Creedence Clearwater Revival – Willy And The Poor Boys (1969)

FrontCover1Creedence Clearwater Revival, also referred to as Creedence and CCR, was an American rock band formed in El Cerrito, California. The band initially consisted of lead vocalist, lead guitarist, and primary songwriter John Fogerty; his brother, rhythm guitarist Tom Fogerty; bassist Stu Cook; and drummer Doug Clifford. These members had played together since 1959, first as the Blue Velvets and later as the Golliwogs, before settling on the Creedence Clearwater Revival name in 1967.

CCR’s musical style encompassed roots rock, swamp rock, blues rock, Southern rock, country rock, and blue-eyed soul. Belying their origins in the East Bay subregion of the San Francisco Bay Area, the band often played in a Southern rock style, with lyrics about bayous, catfish, the Mississippi River and other elements of Southern United States iconography. The band’s songs rarely dealt with romantic love, concentrating instead on political and socially conscious lyrics about topics such as the Vietnam War. The band performed at the 1969 Woodstock festival in Upstate New York, and was the first major act signed to appear there.

CCR disbanded acrimoniously in late 1972 after four years of chart-topping success. Tom Fogerty had officially left the previous year, and John was at odds with the remaining members over matters of business and artistic control, all of which resulted in subsequent lawsuits among the former bandmates. Fogerty’s ongoing disagreements with Fantasy Records owner Saul Zaentz created further protracted court battles, and John Fogerty refused to perform with the two other surviving members at Creedence’s 1993 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Though the band has never officially reunited, John Fogerty continues to perform CCR songs as part of his solo act, while Cook and Clifford have performed as Creedence Clearwater Revisited since the 1990s.

CCR’s music is still a staple of U.S. classic rock radio airplay; 28 million CCR records have been sold in the U.S. alone. The compilation album Chronicle: The 20 Greatest Hits, originally released in 1976, is still on the Billboard 200 album chart and reached the 500-weeks mark in December 2020. It has been awarded 10x platinum.

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Willy and the Poor Boys is the fourth studio album by American rock band Creedence Clearwater Revival, released by Fantasy Records in November 1969. It was the last of three studio albums the band released that year, arriving just three months after Green River.

The album features the songs “Down on the Corner”, from which the album got its name, and “Fortunate Son”, which is a well-known protest song. Creedence also released its own version of “Cotton Fields” on this album, which reached the #1 position in Mexico.

The album was planned to be formed around a concept introduced in “Down on the Corner”, with Creedence taking on the identity of an old-time jug band called “Willy and The Poor Boys”. However, this was dropped rather quickly, except for the cover, where the band remains in character.

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By the fall of 1969, Creedence Clearwater Revival was one of the hottest rock bands in the world, having scored three consecutive #2 singles and the #1 album Green River. In addition, the group had performed at the landmark Woodstock Festival in August and made several high-profile television appearances, including The Ed Sullivan Show. Bandleader and songwriter John Fogerty had assumed control of the band after several years of futility, but, despite their growing success, the other members – bassist Stu Cook, drummer Doug Clifford and guitarist Tom Fogerty, John’s older brother – began to chafe under Fogerty’s demanding, autocratic leadership. The band’s output in 1969 alone – three full-length albums – was staggering considering that they were touring nonstop throughout. “That was a bit of overkill and I never did understand that,” Clifford stated to Jeb Wright of Goldmine in 2013, “Fogerty told us that if we were ever off the charts, then we would be forgotten… To make it worse, it might sound funny, but we had double-sided hits, and that was kind of a curse, as we were burning through material twice as fast. If we’d spread it out, we would not have had to put out three albums in one year.” The fiercely competitive Fogerty remained unapologetic, insisting to Guitar World’s Harold Steinblatt in 1998, “Everyone advised me against putting out great B-sides. They’d tell me I was wasting potential hits. And I looked at them and said, ‘Baloney. Look at the Beatles. Look at Elvis. It’s the quickest way to show them all that good music.”

