The Rolling Stones – Sydney (1966)

FrontCover1.jpgI was given this cassette of the 2UW 1966 Stones Sydney broadcast in 1972 (I was 16) by a chap only 4 years older than me who went on to be one of Australia’s leading music historians. Hadn’t seen him for years except on the telly /radio or on the rare occasion on the opposite side of a music venue. After The Monkees Sydney Opera House June 2019 concert I bumped into him in the foyer, re-introduced myself, we chatted, then shared a train ride home to my suburb where he had parked his car.

I took the opportunity to quiz him about the 2UW Broadcast cassette he had given me decades before. Such as, did he record it himself from the radio at the time? If not did someone else tape it, was my copy a dub from a cassette or reel to reel, did he have any idea when 2UW broadcast the show? I was dead set gobsmacked when he replied he couldn’t remember having this cassette & most likely it was his copy that he gave me.

So what do I have? Methinks i have either a 1st or 2nd generation. I’m sure this would have been aired on radio like the Melbourne 3UZ 1966 broadcast with advertisements / radio station ID, probably too hard to edit them out at the time of taping so possibly this cassette could be a dub from that but with the ads removed. What is present In track 12 Satisfaction at the 3.41 mark are 5 loud pips. I’ve been told that these could represent that it’s 5.00 PM at the time of this broadcast or the 5.00 PM news was coming up next.

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The cassette also included two radio reports. The first of these is about the Stones arrival at Kingsford Smith Sydney Airport on the 16th February 1966. The second a short interview with the Stones in Sydney most likely before the 18th February shows. Unfortunately both are incomplete. Both conducted by Ward “Pally” Austin, a Sydney Radio 2UW DJ. In the 60’s he was probably Sydney’s most famous albeit notorious disc jockey. Ward also introduces the band at the concert.

The 2UW Feb 1966 interview with Mick Jagger and Brian Jones (I think Keith Richards is in there as well) cuts in after a discussion has already started regarding As Tears Go By. Jagger states he recorded it first before Marianne Faithful but his voice was deemed to be a bit camp so they decided to re record it again in a deeper voice.

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Mick & Brian talk about engagements prior to marriage. Ward asks the boys what they’re going to do while in Sydney.
Jagger in an exaggerated Aussie accent talks about going down the beach, doing a bit of water skiing, watch the old sheila’s, sheilas being Australian slang for females, young or old. (The equivalent of the terms birds in the UK & broads in the USA.)

During the interview a voice comes on to tell us that at the time 2UW was one of Sydney’s lowest rated radio stations but they’d been building a new image of 24 hour nonstop teenage music. The voice continues that this has paid off because 2UW is now Sydney’s 3rd highest rated radio station & Ward is the top DJ.

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In the 80’s I had a fling with a 2UW employee who when I asked if they had access to the station’s radio library, replied they did as it was part of the job. I asked if it they would be agreeable to conduct a search of the 2UW library for me looking for the broadcast, “no worries” was the reply. And if located could they one way or the other obtain a copy of it for me. They searched high & low but nowhere could they find the 1966 Broadcast nor could any documentation regarding the broadcast be found. Probably long ago wiped or discarded.

The broadcast does not feature the 1st song of the concert The Last Time, it starts with the 2nd song of the night Mercy Mercy. audiowhore & myself have tried to find the actual date of the broadcast but have been unsuccessful. But he did find a newspaper ad for the Brisbane 4BH Stones 1966 live broadcast aired on the 22nd February 1966, so perhaps the Sydney broadcast was aired the day after the show as well. Hopefully one day the Brisbane broadcast might magically surface just as the Melbourne 3UZ 1966 broadcast did decades later.

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We couldn’t find any reviews of the Sydney 1966 concerts apart from a very brief show report in Go-Set magazine but I have the next best thing. Someone who not only attended this very show but took photographs as well. My friend Big Knob (Big from here on in) attended this concert as a 20 year old, not as a professional photographer but as a fan whose hobby / passion was photography.

