Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young – The Winterland Reunion (1973)

FrontCover1From the time they came together as a trio at the end of 1968, to the fall of 1973 when they turned in this impromptu set at Winterland, the three voices comprising Crosby, Stills and Nash had seen their share of changes: they triumphed with their 1969 self-titled debut, joined forces with Neil Young for the follow-up Déjà Vu in 1970, and took their show on the road; by the end of that run, they’d weathered the kind of wear and tear on their hearts and souls that could throw the average band off course for good. And yet, whether performing songs from those first two albums, Crosby’s If Only I Could Remember My Name, Nash’s Songs for Beginners, Crosby and Nash’s heralded duo album, or Stills’ solo albums and works with Manassas, when the original core CSN trio got together they still made sweet harmony, as they did on this night to remember.

In the Fall of 1973, Crosby, Stills and Nash were still slightly reeling from a busy period that followed recording in Hawaii with Young and the passing of CSN&Y roadie Bruce Berry (famously eulogized by Young on “Tonight’s the Night”). Stills had been on the road with Manassas, and Crosby and Nash were playing their own shows with an electric band. But when Manassas booked a couple of dates at Winterland on October 4 and 7 of 1973, it was family reunion time when Crosby and Nash pulled a walk-on and the trio appeared onstage together for the first time since 1970.

Informal, joking, and pleasingly loose, the three friends seemed to truly enjoy singing together, despite the occasional onstage bristling and ropy moments. Crosby sarcastically refers to “our usual slick Hollywood show,” explaining away the presentation’s unrehearsed nature as “more fun this way for us.” Stills answered his band mate’s quip drolly with, “Anything you say, David, anything you say.”

CSNY02

Between the banter and tuning up, the three manage to turn in some prime vocal shots, from a version of the Beatle’s “Blackbird” to a handful of their group’s and solo works. Nash takes the lead on “Southbound Train” and retreats to piano for “Prison Song,” his protest of tough marijuana laws on the poor population. Stills sings Young’s “Human Highway,” which Crosby characterizes as a song by “our skinny friend;” the live version isn’t quite worked out the way we’ve come to know it, but that’s part of the excitement of this off-the-cuff set. “Wooden Ships” is dedicated to Crosby and Stills’ co-writer, the Jefferson Airplane/Starship’s Paul Kantner, before the evening is crowned with the vocal trio tour de force “Helplessly Hoping.”

The two sets from these Winterland shows foreshadowed a proper reunion on the horizon: a couple of months later, Young would join Nash and Crosby at an appearance at the San Francisco Civic and, the following year, CSN&Y would be on the road again, playing to their largest audiences ever. Marking a tentative step toward their mid-’70s triumph, as well as a throwback to their early days when the vocal giants were just a trio, this Winterland night is a historic footprint on CSN’s trail of rock & roll. Long may they continue to run its course. (by concertvault.com)

CSNY01

Personnel:
David Crosby (guitar, vocals)
Graham Nash (guitar, vocals, piano)
Stephen Stills (guitar, vocals)
Neil Young (guitar, vocals, harmonica)

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. Helplessly Hoping (Stills) 4.00
02. Wooden Ships (Crosby/Kantner/Stills) 6.00
03. Blackbird (Lennon/McCartney) 2.56
04. As I Come Of Age (Stills) 5.56
05. Roll Another Number (Young) 4.37
06. Human Highway (Young) 4.07
07. Dreamland (Mitchell) 4.06
08. So It Goes (Nash) 6.40
09. The Prison Song (Nash) 4.18
10. Long Time Gone (Crosby) 7.27
11. Change Partners (Stills) 5.16
+
12 Down By The River (ABC TV, 1969) (Young) 4.52

AlternateFron+BackCover

Alternate front+ back cover

 

*
**

Advertisements

Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young – Deja Vu (1970)

