Shirley Bassey – Something (1970)

FrontCover1.JPGSomething is a 1970 album by Shirley Bassey. With her career having been in decline since the latter part of the mid 1960s, Something proved to be Shirley Bassey’s comeback when it was released in August 1970. The title track single became her biggest UK hit for many years, reaching No.4 and spending 22 weeks on the chart. This was actually the second single featured on the album, “The Sea and Sand” having already been released earlier. The album was similarly her biggest hit for many years in the album charts, reaching No.5 and spending 28 weeks in the top 50.

This album led to a major revival in Bassey’s career, and it would see Bassey transform into mainly an album artist, recording fifteen albums in the 1970s (four of those live recordings). Of those three would be top ten albums, three others in the top fifteen, and a further four in the top 40. She would also reach the top three twice, with a pair of compilations. This was also her first work with record producer Noel Rogers and producer/arranger Johnny Harris, who built on Bassey’s traditional pop roots to include contemporary songs and arrangements.

The album’s original release was in stereo on vinyl and cassette. This was the first Shirley Bassey studio album not to be issued in mono. The album was released in the US as Shirley Bassey is Really “Something” and featured different artwork and cover photograph. (by wikipedia)

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Locked out of the singles charts for the past seven years, Shirley Bassey finally returned with this collection of “contemporary” standards, including her British Top Five single “Something.” (Bassey, who first heard the song when Peggy Lee sang it, apparently didn’t even know it was a Beatles tune until just before recording it.) To parallel the modern material, Johnny Harris’ arrangements add an upfront electric bass and hang-loose drumkit to the heavy strings and brass. Of course, Bassey was never a jazz singer, so she makes the transition from traditional pop to contemporary rock with an ease more comparable to Barbra Streisand than Peggy Lee. There are a few jazzy rock standards (“Light My Fire,” “Spinning Wheel,” “Something”) plus plenty of latter-day show tunes (“Easy to Be Hard,” “What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life,”) and a few ’60s vocal pieces (“The Sea and Sand,” “My Way,” “Yesterday When I Was Young”). Each tune that comes her way gets stamped with the irrepressible Bassey style, and ends up making a remarkably cohesive album of contemporary pop. (by John Bush)

What a voice !

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Personnel:
Tony Campo (bass)
Harold Fisher (drums)
Bill Parkinson (guitar)
Shirley Bassey (vocals)
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unknown orchestra conducted by Johnny Harris

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Tracklist:
01. Something (Harrison) 3.33
02. Spinning Wheel (Clayton-Thomas) 3.05
03. Yesterday I Heard The Rain (Manzanero/Lees) 3,27
04. The Sea And Sand (Harris/Colton/Smith) 3.59
05. My Way (Comme D’Habitude) (Revaux/François/Thibaut/Anka) 3,36
06. What About Today? (Shire/Maltby, Jr.) 3.08
07. You And I (Bricusse) 3.44
08. Light My Fire (Krieger/Manzarek/Densmore/Morrison) 3.25
09. Easy To Be Hard (MacDermot/Ragni/Rado) 2.39
10. Life Goes On (Theodorakis/Martin) 2.38
11. What Are You Doing The Rest Of Your Life? (Legrand/A.Bergman/M.Bergman) 2.55
12. Yesterday, When I Was Young (Aznavour/Kretzmer) 3.48

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Georges Jouvin – Sa trompette d´or et son orchestre (1973)

FrontCover1.JPG70 albums, 3000 songs, 25 million records sold, an Oscar from the Academy of the disc in 1981 … Georges Jouvin, nicknamed “the man with the golden trumpet” , was a huge international success, Japan to America.

Born June 19, 1923 in Rennes, in a family of musicians, he discovers his instrument with his father, and the saxophone with his brother. At 10 years old, he was offered his first piano. The following year, he entered the Breton conservatory, until he was 17 years. He wins many prizes, music theory but also harmony and trumpet. Then, the gifted continued his studies at the Paris Conservatory in 1942.

