It ended up being a haphazard affair thanks to a growing problem with drummer Viv Prince whose behaviour was becoming ever more erratic and reckless. With Prince being unreliable, the band had help in the form of producer Bobby Graham who was a renowned drummer in his own right, playing on several tracks. John Stax’s flatmate John C. Alder helped out on at least two tracks, one of which was “You’ll Never Do It Baby” Jimmy Page also made a couple of cameos, receiving a partial writing credit on “You Don’t Believe Me.” The album did see the band starting to move away from the staunch R&B direction that dominated the first album, exploring more soulful areas as well as Freakbeat with much use of distortion on guitar and bass parts.

Recorded on three-track tape at Philips Studios in London, the album was only mixed in mono. By the time it was released, Viv Prince had been fired from the band. It left them without a drummer for a few weeks whilst the search was on for a replacement.

The liner notes were written by Bryan Morrison. (by wikipedia)

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The Pretty Things’ second album, Get the Picture? (released December 1965), has not only been remastered from original session tapes so the group sounds like their amps are practically right in your lap, but it’s also been expanded to 18 songs with the addition of tracks cut for singles and EP releases from the same sessions. That’s enough to recommend it even to casual fans — this is now a record that’s just a few notches short of Rolling Stones level in the charisma department, and pretty tough any way you want to look at it. On “Rainin’ in My Heart,” they sound exactly like the Stones from the same era, missing only the little harmonica flourish that might have been added on the break. The liner notes go into the history of the group during this period in delightful detail, and the histories of various songs, most particularly “L.S.D.,” which, amazingly, was cut as a demo and never redone for release, but just put out the way it was. In their good moments here, the Pretty Things approach Rolling Stones’ territory, and even in their off moments, they’re flying at the same level as the Kinks’ album tracks. (by Bruce Eder)

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The frontcover of a rare French cover from 1965

Personnel:
Bobby Graham (drums on a handful of tracks)
Phil May (vocals)
Brian Pendleton (guitar, background vocals)
Viv Prince (drums on a handful of tracks)
John Stax (bass, background vocals)

Dick Taylor (guitar)
Twink (drums on a handful of tracks)
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Skip Alan (drums on 13. – 18.)

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Tracklist:
01. You Don’t Believe Me (May/Graham/Page/Morrell) 2.22
02. Buzz The Jerk (May/Taylor) 1.54
03. Get The Picture? (May/Taylor) 1.55
04. Can’t Stand The Pain (May/Taylor/Graham) 2.40
05. Rainin’ In My Heart (Moore/West) 2.31
06. We’ll Play House (May/Taylor) 2.32
07. You’ll Never Do It, Baby (Smith/Fox) 2.27
08. I Had A Dream (Witherspoon) 2.57
09. I Want Your Love (Dee/Tarr) 2.16
10. London Town (Hardin) 2.26
11. Cry To Me (Russell) 2.51
12. Gonna Find Me A Substitute (Turner) 2.57
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13. Get A Buzz (May/Taylor/Pendleton/Stax/Alan) 4.00
14. Sittin’ All Alone (May/Taylor) 2.47
15. Midnight To Six Man (Taylor/May) 2.19
16. Me Needing You (May/Taylor) 1.57
17. Come See Me (Tubbs/Jackson/Barnes) 2.39
18. L.S.D. (May/Taylor) 2.25
Multimedia Bonus Track – The Pretty Things 1966 movie

(“Midnight To Six Man”, “Me Needing You”, “Come See Me” and “L.S.D.” were produced by Glyn Johns)

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I never see
The people I know
In the bright light of day
So how can I say

That you’re any friend of mine
(See you anytime)
I’m feelin’ fine
(Midnight ’til six)
That’s my time
(That’s your time)

Midnight, midnight ’til six…

I sleep through the day
I wake around four
But I always feel down
Never get off the floor

‘Til the night comes around
(See you downtown)
Take in some sounds
(Maybe we’ll score)
Tell me some more
(Tell him some more)

(See you down town)
Take in some sounds
(Maybe we’ll score)
Tell me some more
(Tell him some more)

Midnight, midnight ’til six…

 

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Alan Price – The Price To Play (1966)

LPFrontCover1Alan Price (born 19 April 1942) is an English musician, best known as the original keyboardist for the British band the Animals and for his subsequent solo work.