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In August, CCR released its third LP, Green River. Shortly after, it began recording songs for its next LP, Willy and the Poor Boys. Two months later the band released its eighth single, “Down on the Corner” b/w “Fortunate Son”. The single’s A-side reached #3 on the Billboard Hot 100 and its B-side made it to #14. “Down on the Corner” chronicles the tale of the fictional band Willy and the Poor Boys, and how they play on street corners to cheer people up and ask for nickels. The song makes reference to a washboard, a kazoo, a Kalamazoo Guitar, and a gut bass.[6] In a 1969 appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show[citation needed], the boys performed the song as Willy and the Poor Boys. Stu Cook played a gut bass, Doug Clifford the washboard, and Tom Fogerty the Kalamazoo, which mimicked the appearance of the band as they appear on the album cover.

“Down on the Corner” b/w “Fortunate Son” peaked at #3 on December 20, 1969 on the Hot 100. “Fortunate Son” is a counterculture era anti-war anthem, criticizing militant patriotic behavior and those who support the use of military force without having to “pay the costs” themselves (either financially or by serving in a wartime military) The song, released during the Vietnam War, is not explicit in its criticism of that war in particular, but its attacks on the elite classes (the families that give birth to eponymous “fortunate sons”) of the United States and their withdrawal from the costs of nationalistic imperialism are easy to contextualize to that conflict. The song was inspired by the wedding of David Eisenhower, the grandson of United States President Dwight David Eisenhower, to Julie Nixon, the daughter of President Richard Nixon, in 1968. The song’s author told Rolling Stone:

Julie Nixon was hanging around with David Eisenhower, and you just had the feeling that none of these people were going to be involved with the war. In 1968, the majority of the country thought morale was great among the troops, and eighty percent of them were in favor of the war. But to some of us who were watching closely, we just knew we were headed for trouble.

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In 1993, Fogerty confessed to Rolling Stone’s Michael Goldberg, “It was written, of course, during the Nixon era, and well, let’s say I was very non-supportive of Mr. Nixon.” The song has been widely used to protest military actions and elitism in Western society, particularly in the United States; as an added consequence of its popularity, it has even been used in completely unrelated situations, such as to advertise blue jeans. It attracted criticism when Bruce Springsteen, Dave Grohl, and Zac Brown performed the song together at the November 2014 Concert for Valor in Washington, D.C. Fogerty, a military veteran, defended their song choice.

Fogerty’s revulsion with President Nixon can also be found on the album’s closing track, “Effigy.” In 2013 the singer-songwriter told David Cavanagh of Uncut that the tune was his response to Nixon emerging from the White House one afternoon and sneering at the anti-war demonstrators outside, with Fogerty remembering, “He said, ‘Nothing you do here today will have any effect on me. I’m going back inside to watch the football game.'”

“Don’t Look Now” displays Fogerty’s concern for the working poor (“Who will take the coal from the mine? Who will take the salt from the earth?”). As recounted in the VH1 Legends episode on the band, Fogerty once stated to Time magazine, “I see things through lower class eyes.”

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The Chuck Berry-guitar romp “It Came Out of the Sky” tells the tale of a farmer who finds a UFO in his field and unwittingly becomes the most famous man in America. The album also includes two instrumental tracks in “Poorboy Shuffle” and “Side o’ the Road”, the former of which segues directly into the song “Feelin’ Blue.”

The LP also contains two songs associated with blues and folk legend Lead Belly: “Cotton Fields” and “The Midnight Special”. In 2012, Fogerty explained to Uncut, “Lead Belly was a big influence. I learned about him through Pete Seeger. When you listen to those guys, you’re getting down to the root of the tree.” In 1982 the band’s rendition of Lead Belly’s “Cotton Fields” made #50 on Billboard magazine’s Country Singles chart.

When the band members were finalizing the album, they and photographer Basul Parik went over to the intersection of Peralta St. and Hollis St. in Oakland, California and shot the photograph of the cover at Duck Kee Market owned by Ruby Lee.

The album was released in November as Fantasy 8397, and in 1970 made the Top 50 in six countries, including France where it reached #1. On December 16, 1970, the Recording Industry Association of America certified the album gold (500,000 units sold). Almost 20 years later, on December 13, 1990, the album was certified platinum (1,000,000 units sold) and 2x platinum (2,000,000 units sold).

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The album was well received, exemplified by the original review in Rolling Stone, which stated it was “the best one yet”. In a contemporary review for The Village Voice, Robert Christgau also believed it was the group’s best record while writing, “Fogerty’s subtlety as a political songwriter (have you ever really dug the words of ‘Fortunate Son’?) comes as no surprise.”[18] He later included it in his “Basic Record Library” of 1950s and 1960s recordings, published in Christgau’s Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies (1981).

