Bob Dylan – Folk Rogue (1998)

FrontCover1This album is one to grab for several reasons. First of all, The Newport shows from Freebody Park are essential both to any serious Dylan collection, as well as to any music historian. This set compares the sublime acoustic folk ’64 show to the infamous ‘Electric’ ’65 show that forever changed the face of folk, rock, and folk-rock music. The entire CD is soundboard recordings, and this is the best sounding Newport recordings ever. The filler material is of fascinating historical importance as well. The two missing songs from the newly discovered Hollywood Bowl show. Finally, the aesthetics are nice andthe venue information is complete. (bobsboots.com)

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In the span of exactly 365 days, from his July 26, 1964, appearance at the famed Newport Folk Festival to his return on July 25, 1965, Bob Dylan rocketed from folk luminary to lightning rod. After first abandoning the protest themes of his classic early anthems to focus on more poetic, personal subjects, Dylan next forsook the rigid traditions of roots music to go electric, drawing on the spirit of rock & roll to forge a revolutionary and controversial sound all his own. The must-have bootleg release Folk Rogue 1964-1965 contains both Newport sets in their entirety, and the contrast is extraordinary: while the 1964 audience treats sublime, introspective songs like “It Ain’t Me, Babe” and “All I Really Want to Do” with reverence and awe, the 1965 crowd seems poised on the brink of anarchy, and regardless of whether the catalyst was the elemental ferocity of the music, the inadequate sound system, or the brevity of the three-song set, the tension is palpable, and it elevates Dylan and his band to remarkable heights.

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Adding a pair of songs from Dylan’s September 3, 1965, show at Los Angeles’ Hollywood Bowl for good measure, Folk Rogue 1964-1965 remains the definitive single-disc presentation of this landmark material. Soundboard-quality fidelity and tasteful packaging complete an essential collection, although Dandelion’s two-disc From Newport to the Ancient Empty Streets in LA adds the Hollywood Bowl show in its entirety while subtracting “It Ain’t Me Babe” from the 1964 Newport appearance, so comparison shopping is recommended. (by Jason Ankeny)

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Personnel:
Bob Dylan (guitar, vocals, harmonica)
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The Paul Butterfield Blues Band (08. – 10.)
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Joan Baez (background vocals on 01.)

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Tracklist:
01. It Ain’t Me, Babe 3.39
02 All I Really Want To Do 4.09
03. To Ramona 4.33
04. Mr. Tambourine Man 7.27
05. Chimes Of Freedom 8.00
06. Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright 3.33
07. All I Really Want To Do 1.37
08. Maggies Farm 6.47
09. Like A Rolling Stone 5.54
10. Phantom Engineer 4.13
11. Tombstone Blues 4.45
12. It Ain’t Me, Babe 4.38
13. We Want Bobby 1.56
14. It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue 5.33
15. Mr. Tambourine Man 6.55

All songs written by Bob Dylan

Track 1 recorded July 24, 1964 at the Newport Folk Festival with Joan Baez
Tracks 2-5 recorded July 26, 1964 at the Newport Folk Festival
Track 6 recorded May 6, 1965 at City Hall, Newcastle, U.K.
Track 7 recorded July 24, 1965 at the Newport Folk Festival afternoon workshop
Tracks 8-10 recorded July 25, 1965 at the Newport Folk Festival with the Butterfield Blues Band
Tracks 11-12 recorded September 3, 1965 at the Hollywood Bowl, Hollywood, California
Tracks 13-15 recorded July 25, 1965 at the Newport Folk Festival

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Bob Dylan – Desire (1975)

FrontCover1Desire is the seventeenth studio album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released on January 5, 1976 by Columbia Records.

It is one of Dylan’s most collaborative efforts, featuring the same caravan of musicians as the acclaimed Rolling Thunder Revue tours the previous year (later documented on The Bootleg Series Vol. 5). Many of the songs also featured backing vocals by Emmylou Harris and Ronee Blakley. Most of the album was co-written by Jacques Levy, and is composed of lengthy story-songs, two of which quickly generated controversy: the 11-minute-long “Joey”, which is seen as glorifying the violent gangster “Crazy Joey” Gallo, and “Hurricane”, the opening track that tells a passionate account of the murder case against boxer Rubin Carter, whom the song asserts was framed. Carter was released in 1985, after a judge overturned his conviction on appeal.

A well-received follow-up to Blood on the Tracks, Desire reached No. 1 on the Billboard Pop Albums chart[1] for five weeks, becoming one of Dylan’s bestselling studio albums, and was certified double Platinum; the album reached No. 3 in the UK. It claimed the No. 1 slot on NME Album of the Year. Rolling Stone named Desire No. 174 on its list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. It was voted number 761 in the third edition of Colin Larkin’s All Time Top 1000 Albums (2000).

Desire was released between the two legs of Dylan’s Rolling Thunder Revue tour. By 1975, Dylan had extensive experience playing with a number of bands, but these groups were assembled by others. In the case of the Hawks (later known as The Band), the group had performed for a number of years before ever meeting Dylan.

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Dylan’s idea of forming his own band, who would later be known as the Rolling Thunder Revue, came when he saw Patti Smith and her group play at The Other End (formerly, and currently renamed The Bitter End) on June 26, 1975. Smith had yet to record an album, but she was already attracting a lot of attention from the music press and industry. According to Clinton Heylin, these were her first shows with drummer Jay Dee Daugherty, the culmination of four years spent “compiling a unique rock & roll sound”. According to Smith, Dylan was immediately struck by the chemistry between Smith and her band, and expressed a wish that he had chosen to stay with a single band.

Dylan would spend many nights over the next two weeks in New York’s Greenwich Village and The Other End in particular, eventually meeting Rob Stoner and reacquainting himself with Bob Neuwirth. Stoner would later join his Rolling Thunder Revue, and Dylan would meet the remaining members through Neuwirth. According to Smith, he was thinking about improvisation and extending himself “language-wise”.

The album’s cover is tentatively inspired by and reminiscent of John Phillips’ 1970 album John Phillips (John, the Wolf King of L.A.). (by wikipedia)

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If Blood on the Tracks was an unapologetically intimate affair, Desire is unwieldy and messy, the deliberate work of a collective. And while Bob Dylan directly addresses his crumbling relationship with his wife, Sara, on the final track, Desire is hardly as personal as its predecessor, finding Dylan returning to topical songwriting and folk tales for the core of the record. It’s all over the map, as far as songwriting goes, and so is it musically, capturing Dylan at the beginning of the Rolling Thunder Revue era, which was more notable for its chaos than its music. And, so it’s only fitting that Desire fits that description as well, as it careens between surging folk-rock, Mideastern dirges, skipping pop, and epic narratives.

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It’s little surprise that Desire doesn’t quite gel, yet it retains its own character — really, there’s no other place where Dylan tried as many different styles, as many weird detours, as he does here. And, there’s something to be said for its rambling, sprawling character, which has a charm of its own. Even so, the record would have been assisted by a more consistent set of songs; there are some masterpieces here, though: “Hurricane” is the best-known, but the effervescent “Mozambique” is Dylan at his breeziest, “Sara” at his most nakedly emotional, and “Isis” is one of his very best songs of the ’70s, a hypnotic, contemporized spin on a classic fable. This may not add up to a masterpiece, but it does result in one of his most fascinating records of the ’70s and ’80s — more intriguing, lyrically and musically, than most of his latter-day affairs. /by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Vinnie Bell (bouzouki)
Dominic Cortese (accordion, mandolin)
Bob Dylan (vocals, guitar, harmonica, piano on 02.)
Emmylou Harris (background vocals)
Scarlet Rivera (violin)
Rob Stoner (bass, background vocals)
Howard Wyeth (drums, piano)
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Eric Clapton (guitar on 07.)
Luther Rix (percussion on 01.)
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background vocals on 01.:
Ronee Blakley – Steven Soles

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Tracklist:
01. Hurricane  8.33
02. Isis (Dylan/Levy) 6.59
03. Mozambique (Dylan/Levy) 3.01
04. One More Cup Of Coffee (Dylan) 3.46
05. Oh, Sister (Dylan/Levy) 4.04
06. Joey (Dylan/Levy) 11.05
07. Romance In Durango (Dylan/Levy) 5.44
08. Black Diamond Bay (Dylan/Levy) 7.30
09. Sara (Dylan) 5.30

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Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton and Emmy Lou Harris
in Columbia Studio E on the first night of “Desire”:
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Bob Dylan, Keith Richards & Friends – Something Else – Sevilla (1991)

FrontCover1.jpgGuitar Legends was a concert held over five nights, from October 15 to October 19, 1991, in Seville, Spain, with the aim of positioning the city as an entertainment destination to draw support for Expo ’92 beginning the following April.

The event featured 27 top guitarists, including Brian May, BB King, George Benson, Joe Walsh, Keith Richards, Les Paul, Robbie Robertson, Robert Cray, Roger Waters, Albert Collins, Steve Vai and Joe Satriani. The vocalists included Rickie Lee Jones, Bob Dylan and Joe Cocker.

The event was conceived by British impresario and producer Tony Hollingsworth who originally agreed to stage the concert as a co-production deal with Spanish state television RTVE. But RTVE dropped out on the day the contract was due to be signed when the director-general (and film director) Pilar Miro Romero left the company.

Later, the organisers of Expo ’92 took on the project to help overcome the problem that PosterSeville was being seen merely as a civil engineering project. They provided half the $7.2 million budget, with Hollingsworth raising the rest from television pre-sales. RTVE bought the Spanish rights, but paid by providing television and radio airtime for advertising slots. These were then sold to Coca-Cola.

Five 90-minute shows and a one-hour documentary were broadcast. Forty-five countries showed at least one live show. Later, broadcasters in 105 countries broadcast one or more programmes. (by wikipedia)

And one of the hightlights of this festival is captured on this bootleg … musicians like BobDylan, Keith Richards, Jack Bruce, Richard Thompson, Roberty Cray, Steve Cropper, Dave Edmunds an manny ore jammed togehter.

A raw, but good audience recording from this event !

Recorded live at the Guitar Legends Festival, Sevilla, Spain
Tracks 1-9 October 17 1991
Tracks 10-13 October 15 1991

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Personnel:

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Tracklist:
01. All Along The Watchtower (Dylan) 6.09
02. Boots Of Spanish Leather (Dylan) 3.21
03. Across The Borderline (Dickinson/Hiatt/Cooder) 5.15
04. Answer Me (Winkler/Rauch/Sigman) 3.25
05. Shake, Rattle & Roll (Calhoun) 3.41
06. Going Down (Nix) 5.16
07. Somethin’ Else (Sheeley/Cochran) 2.55
08. Connection (Jagger/Richards) 2.25
09. I Can’t Turn You Loose (Redding) 4.28
10. Sabre Dance (Khachaturian) 4.45
11. Standing On The Crossroads (Jupp/Edmunds) 4.03
12. Phone Booth (Cray/Cousins/Walker/Vannice) 3.53
13. Going Back Home (unknown) 4.15

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Bob Dylan – In The Summertime – Live In Drammen, Norway (1981)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Bob Dylan World Tour 1981 was a concert tour by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. The tour lasted from June 10, 1981 to November 21, 1981 and consisted of 54 concerts in three legs: 31 in North America and 23 in Europe. The tour promoted the release of Dylan’s 1981 album Shot of Love.

The tour started on June 10, 1981 in Chicago, Illinois. Dylan performed a further three concerts in the United States before travelling to Europe.[5] The European leg of the tour started on June 21 in Toulouse in France and consisted of twenty three concerts, the largest number of concerts taking place in England where eight shows were performed. All shows from July 1 onwards were recorded by members of Dylan’s crew.

Tourposter1981.jpgThe European tour ended in tragedy in Avignon, France where a member of the crowd fell into the electric cables before the first song and caused total power loss. Dylan and the band improvised an unplugged instrumental until the power was restored and ‘Saved’ was started from the beginning. In the accident two people were killed, but the show went ahead despite the incident.

Dylan returned to the United States in October to perform twenty three concerts there. Dylan also performed four concerts in Canada. The tour came to an end in Lakeland, Florida on November 21 after fifty-four concerts. (by wikipedia)

And here´s a pretty good soundboard recording from his concert at the at the Drammenshallen, Drammen, Norway; July 10, 1981 (Concert # 13 of The Europe Summer Tour 1981. 1981 concert #17.)

This 2 CD package is an absolute ‘must have’ for fans of the gospel period. Both shows are smooth, full, warm, and well mixed in a fantastic quality; right from the soundboard.

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Personnel:
Tim Drummond (bass)
Bob Dylan (vocals, guitar)
Jim Keltner (drums)
Steve Ripley (guitar)
Willie Smith (keyboards)
Fred Tackett (guitar)
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background vocals:
Clydie King – Carolyn Dennis – Regina McCrary – Madelyn Quebec

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Tracklist:
01. The Times They Are A-Changin’ 5.11
02. Gotta Serve Somebody 4.12
03. I Believe In You 5.04
04. Like A Rolling Stone 6.44
05. Till I Get It Right  3.46
06. Man Gave Names To All The Animals 4.54
07. Maggie’s Farm 1.09
08. Girl From The North Country 5.50
09. Ballad Of A Thin Man 3.28
10. In The Summertime 3.41
11. Slow Train 5.37
12. Let’s Begin  3.38
13. Lenny Bruce 4.38
14. Mr. Tambourine Man 5.44
15. Just Like A Woman 4.22
16. Forever Young 4.37
17. Jesus Is The One 3.55
18. Heart Of Mine 5.11
19. When You Gonna Wake Up 5.31
20. In The Garden (with band introduction) 9.29
21. Blowin’ In The Wind 5.55
22. It Ain’t Me, Babe 5.59
23. Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door 5.44

All songs written by Bob Dylan
except “Till I Get It Right” which was written by Red Lane & Larry Henley and Let’s Begin, which was written by  Jim Webb

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Gillian Welch and David Rawlings – Nobody Sings Dylan Like Gill ‘n’ Dave (2019)

FrontCover1.jpgIf you saw Gillian Welch and David Rawlings on the Oscars this year, you know they’re amazing. You may not know they are also amazing interpreters of a certain Nobel Prize-winning singer-songwriter. They were featured often on my 40-volume Dylan cover collection “Nobody Sings Dylan Like Dylan,” but when I heard that the Dave Rawlings Machine had covered “Lily, Rosemary and the Jack of Hearts” at a San Francisco concert last year – opening the show with the first half of the song, and closing it with the second half – I decided it was time to give them their own NSD collection. A year later, here it is.

As always, thanks to the tapers – they are the true heroes of the ROIO world – and to Gill and Dave for daring to test their mettle on these incomparable songs. As you might remember, in the summer of 2015 Gill ‘n’ Dave did a 50th anniversary tribute at the Newport Folk Festival to the historic show at which Dylan first plugged in. Surprisingly, it has never turned up on any of the download sites I frequent, though there is a barely listenable/watchable version on YouTube. If you have a better version to offer, please do; if you don’t want to bother with the nuts and bolts of uploading, let me know and I’ll do it for you.

A few of these songs are featured on other NSD sets, but these are different versions. Finally, please allow me to dedicate this collection to my friend and fellow Dylan fan Erik, who first introduced me to Gill ‘n’ Dave’s music in 1996 by giving me a copy of “Revival” and telling me I’d love it. I did, and I still do. (jeffs98119 at dime)

Various dates and venues. Mix of audience and soundboard recordings
between 1996 and 2018

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Dave Rawlings & Gillian Welch (Oscar 2019)

Personnel:
Dave Rawlings Machine (on 01., 03., 05., 07., 11. + 13.)
The Esquires (on 02. + 09.)
Gillian Welch & David Rawlings (on 04., 06., 08., 10. + 12.)

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Tracklist:
01. Lily, Rosemary, and the Jack of Hearts (1) (Mar 1, 2018, Fillmore, San Francisco, CA) 7.36
02. Gotta Serve Somebody (Sep 27, 1999, Radio Cafe, Nashville, TN) 7.31
03. I’ll Be Your Baby Tonight (Oct 4, 2007, Tangier Restaurant, Los Angeles, CA) 5.00
04. I Dreamed I Saw St Augustine (Aug 21, 1996, Acoustic Coffee House, Nederland, CO) 3.42
05. As I Went Out One Morning (Sep 24, 2014, Moore Theatre, Seattle, WA) 5.32
06. Billy (Nov 18, 1998, Off Broadway, St. Louis, MO) 6.13
07. Oh, Sister (Mar 8, 2018, McDonald Theater, Eugene, OR) 5.10
08. Goin’ to Acapulco (Oct 13, 2004, McDonald Theatre, Eugene, OR) 5.53
09. Quinn The Eskimo (Sep 27, 1999, Radio Cafe, Nashville, TN) 3.29
10. Odds And Ends (Aug 2004, WXPN Studios/World Café session, Philadelphia, PA) 2.58
11. Queen Jane Approximately (Jun 20, 2014, Town Park, Telluride, CO) 10.28
12. Mr Tambourine Man (Oct 3, 2015, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, CA) 6.07
13. Lily, Rosemary, and the Jack of Hearts 2 (Mar 1, 2018, Fillmore, San Francisco, CA) 5.05

All songs written by Bob Dylan

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Various Artists – That´s Underground – The Rock Machine Turns You On (1968)

FrontCover1.jpgDuring the Sixties, “underground music” became very popuilar all over the world.

So many record companies decided to release sampler to push this exciting sound.

That’s Underground, The Rock Machine Turns You On (original 1968 CBS pressing), is one of the most treasured records not only for featuring some big names of the era but because of its spectacular psychedelic splatter multicoloured vinyl. Made before they became fashionable and they hardly get more coloured than this.

The West German album has on the rear sleeve the familiar words “The Rock Machine Turns You On” (not the same compilation as the UK, Dutch and French albums The Rock Machine Turns You On above). The West German records are on distinctive “psychedelic” multicoloured vinyl, but both records shown have orange CBS labels. The rear sleeve shows pictures of other contemporary CBS releases.

This album was for many people a very important album:

“This must have been the first colored vinyl I saw in my life. Not only the splashing colors blew my mind, but also the music heard on this album must have blown the brains out of the 16 year old boy I was then. Still love each and every track on this album.” (Leonard)

“Blown my mind just looking at it. It sure is one hell of a production, the vinyl and song selection all look great. I couldn’t believe I hadn’t seen or heard of this before but then looked it up and found it was only issued in Germany, Italy and South Africa. Surely, it deserved a much wider release and I can see why it would have been a totally mind-bending experience to a youngster in the 60’s. 50 years on and it’s freaking me out right now.” (Lee Wrecker)

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Alternate front + back cover from South Africa

This LP was  reissued of released in Germany by Repertoire in 2005 under licence from Sony BMG Music Entertainment (Germany) GmbH. It dates the original release as 1970 (!) …

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I´m sure, that this compilation was for many, many people a very important part of their life … you can call it … a soundrack of their youth …

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Tracklist:
01. The Electric Flag: Killing Floor (Burnett) 4.14
02. Spirit: Mechanical World (Andes/Ferguson) 5.19
03. The Chambers Brothers: Time Has Come Today (J. Chambers/W. Chambers) 4.53
04. Leonard Cohen: Suzanne (Cohen) 3.49
05. Moby Grape: Can’t Be So Bad (Miller)
06. Big Brother And The Holding Company: Piece Of My Heart (Ragovoy/Berns) 4.15
07. The United States Of America: Hard Coming Love (Moskowitz/Byrd) 4.44
08. Blood, Sweat And Tears: My Days Are Numbered (Kooper) 3.19
09. Bob Dylan: Highway 61 Revisited (Dylan) 3.28
10. Mike Bloomfield, Al Kooper, Steve Stills: You Don’t Love Me (Cobb) 4.08

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Many fantastic colors … 

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I got this sampler from Mr. Sleeve … thank you very much !!!

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Bob Dylan – The Times They Are A-Changin’ (1964)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Times They Are a-Changin’ is the third studio album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released on January 13, 1964 by Columbia Records. Whereas his previous albums Bob Dylan and The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan consisted of original material among cover songs, Dylan’s third album was the first to feature only original compositions. The album consists mostly of stark, sparsely arranged ballads concerning issues such as racism, poverty, and social change. The title track is one of Dylan’s most famous; many feel that it captures the spirit of social and political upheaval that characterized the 1960s.

Some critics and fans were not quite as taken with the album as a whole, relative to his previous work, for its lack of humor or musical diversity. Still, The Times They Are a-Changin’ peaked at No. 20 on the US chart, eventually going gold, and belatedly reaching No. 4 in the UK in 1965. (by wikipedia)

If The Times They Are a-Changin’ isn’t a marked step forward from The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan, even if it is his first collection of all originals, it’s nevertheless a fine collection all the same. It isn’t as rich as Freewheelin’, and Dylan has tempered his sense of humor considerably, choosing to concentrate on social protests in the style of “Blowin’ in the Wind.”

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With the title track, he wrote an anthem that nearly equaled that song, and “With God on Our Side” and “Only a Pawn in Their Game” are nearly as good, while “Ballad of Hollis Brown” and “The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll” are remarkably skilled re-castings of contemporary tales of injustice. His absurdity is missed, but he makes up for it with the wonderful “One Too Many Mornings” and “Boots of Spanish Leather,” two lovely classics. If there are a couple of songs that don’t achieve the level of the aforementioned songs, that speaks more to the quality of those songs than the weakness of the remainder of the record. And that’s also true of the album itself — yes, it pales next to its predecessor, but it’s terrific by any other standard. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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A decidedly darker, more serious album than its predecessor, “The Times They Are A-Changin'” has the feel of a young man reveling in his newfound status as the voice of a generation, even as he pretends he does not. While songs like the title track and “With God on Our Side” are universal anthems embracing that status and are similar to some of the social commentary found on Dylan’s prior album, songs like the “Ballad of Hollis Brown” and “The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll” are mired in bleaker subjects with an angrier mood, unafraid to confront injustice and name names, but reluctant to point toward solutions to society’s ills. There are a few lyrically gorgeous songs about love, but the playfulness and sarcasm that made “The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan” so unique is completely absent. (by Kenneth Bridgham)

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Personnel:
Bob Dylan (vocals, guitar, harmonica)

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Tracklist:
01. The Times They Are a-Changin’ 3.13
02. Ballad Of Hollis Brown 5.06
03. With God On Our Side 7.08
04. One Too Many Mornings 2.40
05. North Country Blues 4.34
06. Only A Pawn In Their Game 3.34
07. Boots Of Spanish Leather 4.40
08. When The Ship Comes In 3.18
09. The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll 5.47
10. Restless Farewell 5.35

All songs written by Bob Dylan

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The Traveling Wilburys – Vol. 01 (1988)

FrontCover1.jpgThere never was a supergroup more super than the Traveling Wilburys. They had Jeff Lynne, the leader of ELO; they had Roy Orbison, the best pop singer of the ’60s; they had Tom Petty, the best roots rocker this side of Bruce Springsteen; they had a Beatle and Bob Dylan, for crying out loud! It’s impossible to picture a supergroup with a stronger pedigree than that (all that’s missing is a Rolling Stone), but in another sense it’s hard to call the Wilburys a true supergroup, since they arrived nearly two decades after the all-star craze of the ’70s peaked, and they never had the self-important air of nearly all the other supergroups. That, of course, was the key to their charm: they were a group of friends that fell together easily, almost effortlessly, to record a B-side for a single for George Harrison, then had such a good time they stuck around to record a full album, which became a hit upon its 1988 release. The Traveling Wilburys was big enough to convince the group to record a second album, cheerfully and incongruously titled Vol. 3, two years later despite the death of Orbison. Like most sequels, the second didn’t live up to expectations, and by the time it and its predecessor drifted out of print in the mid-’90s, with the rights reverting to Harrison, nobody much noticed. A few years later, though, it soon became apparent that the Wilburys records — mainly, the debut, widely beloved thanks to its two hits, “Handle With Care” and “End of the Line” — were out of print, and they soon became valuable items as the Harrison estate dragged its heels on a reissue. Finally, the two albums were bundled up as a two-CD set simply called The Traveling Wilburys and reissued with a DVD containing a documentary and all the videos in the summer of 2007 (there is also a deluxe edition containing a longer, lavish booklet).

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Looking back via The Traveling Wilburys, the group’s success seems all the more remarkable because the first album is surely, even proudly, not a major statement. Even under the direction of Lynne, who seems incapable of not polishing a record till it gleams, it’s loose and funny, even goofy. It’s clearly a lark, which makes the offhanded, casual virtuosity of some of the songs all the more affecting, particularly the two big hits, which are sunny and warm, partially because they wryly acknowledge the mileage on these rock & roll veterans. “Handle With Care” and “End of the Line” are the two masterworks here, although Roy’s showcase, “Not Alone Anymore” — more grand and moving than anything on the Lynne-produced Mystery Girl — comes close in the stature, but its stylized melodrama is a ringer here: it, along with Dylan’s offhand heartbreak tune “Congratulations,” is the only slow thing here, and the rest of the album just overspills with good vibes, whether it’s Tom Petty’s lite reggae of “Last Night,” Jeff Lynne’s excellent Jerry Lee Lewis update “Rattled,” or Dylan’s very funny “Dirty World,” which is only slightly overshadowed by his very, very funny Springsteen swipe “Tweeter and the Monkey Man.” These high times keep The Traveling Wilburys fresh and fun years later, after Lynne’s production becomes an emblem of the time instead of transcending it. (The album contains two bonus tracks in this reissue, the excellent Harrison song “Maxine” — a low-key waltz that should have made the cut — and “Like a Ship,” a folky dirge that builds into ELO-esque pop which is pretty good but doesn’t have the effervescence of the rest.)

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The Traveling Wilburys built upon Harrison’s comeback with Cloud Nine and helped revitalize everybody else’s career, setting the stage for Dylan’s 1989 comeback with Oh Mercy, Petty’s first solo album, Full Moon Fever, produced by Lynne (sounding and feeling strikingly similar to this lark), and Orbison’s Mystery Girl, which was released posthumously. Given the success of this record and how it boosted the creativity of the rest of the five, it’s somewhat a shock that the second effort falls a little flat. In retrospect, Vol. 3 plays a little bit better than it did at the time — it’s the kind of thing to appreciate more in retrospect, since you’ll never get another album like it — but it still labors mightily to recapture what came so effortlessly the first time around, a problem that can’t merely be chalked up to the absence of Orbison (who after all, didn’t write much on the first and only took lead on one song).

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Where the humor flowed naturally and absurdly throughout the debut, it feels strained on Vol. 3 — nowhere more so than on “Wilbury Twist,” where Petty implores you to put your underwear on your head and get up and dance, the epitome of forced hilarity — and the production is too polished and punchy to give it a joie de vivre similar to the debut. That polish is an indication that Lynne and Petty dominate this record, which only makes sense because they made it between Full Moon Fever and Into the Great Wide Open, but it’s striking that this sounds like more like their work, even when Dylan takes the lead on “Inside Out” or the doo wop-styled “7 Deadly Sins.” Both of these are quite good songs and they have a few other companions here, like the quite wonderful country stomp “Poor House,” but they’re songs more notable for their craft than their impact — nothing is as memorable as the throwaways on the debut — and when combined with the precise production, it takes a bit for them to sink in. But give the record some time, and these subtle pleasures are discernible, even if they surely pale compared to the open-hearted fun of the debut. But when paired with the debut on this set, it’s a worthy companion and helps support the notion that the Traveling Wilburys were a band that possesses a unique, almost innocent, charm that isn’t diminished after all this time. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Charlie T. Wilbury Jr (Tom Petty) (vocals, guitar)
Lefty Wilbury (Roy Orbison) (vocals, guitar)
Lucky Wilbury (Bob Dylan) (vocals, guitar, harmonica)
Nelson Wilbury (George Harrison) (vocals, guitar, slide guitar)
Otis Wilbury (Jeff Lynne) (vocals, guitar, bass, keyboards)
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Ray Cooper (percussion)
Jim Horn (saxophone)
Buster Sidebury (Jim Keltner) (drums)
Ian Wallace (tom-toms on 01.)

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Tracklist:
01. Handle With Care 3.19
02. Dirty World 3.30
03. Rattled 3.00
04. Last Night 3.48
05. Not Alone Any More 3.24
06. Congratulations 3.30
07. Heading For The Light 3.37
08. Margarita 3.15
09. “Tweeter and the Monkey Man” Dylan 5:30
10. End Of The Line 3.30

All song written by The Traveling WilburysCD1
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What a line-up !

 

Bob Dylan – Between Saved and Shot (1999)

FrontCover1Here´s a nice Bob Fylan bootleg with studio outtakes from his “Saved” and “Shot Of Love” period:

Studio outtakes from March-May 1981. Nice quality. It’s taken from the soundboard, but from a fourth generation analog tape… so the quality isn’t crystal clear. There is a slight white noise throughout. Vocals are rarely up to proper mix level. This is a great collection for fans of the studio process outtake. Gospel era fans will have some interest as well. However, all should keep in mind that these are unfinished songs. Some are little more than ideas. There are no hidden ‘gems’ here that have missed official release, and those seeking the powerful Christian dogma of Saved will be disappointed. Highlights are the bosa nova tune Don’t Ever Take Yourself Away, and the bonus tracks.

The bonus tracks are releasable quality. Much better than the proceeding tunes. Mystery Train is a nice rendition of the classic Sam Phillips tune with the sound and feel of the Shot of Love tunes. The outtakes are slightly more laid back, and less angry sounding than the released versions. There seems to be a better flow of the vocals. All are at least as good as the official versions. (by www.bobsboots.com)

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Personnel:
Steve Douglas (saxophone)
Tim Drummond (bass)
Donald “Duck” Dunn (bass)
Bob Dylan (vocals, guitar)
Jim Keltner (drums)
Danny “Kootch” Kortchmar (guitar)
Carl Pickhardt (piano)
Steve Ripley (guitar)
William D. “Smitty” Smith (organ)
Fred Tackett (guitar)
Benmont Tench (keyboards)
Monalisa Young (vocals)
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background vocals:
Carolyn Dennis – Clydie King – Regina McCrory – Madelyn Quebec

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Tracklist:
01. Is It Worth It 4.22
02. High Away 8.15
03. Hallelujah 2.48
04, Magic 4.41
05. You’re Still A Child To Me 2.10
06. Wind Blows On The Water 3.02
07. All The Way Down
08. My Oriental Home
09. We’re (Living) On Borrowed Time
10. I Want You To Know I Love You
11. On A Rockin’ Boat
12. Movin’ (On The Water)
13. Almost
14. Don’t Ever Take Yourself Away
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15. Mystery Train
16. Heart Of Mine
17. Watered Down Love
18. Shot Of Love

All songs written by Bob Dylan, except “Mystery Train” which was written by Phillips/Parker)

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Bob Dylan – Christmas In The Heart (2009)

FrontCover1Christmas in the Heart is the thirty-fourth studio album and first Christmas album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released on October 13, 2009 by Columbia Records. The album comprises a collection of hymns, carols, and popular Christmas songs. All Dylan’s royalties from the sale of this album benefited the charities Feeding America in the USA, Crisis in the UK, and the World Food Programme.

Dylan said that, although he was born and raised Jewish (he converted to Christianity in the late 1970s before returning to observing Judaism), he never felt left out of Christmas during his childhood in Minnesota. Regarding the popularity of Christmas music, he said, “… it’s so worldwide and everybody can relate to it in their own way.”

The album opened at #1 on Billboard’s Holiday and Billboard’s Folk Album Chart, #10 on Rock Album charts and #23 on overall album charts.