Not even a year after attending this show he would be drafted into the Australian army & fighting in Vietnam. I asked him if in his days of being an audience member taking photographs at concerts (starting with The Beatles in 1964) was he hassled in any way for doing so. He replied no, it was the opposite, people would come up to him asking why was he was bothering to take photographs. He told me that if any newspaper photographer did bother to turn up to shoot a show, they would grab a few photos & then bugger off asap.

When audiowhore & myself searched newspaper articles regarding the Stones Australian 1966 tour we located a few pro-shot B/W Sydney photos but they hadn’t been reproduced in very good quality & in all honesty Big’s photos piss all over them & in colour too! It’s his photographs that he has so kindly allowed me to use for the artwork. The inside front cover photograph with Brian playing harmonica was taken during Not Fade Away. The back cover photograph with Brian sitting down playing the organ is That’s How Strong My Love Is.

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The show was held in the Commemorative Auditorium which is one of the halls inside the Sydney Showgrounds complex, it’s only a hop, skip & jump from the Hordern Pavilion where I would see many groups in the early 70’s to late 80’s. In some of the photographs you can see in the background a stained glass window of a reversed map of Australia on which NSW is the only state coloured in & because this was the early show the sunlight is streaming through it. Of course outside the building the map was the correct way round.

The concert was advertised (as can be seen in the newspaper add on the Back Inside Cover artwork) with the band being on the Centre Revolving Stage, which Big informed me was transported over from the Sydney Stadium at Rushcutters Bay. This would have been a bit of a task to do so. This stage was not electric but hand cranked around by stage hands, with a few songs performed to the front, then cranked around to the right for the next couple of numbers & so on.

RollingStones1966_07In the artwork photographs you can notice that the reversed map of Australia appears in slightly different positions. The photograph of the Stones taken from the back that features on the back inner artwork was taken when the stage had revolved around. I asked Big if he had moved around to take that particular photograph, he replied that he’d taken all his photos basically staying in the same position.

Before Not Fade Away Jagger can be heard asking “Will you stop this thing this going round” referring to the stage. Apparently it was annoying him in some way. Big can’t remember if Jagger’s plea was granted but he does remember that the American singer P.J. Proby’s scarf was caught up in this stage the year before. Jagger says “Where are we?” followed by “Wait right there” & then something undecipherable in Satisfaction that could also be a another reference to the revolving stage.

Big definitely remembers the endless screaming of the sheilas, says it was just as loud as it was for the Beatles Sydney shows two years previously. He added that some brave girls would dash out of their seats, run past the cops to throw streamers at the stage, in the photographs some of these can be seen wrapped around various Stones & their instruments. I was aware that on this tour the Stones where supported by another UK band The Searchers plus New Zealand band Max Merritt & The Meteors but I was unaware until Big informed me that two Australian acts were also on the bill. They being Tony Barber and Steve & The Board.

Although this recording is certainly not Hi-Fi by any stretch I love hearing Brian’s contributions in this Sydney show. This live version of Satisfaction being my mid-60’s favourite version. Revisiting this show finds me wishing that one day soon hopefully the Stones From The Vaults series will release a Brian Jones era live concert instead of endless latter day releases that feature Ron Wood – the king of bum notes & out of tune solos.

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Australian Women’s Weekly Magazine (February 23rd 1966)

I first traded this recording with Stones collectors in the late 70’s, but when I told people I had this recording I was asked a number of times how could I be sure this radio show was Sydney. Easy I wrote back – Ward Austin who can be heard introducing the show was a Sydney DJ plus Jagger himself can be heard shortly before Satisfaction starts saying “Thank you very much Sydney”. Although the word Sydney is not as loud as the preceding words because of background tuning, Jagger definitely says Sydney.

I’m sure it was one of my trades that became the source for it’s appearance on the Japanese Silver Bootleg VGP Label entitled He Is Not Dead because it has the same tape wobble in Get Off Of My Cloud plus the radio pips in Satisfaction. But Ward Austin’s concert introduction is missing and the two 2UW radio segments didn’t make it either. IMHO my original cassette version has slightly more definition & is somewhat superior than the VGP title & other CD-R versions I’ve heard.