In a retrospective review, AllMusic editor Stephen Thomas Erlewine contrasted Willy and the Poor Boys with the band’s previous album, Green River, because the songs were softer and more upbeat, except for “Effigy”, and stating that “Fortunate Son” is not as dated as most of the other protest songs of the era. However, he also feels the song is a little out of place on the album. He also compared “Poorboy Shuffle” to songs performed by jug bands and called the album “one of the greatest pure rock & roll albums ever cut”. In the Blender magazine review of the album it was called the opposite of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band and psychedelic rock, which the reviewer feels is because of the band’s performance at the Woodstock Festival. For his Rolling Stone review of the 40th anniversary reissue of the album, Barry Walters called the album “relaxed” and gives credit to Fogerty for writing a protest song, “Fortunate Son”, that has a good beat to it.

In 2003, the album was ranked number 392 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time; the list’s 2012 edition had it ranked 309th. In the 2020 edition, the album reached number 193. On June 10, 2008, the album was remastered and released by Concord Music Group as a compact disc, with three bonus tracks. The album was remastered and reissued on 180-gram vinyl by Analogue Productions in 2006. (wikipedia)

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Personnel:
Doug Clifford (drums, washboard on 04.)
Stu Cook (bass, washtub bass on 04., background vocals)
John Fogerty (vocals, lead guitar, piano, percussion, harmonica on 04.)
Tom Fogerty (guitar, background vocals)

CCR3Tracklist:
01. Down On The Corner (J.Fogerty) 2.48
02. It Came Out Of The Sky (J.Fogerty) 2.57
03. Cotton Fields (Ledbetter) 2.55
04. Poorboy Shuffle (J.Fogerty) 2.27
05. Feelin’ Blue (J.Fogerty) 5.03
06. Fortunate Son (J.Fogerty) 2.22
07. Don’t Look Now (It Ain’t You Or Me) (J.Fogerty) 2.12
08. The Midnight Special (Traditional) 4.15
09. Side O’ the Road (J.Fogerty) 3.25
10. Effigy(J.Fogerty) 6.28

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Some folks are born made to wave the flag
They’re red, white and blue
And when the band plays “Hail to the Chief”
They point the cannon at you, Lord

It ain’t me, it ain’t me
I ain’t no senator’s son, son
It ain’t me, it ain’t me
I ain’t no fortunate one

Some folks are born silver spoon in hand
Lord, don’t they help themselves, yeah
But when the taxman comes to the door
The house look a like a rummage sale

It ain’t me, it ain’t me
I ain’t no millionaire’s son, no, no
It ain’t me, it ain’t me
I ain’t no fortunate one

Yeah, some folks inherit star-spangled eyes
They send you down to war
And when you ask ’em, “How much should we give?”
They only answer, “More, more, more”

It ain’t me, it ain’t me
I ain’t no military son, son
It ain’t me, it ain’t me
I ain’t no fortunate one, one
It ain’t me, it ain’t me
I ain’t no fortunate one
It ain’t me, it ain’t me
I ain’t no fortunate one

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Creedence Clearwater Revival – Pendulum (1970)

FrontCover1Creedence Clearwater Revival, also referred to as Creedence and CCR, was an American rock band formed in El Cerrito, California. The band initially consisted of lead vocalist, lead guitarist, and primary songwriter John Fogerty; his brother, rhythm guitarist Tom Fogerty; bassist Stu Cook; and drummer Doug Clifford. These members had played together since 1959, first as the Blue Velvets and later as the Golliwogs, before settling on the Creedence Clearwater Revival name in 1967.

CCR’s musical style encompassed roots rock,  swamp rock, blues rock, Southern rock, country rock, and blue-eyed soul.[8] Belying their origins in the East Bay subregion of the San Francisco Bay Area, the band often played in a Southern rock style, with lyrics about bayous, catfish, the Mississippi River and other elements of Southern United States iconography. The band’s songs rarely dealt with romantic love, concentrating instead on political and socially conscious lyrics about topics such as the Vietnam War. The band performed at the 1969 Woodstock festival in Upstate New York, and was the first major act signed to appear there.CCR1

CCR disbanded acrimoniously in late 1972 after four years of chart-topping success. Tom Fogerty had officially left the previous year, and John was at odds with the remaining members over matters of business and artistic control, all of which resulted in subsequent lawsuits among the former bandmates. Fogerty’s ongoing disagreements with Fantasy Records owner Saul Zaentz created further protracted court battles, and John Fogerty refused to perform with the two other surviving members at Creedence’s 1993 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Though the band has never officially reunited, John Fogerty continues to perform CCR songs as part of his solo act, while Cook and Clifford have performed as Creedence Clearwater Revisited since the 1990s.