Price was born in Fatfield, Washington, County Durham, and was educated at Jarrow Grammar School, South Tyneside. He is a self-taught musician and was a founding member of the Tyneside group “The Alan Price Rhythm and Blues Combo”, which was later renamed the Animals. His organ-playing on songs by the Animals, such as “The House of the Rising Sun”, “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood” and “Bring It On Home to Me” was a key element in the group’s success.

After leaving the Animals, Price went on to have success on his own with his own band the Alan Price Set and later with Georgie Fame. He introduced the songs of Randy Newman to a wider audience. Later, he appeared on his own television show as well as achieving success with film scores, including winning critical acclaim for his musical contribution to the 1973 film O Lucky Man! as well as writing the score to the stage musical Andy Capp. Price has also acted in films and television productions.

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The Price to Play is an album released in 1966 by singer songwriter Alan Price.

Debut album from Alan Price & The Alan Price Set (released in the U.K. only, although some tracks would come out in the U.S.) is a rather routine set of club R&B/soul. Fronting a six-piece that includes three horns, Price sticks mostly to covers of familiar American tunes like “Mercy Mercy,” “Ain’t That Peculiar,” “I Can’t Turn You Loose” and “Barefootin'”. (by wikipedia)

Price’s first album (released in the U.K. only, although some tracks would come out in the U.S.) is a rather routine set of club R&B/soul. Fronting a six-piece that includes three horns, Price sticks mostly to covers of familiar American tunes like “Mercy Mercy,” “Ain’t That Peculiar,” “I Can’t Turn You Loose,” and “Barefootin'” on this amiable, but hardly remarkable, set. Price’s voice is appealing, but lacks power, and in all it sounds like a clump of covers ground out hurriedly to get an album on the market. Georgie Fame did this kind of thing better, though Price’s approach isn’t as jazz-oriented.  (by Richie Unterberger)

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Personnel:
Clive Burrows (saxophone)
Steve Gregory (saxophone)
Pete Kirtley (guitar)
“Little” Roy Mills (drums)
Alan Price (keyboards, vocals)
Rod “Boots” Slade (bass)
John Walters (trumpet)

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Tracklist:
01. Barefootin’ (Parker) 4.37
02. Just Once In My Life (Goffin/King/Spector) 3.27
03. Goin’ Down Slow (Jimmy) 4.46
04. Getting Mighty Crowded (McCoy) 2.16
05. Honky Tonk (Butler/Doggett/Scott/Shepherd) 4.41
06. Move On Drifter (Washington) 2.30
07. Mercy, Mercy (Covay) 3.10
08. Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever (Hunter/Wonder) 2.46
09. Ain’t That Peculiar (Moore/Robinson/Rogers/Tarplin) 3.23
10. I Can’t Turn You Loose (Redding) 2.25
11. Critic’s Choice (Nelson) 2.02
12. Hi-Lili, Hi-Lo (Deutsch/Kaper) 2.50

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Cyril Davies (feat. Alexis Korner) – The Legendary Cyril Davies Album (1970)

FrontCover1Cyril Davies (23 January 1932 – 7 January 1964) was an English blues musician, and one of the first blues harmonica players in England.

Born at St Mildred’s, 15 Hawthorn Drive, Willowbank, Denham, Buckinghamshire, he was the son of William Albert Davies, a labourer, and his wife Margaret Mary (née Jones). He had an elder brother named Glyn, and the family is believed to have come from Wales.

Cyril Davies began his career in the early 1950s first within Steve Lane’s Southern Stompers, then in 1955 formed an acoustic skiffle and blues group with Alexis Korner. He began as a banjo and 12-string guitar player before becoming a Chicago-style blues harmonica player after hearing Little Walter. Working by day as a panel beater, he ran an unsuccessful skiffle club before meeting Korner, then Davies and Korner opened a London Rhythm and Blues club “England’s Firstest and Bestest Skiffle Club”, later known as the “London Blues and Barrelhouse Club”. Popular with other musicians, the club hosted gigs by blues musicians such as Muddy Waters, Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee and Memphis Slim.