He soon develops a varied repertoire, from classical to jazz to popular music, with a virtuosity that made him famous. He made his first steps in symphony orchestras, including the arrangements of Albinoni’s Adagio, Carmen and The Magic Flute are among the most famous. At his side: Michel Legrand, Alix Combelle, Jerry Mengo …
Charlie Parker

Subsequently, he recorded albums of covers of fashion tubes for home Pathé-Marconi discs until early 1980. In particular reshuffles La paloma, Le Rififi, History of Love, The téléfon …

By November 1950, Georges Jouvin recorded in Paris in an orchestra led by Maurice Mouflard with Charlie Parker guest star. At the same time, it is part of the association of Rennes Trumpets.

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Forty 45s quarterly fate until 1967, in the collection “Hits Jouvin”. Yet few invited on the days of television sets, it becomes a popular musician in France, and more generally in Europe.

After being Administrator and Vice President of the SACEM (Society of Authors, Composers and Music Publishers), he received the Legion of Honor July 13, 1994. (by chb44.com)

And here´s one of his Easy Listening albums …  I guess this is a sampler with recordings fromthe Sixties …

And it´s a nice sampler, if you love reat trumpet sounds in the Easy Lisening style … you should listen … Georges Jouvin knews how to play this game …

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Personnel:
Georges Jouvin Orchestra

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Tracklist:
01. Johnny Guitare (Boléro, Thème Du Film “Johnny Guitar”) (Lee/Delanoë/Young) 2.57
02. Seize Tonnes (Médium Fox) (Larue/Travis) 2.46
03. Que Sera Sera (Valse Du Film “L’Homme Qui En Savait Trop”( (Marnay/Livingston/Evans) 2.44
04. Jerk For Trumpet (Jerk Monkiss) (Jouvin/Moutet) 1.56
05. Trompettissimo (Jouvin/Moutet) 2.39
06. La Plus Belle Chose Au Monde (Slow) (Love Is A Many Splendored Thing) Du Film “La Colline De L’Adieu”) (Rouzaud/Fain) 2.10
07. Le Temps Du Muguet (Soloviev-Sedoï) 2.24
08. Viens Au Creux De Mon Epaule (Slow) (Aznavour) 2.37
09. Un Jour Tu Verras (Valse Du Film “Secrets D’Alcove”) (v.Parys/Mouloudji) 1.48
10. Dans Les Rues D’Acapulco (Samba Marquina) (Jouvin/Moutet) 0.47
11. Lisboa Antiga (Boléro) (Vale – Salina/Galhardo/Portela) 1.56
12. Tele Boogie (Shuffle Boogie) (Jouvin) 3.44

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Georges Jouvin (June 19, 1923 – October 24, 2016)

George Shearing Quintet – Strolling (1965)

FrontCover1Sir George Shearing, OBE (13 August 1919 – 14 February 2011) was a British jazz pianist who for many years led a popular jazz group that recorded for Discovery Records, MGM Records and Capitol Records. The composer of over 300 titles, including the jazz standard “Lullaby of Birdland”, had multiple albums on the Billboard charts during the 1950s, 1960s, 1980s and 1990s. He died of heart failure in New York City, at the age of 91.

 

Born in Battersea, London, Shearing was the youngest of nine children. He was born blind to working class parents: his father delivered coal and his mother cleaned trains in the evening. He started to learn piano at the age of three and began formal training at Linden Lodge School for the Blind, where he spent four years.

Though he was offered several scholarships, Shearing opted to perform at a local pub, the Mason’s Arms in Lambeth, for “25 bob a week” playing piano and accordion. He joined an all-blind band during that time and was influenced by the records of Teddy Wilson and Fats Waller. Shearing made his first BBC radio broadcast during this time after befriending Leonard Feather, with whom he started recording in 1937.

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In 1940, Shearing joined Harry Parry’s popular band and contributed to the comeback of Stéphane Grappelli. Shearing won seven consecutive Melody Maker polls during this time. Around that time he was also a member of George Evans’s Saxes ‘n’ Sevens band.

