Bob Dylan – Between Saved and Shot (1999)

FrontCover1Here´s a nice Bob Fylan bootleg with studio outtakes from his “Saved” and “Shot Of Love” period:

Studio outtakes from March-May 1981. Nice quality. It’s taken from the soundboard, but from a fourth generation analog tape… so the quality isn’t crystal clear. There is a slight white noise throughout. Vocals are rarely up to proper mix level. This is a great collection for fans of the studio process outtake. Gospel era fans will have some interest as well. However, all should keep in mind that these are unfinished songs. Some are little more than ideas. There are no hidden ‘gems’ here that have missed official release, and those seeking the powerful Christian dogma of Saved will be disappointed. Highlights are the bosa nova tune Don’t Ever Take Yourself Away, and the bonus tracks.

The bonus tracks are releasable quality. Much better than the proceeding tunes. Mystery Train is a nice rendition of the classic Sam Phillips tune with the sound and feel of the Shot of Love tunes. The outtakes are slightly more laid back, and less angry sounding than the released versions. There seems to be a better flow of the vocals. All are at least as good as the official versions. (by www.bobsboots.com)

AlternateCD

Alternate CD

Personnel:
Steve Douglas (saxophone)
Tim Drummond (bass)
Donald “Duck” Dunn (bass)
Bob Dylan (vocals, guitar)
Jim Keltner (drums)
Danny “Kootch” Kortchmar (guitar)
Carl Pickhardt (piano)
Steve Ripley (guitar)
William D. “Smitty” Smith (organ)
Fred Tackett (guitar)
Benmont Tench (keyboards)
Monalisa Young (vocals)
+
background vocals:
Carolyn Dennis – Clydie King – Regina McCrory – Madelyn Quebec

BackCover

Tracklist:
01. Is It Worth It 4.22
02. High Away 8.15
03. Hallelujah 2.48
04, Magic 4.41
05. You’re Still A Child To Me 2.10
06. Wind Blows On The Water 3.02
07. All The Way Down
08. My Oriental Home
09. We’re (Living) On Borrowed Time
10. I Want You To Know I Love You
11. On A Rockin’ Boat
12. Movin’ (On The Water)
13. Almost
14. Don’t Ever Take Yourself Away
+
15. Mystery Train
16. Heart Of Mine
17. Watered Down Love
18. Shot Of Love

All songs written by Bob Dylan, except “Mystery Train” which was written by Phillips/Parker)

CD

*
**

Advertisements

Bob Dylan – Christmas In The Heart (2009)

FrontCover1Christmas in the Heart is the thirty-fourth studio album and first Christmas album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released on October 13, 2009 by Columbia Records. The album comprises a collection of hymns, carols, and popular Christmas songs. All Dylan’s royalties from the sale of this album benefited the charities Feeding America in the USA, Crisis in the UK, and the World Food Programme.

Dylan said that, although he was born and raised Jewish (he converted to Christianity in the late 1970s before returning to observing Judaism), he never felt left out of Christmas during his childhood in Minnesota. Regarding the popularity of Christmas music, he said, “… it’s so worldwide and everybody can relate to it in their own way.”

The album opened at #1 on Billboard’s Holiday and Billboard’s Folk Album Chart, #10 on Rock Album charts and #23 on overall album charts.

The album was recorded in a Santa Monica studio owned by Jackson Browne.

In an interview published by Street News Service, journalist Bill Flanagan asked Dylan why he had performed the songs in a straightforward style, and Dylan responded:

There wasn’t any other way to play it. These songs are part of my life, just like folk songs. You have to play them straight too.

When Flanagan reported that some critics thought the album was an ironic treatment of Christmas songs, Dylan responded:

Critics like that are on the outside looking in. They are definitely not fans or the audience that I play to. They would have no gut level understanding of me and my work, what I can and can’t do—the scope of it all. Even at this point in time they still don’t know what to make of me.

Booklet01

Dylan released a music video for the song “Must Be Santa” directed by Nash Edgerton. In the video, Dylan and some other people are having a Christmas house party, until two of the guests start fighting and smashing things around and one of them running away. In the closing scene, we see Dylan and Santa Claus.

A music video was also released for the song “Little Drummer Boy” directed by Jeff Scher.

At Metacritic, the album currently holds a score of 62 out of 100 based on 17 reviews, indicating generally favorable reviews.

While the unexpected move by Dylan to record a Christmas album was received with skepticism at first, the outcome of the project was lauded by critics for bringing a fresh breath of air into these classics.

Slant Magazine’s critic Jesse Cataldo awarded the album 4 stars out of 5 and said:

This enjoyable sense of exploration, which prizes levity in a genre that usually amounts to an artistic wasteland, is invaluable. It also proves how much life is left in the songs, and how much other artists have succeeded at butchering them.

BobDylan01

Se7en magazine’s critic agreed, writing:

The arrangement of his band mixes up the style of the songs, resulting in a repertoire of Christmas songs that genuinely sound like modern material, while avoiding ever being cliché.

The critic for Tiny Mix Tapes rated the album 4 stars out of 5, writing:

On Christmas in the Heart…it’s not the heat, but the bitter cold, the kind you feel in northern Minnesnowta[sic]. These are traditional numbers, aged but not antiquated. In keeping with releases like Good as I Been to You and World Gone Wrong, the album features Dylan exorcising the musical spirits of the land. Some will rank it among other gimcrack releases, like Dylan & the Dead. Still others will categorize it as an oddity, like Self Portrait. It’s all and none of these. These songs are Dylan’s latest exploits, but they’re deathly sincere (and jolly), as serious and kitschy as Theme Time Radio Hour. It’s the music that introduces old Disney films, an album as dense and allusive as his other recent outings.

It’s a tragedy that more than 35 million people in this country alone—12 million of those children—often go to bed hungry and wake up each morning unsure of where their next meal is coming from. I join the good people of Feeding America in the hope that our efforts can bring some food security to people in need during this holiday season.

SingleFront+BackCover
Bob Dylan´s christmas single from 2009

Feeding America received Dylan’s royalties from sales in the USA, while two further charities, the United Nations’ World Food Programme and Crisis in the UK, received royalties from overseas sales.

Dylan said:

“That the problem of hunger is ultimately solvable means we must each do what we can to help feed those who are suffering and support efforts to find long-term solutions. I’m honoured to partner with the World Food Programme and Crisis in their fight against hunger and homelessness.”

BookletBackCover

Personnel:
Bob Dylan (vocals, guitar, piano, harmonica)
Tony Garnier (bass)
Donnie Herron (steel guitar, mandolin, trumpet, violin)
David Hidalgo (accordion, guitar, mandolin, violin)
George Recile (drums, percussion)
Phil Upchurch (guitar)
Patrick Warren (keyboards, celeste)
+
background vocals:
Amanda Barrett – Bill Cantos – Randy Crenshaw – Abby DeWald – Nicole Eva Emery – Walt Harrah – Robert Joyce

Booklet02

Tracklist:
01. Here Comes Santa Claus (Autry/Haldeman) 2.35
02. Do You Hear What I Hear? (Regney/Baker) 3.02
03. Winter Wonderland” Felix Bernard, Richard B. Smith 1:52
04. Hark The Herald Angels Sin (Mendelssohn/Wesley) 2.30
05. I’ll Be Home For Christmas (Ram/Gannon/Kent 2.54
06. The Little Drummer Boy (Davis/Onorati/Simeone) 2.52
07. The Christmas Blues (Cahn/Holt) 2.54
08. O’ Come All Ye Faithful (Adeste Fideles) (Traditional) 2.48
00. Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas (Martin/Blane) 4.06
10. Must Be Santa (Fredericks/Moore) 2.48
11. Silver Bells (Livingston/Evans) 2.35
12. The First Noel (Traditional) 2.30
13. Christmas Island (Moraine) 2.27
14. The Christmas Song (Tormé/Wells) 3.56
15. O Little Town Of Bethlehem (Traditional) 2.17

CD

*
**

 

Bob Dylan – Another Side Of Bob Dylan (1964)

FrontCover1Another Side of Bob Dylan is the fourth studio album by American singer and songwriter Bob Dylan, released on August 8, 1964 by Columbia Records.

The album deviates from the more socially conscious style which Dylan had developed with his previous LP, The Times They Are A-Changin’. The change prompted criticism from some influential figures in the folk community – Sing Out! editor Irwin Silber complained that Dylan had “somehow lost touch with people” and was caught up in “the paraphernalia of fame”.

Despite the album’s thematic shift, Dylan performed the entirety of Another Side of Bob Dylan as he had previous records – solo. In addition to his usual acoustic guitar and harmonica, Dylan provides piano on one selection, “Black Crow Blues”. Another Side of Bob Dylan reached No. 43 in the US (although it eventually went gold), and peaked at No. 8 on the UK charts in 1965.

With Dylan’s commercial profile on the rise, Columbia was now urging Dylan to release a steady stream of recordings. Upon Dylan’s return to New York, studio time was quickly scheduled, with Tom Wilson back as producer.

Dylan01The first (and only) session was held on June 9 at Columbia’s Studio A in New York. According to Heylin, “while polishing off a couple of bottles of Beaujolais”, Dylan recorded fourteen original compositions that night, eleven of which were chosen for the final album. The three that were ultimately rejected were “Denise Denise”, “Mr. Tambourine Man”, and “Mama, You Been on My Mind”.

Nat Hentoff’s The New Yorker article in late October 1964 on Dylan includes remarkable descriptions of the June 1964 recording session. Hentoff describes in considerable detail the atmosphere in the CBS recording studio and Dylan’s own asides and banter with his friends in the studio, with the session’s producers, and Hentoff himself.

Ramblin’ Jack Elliott was present during part of this session, and Dylan asked him to perform on “Mr. Tambourine Man”. “He invited me to sing on it with him,” recalls Elliott, “but I didn’t know the words ‘cept for the chorus, so I just harmonized with him on the chorus.” Only one complete take was recorded, with Dylan stumbling on some of the lyrics. Though the recording was ultimately rejected, Dylan would return to the song for his next album.

By the time Dylan recorded what was ultimately the master take of “My Back Pages”, it was 1:30 in the morning. Master takes were selected, and after some minor editing, a final album was soon sequenced. (by wikipedia)

Dylan02

The other side of Bob Dylan referred to in the title is presumably his romantic, absurdist, and whimsical one — anything that wasn’t featured on the staunchly folky, protest-heavy Times They Are a-Changin’, really. Because of this, Another Side of Bob Dylan is a more varied record and it’s more successful, too, since it captures Dylan expanding his music, turning in imaginative, poetic performances on love songs and protest tunes alike. This has an equal number of classics to its predecessor, actually, with “All I Really Want to Do,” “Chimes of Freedom,” “My Back Pages,” “I Don’t’ Believe You,” and “It Ain’t Me Babe” standing among his standards, but the key to the record’s success is the album tracks, which are graceful, poetic, and layered. Both the lyrics and music have gotten deeper and Dylan’s trying more things — this, in its construction and attitude, is hardly strictly folk, as it encompasses far more than that. The result is one of his very best records, a lovely intimate affair. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

Dylan03

Personnel:
Bob Dylan (vocals, guitar, piano, harmonica)

BackCover1

Tracklist:
01. All I Really Want To Do 4.02
02. Black Crow Blues 3.12
03. Spanish Harlem Incident 2.22
04. Chimes Of Freedom 7.09
05. I Shall Be Free No. 10 4.45
06. To Ramona 3.50
07. Motorpsycho Nitemare 4.31
08. My Back Pages 4.20
09. I Don’t Believe You 4.20
10. Ballad In Plain D 8.15
11. It Ain’t Me Babe 3.30

All songs written by Bob Dylan

LabelB1

*
**

Bob Dylan – The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan (1963)

FrontCover1The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan is the second studio album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released on May 27, 1963 by Columbia Records. Whereas his self-titled debut album Bob Dylan had contained only two original songs, Freewheelin’ represented the beginning of Dylan’s writing contemporary words to traditional melodies. Eleven of the thirteen songs on the album are Dylan’s original compositions. The album opens with “Blowin’ in the Wind”, which became an anthem of the 1960s, and an international hit for folk trio Peter, Paul & Mary soon after the release of Freewheelin’. The album featured several other songs which came to be regarded as among Dylan’s best compositions and classics of the 1960s folk scene: “Girl from the North Country”, “Masters of War”, “A Hard Rain’s a-Gonna Fall” and “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right”.

Dylan’s lyrics embraced news stories drawn from headlines about the Civil Rights Movement and he articulated anxieties about the fear of nuclear warfare. Balancing this political material were love songs, sometimes bitter and accusatory, and material that features surreal humor. Freewheelin’ showcased Dylan’s songwriting talent for the first time, propelling him to national and international fame. The success of the album and Dylan’s subsequent recognition led to his being named as “Spokesman of a Generation”, a label Dylan repudiated.

Dylan1963_02The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan reached number 22 in the US (eventually going platinum), and became a number-one album in the UK in 1964. In 2003, the album was ranked number 97 on Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. In 2002, Freewheelin’ was one of the first 50 recordings chosen by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Registry. (by wikipedia)

It’s hard to overestimate the importance of The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan, the record that firmly established Dylan as an unparalleled songwriter, one of considerable skill, imagination, and vision. At the time, folk had been quite popular on college campuses and bohemian circles, making headway onto the pop charts in diluted form, and while there certainly were a number of gifted songwriters, nobody had transcended the scene as Dylan did with this record. There are a couple (very good) covers, with “Corrina Corrina” and “Honey Just Allow Me One More Chance,” but they pale with the originals here. At the time, the social protests received the most attention, and deservedly so, since “Blowin’ in the Wind,” “Masters of War,” and “A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall” weren’t just specific in their targets; they were gracefully executed and even melodic.

Dylan1963_03

Although they’ve proven resilient throughout the years, if that’s all Freewheelin’ had to offer, it wouldn’t have had its seismic impact, but this also revealed a songwriter who could turn out whimsy (“Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right”), gorgeous love songs (“Girl From the North Country”), and cheerfully absurdist humor (“Bob Dylan’s Blues,” “Bob Dylan’s Dream”) with equal skill. This is rich, imaginative music, capturing the sound and spirit of America as much as that of Louis Armstrong, Hank Williams, or Elvis Presley. Dylan, in many ways, recorded music that equaled this, but he never topped it. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

Bob Dylan On The Ed Sullivan Show

Personnel:
Bob Dylan (vocals, guitar, harmonica)
+
on 11:
Howie Collins (guitar)
Leonard Gaskin (bass)
Bruce Langhorne (guitar)
Herb Lovelle (drums)
Dick Wellstood (piano)

BackCover

Tracklist:
01. Blowin’ In The Wind (Dylan) 2.47
02. Girl From The North Country (Dylan) 3.22
03. Masters Of War (Dylan) 4.33
04. Down The Highway (Dylan) 3.25
05. Bob Dylan’s Blues (Dylan) 2.24
06. A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall (Dylan) 6.53
07. Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right (Dylan) 3.40
08. Bob Dylan’s Dream (Dylan) 5.03
09. Oxford Town (Dylan) 1.50
10. Talking World War III Blues (Dylan) 6.26
11. Corrina, Corrina (Thomas) 2.42
12. Honey, Just Allow Me One More Chance (Dylan) 2.00
13. I Shall Be Free (Dylan) 4.48

LabelB1
*
**

More Bob Dylan:

 

MoreBobDylan

 

Come, you masters of war
You that build the big guns
You that build the death planes
You that build all the bombs

You that hide behind walls
You that hide behind desks
I just want you to know
I can see through your masks

You that never done nothin’
But build to destroy
You play with my world
Like it’s your little toy

You put a gun in my hand
And you hide from my eyes
And you turn and run farther
When the fast bullets fly

Like Judas of old
You lie and deceive
A world war can be won
You want me to believe

But I see through your eyes
And I see through your brain
Like I see through the water
That runs down my drain

You fasten all the triggers
For the others to fire
Then you sit back and watch
While the death count gets higher

You hide in your mansion
While the young peoples’ blood
Flows out of their bodies
And is buried in the mud

You’ve thrown the worst fear
That can ever be hurled
Fear to bring children
Into the world

For threatenin’ my baby
Unborn and unnamed
You ain’t worth the blood
That runs in your veins

How much do I know
To talk out of turn?
You might say that I’m young
You might say I’m unlearned

But there’s one thing I know
Though I’m younger than you
That even Jesus would never
Forgive what you do

Let me ask you one question
Is your money that good?
Will it buy you forgiveness?
Do you think that it could?

I think you will find
When your death takes its toll
All the money you made
Will never buy back your soul

And I hope that you die
And your death will come soon
I’ll follow your casket
On a pale afternoon

I’ll watch while you’re lowered
Down to your deathbed
And I’ll stand over your grave
‘Til I’m sure that you’re dead

Bob Dylan – Same (1962)

frontcover1Bob Dylan, regarded as the voice of a generation for his influential songs from the 1960s onwards, has won the Nobel Prize for Literature in a surprise decision that made him the only singer-songwriter to win the award.

The 75-year-old Dylan — who won the prize for “having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition” — now finds himself in the company of Winston Churchill, Thomas Mann and Rudyard Kipling as Nobel laureates.

The announcement was met with gasps in Stockholm’s stately Royal Academy hall, followed — unusually — by some laughter.

Dylan’s songs, such as “Blowin’ in the Wind,” “The Times They Are a-Changin’,” “Subterranean Homesick Blues,” and “Like a Rolling Stone” captured a spirit of rebellion, dissent and independence.

More than 50 years on, Dylan is still writing songs and is often on tour, performing his dense poetic lyrics, sung in a sometimes rasping voice that has been ridiculed by detractors.

Some lyrics have resonated for decades.

“Blowin’ in the Wind,” written in 1962, was considered one of the most eloquent folk songs of all time. “The Times They Are A-Changin’,” in which Dylan told Americans “your sons and your daughters are beyond your command,” was an anthem of the civil rights movement and Vietnam War protests.

bobdylan01Awarding the 8 million Swedish crown ($930,000) prize, the Swedish Academy said: “Dylan has the status of an icon. His influence on contemporary music is profound.”

Swedish Academy member Per Wastberg said: “He is probably the greatest living poet.”

Asked if he thought Dylan’s Nobel lecture – traditionally given by the laureate in Stockholm later in the year – would be a concert, replied: “Let’s hope so.”

Over the years, not everyone has agreed that Dylan was a poet of the first order. Novelist Norman Mailer countered: “If Dylan’s a poet, I’m a basketball player.”

Sara Danius, Permanent Secretary of the Nobel Academy, told a news conference there was “great unity” in the panel’s decision to give Dylan the prize.

Dylan has always been an enigmatic figure. He went into seclusion for months after a motorcycle crash in 1966, leading to stories that he had cracked under the pressure of his new celebrity.

He was born into a Jewish family but in the late 1970s converted to born-again Christianity and later said he followed no organized religion. At another point in his life, Dylan took up boxing.

Dylan’s spokesman, Elliott Mintz, declined immediate comment when reached by phone, citing the early hour in Los Angeles, where it was 3 a.m. at the time of the announcement. Dylan was due to give a concert in Las Vegas on Thursday evening.

Literature was the last of this year’s Nobel prizes to be awarded. The prize is named after dynamite inventor Alfred Nobel and has been awarded since 1901 for achievements in science, literature and peace in accordance with his will. (by Reuters)

And this was the start of a very unique career that leads to the nobel prize in 2016:

bobdylan02

Bob Dylan’s first album is a lot like the debut albums by the Beatles and the Rolling Stones — a sterling effort, outclassing most, if not all, of what came before it in the genre, but similarly eclipsed by the artist’s own subsequent efforts. The difference was that not very many people heard Bob Dylan on its original release (originals on the early-’60s Columbia label are choice collectibles) because it was recorded with a much smaller audience and musical arena in mind. At the time of Bob Dylan’s release, the folk revival was rolling, and interpretation was considered more important than original composition by most of that audience. A significant portion of the record is possessed by the style and spirit of Woody Guthrie, whose influence as a singer and guitarist hovers over “Man of Constant Sorrow” and “Pretty Peggy-O,” as well as the two originals here, the savagely witty “Talkin’ New York” and the poignant “Song to Woody”; and it’s also hard to believe that he wasn’t aware of Jimmie Rodgers and Roy Acuff when he cut “Freight Train Blues.” But on other songs, one can also hear the influences of Bukka White, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Blind Willie Johnson, and Furry Lewis, in the playing and singing, and this is where Dylan bobdylan03departed significantly from most of his contemporaries. Other white folksingers of the era, including his older contemporaries Eric Von Schmidt and Dave Van Ronk, had incorporated blues in their work, but Dylan’s presentation was more in your face, resembling in some respects (albeit in a more self-conscious way) the work of John Hammond, Jr., the son of the man who signed Dylan to Columbia Records and produced this album, who was just starting out in his own career at the time this record was made. There’s a punk-like aggressiveness to the singing and playing here. His raspy-voiced delivery and guitar style were modeled largely on Guthrie’s classic ’40s and early-’50s recordings, but the assertiveness of the bluesmen he admires also comes out, making this one of the most powerful records to come out of the folk revival of which it was a part. Within a year of its release, Dylan, initially in tandem with young folk/protest singers like Peter, Paul & Mary and Phil Ochs, would alter the boundaries of that revival beyond recognition, but this album marked the pinnacle of that earlier phase, before it was overshadowed by this artist’s more ambitious subsequent work. In that regard, the two original songs here serve as the bridge between Dylan’s stylistic roots, as delineated on this album, and the more powerful and daringly original work that followed. One myth surrounding this album should also be dispelled here — his version of “House of the Rising Sun” here is worthwhile, but the version that was the inspiration for the Animals’ recording was the one by Josh White. (by Bruce Eder)

bobdylan04

Personnel:
Bob Dylan (guitar, vocals, harmonica)

backcover1

Tracklist:
01. You’re No Good (Fuller) 1.37
02. Talkin’ New York (Dylan) 3.15
03. In My Time Of Dyin’ (Traditional) 2.37
04. Man Of Constant Sorrow (Traditional) 3.06
05. Fixin’ To Die (White) 2.17
06. Pretty Peggy-O (Traditional) 3.22
07. Highway 51 (Jones) 2.49
08. Gospel Plow (Traditional) 1.44
09. Baby, Let Me Follow You Down (v.Schmidt) 2.32
10. House Of The Risin’ Sun (Traditional) 5.15
11. Freight Train Blues (Traditional) 2.16
12. Song To Woody (Dylan) 2.39
13. See That My Grave Is Kept Clean (Jefferson) 2.40

labelb1

*
**

congratulations

Stuart Hoggard + Jim Shields – Bob Dylan – An Illustrated Discography (1978)

BobDylan_AnIllustratedDiscography_01AWhen Bo Dylan read this book in London on his European tour he was amazed at the amount pg work the authors put into tracking down the unofficially released recordings of his work. Even he didn´t know just how big a business bootlegging his songs had become.

Dylan has been the single most influential figure of an entire generation for the past two decades; yet his followers have access to only the tip of the iceberg, when it comes to his recordings.

More than 90 albums are available to collectors under the counter of bootlegs. They show Dylan practising songs, relaxing, and developing, allowing collectors to get closer to the man.

This book is not just a listing of of these 90 albums, his officially released albums, 17 films and interviews; it traces his career from his arrival in New York in 1961 to his European tour de force in 1978 showing what went on around the bare bones of the recording sessions and is set against a background of the music and politics of the time.

Cross referenced, fully indexed and illustrated with over 50 photographs.

BobDylan_AnIllustratedDiscography_71ABobDylan_AnIllustratedDiscography_07ABobDylan_AnIllustratedDiscography_12ABobDylan_AnIllustratedDiscography_21ABobDylan_AnIllustratedDiscography_26BobDylan_AnIllustratedDiscography_26ABobDylan_AnIllustratedDiscography_29ABobDylan_AnIllustratedDiscography_31ABobDylan_AnIllustratedDiscography_39ABobDylan_AnIllustratedDiscography_40ABobDylan_AnIllustratedDiscography_54ABobDylan_AnIllustratedDiscography_60A*
**

BobDylan_AnIllustratedDiscography_03A

 

Bob Dylan – Clean Cuts (1985)

FrontCover1After more than 20 years, opinion is still divided when it comes to Bob Dylan’s 23rd studio album, Empire Burlesque (1985). According to the wikipedia, “fans and critics continue to debate the album’s merits, especially when compared to Dylan’s classics of the 1960s, ’70s and 2000s.”

Kurt Loder, reviewing the album in Rolling Stone magazine, called the album “a blast of real rock & roll, funneled through a dense, roiling production – custom-chopped-and-channeled by remix wiz Arthur Baker – that affords Dylan more pure street-beat credibility than he has aspired to since… well, pick your favorite faraway year. Could there be actual hits hunkering here? Is Dylan “back”? Again? One is tempted to trumpet some such tidings.

“Because of the basic nature of its material, however elliptically presented, Empire Burlesque is bound to confound and exasperate many listeners. I continue to miss the emotional specificity of past Dylan masterworks, like “Tangled Up in Blue,” and grow weary of his woozier generalities (”Emotionally Yours” could be about a lover, or it could be about Jesus; it’s so lacking in detail, I can’t imagine how anyone could care). But I am heartened when he cranks up and rocks out, as he does here. Dylan may never resolve the tension between spiritual conviction and rock & roll kicks, but I like to think he’s straying in the right direction.”

BobDylan01In 1992, Sick Cat released Clean Cuts, a collection of Empire Burlesque outtakes. As bobsboots.com pointed out: “The biggest problem with this release is in trying to put too many tracks on it! The technology of the day allowed 70 to 72 minutes recording time. This disc is 72:02. However, to achieve that time constraint of the CD, the songs were mastered about 10 per cent too fast.”

A Dylan fan took the trouble to speed-correct the tracks and these are offered here.

Empire Burlesque sessions, New York, NY and Hollywood, CA, July 1984-April 1985. Very good soundboard, speed-corrected version.

BobDylan02Personnel:

A. Power Station, NYC
Benmont Tench (organ)
Bob Dylan (vocals, guitar)
Marvin Ettioni (bass)
Don Heffington (drums)
Ronnie Wood (guitar)

B. Delta Sound Labs
John Davis (bass)
Bob Dylan – piano, syntheziser, guitar, vocals)
Anton Fig (drums)
Ronnie Wood (guitar)

C. Cherokee Studio
Bob Dylan (guitar, vocals)
Don Heffington (drums)
Ira Ingber (guitar)
Vince Melamed (keyboards
Madelyn Quebec (background vocals)
Carl Sealove (bass)

D. Shakedown Sound Studios
Sly Dunbar (drums)
Bob Dylan (keyboards, vocals)
Stuart Kimball (guitar)
Al Kooper (guitar)
Ted Pearlman (guitar)
Robbie Shakespear (bass)
Mick Taylor (guitar)

BackCover1Tracklist:
01. Go ‘Way Little Boy (A) (Dylan) 3.20
02. Driftin’ Too Far From Shore (B) (Dylan) 4.01
03. Who Loves You More (B) (Dylan) 6.21
04. New Danville Girl (Brownsville Girl) (C) (Dylan/Shepaard) 12.45
05. Something’s Burning Baby (C) (Dylan) 5.04
06. Tight Connection To My Heart (D) (Dylan) 5.30
07. Clean Cut Kid (B) (Dylan) 5.15
08. I’ll Remember You (C) (Dylan) 4.04
09. Seeing The Real You At Last (C) (Dylan) 4.55
10. Trust Yourself (C) (Dylan) 3.03
11. Emotionally Yours (C) (Dylan) 4.25
12. When The Night Comes Falling (D) (Dylan) 7.07
13. Waiting To Get Beat (D) (Dylan) 2.29
14. Straight A’s In Love (B) (Dylan/Knopfler) 3.45
15. The Very Thought Of You (B) (Dylan)
16. Never Gonna Be The Same Again (D) (Dylan) 3.04

CD*
**