During this period Davies and Korner worked as session musicians, and often backed Ottilie Patterson during her featured set with husband Chris Barber’s band, using amplified instruments for the first time – which did not go down well with their blues purist audience and many fellow musicians. After closing the blues club, Davies and Korner went their separate ways, and, influenced by Muddy Waters electric sound, Davies formed his own electric blues band.

In 1961, Chris Barber recruited Davies and Korner to play harmonica and electric guitar in accompanying Barber’s band regularly at its Wednesday and Friday night sets at the Marquee Club, a popular London jazz club. This opportunity granted Davies and Korner some exposure to the London music scene, but the duo wished to focus more on blues and R&B. The two decided to found their own rhythm and blues group and, in a show of support, Barber offered them the intermission slot at the Marquee on Wednesday nights.

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Korner supplied musicians for the rhythm sections, and Davies recruited Art Wood and Long John Baldry to be the vocalists. They named the group Blues Incorporated, and their initial performances at the Marquee were very well received. However, they realized the need for additional performance opportunities and, since most jazz and folk clubs in London were wary of electric guitars, Davies and Korner decided to found their own club at which they could perform. In 1962 they founded the Ealing Club, which featured performances by both Blues Incorporated and other Trad jazz outfits popular in England at the time. The club proved to be a popular sensation in the burgeoning R&B scene, and attracted such far-flung admirers and future stars as Mick Jagger and Eric Burdon. Jagger was in the audience for the second night at the club and got up to sing “Got My Mojo Working”.

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In June 1962 they recorded R&B from the Marquee,[4] actually recorded in Decca Records’ studio. After touring the UK and headlining a residency at the Marquee,[2] by October 1962 there was musical tension in the band as some members wanted to play crowd pleasers like Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley songs while Cyril Davies and others members were blues purists who wanted to play what they saw as only genuine Chicago-style R&B.[5][6] Following his departure from Blues Incorporated in October 1962, Davies then formed the Cyril Davies All-Stars[7] in November 1962 and recorded five tracks for Pye Records, who had announced an R&B label featuring music imported from Davies’ favourite Chicago musicians (“Country Line Special”, “Chicago Calling”, “Preaching the Blues”, “Sweet Mary” and “Someday Baby”). The original line-up was largely recruited from Screaming Lord Sutch’s Savages, and featured both Long John Baldry and Davies on vocals to give Davies room to play harmonica. The band, later known simply as the All-Stars was subject to frequent personnel changes.

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After contracting pleurisy in 1963, Davies began to drink heavily to assuage the pain while undergoing a heavy touring schedule. He died in January 1964,[9] after collapsing during an engagement at a night club on Eel Pie Island, Twickenham in London.[10] The official cause of death was given as endocarditis,[11] although leukaemia is often quoted. The core band was taken over by Long John Baldry and formed the basis of his ‘Hoochie Coochie Men’.

In October 2014 the compilation entitled Preachin’ The Blues: The Cyril Davies Memorial Album was finally released on GVC Records (GVC2040) in Great Britain. (by wikipedia)

Early in the morning of January 8th, 1964, I received a telephone call from John Martin: “I’m sorry to be the one who has to tell you this, John, but Cyril died last night.” Cyril had been taken to hospital at six in the evening and within five hours was dead. I just could not believe it – he had been ill for some months, that I knew, but the suddenness of his death threw me. Some days before, as we were crossing the footbridge from our old stamping ground Eel Pie Island, he had said something that flashed back into my mind at that moment. “You know, John, I think this will be the last time I’ll walk on this bridge”.

As it happened, that particular evening at the Island was to be his last public appearance.