Thanks to my old friend for the original cassette, Big Knob for his photographs & audiowhore for the 2019 transfer and mixing and last but not least Bobel. (by wazza50)

Recorded live at the Commemorative Auditorium, Sydney Showgrounds, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; February 18, 1966 (1st show). Passable Sydney 2UW Radio broadcast (unknown airdate)

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Personnel:
Mick Jagger (vocals, tambourine)
Brian Jones (guitar, organ, harmonica, background vocals)
Keith Richards (guitar, background vocals)
Charlie Watts (drums)
Bill Wyman (bass, background vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Stones Arrival At Sydney Airport 16th February 1966 #1 1:21
(Soundtrack From UK TV Report)
02. Stones Arrival At Sydney Airport 16th February 1966 #2 1:57
(Ward Austin 2UW Report – Cuts out / then 2UW Ward Austin Stones Interview – Start of interview missing)

03. Intro 0.29
04. Mercy, Mercy (Covay/Miller) 2.19
05. She Said Yeah (Christy/Jackson) 2.01
06. Play With Fire (Jagger/Richards) 2.20
07. Not Fade Away (Hardin/Petty)  2.16
08. Spider And The Fly (Jagger/Richards)  2:57
09. That’s How Strong My Love Is (Jamison) 2.09
10. Get Off Of My Cloud (Jagger/Richards) 3.06
11. 19th Nervous Breakdown (Jagger/Richards) 3.52
12. Satisfaction (Jagger/Richards) 5.03

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Thanks to wazza50 for sharing the show at Dime

Them – Here Comes The Night (1965)

FrontCover1This is the US version of the debut album of Them:

The Angry Young Them is the first album by the Northern Irish rock and roll group Them. The album was released in the UK in June 1965. The band’s lead singer and songwriter was Van Morrison. In the U.S., the album was released as Them with partly different tracks.

As with several Decca releases of the period, the name of the group was conspicuously absent from the front cover and on the back of the LP they were introduced as The Angry Young Them with an essay on this theme declaring: “These five young rebels are outrageously true to themselves. Defiant! Angry! Sad! They are honest to the point of insult!”
Release history

Six of the songs on the album were Morrison originals, including the famous garage band anthem “Gloria”. Another song on the album, “Mystic Eyes”, was a spontaneous creation that came out of the band just “busking around” in Morrison’s words and after seven minutes of instrumental playing he impulsively threw in the words of a song he had been working on.

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The lengthy versions of “Gloria” that the band performed at the Maritime and the ten-minute recording of “Mystic Eyes” have never surfaced. All that is left of the “Mystic Eyes” performance is the little over 2​1⁄2 minutes on the album that remained after splicing out from the beginning and ending. “You Just Can’t Win” was a Dylan inspired song about a gold digger, set in specific places in London such as Camden Town. “Little Girl” was about a boy’s obsession with a fourteen-year-old school girl (an earlier take on Lord’s Taverners charity album had been deleted when a four-letter word was heard in the fade out at the end). “If You And I Could Be As Two” starts with a spoken introduction by Morrison with an aggressive Irish accent. Three Bert Berns originals were included and a cover of John Lee Hooker’s “Don’t Look Back” was considered by Morrison to be his finest vocal to date. (by wikipedia)

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Decca’s willingness to release a full-length Them album was conditioned upon the breakthrough success of the band’s third single, “Here Comes the Night.” It was not, however, the practice in Britain at the time to put hit singles on albums, so this 14-track LP does not include that song. It does, however, contain six songs written by lead vocalist Van Morrison, including the immortal “Gloria” and “Mystic Eyes,” which became a chart single in the U.S., plus some well-played R&B covers. Because of an annotation on the back of the LP, this album is sometimes referred to as The Angry Young Them, although its official title is Them. (by William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
Peter Bardens (orgamn)
Billy Harrison (guitar)
Alan Henderson (bass)
John McAuley (drums, piano, harmonica)
Van Morrison (vocals, harmonica, saxophone)

