The Moody Blues – The Magnificent Moodies (1965)

FrontCover1The Magnificent Moodies is the 1965 debut album by The Moody Blues, first released in the UK, and the first and only album featuring their R&B line-up of guitarist Denny Laine, bassist Clint Warwick, keyboardist Mike Pinder, flautist–percussionist Ray Thomas, and drummer Graeme Edge. Lead vocals were shared by Laine, Pinder and Thomas. The album is a collection of R&B and Merseybeat songs, including the cover of “Go Now”, produced by Alex Wharton, that had been a Number 1 hit single earlier that year. For the U.S. release, on London Records, with the title of Go Now – The Moody Blues #1, four songs were replaced and the tracks re-ordered.

The album did not make the Record Retailer/Music Week chart even though it reached number 5 in August 1965 in the New Musical Express album chart. The U.S. album did not make the Billboard chart.

The sleeve notes on the original UK release include an (undated) review by Virginia Ironside, music critic of Daily Mail, which concludes, “With the Moody Blues, all you need to write is “MAGNIFICENT” in pink lipstick and leave it at that”; and a prose poem by Donovan recommending the band. All the tracks on the UK release were produced by Denny Cordell; except for “Go Now”, which was produced by Alex Wharton.

Laine and Warwick left the group in 1966, and were replaced by guitarist Justin Hayward and bassist John Lodge respectively. (by wikipedia)

TheMoodyBlues1965_01

The pre-psychedelic Moody Blues were represented in England by this album, which is steeped in American soul. The covers include songs by James Brown, Willie Dixon, and Chris Kenner, plus the chart-busting “Go Now” (originally recorded by Bessie Banks), interspersed with a brace of originals by lead singer/guitarist Denny Laine and keyboardist Mike Pinder, and one Jeff Barry/Ellie Greenwich number, “I’ve Got a Dream.” The shouters, like “I’ll Go Crazy” and “Bye Bye Bird,” will be the big surprises, showcasing the rawest sound by the group, but “I’ve Got a Dream” shows a lyrical, harmony-based sound that is vaguely reminiscent of the Four Tops (which is ironic, as that group later cut a single of the latter-day Moody Blues original “So Deep Within You”), while “Thank You Baby,” a Laine/Pinder original, offers them doing a smooth, dance-oriented number with some catchy hooks. The group’s sound is good and loud, and Laine was a phenomenal singer, though the band lacked the charisma and built-in excitement of such rivals as the Rolling Stones and the Animals. This album is more interesting than its American equivalent, but also not as good, since it leaves off such single sides as “Steal Your Heart Away” and the Pinder/Laine “From the Bottom of My Heart,” the latter being the best side this version of the group ever recorded. (by Bruce Eder)

Ray Thomas, flautist and vocalist for British rock group The Moody Blues, has died suddenly on January 4, 2018 …

Listen to his harmonica solo on “Bye Bye Bird” … bye bye Ray Thomas ….

The Moody Blues in Concert at The Pier - Summer 1987

Personnel:
Graeme Edge (drums, percussion, vocals)
Denny Laine (vocals, guitar, harmonica)
Mike Pinder (keyboards, vocals)
Ray Thomas (flute, harmonica, percussion, vocals)
Clint Warwick (bass, vocals)
+
Elaine Caswell (percussion)

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. I’ll Go Crazy (Brown) 2.08
02. Something You Got (Kenner) 2.49
03. Go Now (Banks/Bennett) 3.09
04. Can’t Nobody Love You (Mitchell) 3.59
05. I Don’t Mind (Brown) 3.24
06. I’ve Got A Dream (Greenwich/Barry) 2.48
07. Let Me Go (Laine/Pinder) 3.11
08. Stop (Laine/Pinder) 2.02
09. Thank You Baby (Laine/Pinder) 2.26
10. It Ain’t Necessarily So (Heyward/G. Gershwin/I. Gershwin) 3.18
11. True Story (Laine/Pinder) 1.42
12. Bye Bye Bird (Williamson/Dixon) 2.47LabelB1

*
**

Ray Thomas

Ray Thomas, flautist and vocalist for British rock group The Moody Blues, has died suddenly on January 4, 2018, his record label said. He was 76. Cherry Red Records and Esoteric Recordings said in a statement: “We are deeply shocked by his passing and will miss his warmth, humour and kindness. It was a privilege to have known and worked with him and our thoughts are with his family and his wife, Lee, at this sad time.” In 2014 Thomas revealed on his website that he had been diagnosed with prostate cancer. He said he had received his diagnosis in 2013. Born in 1941, Thomas founded The Moody Blues in 1964 with fellow musicians including Mike Pinder and Denny Laine. The band soon swapped blues roots for a more orchestral sound that came to be called progressive rock. Thomas’s flute solo was a key ingredient on one of its biggest hits, “Nights in White Satin.” The band is due to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio in April 2018. – The Guardian/Billboard

Advertisements

The Yardbirds – Leverkusen, Germany (1997)

FrontCover1What a long history … from the early Sixties … till today !

The Yardbirds were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992. Nearly all the original surviving musicians who had been part of the band’s heyday, including Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page, appeared at the ceremony. (Original lead guitarist Top Topham was not included.[57]) Eric Clapton, whose Hall of Fame induction was the first of three, was unable to attend because of his obligations while recording and working on a show for the MTV Unplugged series. Accepting the induction on behalf of the late Keith Relf were his wife April and son Danny.

In 1992, Peter Barton from Rock Artist Management contacted Jim McCarty about the prospect of reforming the Yardbirds. McCarty was interested but only if Chris Dreja would agree, but at the time he thought it highly unlikely that Dreja would want to tour again. Barton then contacted Dreja, who agreed to give it a try.

Yardbirds02

Their debut gig was booked at the Marquee Club in London along with the newly reformed Animals. It was a great success. The lineup featured John Idan handling bass and lead vocals. Barton managed the band and booked all their dates for over a decade; he still works with the band on occasion. (by Wikipedia)

Yardbirds01

And The Yardbirds continued to play  … and here´s a rare but wonderful album recorded live at a blues Festival in Germany … and this is a FM broadcast recording … excellent sound quality !

And they played a gig with timeless classic blues Songs including on song from their Box Of Frogs (“Back Where I Started“) period.

Yardbirds03.jpg

Personnel:
Chris Dreja
Laurence Garman (harmonica)
John Idan (bass, vocals)
Gypie Mayo (guitar, background vocals)
Jim McCarty (drums, vocals)

BackCover1.jpg
Tracklist:
01. Radio Intro (in German) 0,54
02. Train Kept A Rolling (Bradshaw/Mann) 3.31
03. I Got Love If You Want It (Harpo) 3.42
04. Heartful Of Soul (Gouldman) 2.37
05. I’m Not Talking (Allison) 3.25
06. I Ain’t Got You (Carter) 2.17
07. I Ain’t Done Wrong (Relf) 5.24
08. You’re A Better Man Than I (Hugg) 3.49
09. Sitting On Top Of The World (Vinson/Chatmon) 5.14
10. I’m A Man (McDaniels) 4.54
11. Back Where I Started (Samwell-Smith/Dreja/McCarty/Fiddler) 6.58
12. Over Under Sideways Down (Dreja/McCarty/Beck/Relf/Samwell-Smith) 3.17
13. Smokestack Lightning (Burnett) 5.05

Yardbirds04.jpg

*
**

And here a part of this gig on you tube:

Yardbirds – Five Live Yardbirds (1964)

FrontCover1.jpgFive Live Yardbirds is the live debut album by English rock band the Yardbirds. It features the group’s interpretations of ten American blues and rhythm and blues songs, including their most popular live number, Howlin’ Wolf’s “Smokestack Lightning”. The album contains some of the earliest recordings with guitarist Eric Clapton.

Recorded at the Marquee Club in London on 20 March 1964, it was released in the United Kingdom by Columbia Records nine months later. Despite several favourable retrospective reviews, the album did not reach the UK album charts. It was not issued in the United States; however, four songs were included on the Yardbirds’ second American album, Having a Rave Up.

In October 1963, the Yardbirds took over the Rolling Stones’ position at the Crawdaddy Club and had signed a management contract with club owner Giorgio Gomelsky. After touring with Sonny Boy Williamson II, the band signed a contract with Columbia Records. In 1964, they recorded two singles, “I Wish You Would” and “Good Morning Little Schoolgirl”. These had limited success and Gomelsky was able to persuade Columbia to release a live album as the Yardbirds’ debut album.

YardbirdsLive1964

The Yardbirds were a popular live attraction at music clubs. Much of their reputation was built on their use of a “rave up” musical arrangement, an instrumental interlude that builds to a climax. Clapton credits the rave up to bassist Paul Samwell-Smith and explains: “While most other bands were playing three-minute songs, we were taking three-minute numbers and stretching them out to five or six minutes, during which time the audience would go crazy”. In was at such performances that Clapton often broke a guitar string. While he was putting on a new one, the audience would slowly clap their hands (slow handclapping). This led manager Gomelsky to nickname him “Eric ‘Slowhand’ Clapton”.

Five Live Yardbirds was recorded at the Marquee Club in London. Yardbirds’ biographer Gregg Russo describes the conditions and equipment for recording at the club was less than ideal, they were able to capitalise on their greater popularity there than at the Crawdaddy.

Yardbirds01

He adds: The recording date for the album has been previously listed as Tuesday, March 10, 1964, but Gomelsky distinctly remembers the show taking place at Wardour Street. On March 10, the club was still at Oxford Street, and combined with the fact that the Yardbirds played on Fridays at the Wardour Street location, the March 20, 1964 recording date seems much more likely.

All of the songs that appear on Five Live Yardbirds were written by American blues and rhythm and blues artists and several of the original recordings appeared on the American record charts. The band’s early material reflects the repertoires of the early British rhythm and blues groups, such as the Rolling Stones and the Animals.[6] Clapton biographer David Bowling described the album as “a lot of straight electric blues, but at times they come close to a rock sound.” Their version of Chuck Berry’s “Too Much Monkey Business”, which is the album opener, is the most rock-oriented song on the album.

Private Concert

18th May 1964: British rock group the Yardbirds, (left to right) lead guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Paul Samwell-Smith, singer Keith Relf, drummer Jim McCarty, and rhythm guitarist Christopher Dreja performing on a backyard patio for British playwright Lord Willis and his daughter Sally. (Photo by Daily Express)

Several songs feature extended instrumental improvisation. Bo Diddley’s “Here ‘Tis” and the Isley Brothers’ “Respectable” are high-energy tunes, which represent the use of double-time feature of the rave up for the entire songs. AllMusic critic Matthew Greenwald describes “Here ‘Tis” as “driven by a furious “Bo Diddley” beat and rhythm … Clapton’s interplay with bassist Paul Samwell-Smith is one of the great moments in the band’s recorded history” The instrumental spotlight was also shared with singer and blues harmonica player Keith Relf. Clapton and Relf trading riffs is one of the highlights of “Smokestack Lightning”. The Howlin’ Wolf song was the Yardbirds’ most popular live number and a regular in their sets. Performances of the song could last up to 30 minutes.[10] Howlin’ Wolf reportedly referred to the group’s 5:35 album version as “the definitive version of his song”.

The slow blues standard, “Five Long Years”, features extended guitar soloing by Clapton in a style he further developed with John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers. Clapton and Samwell-Smith share the lead vocals on “Good Morning Little Schoolgirl”, which is based on the version by the American R&B duo Don and Bob. Bo Diddley’s “I’m a Man” (which became a hit when the Yardbirds later recorded it with Jeff Beck) and songs by Slim Harpo and John Lee Hooker round out the album.

Yardbirds02

Five Live Yardbirds was released before critical rock music journalism became popular. However, Clapton biographer Christopher Sandford notes “When Five Live Yardbirds was released that winter, to generally favourable reviews (‘Raucous interplay … great guitar …feral energy of the ensemble’) it, too, failed to materially benefit the group.” The album did not appear in the British record charts and subsequently was not issued in the US.

Later, several critics have also given the album favourable reviews. AllMusic’s Eder gave the album four and a half out of five stars and describes it as “Five Live Yardbirds was the first important—indeed, essential—live album to come out of the 1960s British rock & roll boom. In terms of the performance captured and the recording quality, it was also the best such live record of the entire middle of the decade”. In a separate review for AllMusic, Rick Clark noted “Smokestack Lightning” [and other songs] were open-ended improvisations that helped lay the groundwork for groups like Cream and the Jimi Hendrix Experience.” Bowling calls the material “raw and powerful” and Russo adds it is “a completely faithful reproduction” of the group’s early shows. “Ultimate Classic Rock” ranked the album in the “Top 100 Live Albums, and called it an “explosive document of a British blues band fueling a decidedly American music with power, fireworks and amped-up resourcefulness. (by wikipedia)

Yardbirds03

Personnel:
Eric “Slowhand” Clapton (lead guitar, co-lead vocals on 03.)
Chris Dreja (guitar)
Jim McCarty (drums)
Keith Relf (vocals, harmonica, maracas)
Paul “Sam” Samwell-Smith (bass, vocals on 03.)

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. Too Much Monkey Business (Berry) 3.49
02. I Got Love If You Want It (Moore a.k.a. Slim Harpo) 2.37
03. Smokestack Lightnin’ (Burnett) 5.35
04. Good Morning Little Schoolgirl (Demarais) 2.41
05. Respectable (K.Isley/R.Isley(R.Isley) 5.30
06. Five Long Years (Boyd) 5.16
07. Pretty Girl (McDaniel) 3.02
08. Louise (Hooker) 3.41
09. I’m A Man (McDaniel) 4.30
10. Here ‘Tis (McDaniel) 5.09
+
11. You Can’t Judge A Book By Looking At The Cover (Dixon) 2.56
12. Let It Rock (Berry) 2.17
13. I Wish I Would (Arnold) 5.54
14. Who Do You Love (McDaniel) 5.07
15. Honey In Your Hips (Relf) 2.28
16. A Certain Girl (Neville) 2.17
17. Got To Hurry (Rasputin2.48
18. I Ain´t Got You (Carter) 1.59
19. Good Morning Little Schoolgirl (Single) (Demarais)

LabelA

*
**

Manfred Mann – The Five Faces Of (1964)

FrontCover1The Five Faces of Manfred Mann is the first studio album by British beat/R&B group Manfred Mann. It was first released in the United Kingdom on 11 September 1964 by His Master’s Voice. In late October/early November, the album was released in Canada by Capitol Records. The Canadian track listing was almost the same as the UK version, except it included the hit “Do Wah Diddy Diddy” instead of “I’ve Got My Mojo Working”. The record has been called “one of the great blues-based British invasion albums; it’s a hot, rocking record that benefits from some virtuoso playing as well”.

The American version of the album (their second U.S. release following The Manfred Mann Album) was released in February 1965 by Ascot Records (a subsidiary of United Artists) with a very different track listing.

The songs on the original version of the Five Faces of Manfred Mann are R&B, including the band’s cover versions of Howlin’ Wolf’s “Smokestack Lightning”, Muddy Waters’ “Got My Mojo Working”, and Bo Diddley’s “Bring It to Jerome”, as well as a few of the group’s own jazzy compositions. Particularly noticeable in the instrumental sections are Manfred Mann’s keyboard work, Mike Vickers flute and saxophone work, and Mike Hugg’s vibes. The album includes the Cannonball Adderley song “Sack O’ Woe” from the R&B-influenced school of early 60s jazz .

The American release is more pop-oriented with the inclusion of the hits “Sha-La-La”, “Hubble Bubble Toil and Trouble” and “Come Tomorrow”; as well as Jones’ compositions and the American folk song “John Hardy”. It also includes a smaller selection of the band’s R&B and jazz influences. (by wikipedia)

ManfredMann01
The debut album by Manfred Mann holds up even better 40 years on than it did in 1964. It’s also one of the longest LPs of its era, clocking in at 39 minutes, and there’s not a wasted note or a song extended too far among its 14 tracks. The Manfreds never had the reputation that the Rolling Stones enjoyed, which is a shame, because The Five Faces of Manfred Mann is one of the great blues-based British invasion albums; it’s a hot, rocking record that benefits from some virtuoso playing as well, and some of the best singing of its era, courtesy of Paul Jones, who blew most of his rivals out of the competition with his magnificently impassioned, soulful performance on “Untie Me,” and his simmering, lusty renditions of “Smokestack Lightning” and “Bring It to Jerome.” The stereo mix of the album, which never surfaced officially in England until this 1997 EMI anniversary reissue (remastered in 24-bit digital sound), holds up very nicely, with sharp separation between the channels yet — apart from a few moments on “Untie Me” — few moments of artificiality. (by Bruce Eder)

ManfredMann02

Personnel:
Mike Hugg (drums, vibraphone)
Paul Jones (vocals, harmonica, maracas)
Manfred Mann (keyboards)
Tom McGuinness (bass)
Mike Vickers (guitar, flute, saxophone)

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. Smokestack Lightning (Burnett) 3.33
02. Don’t Ask Me What I Say (Jones) 3.02
03. Sack O’ Woe (Adderley) 2.10
04. What You Gonna Do? (Jones/Mann) 2.39
05. Hoochie Coochie (Dixon) 3.20
06. I’m Your Kingpin (Mann/Jones) 2.49
07. Down the Road Apiece (Raye) 2.27
08. Got My Mojo Working (Preston Foster; credited to Muddy Waters) 3.13
09. It’s Gonna Work Out Fine (Seneca/Lee) 2.37
10. Mr. Anello (Hugg/Jones/Mann/McGuinness/Vickers) 2.09
11. Untie Me (South) 3.39
12. Bring It To Jerome (Green) 3.27
13. Without You (Jones) 2.22
14. You’ve Got To Take It”(Jones) 2.17
+
15. Smokestack Lightning (alternate version) (Burnett) 2.54
16. What You Gonna Do? (mono version) (Jones/Mann) 2.39
17. Sack O’ Woe (instrumental version) (Adderley) 2.09
18. Mr. Anello(instrumental version) (Hugg/Jones/Mann/McGuinness/Vickers) 2.09

LabelB1
*
**

The Pretty Things – Same (1965)

FrontCover1The Pretty Things is the self-titled 1965 release by The Pretty Things, which features mostly R&B and rock and roll cover versions.
The liner notes were written by Jimmy Duncan and Bryan Morrison.
The Pretty Things’ debut LP was a legendary exercise in anarchy — 30 minutes into the two days’ worth of sessions, their original producer, Jack Baverstock (the head of the label, no less), walked out, and was eventually replaced by a slightly more sympathetic personality in the hopes of salvaging something from the efforts of the band, who, whatever their shortcomings in decorum or sobriety, were on their third successive charting single. The resulting album, made under the coordination (if not control) of drummer-turned-producer Bobby Graham, made the early work of the Rolling Stones — rivals and one-time bandmates to the Pretty Things’ Dick Taylor — sound more like the work of the Beatles: very calculated, lightweight, and…genteel. The Pretty Things is recorded with practically every song and instrument pushing the needle into the red (i.e., overload). Normally, that would be a problem, except for the fact that a third of the repertory was written by Bo Diddley and most of the other two-thirds was inspired by him (even their version of Chuck Berry’s “Oh Baby Doll” sounds like it was lifted from the Two Great Guitars sessions where the two legends crossed swords) — and Bo spent most of his career with his amplifiers set on “11” in a world where ten was the max.

PrettyThings1965

“Roadrunner” is about as raw and loud as British rock & roll ever got up to that time, and it’s just the beginning — “Judgement Day” has a lead guitar buried somewhere in there, beneath rhythm instruments that sound like metal being ground up, and “13 Chester Street” is, strangely enough, an homage to the house the band once shared with the Stones’ Brian Jones; appropriately enough, it mixes the band’s crunchy rhythm guitar-centered sound with a Slim Harpo-style lead (all of the stuff that Jones was identified with musically), in a group “composition” that shimmers and pulses around Phil May’s dissolute vocals. “Big City” takes them back to Chess Records territory, from which they never stray — “Mama, Keep Your Big Mouth Shut” even sounds like a Chess outtake, what Leonard Chess would’ve said needed one more pass to get right (and he’d have been wrong). And just to show that there is some justice in the world,
PrettyThings1965_02
The Pretty Things did reach number ten on the U.K. charts, bewildering all of the more “professional” hands at Fontana Records by grabbing the ears of that harder, more intense part of the Stones’ larger audience and throwing them the sonic equivalent of raw meat to chew on. Phil May reveals himself as a fairly powerful singer, though lacking some of the charisma that Mick Jagger projected, but the group’s own raw power made for quirky appeal all of its own that would carry them for many years beyond this roaring start. And in the meantime, records like this would point the way not only toward the work of such American garage band icons as the MC5, but blast a path through the wilderness that the likes of Billy Childish and his band the Milkshakes and their successors would traverse. (by Bruce Eder)
PrettyThings1965_03
Personnel:
Phil May (vocals)
Brian Pendleton (guitar)
Viv Prince (drums)
Dick Taylor (guitar)
John Stax (bass)
+
Bobby Graham (drums)
BackCover1
Tracklist:
01. Road Runner(McDaniel) 3.12
02. Judgement Day (Morrison) 2.47
03. 13 Chester Street (May/Taylor/Pendleton/Stax/Prince) 2.22
04. Big City (Duncan/Klein) 2.02
05. Unknown Blues (May/Taylor/Pendleton/Stax/Prince) 3.48
06. Mama, Keep Your Big Mouth Shut (McDaniel) 3.04
07. Honey, I Need (Taylor/Warburton/Smith/Stirling) 2.00
08. Oh, Baby Doll (Berry) 3.01
09. She’s Fine, She’s Mine (McDaniel) 4.24
10. Don’t Lie To Me (Red) 3.53
11. The Moon Is Rising (Reed) 2.33
12. Pretty Thing (Dixon) 1.39
LabelA1

Supercharge – Between Music And Madness (1974)

originalfrontcover1Supercharge were a 1970s English rock band from Liverpool, founded by singer/saxophonist Albie Donnelly and drummer Dave Irving. They had a number three hit single in Australia with “You’ve Gotta Get Up and Dance” in 1977.
Founded in early 1974, by Liverpool tenor-saxophonist, Albie Donnelly (born Albert Edward Donnelly, 12 August 1947, Huyton, Liverpool), and drummer Dave Irving (born David Geddes Irving, 18 November 1946, Crosby, Liverpool) after they had both left the ‘In Crowd’ cabaret band, Supercharge soon built up quite a cult following in Liverpool at ‘The Sportsman’, a popular city-centre pub on Sunday and later Monday nights and also at the ‘Dove and Olive’ at Speke.
Original members included Donnelly (bandleader, vocalist, and tenor saxophonist), Ozzie Yue (guitar/vocals) (born Austin J Yue, 12 August 1947, Liverpool), Allen ‘Gaz’ Gaskell (tenor sax, guitar, harmonica, and vocals), Alan Peters (trumpet), Bob Robertson (baritone sax), Pete Newton (bass guitar), Tony Dunmore (bass) and Dave Irving (drums).
Supercharge also quickly established themselves as a major player on the UK college / university circuit. Their first album Between Music and Madness, which was locally produced, soon followed.
Around 1975, in an attempt to attract a major record label offer, Supercharge began to gig regularly on the London live circuit at venues such as the Hope and Anchor, Islington, the Nashville Rooms, and the Marquee Club. As a result, Supercharge were soon signed by Supercharge02Virgin Records, and with the company’s new record producer, Robert “Mutt” Lange, they had a number three hit in Australia with their 1976 single “You’ve Gotta Get Up and Dance”. Personnel on these recordings also included organist Iain Bradshaw. It was also in Australia that their first album, Local Lads Make Good went gold – resulting in a number of successful major tours with a version of the band that included Les Karski on guitar.
supercharge1974_01
These live UK gigs often featured celebrated live sound engineer Chrys Lindop, and included the infamous comedy track ‘She Moved The Dishes First’, which Donnelly claims they wrote so they could mess about a bit while the band were replacing broken guitar strings. This track also achieved notoriety when it was picked up and played regularly by Radio Caroline.
Meanwhile, back in the UK, although their record sales were disappointing, Supercharge still managed to achieve a reputation as one of the UK’s best live bands. This included Supercharge’s opening set for Queen at the 1976 Hyde Park Festival. However, it was becoming clear to Donnelly that Virgin did not really know what to do with them, and they eventually parted company sometime during the punk era.
Despite their reputation as a killer band live, Richard Branson decided that after two albums without major success that he would only offer Donnelly / Karski a continuous deal. The rest of the band became redundant, and ironically months later the ‘Local lads’ album went gold in Australia. However, the deed had been done, and Donnelly resorted to taking a scratch band to do the hit tour in Australia much to the chagrin of the original guys who had put all the hard studio and roadwork in to get the band where it was.
Success in Europe.(by Wikipedia)
And this is their phenomenal debut Album … a timeless classic ! Feel the power and the energy of Supercharge !
supercharge1974_02
Personnel:
Albie Donnelly (Saxophone, vocals)
Tony Dunmore (bass)
Dave Irving (drums)
Alan Peters (trumpet, flugelhorn, vocals)
Bob Robertson Saxophone, guitar, vocals)
Ozzie Yue (guitar, vocals)
+
Vinnie Parker (piano on 06. + 11.)
supercharge1974_03
Tracklist:

01. Tune, Gap, Clap, Fig (Donnelly) 1.15
02. Still Alive And Well (Derringer) 3.21
03. Doggone (Tarplin/Robinson/Moore) 4.29
04. Give It Up (Kool And The Gang) 4.54
05. Midnight (Donnelly/Irving/Yue) 5.02
06. Lazy Lady (Peters) 4.46
07. Superstition (Wonder) 4.32
08. New York (Dreams) 5.59
09. Blessed Relief (Zappa) 5.08
10. Troubled Soul (Peters) 5.20
11. Wine, Wine, Wine (Donnelly/Yue) 4.06
12  Fig, Chat, Feet, Slam, Bang (Donnelly) 1.13
cd1

*
**

Eric Burdon And The Animals – Roadrunners! Rare Live And Studio Recordings (1990)

front-cover1Eric’s at his wild best in these rare recordings-many never heard by even the most ardent Animals collector! Four tracks are British radio broadcasts from ’66, one is from German TV in ’67; the rest are all live, from Monterey in ’67, London in ’67 (including Inside Looking Out ) and Stockholm in ’68 ( San Franciscan Nights; Monterey , and more). And the rarest of the rare: six live cuts from Melbourne, Australia in ’67, including See See Rider and When I Was Young .
This is a mixed bag of live and BBC recordings from both the post-Alan Price edition of the original band, and the later New Animals of “San Franciscan Nights” fame. Sound quality varies, but the obscurity of these tracks more than compensates. The Beeb tracks include one Price number, a faithful rendition of “Heartbreak Hotel.” Other highlights include gritty takes on “Inside Looking Out” and “Maudie” plus a fantastic version of “Jailhouse Rock” that comes within shouting distance of Elvis (honestly!). Barry Jenkins almost steals the show with his knockout drumming, and Zoot Money’s organ washes are utterly scintillating. There’s also a raw set culled from the New Animals’ tour of Australia, highlighted by spirited versions of standards like “Shake Rattle and Roll” and “See See Rider.” The version of “When I Was Young” is also strong and the groovy radio announcer at the end is a trip. Burdon’s Monterey appearance is showcased in a pair of freakout versions of “Ginhouse Blues” and “Hey Gyp”, both of which are way too long and too self-indulgent. This is the weakest part of the album by far. New Animals fans will adore the 1968 tracks from Stockholm which feature the band at its psychedelic apex. As goofy as it sounds on WINDS OF CHANGE, “Yes I’m Experienced” really rocks on stage (especially the killer feedback rave up—and Eric’s rap at the end is hilarious), and the other tracks (“Paint It Black”, “San Franciscan Nights” and “Monterey”) are faithful, though edgier recreations of the group’s studio versions. Vic Briggs always claims the band was much better on stage than in the studio and this set backs him up, mainly because Burdon’s often wearying improvisations are kept to a reasonable minimum. Grab it if you dig Burdon’s post-1966 work (although Glen A. Baker’s liner notes are so fawning they’re worthless).(by an amazon customer

booklet01aPersonnel:
Various Animals line-ups

booklet03aTracklist:

Broadcasts:
BBC 1966:

01. Heartbreak Hotel (Axton/Durden) 2.40
02. The Work Song (Adderley/Brown) 2.52
03. Corrina Corrina (Traditional) 2.46
04. Jailhouse Rock (Leiber/Stoller) 2.52

German TV 1967:
05. Roadrunner (McDaniel) 2.53

Concerts:
Monterey 1967:
06. Gin House Blues (Troy/Henderson) 5.51
07. Hey Gyp (Dig The Slowness) (Leitch) 8.24

Festival Hall, Melbourne, 1967:
08. Shake, Rattle & Roll (Calhoun) 4.25
09. When I Was Young (Burdon/Briggs/Weider/Jenkins/McCulloch) 3.15
10. See See Rider (Rainey) 4.02
11. Rock Me Baby (King/Josea) 2.36
12. Tobacco Road (Loudermilk) 5.37
13. So Long (Burdon/Briggs/Weider/Jenkins/McCulloch) 3.46

Live London, 1967:
14. Inside Looking Out (L.Lomax/A.Lomax/Burdon/Chandler) 3.04
15. Maudie (Hooker) 4.15

Live Stockholm, 1968:
16. San Franciscan Nights (Burdon/Briggs/Weider/Jenkins/McCulloch) 4.33
17. Monterey (Burdon/Briggs/Weider/Jenkins/McCulloch) 6.16
18. Paint It Black (Jagger/Richards) 6.28

cd1

*
**

bookletbackcover