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The first time I ever met Cyril Davies was a few weeks before the earliest tracks on this album were recorded. I was only a young kid just out of school at that time, just playing guitar and singing a little and very much in love with the blues. Although I had been listening to records by Bill Broonzy, and Muddy Waters among others since I was twelve, I had never heard English people playing and singing the blues until the evening I walked into the Roundhouse (the pub in Soho, not Arnold Wesker’s ex-railway turntable shed) and heard Cyril and Alexis Korner. I used to go every Thursday evening and they would invite me to join them on the piece of lino between the piano and the bar, which served as the bandstand, encouraging me in my desire to be part of the blues scene. Those were great days, because apart from Cyril, Alex and myself performing, there were visits to the club by Big Bill, Muddy, Memphis Slim, Otis Spann, Ramblin’ Jack Elliot and Derroll Adams and many more.

Of course, Cyril was better known then as a twelve-string guitarist than as a harmonica player. But later, in the days of the “Blues Incorporated” and the All Stars”, he never played guitar on stage, so naturally became absolutely identified with harmonica. I have always thought it a great pity that his guitar playing was never utilized on his recordings for Decca and Pye. However, this situation can now be rectified as we listen to this collection of memorable recordings thanks to Doug Dobell.

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As I listen, I look back and think of the little black Alsatian Uschi (still alive and well and monstrous in Kent) that he gave me from the litter of his scrapyard watchdog Kim. The entire barful of dockers on Teesside for whom he bought drinks all night. The inimitable way he curbed a tribal civil war in the back of a Timpson’s coach outside Middlesbrough Infirmary. My sudden arrival back to sobriety one night in Burslem with a well-aimed harmonica hurled at my head from the stage. But there’s not enough room on this sleeve to tell it all. Perhaps Doug might let me record an album one day so that I can tell you the WHOLE story of the Legendary Cyril Davies. (by Long John Baldry, taken from the originaL liner notes)

It´s time to honour Cyril Davies, one of the first blues man in UK. Listn !

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Personnel:
Cyril Davies (guitar, vocals, harmonica)
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Jeff Bradford (mandolin, kazoo, guitar on 06. + 12.)
Mike Collins (washboard on 02., 10. + 11)
Alexis Korner (guitar, mandolin, vocals on 02., 03., 05., 08. – 11.
Terry Plant (bass on 02., 05., 10. + 11.)
Lisa Turner (banjo, vocals on 06 . + 12.)
Reg Turner (jug on 06. + 12.)

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Tracklist:
01 Leaving Blues (Ledbetter) 3.15
02- Roundhouse Stomp (Johnson) 2.53
03. Rotten Break (Taylor) 3.48
04. K.C. Moan (Blackman) 2.54
05. Skip To My Lou (Traditional) 1.54
06. It’s The Same Old Thing (Shade) 2.19
07. Alberta (Leadbelly) 2.43
08. Hesitation Blues (Handy) 2.29
09. Ella Speed (Traditional) 2.58
10. Good Morning (Leadbelly) 2.36
11. Boll Weevil (Brownwell) 3.25
12. Short Legs Shuffle (Bradford) 2.34

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The Animals – Live At Ed Sullivan (1964 – 1966)

FrontCover1The Animals had hit the ground running with “House of the Rising Sun”, which topped the US and UK charts in 1964. Bob Dylan had previously recorded the folk song about a brothel in New Orleans, but the Animals took it to Number One. This song was the perfect vehicle for their powerful take on rhythm and blues, highlighted by Eric Burdon’s gritty howl. The quintet was made up of lead singer Burdon, Hilton Valentine on guitar, Alan Price on keyboards, Bryan “Chas” Chandler on bass, and John Steel on the drums.

The boys first appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show on October 18th 1964. With young girls screaming their lungs out, The Animals took the audience hostage as they played “I’m Crying” followed by their #1 hit “House of the Rising Sun.” The audience got so out of control that Sullivan had to shush them several times.

Eric Burden remembers, “I was making my way to CBS one time to do The Sullivan Show, and I ran down this back alley and got cornered and I had to get rescued by a couple of New York cops, and the kids were so wild, one cop lost his badge and his cap and his gun, I think, and the other one backed into a corner and he had a night stick, and he put the night stick across this doorway, and I was in the doorway. And the hounds were like this, and the door under the pressure just gave in, and I fell in through the door and landed in somebody’s front room.”

