Clarence Carter – Patches (1970)

FrontCover1Clarence George Carter (born January 14, 1936) is an American blues and soul singer, musician, songwriter and record producer. His most successful records included “Slip Away”, “Back Door Santa” (both 1968), “Patches” (1970), and “Strokin'” (1985).

Born in Montgomery, Alabama, on January 14, 1936, Carter attended the Alabama School for the Blind in Talladega, Alabama, and Alabama State College in Montgomery, graduating in August 1960 with a Bachelor of Science degree in music. His professional music career began with friend Calvin Scott, signing to the Fairlane label to release “I Wanna Dance But I Don’t Know How”, as Clarence & Calvin, the following year. After the 1962 release of “I Don’t Know (School Girl),” the pair joined Duke Records, renaming themselves the C & C Boys and releasing four singles for the label, though none were commercially successful. In 1965 the duo recorded “Step by Step” at Rick Hall’s FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals; it was released on the Atlantic Records’ subsidiary Atco label, but it also failed to chart.

The duo performed regularly in clubs in Birmingham, Alabama in 1966. After Scott was seriously injured in an auto accident, Carter continued as a solo singer, and recorded for the Fame label. In 1967 he recorded “Tell Daddy”, which reached number 35 on the Billboard R&B chart and inspired Etta James’ answer record, “Tell Mama”, for which Carter was credited as writer. At the end of 1967, Carter joined Atlantic Records. He then began a string of hits on the R&B and pop charts, starting with “Slip Away” (number 2 R&B, number 6 pop), which has been described as “a superior cheating ballad spotlighting his anguished, massive baritone alongside the remarkably sinuous backing of Fame’s exemplary backing band”, and “Too Weak To Fight” (number 3 R&B, number 13 pop). At the end of 1968, he had a seasonal pop hit with the raunchy and funky “Back Door Santa” (number 4 pop), and toured nationally.[3][5][6] His backing singers included Candi Staton; they married in 1970 and produced a son, Clarence Carter Jr., before divorcing in 1973.

ClarenceCarter1Carter continued to have hits in 1969 and 1970, with “Snatching It Back”, “The Feeling Is Right”, “Doin’ Our Thing”, and “I Can’t Leave Your Love Alone” all reaching both the US pop and R&B charts. The B-side of “Snatching It Back” was a remake of a remake of James Carr’s “The Dark End of the Street.” Carter’s biggest hit came in 1970 with his version of “Patches”, first recorded by Chairmen of the Board, which was a UK number 2 hit and a US number 4. The record sold over one million copies, and received a gold disc awarded by the R.I.A.A. in September 1970, just two months after its release, and won the Grammy Award for Best R&B Song in 1971. Following “Slip Away” and “Too Weak to Fight”, it was Carter’s third million-seller. However, Carter’s later record releases were less successful, and he left Atlantic at the end of 1971 to rejoin the Fame label. In 1975 he signed to ABC Records, releasing three albums including Loneliness and Temptation.[3][9] According to writer Brian Ward, Carter “virtually made a career from tales of unbridled love and illicit sex…”

With the advent of disco in the mid 1970s, Carter’s career suffered. However, he signed for Ichiban Records in 1985, and found a new audience with songs such as “Strokin'” and “Dr. C.C.” in the 1980s and 1990s. “Strokin'” was reputedly deemed too ribald for a public release or radio play, so the record company placed the records in jukeboxes, where bar patrons discovered the song. “Strokin'” was given further acclaim when it was used in the Eddie Murphy remake of The Nutty Professor. It was most recently used in William Friedkin’s film Killer Joe. Carter’s soul sound also found an audience within the then-nascent hip-hop community.[citation needed] Most notably, the horn break from “Back Door Santa”, is sampled in the Run-D.M.C. Christmas song “Christmas in Hollis”.

ClarenceCarter2Carter’s later songs appealed (and still appeal) to a primarily African-American working-class audience that was also interested in contemporary blues artists such as Denise LaSalle, Bobby Rush, Marvin Sease and Sir Charles Jones. He has continued recording, releasing six albums for the Ichiban label and, since 1996, establishing his own Cee Gee Entertainment label. He has also continued to tour regularly in the Southern states and internationally- (by wikipedia)

Clarence Carter’s first major-hit album remains a must-own record, holding up extraordinarily well across four decades. Carter’s singing possesses an immediacy and emotional impact that is as striking today as it was in 1970, and displays a vast range as well. The title track is the best-known song here, though “It’s All in Your Mind” was also a hit later in the year, and “I Can’t Leave Your Love Alone” and “Your Love Lifted Me” could easily have joined it and topped the pop charts as well. Carter even provides a bracing authentic gospel approach to the then-new Beatles song “Let It Be,” taking the song back to the roots whence Paul McCartney drew his inspiration. He also assumes a more pop-oriented persona on “Till I Can’t Take It Anymore,” on which Carter starts to sound a bit like Elvis Presley, while on “It’s All in Your Mind” he seems to invoke the ghost of Sam Cooke. On his own “C.C. Blues,” Carter’s bluesiest persona emerges, his crunchy guitar playing off beautifully against a soaring horn section and Clayton Ivey’s piano, and he returns to a soul sound for the finale, the soaring “Getting the Bills (But No Merchandise).” (by Bruce Eder)