In 1947, Shearing emigrated to the United States, where his harmonically complex style mixing swing, bop and modern classical influences gained popularity. One of his first performances was at the Hickory House. He performed with the Oscar Pettiford Trio and led a jazz quartet with Buddy DeFranco, which led to contractual problems, since Shearing was under contract to MGM and DeFranco to Capitol Records.[citation needed]

In 1949, he formed the first George Shearing Quintet, a band with Margie Hyams (vibraphone), Chuck Wayne (guitar), later replaced by Toots Thielemans (listed as John Tillman), John Levy (bass) and Denzil Best (drums) and recorded for Discovery, Savoy and MGM, including the immensely popular single “September in the Rain” (MGM), which sold over 900,000 copies; “my other hit” to accompany “Lullaby of Birdland”. Shearing said of this hit that it was “as accidental as it could be.”

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Shearing’s interest in classical music resulted in some performances with concert orchestras in the 1950s and 1960s, and his solos frequently drew upon the music of Satie, Delius and Debussy for inspiration. He became known for a piano technique known as “Shearing’s voicing”, a type of double melody block chord, with an additional fifth part that doubles the melody an octave lower. (This style is also known as “locked hands” and the jazz organist Milt Buckner is generally credited with inventing it.[citation needed])

In 1956, Shearing became a naturalized citizen of the United States. He continued to play with his quintet, with augmented players through the years, and recorded with Capitol until 1969. He created his own label, Sheba, that lasted a few years. Along with dozens of musical stars of his day, Shearing appeared on ABC’s The Pat Boone Chevy Showroom. Earlier, he had appeared on the same network’s reality show, The Comeback Story, in which he discussed how to cope with blindness.

Shaering05In 1970, he began to “phase out his by-now-predictable quintet” and disbanded the group in 1978. One of his more notable albums during this period was The Reunion, with George Shearing (Verve 1976), made in collaboration with bassist Andy Simpkins and drummer Rusty Jones, and featuring Stéphane Grappelli, the musician with whom he had debuted as a sideman decades before. Later, Shearing played with a trio, as a soloist and increasingly in a duo. Among his collaborations were sets with the Montgomery Brothers, Marian McPartland, Brian Q. Torff, Jim Hall, Hank Jones and Kenny Davern. In 1979, Shearing signed with Concord Records, and recorded for the label with Mel Tormé. This collaboration garnered Shearing and Tormé two Grammys, one in 1983 and another in 1984.

Shearing remained fit and active well into his later years and continued to perform, even after being honoured with an Ivor Novello Lifetime Achievement Award in 1993. He never forgot his native country and, in his last years, would split his year between living in New York and Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire, where he bought a house with his second wife, singer Ellie Geffert. This gave him the opportunity to tour the UK, giving concerts, often with Tormé, backed by the BBC Big Band. He was appointed OBE in 1996. In 2007, he was knighted. “So”, he noted later, “the poor, blind kid from Battersea became Sir George Shearing. Now that’s a fairy tale come true.”

He was the subject of This Is Your Life in 1992 when he was surprised by Michael Aspel.

In 2004, he released his memoirs, Lullaby of Birdland, which was accompanied by a double-album “musical autobiography”, Lullabies of Birdland. Shortly afterwards, however, he suffered a fall at his home and retired from regular performing.

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Lynn Redgrave and George Shearing at an
Arts and Entertainment Network Party in New York
 

In 2012 Derek Paravicini and jazz vocalist Frank Holder did a tribute concert to the recordings of Shearing. Ann Odell transcribed the recordings and taught Paravicini the parts, as well as being the MD for the concerts. Lady Shearing also endorsed the show, sending a letter to be read out before the Watermill Jazz Club performance.

Shearing was married to Trixie Bayes from 1941 to 1973. Two years after his divorce he married his second wife, the singer Ellie Geffert, who survived him.