frontcover1Déjà Vu is the second album by Crosby, Stills & Nash, and their first in the quartet configuration of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. It was released in March 1970 by Atlantic Records, catalogue SD-7200. It topped the pop album chart for one week and generated three Top 40 singles: “Woodstock”, “Teach Your Children”, and “Our House”. It was rereleased in 1977 as SD-19188 and the cover was changed from black to brown. In 2003, the album was ranked #148 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. Certified 7x platinum by the RIAA, the album’s sales currently sit at over 8 million copies. It remains the highest selling album of each member’s career to date.
Déjà vu was greatly anticipated after the popularity of the first CSN album and given the addition of Young to the group. Stills estimates that the album took around 800 hours of studio time to record; this figure may be exaggerated, even though the individual tracks display meticulous attention to detail.[5] The songs, except for “Woodstock”, were recorded as individual sessions by each member, with each contributing whatever was needed that could be agreed upon. Young appears on only half of the tracks, and drummer Dallas Taylor and bassist Greg Reeves are credited on the cover with their names in slightly smaller typeface. Jerry Garcia plays pedal steel on “Teach Your Children” and John Sebastian plays harmonica on the title track.
Four singles were released from the album with all but the last, “Carry On,” charting on the Billboard Hot 100. The popularity of the album contributed to the success of the four albums released by each of the members in the wake of Déjà vu — Neil Young’s After the Gold Rush, Stephen Stills’ self-titled solo debut, David Crosby’s If I Could Only Remember My Name, and Graham Nash’s Songs for Beginners.
In 2003, the album was placed at number 148 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. The same year, the TV network VH1 named Déjà vu the 61st greatest album of all time. (by Wikipedia)
csny01
CSN & Y with Greg Reeves + Dallas Taylor, 1970
One of the most hotly awaited second albums in history — right up there with those by the Beatles and the Band — Déjà Vu lived up to its expectations and rose to number one on the charts. Those achievements are all the more astonishing given the fact that the group barely held together through the estimated 800 hours it took to record Déjà Vu and scarcely functioned as a group for most of that time. Déjà Vu worked as an album, a product of four potent musical talents who were all ascending to the top of their game coupled with some very skilled production, engineering, and editing. There were also some obvious virtues in evidence — the addition of Neil Young to the Crosby, Stills & Nash lineup added to the level of virtuosity, with Young and Stephen Stills rising to new levels of complexity and volume on their guitars. Young’s presence also ratcheted up the range of available voices one notch and added a uniquely idiosyncratic songwriter to the fold, though most of Young’s contributions in this area were confined to the second side of the LP. Most of the music, apart from the quartet’s version of Joni Mitchell’s “Woodstock,” was done as individual sessions by each of the members when they turned up (which was seldom together), contributing whatever was needed that could be agreed upon. “Carry On” worked as the album’s opener when Stills “sacrificed” another copyright, “Questions,” which comprised the second half of the track and made it more substantial. “Woodstock” and “Carry On” represented the group as a whole, while the rest of the record was a showcase for the individual members. David Crosby’s “Almost Cut My Hair” was a piece of high-energy hippie-era paranoia not too far removed in subject from the Byrds’ “Drug Store Truck Drivin’ Man,” only angrier in mood and texture (especially amid the pumping organ and slashing guitars); the title track, also by Crosby, took 100 hours to work out and was a better-received successor to such experimental works as “Mind Gardens,” out of his earlier career with the Byrds, showing his occasional abandonment of a rock beat, or any fixed rhythm at all, in favor of washing over the listener with tones and moods.
csny02a
“Teach Your Children,” the major hit off the album, was a reflection of the hippie-era idealism that still filled Graham Nash’s life, while “Our House” was his stylistic paean to the late-era Beatles and “4+20” was a gorgeous Stephen Stills blues excursion that was a precursor to the material he would explore on the solo album that followed. And then there were Neil Young’s pieces, the exquisitely harmonized “Helpless” (which took many hours to get to the slow version finally used) and the roaring country-ish rockers that ended side two, which underwent a lot of tinkering by Young — even his seeming throwaway finale, “Everybody I Love You,” was a bone thrown to longtime fans as perhaps the greatest Buffalo Springfield song that they didn’t record. All of this variety made Déjà Vu a rich musical banquet for the most serious and personal listeners, while mass audiences reveled in the glorious harmonies and the thundering electric guitars, which were presented in even more dramatic and expansive fashion on the tour that followed. (by Bruce Eder)
In other words: one of the most important albums in the history of rock music !
single01
Personnel:
David Crosby (guitar, vocals)
Graham Nash (vocals, guitar, Percussion on 01. + 02.)
Greg Reeves (bass)
Stephen Stills (guitar, vocals, keyboards on 01., bass on 01., 02. + 06., percussion on 01.)
Dallas Taylor (drums, percussion)
Neil Young (guitar, vocals, Keyboards, harmonica on 09.)

+
Jerry Garcia (pedal steel guitar on 02.)
John Sebastian (harmonica on 06.)

booklet1

Tracklist:
01. Carry On (Stills) 4.26
02. Teach Your Children  (Nash) 2.53
03. Almost Cut My Hair (Crosby) 4.31
04. Helpless (Young) 3.33
05. Woodstock (Mitchell) 3.54
06. Déjà Vu (Crosby) 4.12
07. Our House (Nash) 2.59
08. 4 + 20  (Stills) 2.04
09. Country Girl
09.1.Whiskey Boot Hill
09.2.Down Down Down
09.3. Country Girl (I Think You’re Pretty)) (Young) 5.11
10. Everybody I Love You  (Stills/Young) 2.21
labela1
csny03
Many years later ….