Eric Dolphy – The Berlin Concerts (1980)

FrontCover1This two-LP set features the great multi-instrumentalist Eric Dolphy mostly stretching out on standards, coming up with very original statements on such songs as ‘Hot House,’ ‘When Lights Are Low,’ ‘Hi Fly,’ ‘I’ll Remember April’ and ‘God Bless the Child’ (the latter taken as an unaccompanied bass clarinet solo), in addition to two brief originals.

With trumpeter Benny Bailey helping out on half of the selections along with a strong rhythm section, the twofer would be a perfect introduction for listeners not familiar with Eric Dolphy’s innovative style, but this set is very difficult to find. (by deejay.de)

This two-LP set features the great multi-instrumentalist Eric Dolphy mostly stretching out on standards, coming up with very original statements on such songs as “Hot House,” “When Lights Are Low,” “Hi Fly,” “I’ll Remember April” and “God Bless the Child” (the latter taken as an unaccompanied bass clarinet solo), in addition to two brief originals. With trumpeter Benny Bailey helping out on half of the selections along with a strong rhythm section, the two-fer would be a perfect introduction for listeners not familiar with Eric Dolphy’s innovative style, but this set is very difficult to find. (by Scott Yanow)

Tracks 1 to 3 recorded at Funkturm Exibition Hall, Berlin, Germany, August 30, 1961
Tracks 4 to 7 recorded at Club Jazz Saloon, Berlin, Germany, August 30, 1961
(recorded by SWF Radio facilities.)

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Personnel:
Pepsi Auer (piano)
Benny Bailey (trumpet)
Eric Dolphy (saxophonne, flute, clarinet)
George Joyner (bass)
Buster Smith (drums)

Booklet1

Tracklist:
01. Hot House (Dameron) 19.04
02. When Lights Are Low (Carter)13.02
03. Geewee (Dolphy) 2.49
04. God Bless The Child (Holiday/Herzog) 3.29
05. Hi-Fly (Weston) 14.40
06. The Meeting (Dolphy) 5.38
07. I’ll Remember April (DePaul)13.12

LabelD1*
**

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This album is part of the great greygoose collection … thank you !

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Eric Dolphy Quintet – Outward Bound (1960)

LPFrontCover1 Unlike Ornette Coleman—who wanted to blow orthodox jazz form out of the water—John Coltrane and Eric Dolphy initially worked to change the system from within, making music that fit the jazz standards of the time while injecting their own unique spin. This is why Outward Bound, Dolphy’s first recording as a leader, is a not-so-distant relative of Coltrane’s My Favorite Things (Atlantic, 1960).

On balance, both discs have a conventional base. While Coltrane stuck to the Great American Songbook, Dolphy penned over half the tunes on Outward Bound; even so, those originals mesh perfectly with classics like “On Green Dolphin Street and Charles Greenlea’s “Miss Toni. It’s the respective opening tracks that separate both discs from the norm. As Coltrane used an innocuous song from The Sound of Music to launch us into space, so does Dolphy use “G.W. to prove Coleman’s theory that “you could play sharp or flat in tune.

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A fast 4/4 beat drives borderline-dissonant opening salvos from the front line. While the rest of the band lays down beats and fills that would not be out of place on any bop date, Dolphy steps out of the head to blister us with a mind-boggling, lightning-fingered alto solo that threatens to go over a cliff at any moment. Dolphy and his partners maintain this unorthodox balancing act throughout the 1960 session.

At the time, the bass clarinet was nearly unheard of as a lead instrument, but Dolphy uses it to great atonal effect on the zippy “Miss Toni. It also applies a noir-like patina to the opening of “Green Dolphin Street. Dolphy’s flute on Rodgers and Hart’s “Glad To Be Unhappy is flat and mournful one second, jumping and dancing (and sometimes screaming) the next, but rarely following a predictable path. Jaki Byard is Dolphy’s faithful wingman, contributing Monk-laced lines that stay within “acceptable guidelines while tipping the reality a little bit further out.

George Tucker’s foundation on bass is key, rooting the music so the other players can create in space. Roy Haynes displays a range as big as all outdoors, playing drums like a machine gun on the blasting “Les one minute, using brushes like an artist on “Green Dolphin Street the next. Freddie Hubbard’s trumpet is as empirical as Dolphy’s reedwork is existential; the 21-year old Hubbard’s solos (particularly on “Les and the bluesy “245 ) show power and control beyond his years. One wonders what would have happened if he’d stayed with Dolphy and not gone off with Art Blakey.