The album was recorded in a Santa Monica studio owned by Jackson Browne.

In an interview published by Street News Service, journalist Bill Flanagan asked Dylan why he had performed the songs in a straightforward style, and Dylan responded:

There wasn’t any other way to play it. These songs are part of my life, just like folk songs. You have to play them straight too.

When Flanagan reported that some critics thought the album was an ironic treatment of Christmas songs, Dylan responded:

Critics like that are on the outside looking in. They are definitely not fans or the audience that I play to. They would have no gut level understanding of me and my work, what I can and can’t do—the scope of it all. Even at this point in time they still don’t know what to make of me.

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Dylan released a music video for the song “Must Be Santa” directed by Nash Edgerton. In the video, Dylan and some other people are having a Christmas house party, until two of the guests start fighting and smashing things around and one of them running away. In the closing scene, we see Dylan and Santa Claus.

A music video was also released for the song “Little Drummer Boy” directed by Jeff Scher.

At Metacritic, the album currently holds a score of 62 out of 100 based on 17 reviews, indicating generally favorable reviews.

While the unexpected move by Dylan to record a Christmas album was received with skepticism at first, the outcome of the project was lauded by critics for bringing a fresh breath of air into these classics.

Slant Magazine’s critic Jesse Cataldo awarded the album 4 stars out of 5 and said:

This enjoyable sense of exploration, which prizes levity in a genre that usually amounts to an artistic wasteland, is invaluable. It also proves how much life is left in the songs, and how much other artists have succeeded at butchering them.

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Se7en magazine’s critic agreed, writing:

The arrangement of his band mixes up the style of the songs, resulting in a repertoire of Christmas songs that genuinely sound like modern material, while avoiding ever being cliché.

The critic for Tiny Mix Tapes rated the album 4 stars out of 5, writing:

On Christmas in the Heart…it’s not the heat, but the bitter cold, the kind you feel in northern Minnesnowta[sic]. These are traditional numbers, aged but not antiquated. In keeping with releases like Good as I Been to You and World Gone Wrong, the album features Dylan exorcising the musical spirits of the land. Some will rank it among other gimcrack releases, like Dylan & the Dead. Still others will categorize it as an oddity, like Self Portrait. It’s all and none of these. These songs are Dylan’s latest exploits, but they’re deathly sincere (and jolly), as serious and kitschy as Theme Time Radio Hour. It’s the music that introduces old Disney films, an album as dense and allusive as his other recent outings.

It’s a tragedy that more than 35 million people in this country alone—12 million of those children—often go to bed hungry and wake up each morning unsure of where their next meal is coming from. I join the good people of Feeding America in the hope that our efforts can bring some food security to people in need during this holiday season.

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Bob Dylan´s christmas single from 2009

Feeding America received Dylan’s royalties from sales in the USA, while two further charities, the United Nations’ World Food Programme and Crisis in the UK, received royalties from overseas sales.

Dylan said:

“That the problem of hunger is ultimately solvable means we must each do what we can to help feed those who are suffering and support efforts to find long-term solutions. I’m honoured to partner with the World Food Programme and Crisis in their fight against hunger and homelessness.”

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Personnel:
Bob Dylan (vocals, guitar, piano, harmonica)
Tony Garnier (bass)
Donnie Herron (steel guitar, mandolin, trumpet, violin)
David Hidalgo (accordion, guitar, mandolin, violin)
George Recile (drums, percussion)
Phil Upchurch (guitar)
Patrick Warren (keyboards, celeste)
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background vocals:
Amanda Barrett – Bill Cantos – Randy Crenshaw – Abby DeWald – Nicole Eva Emery – Walt Harrah – Robert Joyce

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Tracklist:
01. Here Comes Santa Claus (Autry/Haldeman) 2.35
02. Do You Hear What I Hear? (Regney/Baker) 3.02
03. Winter Wonderland” Felix Bernard, Richard B. Smith 1:52
04. Hark The Herald Angels Sin (Mendelssohn/Wesley) 2.30
05. I’ll Be Home For Christmas (Ram/Gannon/Kent 2.54
06. The Little Drummer Boy (Davis/Onorati/Simeone) 2.52
07. The Christmas Blues (Cahn/Holt) 2.54
08. O’ Come All Ye Faithful (Adeste Fideles) (Traditional) 2.48
00. Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas (Martin/Blane) 4.06
10. Must Be Santa (Fredericks/Moore) 2.48
11. Silver Bells (Livingston/Evans) 2.35
12. The First Noel (Traditional) 2.30
13. Christmas Island (Moraine) 2.27
14. The Christmas Song (Tormé/Wells) 3.56
15. O Little Town Of Bethlehem (Traditional) 2.17

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