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For their second appearance on January 24, 1965 The Animals performed “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood.” These early shows recorded some of The Animals best performances as they energetically charged the audience. Although Burdon’s singing was emotionally raw, he came off as shy and somewhat awkward.

During 1965, they did two more Sullivan shows, singing “Bright Lights Big City,” “Bring it Home to Me” and “The Work Song.” On February 6, 1966 they again appeared, and performed the hit “We Gotta Get Out of This Place” and “Inside Looking Out.” For their last appearance on August 14th 1966, they sang Sam Cooke’s “Shake” and “Don’t Bring Me Down.” But by this time, they had begun to disintegrate.

The original lineup of the group only recorded three albums, yet nevertheless managed to break out eight Top 40 hits between 1964 and 1966. Price left in 1965, and Steel the following year. Also in 1966, Chandler left to start managing talent, and it was he who discovered Jimi Hendrix in Greenwich Village. Now a very different group, they were known as Eric Burdon & The Animals, and had six additional Top 40 hits before finally disbanding in 1968.

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After a few unsuccessful attempts at reunions, The Animals got together for their induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994. In 1996, Chandler died in his sleep from a heart attack, and Rowberry died of heart failure in 2003. The Ed Sullivan Show remains an integral part of the group’s history. In a recent interview with The Examiner, Burdon recalls The Ed Sullivan Show as “Long hours of continuous rehearsals, but if you didn’t do the show, you went nowhere. It seems like he liked us. We were invited back to the show many times. Six appearances in all.” (by edsullivan.com)

And here ar six songs from this legendary perio of The Animals …

Listen and enjoy this fucking good band from Newcastle/UK.

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Personnel:
Eric Burdon (vocals)
Bryan “Chas” Chandler (bass)
Alan Price (keyboards)
John Steel (drums)
Hilton Valentine (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. The House of the Rising Sun (Traditional) 3.12
02. Don’t Bring Me Down (Goffin/King) 2.23
03. Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood (Benjamin/Caldwell/Marcus) 2.25
04. Baby Please Don’t Go (Williams) 2.32
05. We’ve Gotta Get Out of This Place (Mann/Weil) 2.13
06. Inside Looking Out (J.Lomax/A.Lomax/Burdon/Chandler) 2.53

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In this dirty old part of the city
Where the sun refused to shine
People tell me there ain’t no use in tryin’
Now my girl you’re so young and pretty
And one thing I know is true
You’ll be dead before your time is due, I know
Watch my daddy in bed a-dyin’
Watched his hair been turnin’ grey
He’s been workin’ and slavin’ his life away
Oh yes I know it
(Yeah!) He’s been workin’ so hard
(Yeah!) I’ve been workin’ too, baby
(Yeah!) Every night and day
(Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah!)
We gotta get out of this place
If it’s the last thing we ever do
We gotta get out of this place
’cause girl, there’s a better life for me and you
Now my girl you’re so young and pretty
And one thing I know is true, yeah
You’ll be dead before your time is due, I know it
Watch my daddy in bed a-dyin’
Watched his hair been turnin’ grey, yeah
He’s been workin’ and slavin’ his life away
I know he’s been workin’ so hard
(Yeah!) I’ve been workin’ too, baby
(Yeah!) Every day baby
(Yeah!) Whoa!
(Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah!)
We gotta get out of this place
If it’s the last thing we ever do
We gotta get out of this place
Girl, there’s a better life for me and you
Somewhere baby, somehow I know it
We gotta get out of this place
If it’s the last thing we ever do
We gotta get out of this place
Girl, there’s a better life for me and you
Believe me baby
I know it baby
You know it too

John Peel – Rock Family Trees – The British R&B Boom (TV rip) (1995)

FrontCoverWhat follows is, pretty much documentary called “The British R&B Boom” which was an episode in the TV series “Rock Family Trees”

The series originates from the work of a gentleman called Pete Frame who drew family trees of various bands/artists and were, as far as I can remember, first published in the late 70’s/80’s in the UK weekly music publication “Sounds” (now defunct).  All the TV documentaries were narrated by the respected English music broadcaster, John Peel.