ClarenceCarter3Personnel:
Harrison Calloway, Jr. (trumpet)
Clarence Carter (guitar)
Ronnie Eades (saxophone)
Clayton Ivey (keyboards)
Albert Lowe Jr. (guitar)
Jerry Masters (bass)
Cornell McFadden (drums)
Jack Peck (trumpet)
Fred Prouty (drums)
Harvey Thompson (saxophone)
Aaron Varnell (saxophone)
Travis Wammack (guitar)
Bob Wray (bass)
+
Background vocals:
Charles Chalmers – Donna Rhodes – Sandy Rhodes

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. Willie And Laura Mae Jones (White) 4.18
02. Say Man (Carter/Jackson) 3.25
03. I’m Just A Prisoner (Of Your Good Lovin’) (Harris/Jackson) 2.15
04. Let It Be (Lennon/McCartney) 3.29
05. I Can’t Leave Your Love Alone (Carter/Jackson) 2.24
06. Your Love Lifted Me (McClinton) 2.37
07. Till I Can’t Take It Anymore (Otis/Burton) 3.13
08. Patches (Johnson/Dunbar) 3.11
09. It’s All In Your Mind (Jackson/Moore) 2.37
10. Changes (Dees) 2.53
11. C. C. Blues (Carter) 3.25
12. Getting The Bills (But No Merchandise) (Jackson/Moore) 2.19

LabelB1*
**

Advertisements

Various Artists – Soul Christmas (1968)

FrontCover1Originally issued as an Atlantic compilation back in 1968, Soul Christmas is just what is says: a collection of songs featuring R&B legends such as Otis Redding, Carla Thomas, Solomon Burke, Joe Tex, Clarence Carter, William Bell, King Curtis, and Booker T. & the MG’s. But if you’re looking for a compilation of mostly traditional Christmas tunes, this is not the record to buy. Apart from nods to time-honored classics like “White Christmas” (gloriously reinterpreted by Redding), Booker T.’s perky “Jingle Bells,” and the R&B favorite “What Are You Doing New Year’s Eve” (featuring sax man King Curtis at his bluesy best, along with a guitar solo by Duane Allman), the songs are all tailor-made originals that fit the style of the respective artists. Thus, Carter’s “Back Door Santa” is a hilariously salacious cut; Tex gives us a preacherlike “I’ll Make Everyday Christmas (For My Woman)”; and Thomas is at her most cute and innocent with “Gee Whiz, It’s Christmas.” Redding’s version of “Merry Christmas Baby” (a hit for Johnny Moore’s Three Blazers) is an obvious standout, while Bell’s “Everyday Will Be Like a Holiday” is the only bona fide charted single (albeit back in January 1968). For added value, Rhino has included three bonus tracks, including a 1978 recording by Ray Charles of “Christmas Time.” (by David Nathan)

BackCoverTracklist:
01. Clarence Carter: Back Door Santa (Carter) 2.10
02. King Curtis: The Christmas Song (feat. Duane Allman) (Tormé/Wells) 3.11
03. Otis Redding: White Christmas (feat. Booker T & The MG´s + The Memphis Horns) (Berlin) 3.09
04. Joe Tex: I’ll Make Every Day Christmas (For My Woman) (Tex) 3.32
05. Booker T. & The MG’s: Silver Bells (Evans/Livingstone) 2.33
06. Carla Thomas: Gee Whiz, It’s Christmas (Cropper) 2.47
07. Otis Redding: Merry Christmas Baby (feat. Booker T & The MG´s + The Memphis Horns) (Traditional) 2.34
08. Solomon Burke: Presents For Christmas )D.Burke/S.Burke) 3.13
09. Booker T. & The MG’s: Jingle Bells (Traditional) 2.238
10. William Bell: Every Day Will Be Like A Holiday (Bell) 2.40
11. King Curtis: What Are You Doing New Year’s Eve (feat. Duane Allman) (Loesser) 3.45
12. Carla Thomas: All I Want For Christmas Is You (Williams) 1.45
+
13. Ray Charles: Christmas Time (Shepard) 4.31
14. Booker T. & The MG’s: Santa Claus Is Coming To Town (Gillespie/Coots) 2.35

Label*
**

AlternateFrontCoverAlternate frontcover