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CCR’s music is still a staple of U.S. classic rock radio airplay; 28 million CCR records have been sold in the U.S. alone. The compilation album Chronicle: The 20 Greatest Hits, originally released in 1976, is still on the Billboard 200 album chart and reached the 500-weeks mark in December 2020. It has been awarded 10x platinum.

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Pendulum is the sixth studio album by American rock band Creedence Clearwater Revival, released by Fantasy Records on December 9, 1970[1]—their second album release of that year. A single from the album, “Have You Ever Seen the Rain”/”Hey Tonight”, was released in January 1971.

Pendulum is their only album to not contain any cover songs; all tracks were written by John Fogerty. It was the last album the band recorded with Tom Fogerty, who would leave the band to start a solo career. It was also the last album to feature John Fogerty as the record’s sole producer.

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The most sonically adventurous CCR album, Pendulum is noted for its widespread use of saxophone and keyboards, in contrast to the group’s previous albums, which were dominated by guitar. Among several lesser-known Fogerty songs (“Pagan Baby”, “Sailor’s Lament”, “It’s Just a Thought”, “Born to Move”) were two top-ten hits, “Hey Tonight” and “Have You Ever Seen the Rain”. Both songs reached number eight in 1971. It also contains an uncharacteristic venture into avant-garde psychedelia, the closing instrumental “Rude Awakening #2”.

The album was recorded at Wally Heider Studios in San Francisco, and took a month to complete—an unusually long time for the band. On previous albums, the group had rehearsed songs before entering the studio. However, on Pendulum the members learned the songs in the studio.[6] The first take of a song was performed by the whole band,[7] with various members going in later for a wide variety of instrumental and vocal overdubs, including a saxophone section played entirely by John Fogerty, as well as extensive use of keyboards by Fogerty and Cook.(wikipedia)

The US Labels:
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During 1969 and 1970, CCR was dismissed by hipsters as a bubblegum pop band and the sniping had grown intolerable, at least to John Fogerty, who designed Pendulum as a rebuke to critics. He spent time polishing the production, bringing in keyboards, horns, even a vocal choir. His songs became self-consciously serious and tighter, working with the aesthetic of the rock underground — Pendulum was constructed as a proper album, contrasting dramatically with CCR’s previous records, all throwbacks to joyous early rock records where covers sat nicely next to hits and overlooked gems tucked away at the end of the second side. To some fans of classic CCR, this approach may feel a little odd since only “Have You Ever Seen the Rain” and maybe its B-side “Hey Tonight” sound undeniably like prime Creedence. But, given time, the album is a real grower, revealing many overlooked Fogerty gems. Yes, it isn’t transcendent like the albums they made from Bayou Country through Cosmo’s Factory, but most bands never even come close to that kind of hot streak.

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Instead, Pendulum finds a first-class songwriter and craftsman pushing himself and his band to try new sounds, styles, and textures. His ambition results in a stumble — “Rude Awakening 2” portentously teeters on the verge of prog-rock, something CCR just can’t pull off — but the rest of the record is excellent, with such great numbers as the bluesy groove “Pagan Baby,” the soulful vamp “Chameleon,” the moody “It’s Just a Thought,” and the raver “Molina.” Most bands would kill for this to be their best stuff, and the fact that it’s tucked away on an album that even some fans forget illustrates what a tremendous band Creedence Clearwater Revival was. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Stu Cook (bass, piano, kalimba, percussion)
Doug Clifford (drums, percussion)
John Fogerty (vocals, lead guitar, keyboards, saxophone, percussion)
Tom Fogerty (guitar, percussion)