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Tracklist:
01. Here Comes The Night (Berns) 2.48
02. Mystic Eyes (Morrison) 2.44
03. Don’t Look Back (Hooker) 3.23
04. Little Girl (Morrison) 2.49
05. One Two Brown Eyes” (Morrison) 2.35
06. Gloria (Morrison) 2.39
07. One More Time (Morrison) 2.50
08. If You and I Could Be As Two (Morrison) 2.54
09. I Like It Like That (Morrison) 3.19
10. I’m Gonna Dress in Black (Gillon/Howe) 3.31
11. (Get Your Kicks On) Route 66 (Troup) 2.25
12. Go On Home Baby (Morrison) 2.34

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Dr Feelgood – Mad Man Blues (1986)

FrontCover1.JPGDr. Feelgood are an English pub rock band formed in 1971. Hailing from Canvey Island, Essex, the group are best known for early singles such as “She Does It Right”, “Roxette”, “Back in the Night” and “Milk and Alcohol” . The group’s original distinctively British R&B sound was centred on Wilko Johnson’s choppy guitar style. Along with Johnson, the original band line-up included singer Lee Brilleaux and the rhythm section of John B. Sparks, known as “Sparko”, on bass guitar and John Martin, known as “The Big Figure”, on drums. Although their most commercially productive years were the early to mid-1970s, and in spite of Brilleaux’s death in 1994 of lymphoma, a version of the band (featuring none of the original members) continues to tour and record to this day. (by wikipedia)

1985 was bringing in some musical surprises, some of them good, some not so, but with the advent of the musical video, things were all about the “forward look,” so it goes without saying that many great rock n’ roll bands, bands who should have been receiving countless amounts of air time, saw none. You can count Dr. Feelgood in that category of “none,” and that’s a loss this world will never bounce back from.

There are people out there who are gonna tell you that Dr. Feelgood was a working man’s R&B, Rockin’ Blues band, and while that’s sort of true, it’s like saying that Gram Parsons was a working man. Gram wasn’t any more a working man then Dr. Feelgood, the Doctor [or should I say Doctors] had no choice, the music was in them, and if it didn’t get out, they were gonna explode … which is pretty much what happened whenever the took the stage. You need to feel this music, you need to turn the speakers up loud … that “Blown Away Guy” sitting in the Le Corbusier armed chair facing a JBL L100 speaker for the Maxell tape ad back in the 70’s, well hands down he was listin’ to Dr. Feelgood for sure.

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Go ahead, dismiss this album if you wish, wave off this review if you must … but just for one minute, open any window in your house and take a listen to what’s blasting from mine, and you might just change your thinking. And that’s a fact, Jack! (streetmouse)

Lee Brilleaux and Dr. Feelgood sound positively revitalized on Mad Man Blues, a collection of raw versions of blues standards that is their best album since 1977’s Be Seeing You. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Lee Brilleaux (guitar, harmonica, slide-guitar, vocals)
Phil H. Mitchell (bass, vocals)
Kevin Morris (drums, percussion, background vocals)
Gordon Russell (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Dust My Broom (James) 2.57
02. Something You Got (Cropper/Floyd) 2.40
03. Dimples (Hooker) 2.59
04. Living On The Highway (Nix/Russell) 3.37
05. Tore Down (King) 2.41
06. Mad Man Blues (Hooker) 2.25
07. I’ve Got News For You (Brilleaux/Morris/Russell/Vernon) 3.57
08. My Babe (Dixon) 2.23
09. Can’t Find The Lady (Wallis) 3.31
10. Rock Me Baby (Bihari/King) 4.30

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Lee Brilleaux

Lee Brilleaux (born Lee John Collinson, 10 May 1952 – 7 April 1994)

The (Count) Bishops – Live (1979)

FrontCover1.JPGThe Count Bishops were a British rock band, formed in 1975 in London and which broke up in 1980. The Count Bishops had limited commercial success, but forged an important stylistic and chronological link between the root rhythm and blues band Dr. Feelgood and the proto punk sound of Eddie and the Hot Rods; together forming the foundation of the pub-rock scene, which influenced the emergence of punk rock. The group made history in England by releasing the first record from independent label Chiswick Records. They splintered following the death of guitarist Zenon DeFleur on 18 March 1979. (by wikipedia)

From the best looking rock band this side of The Motors . . . The Bishops’ particular variety of rowdy, rumbustious R&B has always functioned best live, which is why this album cuts their studio elpee to shreds fairly effortlessly.
About three quarters of the material has shown up on previous Bishops’ recordings (“Sometimes Good Guys Don’t Wear White”, “I Need You”, “Baby You’re Wrong”, “Takin’ It Easy” and the sublime “Train Train”) but all of ’em with the possible exception of “Train” sound a lot better here.

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The whole thing’s topped off with a couple of comparative newies (“I Don’t Live It” and “Too Much Too Soon” composed by singer Dave Tice and rhythm guitarist Zenon De Fleur) and a sprinkling of revibes: (“Somebody’s Gonna Get Their Head Kicked In” from the repertoire of, believe it or not, Fleetwood Mac, though it must be said that Mac ain’t played that song for a while), Sonny Boy Williamson’s “Don’t Start Me Talkin'” and The Strangeloves’ “I Want Candy” (featuring – gulp – a drum solo).

Right now, The Bishops have a single – a revival of Sam And Dave’s classic “I Take What I Want” on Radio One’s playlist, plus another studio album lined up and ready for Chiswick to disgorge upon a suspecting public. If the world is once again ready for an enthusiastic and finely crafted brew of tough guy pop and drunken R&B, then they might as well get it from The Bishops as from anybody else, because in the two or three years that they’ve been going they’ve waved the flag for their kind of music as hard as anybody against both apathy and more restrictive types of New Wave mentality.
This album is as convincing a demonstration as could be required. Miss out and it’s your loss. (by Charles Shaar Murray in 1979)

In other words: one of the finest live albums from the second wave of British R & B and Beat … Listen and enjoy ! … we want the world, and we want it now !

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Personnel:
Paul Balbi (drums)
Zenon de Fleur (guitar)
Johnny Guitar (guitar)
Pat McMullan (bass)
Dave Tice (vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Too Much, Too Soon (Tice) 2.41
02. Till The End Of The Day (Davies) 2.07
03. Taking It Easy (Lewins) 3.02
04. Train, Train (de Fleur) 3.19
05. Someone’s Gonna Get Their Head Kicked In Tonight (Spencer) 2.38
06. Sometimes Good Guys Don’t Wear White (Cobb) 2.38
07. Don’t Start Me Talking (Raye) 2.26
08. Baby You’re Wrong (de Fleur) 2.30
09. I Don’t Like It (Tice/de Fleur) 2.05
10. (I Want) Candy (Berns/Feldman/Goldstein/Gottehrer) 3.43

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Georgie Fame & The Blue Flames – Fame At Last (1964)

FrontCover1.jpgGeorgie Fame and the Blue Flames were a noted British rhythm and blues/soul, jazz, ska, pop group during the 1960s. They were also the backing band for Billy Fury. At the end of 1961, their piano player Georgie Fame took over as vocalist and they went on to enjoy great success without Fury. They were influenced by Jon Hendricks, Mose Allison and blues musicians such as Willie Mabon. The group found other influences in ska, which could be heard in Jamaican cafes in and around Ladbroke Grove frequented by the group’s Jamaican born trumpeter Eddie Thornton. During the group’s three-year residency at the Flamingo Club, Fame heard the latest jazz and blues from America, and it was Booker T. & the M.G.’s “Green Onions” which inspired him to take up playing Hammond organ with the band.

Colin Green and Georgie Fame (then known as Clive Powell) worked together in ‘Colin Green’s Beat Boys’, who had backed Gene Vincent and Eddie Cochran during UK tours. In 1961 piano player Fame, drummer Red Reece, bassist Tex Makins and Green were hired by Larry Parnes to back Billy Fury as the Blue Flames. Fury’s Manager dismissed them in February 1962 as he felt they were “too jazzy” and replaced them with The Tornados.

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In December 1961 Alan “Earl” Watson fronted The Blue Flames, playing tenor saxophone and singing. In May 1962 the group was augmented by Ghanaian percussionist Neeomi “Speedy” Acquaye and Green left the group. Fame took over as the lead vocalist, Green was replaced by Joe Moretti and in turn was later replaced by John McLaughlin. During that time Rod “Boots” Slade had taken over as bass player while Makins toured with Johnny Hallyday. Saxophonist Mick Eve joined the group during 1962 and eventually the line up was completed by Johnny Marshall.

McLaughlin departed in April 1963 when he joined The Graham Bond Organisation, leaving the group without a guitarist for eighteen months and during this period Rik Gunnell took over the management of the band. In September 1963, they recorded their debut album Rhythm And Blues at the Flamingo which was produced by Ian Samwell, engineered by Glyn Johns and released on the Columbia label.

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Rhythm And Blues at the Flamingo failed to enter the UK chart, as did the single ‘Do The Dog’ which was taken from this album and released in 1964. Two other singles ‘Do Re Mi’, and ‘Bend A Little’ were also released during 1964, achieving no commercial success.

In July 1964, Peter Coe replaced Marshall and was soon joined by baritone saxist Glenn Hughes and trumpet player Eddie “Tan-Tan” Thornton who had previously appeared occasionally with them and Green rejoined the group in October 1964.

Reece became ill in 1964 and was replaced by Tommy Frost. Jimmie Nicol spent a brief period as drummer, then left to replace Ringo Starr for 13 days on a Beatles tour. Phil Seamen and Micky Waller sat in for Nicol until Bill Eyden became the band’s full-time drummer in September 1964.

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In October 1964 the album Fame at Last reached No.15 in the U.K. album chart. The band’s version of the song “Yeh Yeh” was released as a single in the U.K. on 14 January 1965 and reached No.1 on the U.K. Singles Chart for two weeks (out of a total of twelve weeks on the chart).

The song “In The Meantime” was released as a single in February 1965 and reached the U.K. Top Twenty, however the band’s next two single releases were not chart entries. Success followed with Fame’s self penned song Get Away (released on 17 June 1966),[9] which climbed to the top of the UK chart for a solitary week in late-July. The song was originally written as a jingle for a television petrol advertisement (National filling stations). It was later used as the theme tune for a long-running travel and lifestyle show on Australian television called Getaway. The two subsequent singles, “Sunny” and “Sitting in the Park” reached chart positions of No.13 and No.12 respectively. After the album Sweet Thing (1966) was released, Fame signed to CBS and became a solo artist.

Eyden and Makins remained as the group’s rhythm section until they were replaced in December 1965 by Cliff Barton and Mitch Mitchell. That lineup recorded the album Sweet Things, then on 1 October 1966 Fame disbanded the Blue Flames to pursue a solo career. Within a week Mitchell had been selected over Aynsley Dunbar to be the third member of what would be dubbed The Jimi Hendrix Experience. (by wikipedia)

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‘And here´s the second album of Georgie Fame & The Blue Flames:

Following on from the blazing live set that was his debut (listen here), Georgie Fame’s first studio album is one of those discs to which only one appellation can truly be applied — it’s dangerous. A blistering romp through Fame & His Blue Flames’ live repertoire of the day, fast and loose and driving, it captures one of Britain’s best-ever R&B troupes stepping so far beyond the customary precepts of the Beat Boom that, if you were to come to this record without knowing who it was, there’s no way you’d ever guess a bunch of (predominantly) Londoners were responsible. To pull out any highlights is to indicate that there are any corresponding low-lights — there aren’t. But a “Green Onions” so sweet that you can taste it captures the group in full flame, while Willie Dixon’s “I Love the Life I Live” has rarely sounded so supreme. Even the closing “I’m in the Mood for Love” — not a song one normally associates with heads-down blues boogie — is granted a cigarettes’n’alcohol ambience that could choke any passing puritan, and the whole disc adds up to one of the all-time great albums of its, or any other, R&B-blessed era. (by Dave Thompson)

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Personnel:
Speedy Acquaye (percussion)
Peter Coe (saxophone)
Georgie Fame (organ, vocals)
Anthony Paul ‘Tex’ Makins (bass) 
Phil Seamen (drums)
Edward ‘Eddie’ Thornton (trumpet)

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Tracklist:
01. Get On The Right Track, Baby (Turner) 2.52
02. Let The Sunshine In (Barberis/Weinstein/Randazzo) 2.38
03. The Monkey Time (Mayfield) 2.39
04. All About My Girl (McGriff) 4.27
05. Point Of No Return (Goffin/King) 2.26
06. Gimme That Wine (Hendricks) 3.06
07. Pink Champagne (Liggins) 3.51
08. Monkeying Around (Cropper/Bell) 2.12
09. Pride And Joy (Gaye/Whitfield/Stevenson) 2.24
10. Green Onions (Jackson/Jones/Steinberg/Cropper) 2.12
11. I Love The Life I Live (Dixon) 3.22
12. I’m In The Mood For Love (Moody’s Mood For Love) (Fields/McHugh) 4.23

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Georgie Fame … still alive and well …

Manfred Mann -The Manfred Mann Album (1964)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Manfred Mann Album is the debut American studio album by Manfred Mann, released in September 1964 on Ascot Records. It contains the hit single “Do Wah Diddy Diddy”, as well as covers of well-known R&B hits such as “Smokestack Lightning” by Howlin’ Wolf, “I’m Your Hoochie Coochie Man” by Muddy Waters, and “Down the Road Apiece” by Will Bradley. Modern reviews of the album are generally positive and consider The Manfred Mann Album an important piece during the heydey of the British Invasion.

The twelve tracks on the record include the group’s hit single “Do Wah Diddy Diddy”, which reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, while the rest reflect on their love of R&B, including cover versions of Howlin’ Wolf’s “Smokestack Lightning”, Muddy Waters’ “Got My Mojo Working”, and Bo Diddley’s “Bring It to Jerome”. The album includes the Cannonball Adderley song “Sack O’ Woe”.

Eleven of the twelve tracks were taken from Manfred Mann’s debut British release, The Five Faces of Manfred Mann.

All of the songs were recorded 17 December 1963 – 22 June 1964 at EMI Studios, London, England. (by wikipedia)

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Manfred Mann’s debut full-length U.S. platter was probably their strongest, and indeed one of the stronger British Invasion albums of the very competitive year of 1964. Besides the smash “Do Wah Diddy Diddy,” it contained a number of fine soul and R&B covers. Standouts were the versions of “Untie Me” and Ike & Tina Turner’s “It’s Gonna Work Out Fine,” as well as the strong pounding Paul Jones original, “Without You.” (by Richie Unterberger)

A real strong album from the very early days of British Beat and R & B !!!

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Personnel:
Tom McGuinness (bass, background vocals)
Mike Hugg (drums, percussion, vibraphone)
Paul Jones (vocals, harmonica)
Manfred Mann (keyboards, background vocals)
Mike Vickers (guitar, saxophone, flute, background vocals)
+
Dave Richmond (bass on 12.)

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Tracklist:
01. Do Wah Diddy Diddy (Greenwich/Barry) 2.24
02. Don’t Ask Me What I Say (Jones) 2.56
03. Sack O’ Woe (Arderley) 2.07
04. What You Gonna Do? (Jones/Mann) 2.34
05. I’m Your Hoochie Coochie Man (Dixon) 3.17
06. Smokestack Lightning (Burnett) 3.31
07. Got My Mojo Working (Morganfield) 3.10
08. It’s Gonna Work Out Fine (McCoy/McKinney/Seneca/Lee) 2.33
09. Down The Road Apiece (Raye) 2.24
10. Untie Me (South) 3.34
11. Bring It To Jerome (Greene) 3.24
12. Without You (Jones) 2.17

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Nine Below Zero – Live In London (1995)

FrontCover1Nine Below Zero started life in South London during 1977, in the midst of the punk rock boom in England but their sound and inspiration were so totally counterintuitive to what was going on in punk rock that they scarcely seemed to be part of that movement, apart from their extremely energetic attack on their instruments. Rather than noise for its own sake or auto-destruction, their inspiration lay in classic Chicago blues (though John Mayall’s early music and that of the Who and the Kinks from early in their careers also figured into their sound). Dennis Greaves (lead vocals, guitar), Peter Clark (bass), and Kenny Bradley (drums) soon joined by Mark Feltham (who actually replaced a teacher of theirs who had sat in on the early gigs) on vocals and harmonica were schoolmates and friends who shared a love of blues; all had all come into the world in the early ’60s, and might well have resigned themselves to having missed the boat for the British blues revival by virtue of having been born in the midst of it. Instead, they reached back to that era and found themselves pegged as part of the “mod revival” in the midst of the punk era.

Originally billed as Stan’s Blues Band, they made a name for themselves locally in South London, sounding a lot like the Who from their “maximum R&B” days and the Kinks Mark_Feltham01from their early days, and arrived as younger rivals to Dr. Feelgood. A couple of years later, they acquired a manager and a new name, taken from a song by Sonny Boy Williamson II, and cut a debut record on their own label. By 1980, they’d been signed to A&M Records’ British division and took the bold step of making their major-label debut a live album from the Marquee Club in London to judge from the results, one heartily wished that some of the earlier bands that inspired them had displayed similar daring. Live at the Marquee, recorded on June 16, 1980 by which time Stix Burkey had replaced Bradley on the drums was a success and led to their follow-up album. For their sophomore effort, Don’t Point Your Finger, they were determined to translate their live energy into the studio and turned to no less a producer than Glyn Johns, who had worked with the Rolling Stones and the Who in their respective best years. The resulting record reached number 56 on the British charts.

The band’s upward momentum was slowed in the years that followed, with Clark’s departure (replaced by Brian Berhall), though a third album, Third Degree, followed but it seemed as though the moment had passed, as that record never got the attention or recognition it deserved from the press or the public. Greaves’ involvement with an outfit called the Truth, who coalesced as a full-time band in 1984, seemed to bring an end to Nine Below Zero, and that might have been as far as the group got. But a 1990 reunion got them playing before sell-out audiences, and the group has been working ever since, with Greaves on lead guitar and Mark Feltham even returning to the fold in 2001.

And here´s an obscure live recording with no further informations …

… but this another high energy concert by Nine Below Zero … maximum fun … !

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Personnel:
Mickey Burkey (drums)
Mark Feltham (harmonica)
Dennis Greaves (guitar, vocals)
Dennis Ratcliffe (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Homework (Perkins/Clark) 2.31
02. You Gotta Walk It Off (Greaves) 3.02
03. Doghouse (Greaves/Turner) 2.17
04. Three Times Enough (Greaves/Burkey) 2.14
05. Twenty Yards Behind (Johnson) 2.32
06. I Can’t Help Myself (Dozier/Holland) 2.41
07. Treat Her Right (Head)
08. Ridin’ On The L&N (Hampton) 4.39
09. Stop Your Naggin’ (Greaves) 2.22
10. I Can’t Quit You Baby (Dixon) 7.59
11. Rockin’ Robin (Thomas) 3.06
12. Can I Get A Witness (B.Holland/Dozie/E.Holland) 2.15
13. Hoochi Coochi Coo (Ballard) 2.19
14. Is That You (Greaves) 2.24
15. Keep A Knockin’ (Penniman/Williams/Mays) 5.35
+ In the studio:
16. Liquor Lover (Greaves) 3.13
17. Three Times Enough (Greaves/Burkey) 2.07
18. One Way Street (Greaves) 3.02

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