Shearing was a member of the Bohemian Club and often performed at the annual Bohemian Grove Encampments. He composed music for two of the Grove Plays (by wikipedia)

And here´s a fine example of his tasteful mixture between jazz and easy listening …  Maybe you should imagine … sitting in a bar with a hot lady on your side … close your eyes an drift away …

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Personnel:
The George Shearing Quintet

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Tracklist:
01. Strolling (Levy Jr.) 3.01
02. November Sea Scape (Hyams) 2.31
03. Easy Livin’ (Wright/Forrest) 6.05
04, Lonely Moments (Williams) 3.14
05. This Is Cuba? (Shearing) 2.30
06. If You Were The Only Girl In The World (Ayer) ‎2.49
07. I’ll Never Smile Again (Lowe) 2.53
08. Loose Leaf (Zarantonello) 2.26
09. Midnight Mood (Shearing/Hazard) 3.03
10. Minoration (Pate) 2.28
11. My Silent Love (Suesse) 2.47
12. We’ll Be Together Again (Fischer) 2.24

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Sir George Shearing, OBE (13 August 1919 – 14 February 2011)

Peggy Lee – Blues Cross Country (1962)

FrontCover1Blues Cross Country is a 1962 studio album by Peggy Lee, principally arranged by Quincy Jones, with some arrangements by Benny Carter. The album can be described as a concept album, consisting of a musical journey across the United States through swinging blues songs, many of which were written by Lee with other contributors.Blues Cross Country is a 1962 studio album by Peggy Lee, principally arranged by Quincy Jones, with some arrangements by Benny Carter. The album can be described as a concept album, consisting of a musical journey across the United States through swinging blues songs, many of which were written by Lee with other contributors.
Blues Cross Country was the second of Lee’s two albums featuring arrangements by Jones. He had also arranged her previous studio album, If You Go (1961). (by wikipedia)

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Peggy Lee and Quincy Jones

One of Peggy Lee’s most intriguing concept LPs of the ’50s and ’60s, Blues Cross Country teams her with the Quincy Jones Orchestra on a set of swinging blues set all over America, almost like a continental version of Sinatra’s “Come Fly with Me.” She balances standards like “Basin Street Blues,” “St. Louis Blues,” “I Left My Sugar (In Salt Lake City),” and “Goin’ to Chicago Blues” alongside collaborations with Jones on “Los Angeles Blues,” “New York City Blues,” and “The Train Blues.” (She is also the lyricist of four other songs PeggyLee02on the album.) Though Jones’ arrangements are often a touch brassier than the blues standards can handle, Lee contributes just the right blend of vigor and feeling to the songs. Blues Cross Country also includes her first waxing of the Leiber & Stoller song “Kansas City,” which looks forward to her successful performances of their “I’m a Woman,” “Is That All There Is?,” and the Mirrors album. At a little over half-an-hour, it is a brief LP, and the 1999 CD reissue has two additional tracks. From the same spring 1961 sessions that produced the album came Lee’s single recording of Cy Coleman and Carolyn Leigh’s “Hey! Look Me Over,” the most popular song to emerge from the 1960 Broadway musical Wildcat, also arranged by Quincy Jones. Skipping ahead five years, there was another Lee single, “The Shining Sea,” which she wrote with Johnny Mandel, who also arranged it. Neither song fits in with the album’s concept, but they at least add more than four minutes to its running time. (by William Ruhlmann)

This not only a hot easy listening album, but a great album with Big Band music with a real hot voice … Peggy Lee at her best !