This documentary (with lot´s of old TV nd concert clips and many interviews) exploring  all the stories that lie behind some of the best-known bands. In this edition, John Peel narrates the story of the British R&B boom, which included two of the biggest bands of the late 60s and early 70s, Cream and Led Zeppelin. This programme charts the careers of groups as diverse as the Yardbirds, John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, Manfred Mann and Cream as they turned the blues into rock.

And here´s  this pretty good documentary about of the most important years of British Blues & Rock …

 

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Two legends: Pete Frame and John Peel

 

I got this very rare item from a serious record collector … I will call him Mister Sleeve … thanks a lot !

The Moody Blues – The Magnificent Moodies (1965)

FrontCover1The Magnificent Moodies is the 1965 debut album by The Moody Blues, first released in the UK, and the first and only album featuring their R&B line-up of guitarist Denny Laine, bassist Clint Warwick, keyboardist Mike Pinder, flautist–percussionist Ray Thomas, and drummer Graeme Edge. Lead vocals were shared by Laine, Pinder and Thomas. The album is a collection of R&B and Merseybeat songs, including the cover of “Go Now”, produced by Alex Wharton, that had been a Number 1 hit single earlier that year. For the U.S. release, on London Records, with the title of Go Now – The Moody Blues #1, four songs were replaced and the tracks re-ordered.

The album did not make the Record Retailer/Music Week chart even though it reached number 5 in August 1965 in the New Musical Express album chart. The U.S. album did not make the Billboard chart.

The sleeve notes on the original UK release include an (undated) review by Virginia Ironside, music critic of Daily Mail, which concludes, “With the Moody Blues, all you need to write is “MAGNIFICENT” in pink lipstick and leave it at that”; and a prose poem by Donovan recommending the band. All the tracks on the UK release were produced by Denny Cordell; except for “Go Now”, which was produced by Alex Wharton.

Laine and Warwick left the group in 1966, and were replaced by guitarist Justin Hayward and bassist John Lodge respectively. (by wikipedia)

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The pre-psychedelic Moody Blues were represented in England by this album, which is steeped in American soul. The covers include songs by James Brown, Willie Dixon, and Chris Kenner, plus the chart-busting “Go Now” (originally recorded by Bessie Banks), interspersed with a brace of originals by lead singer/guitarist Denny Laine and keyboardist Mike Pinder, and one Jeff Barry/Ellie Greenwich number, “I’ve Got a Dream.” The shouters, like “I’ll Go Crazy” and “Bye Bye Bird,” will be the big surprises, showcasing the rawest sound by the group, but “I’ve Got a Dream” shows a lyrical, harmony-based sound that is vaguely reminiscent of the Four Tops (which is ironic, as that group later cut a single of the latter-day Moody Blues original “So Deep Within You”), while “Thank You Baby,” a Laine/Pinder original, offers them doing a smooth, dance-oriented number with some catchy hooks. The group’s sound is good and loud, and Laine was a phenomenal singer, though the band lacked the charisma and built-in excitement of such rivals as the Rolling Stones and the Animals. This album is more interesting than its American equivalent, but also not as good, since it leaves off such single sides as “Steal Your Heart Away” and the Pinder/Laine “From the Bottom of My Heart,” the latter being the best side this version of the group ever recorded. (by Bruce Eder)

Ray Thomas, flautist and vocalist for British rock group The Moody Blues, has died suddenly on January 4, 2018 …

Listen to his harmonica solo on “Bye Bye Bird” … bye bye Ray Thomas ….