BookletTracklist:
01. Pagan Baby 6.21
02. Sailor’s Lament 3.34
03. Chameleon 3.11
04. Have You Ever Seen The Rain? 2.38
05. (Wish I Could) Hideaway 3.33
06. Born To Move 5.38
07. Hey Tonight 2.33
08. It’s Just A Thought 3.35
09. Molina 2.36
10. Rude Awakening #2 (instrumental) 6.13
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11. 45 Revolutions Per Minute (Part 1) 3.14
12. 45 Revolutions Per Minute (Part 2)  7.17
13. Hey Tonight (live in Hamburg September 17, 1971) 2.28

(Tracks 11 and 12 are musique concrète tracks (in the vein of “Revolution 9”), including tongue-in-cheek interviews with band members)

All songs written by John Fogerty

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Creedence Clearwater Revival – Same (1968)

OriginalFrontCover1Creedence Clearwater Revival, also referred to as Creedence and CCR, was an American rock band formed in El Cerrito, California. The band initially consisted of lead vocalist, lead guitarist, and primary songwriter John Fogerty; his brother, rhythm guitarist Tom Fogerty; bassist Stu Cook; and drummer Doug Clifford. These members had played together since 1959, first as the Blue Velvets and later as the Golliwogs, before settling on the Creedence Clearwater Revival name in 1967.

CCR’s musical style encompassed roots rock, swamp rock, blues rock, Southern rock, country rock, and blue-eyed soul.[8] Belying their origins in the East Bay subregion of the San Francisco Bay Area, the band often played in a Southern rock style, with lyrics about bayous, catfish, the Mississippi River and other elements of Southern United States iconography. The band’s songs rarely dealt with romantic love, concentrating instead on political and socially conscious lyrics about topics such as the Vietnam War. The band performed at the 1969 Woodstock festival in Upstate New York, and was the first major act signed to appear there.

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CCR disbanded acrimoniously in late 1972 after four years of chart-topping success. Tom Fogerty had officially left the previous year, and John was at odds with the remaining members over matters of business and artistic control, all of which resulted in subsequent lawsuits among the former bandmates. Fogerty’s ongoing disagreements with Fantasy Records owner Saul Zaentz created further protracted court battles, and John Fogerty refused to perform with the two other surviving members at Creedence’s 1993 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Though the band has never officially reunited, John Fogerty continues to perform CCR songs as part of his solo act, while Cook and Clifford have performed as Creedence Clearwater Revisited since the 1990s.

CCR’s music is still a staple of U.S. classic rock radio airplay; 28 million CCR records have been sold in the U.S. alone. The compilation album Chronicle The 20 Greatest Hits, originally released in 1976, is still on the Billboard 200 album chart and reached the 500-weeks mark in December 2020. It has been awarded 10x platinum.

CCR02

Creedence Clearwater Revival is the debut studio album by American rock band Creedence Clearwater Revival, released on May 28, 1968.

While “Suzie Q” proved to be a hit, the band had played for years as the Golliwogs in the early 1960s, releasing numerous singles before achieving success in the pop world. In 1967, Saul Zaentz bought Fantasy Records and offered the band a chance to record a full-length album on the condition that they change their name. Having never liked ‘the Golliwogs’, in part because of the racial charge of the name, the four readily agreed, coming up with Creedence Clearwater Revival. In Hank Bordowitz’s book Bad Moon Rising: The Unauthorized History of Creedence Clearwater Revival, bassist Stu Cook is quoted, “Fogerty, Cook, Clifford and Fogerty signed a publishing agreement with one of Fantasy’s companies that gave up rights to copyright ownership…Lennon and McCartney never owned the copyrights to their compositions, either. When you’re on the bottom, you make the best deal you can.”[1] John Fogerty took charge of the group artistically, writing all of the band’s fourteen hit records and assuming the roles of singer, guitarist, producer and arranger of nearly everything that appeared on Creedence’s seven studio albums.

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“Porterville”, which was the last single released by the band under the name the Golliwogs in November 1967, was included on the band’s debut album and revealed singer/guitarist John Fogerty’s nascent songwriting talents. The song was a breakthrough of sorts for Fogerty, who stated to Tom Pinnock of Uncut in 2012, “It’s semi-autobiographical; I touch on my father, but it’s a flight of fantasy, too. And I knew when I was doing it, ‘Man, I’m on to something here.’ Everything changed after that. I gave up trying to write sappy love songs about stuff I didn’t know anything about, and I started inventing stories.” The album also includes the only co-write between John and his brother Tom Fogerty (who had been the original lead singer in the group) to appear on a Creedence album: the foreboding “Walk on the Water”. The song had already been released in 1966 under the Golliwogs name. The album features three other Fogerty originals: “The Working Man”, “Get Down Woman”, and “Gloomy”.

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Creedence Clearwater Revival is best remembered for the band’s first hit single “Suzie Q”, which had been a hit for Dale Hawkins in 1957. It was released as a single version split into two parts, with the jam session during the coda on the A-side fading out with the guitar solo right before the coda which fades in part two on the B-side. Fogerty stated in a 1993 interview with Rolling Stone magazine that his purpose in recording “Suzie Q” was to get the song played on KMPX, a funky progressive-rock radio station in San Francisco, which is why the song was extended to eight minutes in length. “‘Suzie Q’ was designed to fit right in,” he explained. “The eight-minute opus. Feedback

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.Like [the Paul Butterfield Blues Band’s] ‘East-West’. And especially the little effect, the little telephone-box [vocal] in the middle, which is the only part I regret now. It’s just funny sounding. But, lo and behold, it worked!” Fogerty elaborated to Larry King in 1999, “We recorded an old Dale Hawkins song but I psychedelicized it to get it played on the local San Francisco underground radio station.” The guitarist on the original Hawkins version, James Burton, would also exert a major influence on Fogerty, with the singer telling Lynne Margolis of American Songwriter, “James Burton was a huge influence on me going back to when I was a child, when I bought that record, ‘Suzie-Q,’ and that was James Burton playing that guitar—which I didn’t know at the time, of course.”

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Drummer Doug Clifford concurs to Jeb Wright on the Classic Rock Revisited website that he too tried to experiment with the tune, recalling “‘Susie Q’ was a rockabilly song that sounded like all of the other rockabilly songs. I came up with a quarter note idea and it made it harder edged and it gave it space and a totally different feel…” The Creedence version would reach #11 in the charts. In 2012 David Cavanagh of Uncut wrote, “For all his scepticism about long solos, Fogerty stretched out penetratingly on guitar while Creedence’s rhythm trio laid down a sublime slow boogie.” In 1998, Fogerty stated to Harold Steinblatt of Guitar World that the recording of “Suzie Q” was “very pivotal” in another respect:

it established how we would work for the next few years. After we finished recording our parts, the other guys hung around while I mixed. The problem was they were making all these comments like, “Well, that won’t work. This won’t work.” You know, they were having a great time laughing…And that was the very last time I ever allowed them to be around when I mixed a record…Basically, we’d go in, we’d record the band, and then I’d throw them out of the studio. I just couldn’t have them around while I was doing overdubs or when I was mixing, because they weren’t very constructive.

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The album’s other notable cover, the Screamin’ Jay Hawkins classic “I Put a Spell on You”, was a natural for Fogerty, whose own manic vocal delivery had much in common with Hawkins’ powerful singing style. Released as a follow up to “Suzie Q” in October 1968 with “Walk on the Water” as the B-side, it peaked on the U.S. charts at #58.

The album was remastered and reissued on 180 Gram vinyl by Analogue Productions in 2006.

While the band did gain success with their chart debut, critics initially denied the band respect. Barry Gifford writing in Rolling Stone at the time stated, “The only bright spot in the group is John Fogerty, who plays lead guitar and does the vocals. He’s a better-than-average singer (really believable in Wilson Pickett’s “Ninety-Nine and a Half”), and an interesting guitarist. But there’s nothing else here. The drummer is monotonous, the bass lines are all repetitious and the rhythm guitar is barely audible.” Time has been far kinder to the album, although critics note that Fogerty’s songwriting talent had yet to truly blossom like it would on the band’s future albums and singles.

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On AllMusic the album received 4 stars (out of 5), with Stephen Thomas Erlewine stating: “Released in the summer of 1968 – a year after the Summer of Love, but still in the thick of the Age of Aquarius – Creedence Clearwater Revival’s self-titled debut album was gloriously out-of-step with the times, teeming with John Fogerty’s Americana fascinations.” He also noted that the album “points the way to the breakthrough of Bayou Country, with “Porterville” being “an exceptional song with great hooks, an underlying sense of menace, and the first inkling of the working-class rage that fueled such landmarks as ‘Fortunate Son.'”