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Personnel:
Bob Bain (guitar)
Max Bennett (bass)
Hoyt Bohannon (trombone)
Aubrey Bouck (french horn)
Dennis Budimir (guitar)
Larry Bunker (percussion)
Pete Candolli (trumpet)
Benny Carter (saxophone, tuba)
Buddy Collette (saxophone)
Bob Cooper (woodwind)
Bob Fowler (trumpet)
Vern Friley (trombone)
Justin Gordon (saxophone)
Conrad Gozzo (trumpet)
Joe Graves (trumpet)
Bill Green (saxophone)
Chico Guerrero (percussion)
Bill Henshaw (rench horn)
Plas Johnson (saxophone)
Artie Kane (organ)
Harry Klee (woodwind)
Bobby Knight (trombone)
Peggy Lee (vocals)
Lou Levy (piano)
Stan Levey (drums)
Sinclair Lott (french horn)
Lew McCreary (trombone)
Dick Nash (trombone)
Jack Nimitz (saxophone)
Earl Palmer (drums)
Bill Perkins (saxophone)
John Pisano (guitar)
Al Porcino (trumpet)
Emil Richards (percussion)
George Roberts (trombone)
Howard Roberts (guitar)
Frank Rosolino (trombone)
Jimmy Rowles (piano)
Bud Shank (woodwind)
Jack Sheldon (trumpet)
Tommy Shepard (trombone)
Henry Sigismonti (french horn)
Frank Strazzeri (piano)
Toots Thielemans (guitar)
Ray Triscari (trumpet)

Arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones

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Tracklist:
01. Kansas City (Leiber/Stoller) – 2:29
02. Basin Street Blues (Williams) – 3:04
03. Los Angeles Blues (Lee/Jones) – 2:38
04. I Left My Sugar in Salt Lake City (Lange/ Rene) – 2:53
05. The Grain Belt Blues (Lee/Raskin/Schugler) – 1:52
06. York City Blues (Jones/Lee) 3:21
07. Goin’ to Chicago Blues (Basie/Rushing) – 2:37
08. San Francisco Blues (Lee/Raskin) – 2:37
09. Fisherman’s Wharf (Lee/Raskin) – 3:11
10. Boston Beans (Lee/Raskin/Schugler) 2:05
11. The Train Blues (Jones/Lee) 2:42
12. Saint Louis Blues (Handy) – 2:15
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13. Hey, Look Me Over! (Cy Coleman/Leigh) – 1:55
14. The Shining Sea (Lee/Mandel) – 2:45

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101 Strings Orchestra – The Soul Of Greece (1972)

FrontCover1101 Strings Orchestra was a brand for a highly successful easy listening symphonic music organization, with a discography exceeding 150 albums and a creative lifetime of around 30 years beginning in 1957. 101 Strings had a trademark sound, focusing on melody with a laid-back ambiance most often featuring strings. Their LPs were individualized by the slogan “The Sound of Magnificence”, a puffy cloud logo and sepia-toned photo of the orchestra. The 101 Strings orchestra included 124 string instruments, and was conducted by Wilhelm Stephan. The orchestra’s famous official photograph was taken in the Musikhalle Hamburg.

Record label mogul David L. Miller came to prominence by releasing the first Bill Haley & His Comets’ records in 1952–1953 on his own Essex label (followed by Trans-World, then Somerset Records). In this capacity, Miller played a role in the creation of rock and roll.

Following the rise of mood music (practitioners Mantovani and Jackie Gleason Presents), Miller subcontracted the Orchester des Nordwestdeutschen Rundfunks Hamburg (the Northwest German Radio Orchestra of Hamburg) conducted by Wilhelm Stephan to play in-house arrangements of popular standards.[3] The first three 101 Strings albums were released in November 1957, and twelve more titles were released in 1958 (many of which featured recycled material from earlier albums attributed to the New World Orchestra, Rio Carnival Orchestra, and other light music orchestras). These records were pressed by Miller’s own plants and released through his own distribution channels (such as grocery stores).

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His core staff arrangers were Monty Kelly, Joseph Francis Kuhn, and Robert Lowden. All three proved adept at writing original compositions that were stylistically consistent both with contemporary hit songs and each other. Miller placed these on 101 Strings albums to provide additional publishing revenues.

Kelly’s earliest successes were Latin and Spanish travelogues (such as the “Soul of Spain” series), although he became 101 Strings’ “Now Sound” specialist following the British Invasion. Kuhn concentrated on radio-friendly numbers in the “Pops”‘s orchestral manner (“Blues Pizzicato”, etc.) which provided Somerset its initial catalog of originals. Lowden composed lounge ballads (such as “Blue Twilight”). Their body of early 1960s work was recycled via re-release throughout the next twenty years.