The Moody Blues in Concert at The Pier - Summer 1987

Personnel:
Graeme Edge (drums, percussion, vocals)
Denny Laine (vocals, guitar, harmonica)
Mike Pinder (keyboards, vocals)
Ray Thomas (flute, harmonica, percussion, vocals)
Clint Warwick (bass, vocals)
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Elaine Caswell (percussion)

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Tracklist:
01. I’ll Go Crazy (Brown) 2.08
02. Something You Got (Kenner) 2.49
03. Go Now (Banks/Bennett) 3.09
04. Can’t Nobody Love You (Mitchell) 3.59
05. I Don’t Mind (Brown) 3.24
06. I’ve Got A Dream (Greenwich/Barry) 2.48
07. Let Me Go (Laine/Pinder) 3.11
08. Stop (Laine/Pinder) 2.02
09. Thank You Baby (Laine/Pinder) 2.26
10. It Ain’t Necessarily So (Heyward/G. Gershwin/I. Gershwin) 3.18
11. True Story (Laine/Pinder) 1.42
12. Bye Bye Bird (Williamson/Dixon) 2.47LabelB1

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Ray Thomas

Ray Thomas, flautist and vocalist for British rock group The Moody Blues, has died suddenly on January 4, 2018, his record label said. He was 76. Cherry Red Records and Esoteric Recordings said in a statement: “We are deeply shocked by his passing and will miss his warmth, humour and kindness. It was a privilege to have known and worked with him and our thoughts are with his family and his wife, Lee, at this sad time.” In 2014 Thomas revealed on his website that he had been diagnosed with prostate cancer. He said he had received his diagnosis in 2013. Born in 1941, Thomas founded The Moody Blues in 1964 with fellow musicians including Mike Pinder and Denny Laine. The band soon swapped blues roots for a more orchestral sound that came to be called progressive rock. Thomas’s flute solo was a key ingredient on one of its biggest hits, “Nights in White Satin.” The band is due to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio in April 2018. – The Guardian/Billboard

The Yardbirds – Leverkusen, Germany (1997)

FrontCover1What a long history … from the early Sixties … till today !

The Yardbirds were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992. Nearly all the original surviving musicians who had been part of the band’s heyday, including Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page, appeared at the ceremony. (Original lead guitarist Top Topham was not included.[57]) Eric Clapton, whose Hall of Fame induction was the first of three, was unable to attend because of his obligations while recording and working on a show for the MTV Unplugged series. Accepting the induction on behalf of the late Keith Relf were his wife April and son Danny.

In 1992, Peter Barton from Rock Artist Management contacted Jim McCarty about the prospect of reforming the Yardbirds. McCarty was interested but only if Chris Dreja would agree, but at the time he thought it highly unlikely that Dreja would want to tour again. Barton then contacted Dreja, who agreed to give it a try.

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Their debut gig was booked at the Marquee Club in London along with the newly reformed Animals. It was a great success. The lineup featured John Idan handling bass and lead vocals. Barton managed the band and booked all their dates for over a decade; he still works with the band on occasion. (by Wikipedia)

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And The Yardbirds continued to play  … and here´s a rare but wonderful album recorded live at a blues Festival in Germany … and this is a FM broadcast recording … excellent sound quality !

And they played a gig with timeless classic blues Songs including on song from their Box Of Frogs (“Back Where I Started“) period.

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Personnel:
Chris Dreja
Laurence Garman (harmonica)
John Idan (bass, vocals)
Gypie Mayo (guitar, background vocals)
Jim McCarty (drums, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Radio Intro (in German) 0,54
02. Train Kept A Rolling (Bradshaw/Mann) 3.31
03. I Got Love If You Want It (Harpo) 3.42
04. Heartful Of Soul (Gouldman) 2.37
05. I’m Not Talking (Allison) 3.25
06. I Ain’t Got You (Carter) 2.17
07. I Ain’t Done Wrong (Relf) 5.24
08. You’re A Better Man Than I (Hugg) 3.49
09. Sitting On Top Of The World (Vinson/Chatmon) 5.14
10. I’m A Man (McDaniels) 4.54
11. Back Where I Started (Samwell-Smith/Dreja/McCarty/Fiddler) 6.58
12. Over Under Sideways Down (Dreja/McCarty/Beck/Relf/Samwell-Smith) 3.17
13. Smokestack Lightning (Burnett) 5.05

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And here a part of this gig on you tube: