Various Artists – The History Of Jazz – The New Orleans Joys (1994)

frontcover1This is a real fine compilation about the roots of Jazz, about the early Jazz in New Orleans:

The music of New Orleans assumes various styles of music which have often borrowed from earlier traditions. New Orleans, Louisiana, is especially known for its strong association with jazz music, universally considered to be the birthplace of the genre. The earliest form was dixieland, which has sometimes been called traditional jazz, ‘New Orleans’, and ‘New Orleans jazz’. However, the tradition of jazz in New Orleans has taken on various forms that have either branched out from original dixieland or taken entirely different paths altogether. New Orleans has also been a prominent center of funk, home to some of the earliest funk bands such as The Meters.

The African influence on New Orleans music can trace its roots at least back to Congo Square in New Orleans in 1835, when slaves would congregate there to play music and dance on Sundays. African music was played as well as local music, including that of such local white composers as Louis Moreau Gottschalk. Along with such popular European musical forms popular in the city, perhaps most notably the brass band traditions, the cultural mix laid the groundwork for the New Orleans musical art forms to come.
By 1838 the local paper—the daily Picayune—ran a scathing article complaining about the emergence of brass bands in the city, which it stated could be found on every corner.
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Caricature of an African-American band playing in New Orleans in 1890. New Orleans writer Al Rose has called this “The earliest known illustration of a jazz band”. While the instrumentation of cornet or trumpet, trombone, clarinet, and drums is suggestive of the early jazz bands of some 15 years later, how close this music was to what would be known as “jazz” is speculative.

The term “jazz” (early on often spelled “jass”) did not become popular until the mid and late 1910s, when New Orleans musicians first rose to prominence in other parts of the USA and the New Orleans style needed a new name to differentiate it from the nationally popular ragtime. Before then, the New Orleans style was frequently simply called “ragtime” (Sidney Bechet continued to call his music “ragtime” throughout his life), along with such local terms as “hot music” and “ratty music”.

The local New Orleans dance music style was already distinctive in the 19th century. When this style became what was later known as “jazz” remains a matter of debate and definition, although most New Orleans music historians believe what became known as New Orleans style jazz was the product of a series of developments, probably reaching its famous form no earlier than the 1890s and no later than the mid 1910s.
By the 1890s a man by the name of Poree hired a band led by cornetist Buddy Bolden, many of whose contemporaries as well as many jazz historians consider to be the first prominent jazz musician. The music was not called jazz at this time, consisting of marching band music with brass instruments and dancing. If anything, Bolden could be said to have been a blues player.
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The actual term “jazz” was first “jass”, the etymology of which is still not entirely clear. The connotation is sexual in nature, as many of the early performers played in rough working class venues. Despite colorful stories of mid-20th century writers, the prostitution district known as Storyville was no more important in the development of the music than the city’s other neighborhoods, but did play a role in exposing some out of town visitors to the style. Many instruments used were often acquired second-hand at pawn shops, including used military band instruments.

The Creole people of New Orleans also contributed greatly to the evolution of the artform, though their own music became heavily influenced by the pioneering work of Bolden. New Orleans-born musicians such as Louis Armstrong, Sidney Bechet and Jelly Roll Morton all recalled the influence Bolden had on the direction of the music of New Orleans. (Armstrong himself had no memory of Bolden, but was told about him by his mentor King Oliver), and jazz itself. (by wikipedia)

Enjoy this sentimental journey to the roots of (New Orleans) Jazz !
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Personnel:
see booklet for details
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Tracklist:
CD 1:
01. King Oliver and His Creole Jazz Band: Chimes Blues (Oliver) 2.53
02. Piron’s New Orleans Orchestra: Bouncing Around (Bocage/Piron) 2.45
03. Fate’s Society Orchestra Marable: Frankie & Johnny (Traditional) 2.47
04. Jelly Roll Morton: Tia Juana (Morton) 2.50
05. Clarence Williams Blue Five: Texas Moaner Blues (Barnes/Williams) 3.14
06. Red Onion Jazz Babies: Calke Walking Babies (Williams/Smith/Troy) 3.18
07. Celestin’s Original Tuxedo Jazz Orchestra: Original Tuxedo Rag (Celestin) 2.44
08. King Oliver & Jelly Roll Morton:King Porter Stomp (Morton) 2.31
09. Bertha “Chippie” Hill: Trouble in Mind (Jones) 2.52
10. Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five: Cornet Shop Suey (Armstrong) 3.01
11. Arthur Sims & His Creole Roof Orchestra: Soapstick Blues (Jones) 3.06
12. Cookie’s Gingersnaps: Here Comes the Hot Tamale Man (Rose/Harrison) 3.24
13. New Orleans Wanderers: Perdido Street Blues (Armstrong) 3.11
14. Jelly Roll Morton’s Red Hot Peppers: Doctor Jazz (Other) 3.26
15. Louis Dumaine Jazzola Eight: Franklin Street Blues (Dumaine/Jackson) 3.22
16. Sam Morgan Jazz Band: Mobile Stomp (Morgan) 3.00
17. Johnny’s  Dodds Black Bottom Stompers: New Orleans Stomp (Dodds) 2.44
18. King Oliver and His Dixie Syncopators: Willie The Weeper (Rymal/Melrose/Bloom) 2.54

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CD 2:
01. Louis Armstrong and His Hot Seven: Wild Man Blues (Armstrong/Morton) 3.18
02. Louis Armstrong and His Hot Seven: Ory’s Creole Trombone (Ory) 3.08
03. The Chicago Footwarmers: Get ’em Again Blues (Barbarin/Russell) 2.54
04. Johnny Dodds: Too Tight (Armstrong) 2.59
05. Jabbo Smith’s Rhythm Aces: Sweet ‘n’ Low Blues (Smith) 4.23
06. Omer Simeon and Earl Hines: Beau Koo Jack (Simeon) 2.43
07. Jones & Collins Astoria Hot Eight: Duet Stomp (Collins/Jones) 2.53
08. New Orleans Feetwarmers: Maple Leaf Rag (Joplin) 2.59
09. Trixie Smith: He May Be Your Man (But He Comes To See Me Sometimes) (Fowler/Bradford) 2.50
10. Tommy Ladnier: Really the Blues (Mezzron) 3.39
11. Jelly Roll MortonNew Orleans Jazzmen: Oh, Didn’t He Ramble (Handy) 2.59
12. Louis Armstrong: 2.19 Blues (Desdume) 2.51
13. Zutty Singleton: Shimme-Sha-Wobble (Williams) 3.06
14, Henry “Red” Allen and His Orchestra: Down In Jungle Town (Morse/Madden) 2.50
15. Sidney Becher and His New Orleans Feetwarmers: Make Me A Pallet On The Floor (Traditional) 3.15
16. Johnny Dodds: Red Onion Blues (Williams) 2.54
17. Jimmie Noone: New Orleans Hop Scop Blues (Thomas) 2.55
18. Edmond Hall’s Blue Note Jazzmen: High Society (Piron) 4.05

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