In 1964, Miller sold the franchise to Al Sherman, a successful record label distributor, who renamed the label Alshire (based in Los Angeles) and moved recording to London. Sherman retained Miller as a partner to oversee production and A&R. The Alshire era is characterized by large-scale expansion of product, attempts to branch out to younger markets and beginning in 1969, eventual stagnation (although late efforts by Les Baxter and Nelson Riddle were released under the 101 name in 1970). Output decreased from 1974 on. A tribute to John Lennon (composed of earlier Beatle tribute material – 101 Strings play Hits written by The Beatles) in January 1981 marked the final 101 Strings effort.

Al Sherman

Many 101 Strings albums are simply orchestrated versions of pop hits and show tunes, although the early Somerset material contains many examples of the exotica and lounge genres. Songs of the Seasons in Japan, Hawaiian Paradise, and East of Suez are three such albums. 101 Strings Play the Blues and Back Beat Symphony were early experiments in symphonic-pop hybridization, while Fly Me To The Moon contains five noir-ish originals. Alshire releases include ‘Now Sound’ albums such as Jet Set, Sounds of Today, and Astro-Sounds from Beyond the Year 2000, the last of which has been frequently sampled by electronic music artists of the 1990s and 2000s (decade).
Sims and the New 101 Strings Orchestra

This possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed. (April 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

The Alshire catalog was sold to Madacy, Inc. in the 1990s and, under the direction of Greg Sims, a “New 101 Strings Orchestra” began releasing a series of CDs (including a two-volume Beatles set). 101 Strings compilations were reissued on CD during the “lounge revival” of the 1990s. Few 101 Strings LPs have been re-released in their original form.

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The cover of the first album, 1957

If one goes to the Madacy site to view their 101 Strings collection, exactly the same description that was used on the Bel Canto’s ST- 76 two track stereo release about the 101 Strings sound is reprinted. The 50 Hz hum heard on many of those tape recordings was due to the Ampex 350’s filtering which was not well suited for European 50 Hz power. The “My Fair Lady” and “King and I” releases have what appears to be the sound of dirty mixing pots used on the fly during those sessions. There were a number of tape releases that sounded like tape copies of pristine Stereo Fidelity vinyl which actually, were not all that pristine. Stereo recordings were made with a triangular cutting stylus. This resulted at times in pinch distortion which early conical styli did not handle well. Inner grooves especially, due to the increased density of the recorded information due to the slower relative movement of the track under the stylus, were more susceptible to distortion with conical styli in use at the time this record was released. The later development of elliptical styli allowed more precise tracking of the track and greatly reduced inner-track distortion.

In the 10 years and 2 months of their existence, 101 Strings sold over 50,000,000 records worldwide. (by wikipedia)

And here´s one of the many albums by the 101 Strings Orchestra:

The music on this CD is nicely arranged and played, but it sounds too orchestrated! To be fair, it is performed by the 101 Strings Orchestra and it wasn’t misrepresented in the write-up. But I was looking for music with a folksy feel like you might hear at a cafe in Greece, and this is not it. (by an amazon customer)

If you’re looking for string orchestrated, romanticized versions of popular Greek songs, this is a good album. This version of “Never on Sunday” beats Percy Faith’s overly cute, string orchestrated version on his “Tara’s Theme” album (1961), since this version has real bouzoukis in it and also the full intro. Most of these songs do have bouzoukis, without which they wouldn’t sound very Greek. A few songs here like “Athens By Night” have vocals, but most are instrumental. Many of these melodies will be recognizable to anyone who collects American pop Greek song albums, especially “Hassaposer Vico” and all the songs on the last half of the CD. I’m not sure how many of these songs are authentic Greek songs; “Zorba the Greek” and “Never On Sunday” of course are modern American pop songs from movie soundtracks, written in a Greek style. (by another amazon customer)

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Personnel:
101 Strings Orchestra