It makes sad sense we lost Coltrane and Dolphy too soon—Trane from cancer, Dolphy of complications from diabetes. Stars burn out, meteors crash… but while they live, they burn oh so bright. Outward Bound is Dolphy’s first burst of light, a beautiful and frightening glow that must be experienced. (by J.Hunter)

EricDolphyPersonnel:
Jaki Byard (piano)
Eric Dolphy (saxophone, clarinet, flute)
Roy Haynes (drums)
Freddie Hubbard (trumpet)
George Tucker (bass)

LPBackCover1Tracklist:
01. G.W. (Dolphy) 7.54
02. On Green Dolphin Street (Kaper/Washington) 5.42
03. Les (Dolphy) 5.11
04. 245 (Dolphy) 8.04
05. Glad To Be Unhappy (Rodgers/Hart) 5.26
06. Miss Toni  (Greenlee) 5.40

LabelA1*
**

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Charles Mingus & Eric Dolphy Sextet – The Complete Bremen Concert (2010)

FrontCover1There are so many faces to Mingus that it is hard to choose which one you like best, but his relationship with Eric Dolphy was one of the high points, and this remarkable CD captured that time (1964) in Bremen, Germany, shortly before they parted ways, sadly forever.

Mingus was a tough, uncompromising bandleader. He expected everything out of his musicians, even if it meant punching them in the face like he did Jimmy Knepper once because he couldn’t hit the right note on his trombone. He would also scold his audiences for not listening, too busy clinking glasses or chatting with each other in the clubs. With Dolphy, their relationship appeared telepathic. Not much needed to said, as if Dolphy said very much to begin with. He always came in where Mingus needed him to, and seemed to carry the notes into other dimensions.

Dolphy became the star of these concerts, but of course Clifford Jordan was no slouch himself. Jacki Byard sounds like he had great fun, sometimes falling into a barrel house style of playing which was in keeping with Mingus’ eccentric mix of rhythms. You never quite know what will come next. Dannie Richmond and Johnny Coles round out the band.

I think some of these songs have appeared on other CD’s before. The moment where Dolphy says he is leaving the band to spend the rest of his time in Europe on his own, I believe came at Bremen. Sadly, he would fall a few weeks later from insulin shock and drift into a diabetic coma from which he never recovered. This CD serves as a beautiful testament to the last days of Mingus and Dolphy together. (James Ferguson)

And yes … this is a bootleg, and if you listen to this album, you´ll know, why bootlegs are an importnt addition to all the official releases … this is one of the best recordings of Charles Mingus and Eric Dolphy we ever heard !

Booklet01APersonnel:
Jaki Byard (piano)
Johnny Coles (trumpet)
Eric Dolphy (saxophone, flute, clarinet)
Clifford Jordan (saxophone)
Charles Mingus (bass)
Dannie Richmond (drums)

Booklet03ATracklist:
01. A.T.F.W (Art Tatum-Fats Waller) (Mingus/Byard) 4.51
02. Sophisticated Lady (Ellington/Parish/Mills) 4.09
03. So Long Eric (Mingus) 26.49
04. Parkeriana (Mingus) 21.49
05. Meditations On Integration (Mingus) 25.28
06. Fables Of Faubus (Mingus) 34.03

CD2A*
**

Eric Dolphy – Music Matador (1963)

FrontCover1In the spring of 1963, in the last full year of his life, Eric Dolphy recorded nine tracks in New York with producer Alan Douglas. Working with an ensemble that was mixed and matched in different configurations and included Prince Lasha on flute, Clifford Jordan on soprano sax, Woody Shaw on trumpet, Huey Simmons on alto sax, Bobby Hutcherson on vibraphone (there was no pianist at the sessions), bassists Richard Davis and Eddie Kahn, and drummers J.C. Moses and Charles Moffett, Dolphy tracked material that clearly anticipated his landmark Out to Lunch album that appeared in 1964 while still providing a bridge to the more traditionally accessible work that preceded it. Dolphy delivered some of the best and most striking work of his career, whether offering full-band treatments of originals like “Iron Man” and “Burning Spear”; giving a loose and lilting calypso feel to “Music Matador”; turning Fats Waller’s “Jitterbug Waltz” upside down and sideways; or playing wonderful lines on flute, bass clarinet, and alto saxophone. The sessions were split up and originally issued as a pair of LPs, Conversations and Iron Man, and have been reissued in different configurations and under different titles many times since. The complete sessions are available on CD as the double-disc Dolphy Sound from Jazz World, and that’s ultimately the way to go, although this set holds up quite well as a sequence. The bottom line is that no Dolphy fan should be without the material recorded at these 1963 New York sessions. The music is brilliant no matter whether it’s presented in part or in whole, but once you hear it, you’ll want it all. (by Steve Leggett)

EricDolphyPersonnel:
Richard Davis (bass)
Eric Dolphy (flute, bass clarinet)
Bobby Hutcherson (vibraphone)
Clifford Jordan (saxophone)
Eddie Khan (bass)
Prince Lasha (flute)
J.C. Moses (drums)
Woody Shaw, Jr. (trumpet)
Sonny Simmons (saxophone)

BackCover1Tracklist:
01. Jitterbug Waltz (Waller) 7.05
02. Music Matador (Lasha/Simmons) 9.05
03. Alone Together (Dietz/Schwartz) 13.30
04. Come Sunday (Ellington) 6.30
05. Ode to C.P (Byard) 8.13
06. Love Me (Washington/Young) 3.25

LabelA1*
**

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