The album was first certified Gold by the RIAA on December 16, 1970, then Platinum twenty years later on December 13, 1990. (wikipedia)

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Personnel:
Stu Cook (bass, background vocals)
Doug Clifford (drums, background vocals)
John Fogerty (lead guitar, vocals, percussion)
Tom Fogerty (guitar, background vocals)

Reissue Labels:
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Tracklist:
01. I Put a Spell On You (Hawkins) 4.35
02. The Working Man (J.Fogerty) 3.05
03. Susie Q (Hawkins/Broadwater/Lewis 8.40
04. Ninety-Nine And A Half (Won’t Do) (Cropper/Floyd/Pickett) 3.40
05. Get Down Woman (J.Fogerty) 3.10
06. Porterville (1) (J.Fogerty) 2.25
07. Gloomy (J.Fogerty) 3.50
08. Walk On The Water (2) (J. Fogerty/T.Fogerty) 4.40

(1) recorded October 1967, initially released as a single in November 1967, the last single the band released as The Golliwogs
(2) this track is a remake of “Walking on the Water”, a recording released by the band as a single in 1966, while they were still known as The Golliwogs)

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Creedence Cleartwater Revival – Midnight On The Bay (The Concert) (1970)

FrontCover1The Concert is a second live album by American rock band Creedence Clearwater Revival, released by Fantasy Records in October 1980. The album was recorded at the Oakland Coliseum in Oakland, California on January 31, 1970.

Originally the album was mistakenly titled The Royal Albert Hall Concert. Only later was it discovered that it was not recorded at the Royal Albert Hall, it was duly renamed for later reissues.

The album reached #62 on the Billboard 200 in 1981. The album achieved gold status (500,000 units sold) by the Recording Industry Association of America on February 27, 1986 and made platinum status (1,000,000 units sold) on September 30, 1996. (by wikipedia)

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“Midnight On The Bay” is the same concert that Fantasy Records first released as “The Royal Albert Hall Concert” and then as “In Concert”.

There are three reasons to get this album: First, it’s one of their greatest performances. Second, it sounds better than others release, and third, it doesn’t have the annoying fades between songs. It’s the complete show as it was performed that night. (by vivalesbootlegs.blogspot)

LiveThe album simply captures Creedence Clearwater Revival at the height of their powers, when they were the most popular American rock & roll band. They released three albums in 1969, all of which went into the Top 10. They had three number two singles that year (“Proud Mary,” “Bad Moon Rising,” “Green River”) and one number three single (“Down on the Corner”). They were simply a phenomenon and this record shows why. It’s not as good as a compilation of hit singles; CCR were the rare excellent live band whose studio recordings were as ferocious as their stage work, and those were better detailed, too. Still, it’s a pretty terrific little record, since the band is in fine form, tearing through the hits and such album favorites as “Tombstone Shadow,” “Don’t Look Now,” “Born on the Bayou,” “The Midnight Special,” and “Keep on Chooglin’.” Only hardcore fans really need to pick up this record and they might not even spin it all that often. But when they do, they’ll wind up satisfied. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

Recorded live at The Oakland Coliseum Show From January 31, 1970

CCRLivePersonnel:
Doug Clifford (drums)
Stu Cook (bass, background vocals)
John Fogerty (guitar, vocals, harmonica)
Tom Fogerty (guitar, background vocals)

BackCover1Tracklist:
01. Born On The Bayou (J.Fogerty) 5.14
02. Green River (J.Fogerty) 3.00
03. Tombstone Shadow (J.Fogerty) 4.05
04. Don’t Look Now (It Ain’t You or Me) (J.Fogerty) 2.05
05. Travelin’ Band (J.Fogerty) 2.18
06. Who’ll Stop the Rain? (J.Fogerty) 2.31
07. Bad Moon Rising (J.Fogerty) 2.16
08. Proud Mary (J.Fogerty) 3.09
09. Fortunate Son (J.Fogerty) 2.22
10. Commotion (J.Fogerty) 2.36
11. The Midnight Special (Traditional) 3.48
12. Night Time Is The Right Time (Brown/Cadena/Herman) 3.29
13. Down on the Corner (J.Fogerty) 2.44
14. Keep On Chooglin’ (J.Fogerty) 9.09

OfficialCoversThe official frontcovers

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