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Tracklist:
01. Athens By Night (Lavranos/Mastorakis) 3.23
02. A Bed For Two (Theodorakis/Kampanelis) 3.14
03. Hassaposerviko (Gagaris) 2.45
04. Mykonos Sunset (Lowden) 3.13
05. Never On Sunday (Hadjidakis) 3.29
06. Aharisti (Tsitsanis) 3.07
07. Sirtaki (from “Zorba The Greek”) (Theodorakis) 4.12
08. Sorrow In Every Port (Katsaros/Pythagoras) 3.45
09. Daybreak (Lavranos/Pythagoras) 3.05
10. Hellena (Lowden) 1.35
11. Departure (Zambetas) 4.17

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Jerry Murad’s Fabulous Harmonicats – Sentimental Serenade (1962)

FrontCover1Jerry Murad’s Harmonicats were an American harmonica-based group. The band was founded in 1947; by 2009, it was no longer performing. Originally they were named The Harmonica Madcaps and the group consisted of Jerry Murad (chromatic lead harmonica), Bob Hadamik (bass harmonica), Pete Pedersen (chromatic harmonica), and Al Fiore, (chord harmonica). They reformed later as a trio with Murad, Fiore, and bass harmonica player Don Les.

Pedersen and Gail Wallace remained contributors to the group throughout its existence, working on arrangements and occasionally recording.
Jerry Murad
Jerry Murad (chromatic harmonica), was an Armenian born in Istanbul, Turkey who moved to America at the age of 2. He played diatonic harmonicas at first, and took up chromatic soon after. Murad played Hohner 270s and 64s, as well as the Musette, a harmonica made especially for him that replicates the sound qualities of a French accordion. It is featured on their 1960s recording of “Parisienne Fantasy”. Murad also played the Hohner Polyphonia (a type of orchestral melodic harmonica).

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Don Les
Don Les (bass harmonica) was born in Chicago, and was blind at birth. He was able to see again at the age of twelve after a successful surgery. At one point, he formed his own version of the Harmonicats. The Don Les Harmonicats, which featured Mildred Mulcay (of the harmonica duo the Mulcays) and Lenny Leavitt. They released a Christmas album entitled Christmas with the Don Les Harmonicats.

Al Fiore
Al Fiore (chord harmonica), was born in Chicago and started experimenting with chord harmonicas at the age of 13. Fiore played the rare pre-war Hohner Chord harmonica. He recorded the band’s No. 1 hit, Peg o’ My Heart on this harmonica. (by wikipedia)

Or, in their own words:

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Ok, this is Easy Listening music but witha real unique sound.

Just listen to the legendary magic of Jerry Murad and his fabulous Harmonicats – you won’t have heard anything like it!

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Personnel:
Al Fiore (harmonica 24″ chord)
Don Les (bass harmonica)
Jerry Murad (harmonica)
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unknown bass player and drummer

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Tracklist:
01. Who’s Sorry Now? (Kalmar/Ruby/Snyder) 2.09
02. Moonlight Cocktail (Roberts/Gannon) 2.33
03. Sentimental Journey (Homer/Green/Brown) 2.15
04. Blue Champagne  (Ryerson/Watts) 2,36
05. My One And Only Love (Wood/Mellin) 2.29
06. Ebb Tide (Sigman/Maxwell) 2.21
07. September Song (Weill/Anderson) 2.18
08. On Green Dolphin Street (Kaper/Washington) 2.00
09. Nora’s Theme (Lynn) 2.12
10. There Goes My Heart (Silver/Davis) 2.39
11. Shangri-La (Malneck/Maxwell) 2.11
12. Sunrise Serenade (Carle/Lawrence) 2.45

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Buddy Cole – Swing Fever (1960)

FrontCover1Edwin LeMar “Buddy” Cole (December 15, 1916 – November 5, 1964), was a jazz pianist and orchestra leader. He played behind a number of pop singers, including Rosemary Clooney, Jill Corey, Johnnie Ray and The Four Lads, who recorded for Columbia Records. As “Buddy Cole and his Trio” he recorded the albums Some Fine Old Chestnuts and New Tricks with Bing Crosby.

 

Buddy Cole was born in Irving, Illinois, and started his musical career in the theater playing between movies. He moved to Hollywood and played with a couple of bands, most notably the Alvino Rey big band, before becoming a studio musician. Joining the John Scott Trotter orchestra as a pianist in 1947, he worked closely with Bing Crosby for a number of years and in 1954 he began a daily radio show with Crosby supported by a trio comprising Vince Terri on guitar, banjo etc., Don Whittaker on bass and Nick Fatool on drums. Cole played piano and electric organ. He and Crosby built up a large library of songs which could then be inserted into the show. Cole also recorded a similar library of songs with Rosemary Clooney (with whom he had previously toured) and these songs together with those of Crosby’s were employed in The Bing Crosby – Rosemary Clooney Show (1960-1962). Albums with his combo were recorded on piano and Hammond organ.

BuddyCole01Cole recorded for Capitol Records as both Buddy Cole and Eddie LaMar and His Orchestra. He did both commercial and transcription recordings for Capitol.

Although primarily known as a pianist, he had an abiding love for the organ, both Hammond and theatre organ. In his capacity as a studio musician, he worked extensively with Henry Mancini, who used his distinctive Hammond organ sound for the sound track to the TV series “Mr. Lucky”. He also recorded several albums for Warner Brothers on piano, Hammond organ and theatre pipe organ.

The theatre organ heard on these albums was the 17-rank Wurlitzer organ from the United Artists theatre plus nine ranks from a one-time radio studio Robert Morton theatre organ which he installed in the garage of a former residence in North Hollywood and on which he recorded three albums for the Columbia and Capitol labels. The combined ranks were installed in a specially built studio next to his home.

Two albums – Modern Pipe Organ and Autumn Nocturne – were recorded for Warner Brothers, as well as two albums done in conjunction with arranger Monty Kelly, one of which contained an arrangement of Richard Rodgers’ Slaughter on Tenth Avenue, and the other of which contained transcriptions of big band arrangements with spaces for the organ. These two albums – for the Alshire label – were Cole’s last disc recordings.

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He married Yvonne King on 17 August 1940, member of the King Sisters, and with her had two daughters, actress Tina Cole and Cathy Cole Green. They divorced in 1953.

He married Clare Foley Woodruff on 12 November 1957, who already had two children, Jay and Jeffrey Woodruff, the latter of whom would often assist him in organ tuning. The marriage lasted until Cole’s death.

Cole had been suffering from an advanced case of heart disease for a number of years, and beginning as early as 1959, suffered a series of heart attacks as a result. On November 4, 1964, Cole was contracted to record some organ pieces featured in 20th Century Fox’s blockbuster hit The Sound of Music including sections of the “End Titles”, the reprise of “Climb Ev’ry Mountain” and “Processional” and “Maria”. In the early hours of November 5, after the marathon six-hour recording session had been completed for the evening, Cole headed home, went to bed and died in his sleep of a heart attack, being found the following morning by a staff member (by wikipedia)

And here´s one of his countless albums … this is not a real jazz-album but a Easy Listening album … with lot´s of all these swinging organ sounds from that period.

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Personnel:
Red Callender (bass)
Buddy Cole (organ)
Vince Terry (guitar)
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percussion:
Jack Costanzo – Al Stoller – Lou Singer – Milt Holland

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Tracklist:
01. Pagan Love Song (Brown/Freed) 1.36
02. Brazil (Barroso/Russell) 2.09
03. The Hour Of Parting (Khan/Spolianski) 2.15
04. The Peanut Vendor (Sunshine/Simons/Gilbert) 2.12
05. Solftly, As In The Morning Sunrise (Hammerstein/Romberg) 3.13
06. Old Devil Moon (Lane) 2.51
07. Heat Wave (Berlin) 2.07
08. La Rosita (Dupont/Stewart) 2.52
09. Frenesi (Charles/Russell/Dominguez) 2.19
10. The Moon Was Yellow (Leslie/Ahlert) 3.08
11. Poinciana (Bernier/Simon) 3.25
12, Crazy Rhythm (Caesar/Kahn/Meyer) 1,50

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