Kraftwerk – Ralf And Florian (1973)

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Kraftwerk (German: [ˈkʁaftvɛɐ̯k], lit. “power station”) are a German band formed in Düsseldorf in 1970 by Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider. Widely considered innovators and pioneers of electronic music, Kraftwerk were among the first successful acts to popularize the genre. The group began as part of West Germany’s experimental krautrock scene in the early 1970s before fully embracing electronic instrumentation, including synthesizers, drum machines, and vocoders. Wolfgang Flür joined the band in 1974 and Karl Bartos in 1975, expanding the band to a quartet.

On commercially successful albums such as Autobahn (1974), Trans-Europe Express (1977), The Man-Machine (1978), and Computer World (1981), Kraftwerk developed a self-described “robot pop” style that combined electronic music with pop melodies, sparse arrangements, and repetitive rhythms, while adopting a stylized image including matching suits. Following the release of Electric Café (1986), Flür left the group in 1987, followed by Bartos in 1990. Founding member Schneider left in 2008.

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The band’s work has influenced a diverse range of artists and many genres of modern music, including synth-pop, hip hop, post-punk, techno, house music, ambient, and club music. In 2014, the Recording Academy honoured Kraftwerk with a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. They later won the Grammy Award for Best Dance/Electronic Album with their live album 3-D The Catalogue (2017) at the 2018 ceremony. In 2021, Kraftwerk was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in the early influence category.[3] As of 2022, the band continues to tour.

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Ralf und Florian (English title: Ralf and Florian) is the third studio album by the German electronic band Kraftwerk. It was released in October 1973 on Philips. It saw the group moving toward its signature electronic sound.

Along with Kraftwerk’s first two albums, Ralf und Florian to date has never been officially re-issued on compact disc. However, the album remains an influential and sought-after work, and bootlegged CDs were widely distributed in the 1990s on the Germanofon label. In 2008, Fact named it among the 20 greatest ambient albums ever made.

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As indicated by the title (and like their previous album), all the tracks were written, performed and produced by Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider, with the sessions engineered by the influential Konrad “Conny” Plank. The album has a fuller and more polished sound quality than previous efforts, and this is clearly due to the use of a number of commercial recording studios in addition to Kraftwerk’s own yet-to-be-named Kling Klang. The colour photograph on the back of the cover gives a vivid impression of the bohemian state of Kraftwerk’s own facilities at the time – including egg-box trays pasted, nailed, or stuck on the walls as acoustic treatment.

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Fact stated that the album’s sound “sits halfway between LSD-fried Kraut prog and the refined minimal art of classic Kraftwerk.” The album is still almost entirely instrumental (some wordless vocalising appears in “Tanzmusik”, and “Ananas Symphonie” features the band’s first use of a machine voice created by an early prototype vocoder, a sound which would later become a Kraftwerk trademark). Instrumentation begins to show more obvious use of synthesizers (Minimoog and EMS Synthi AKS[4]), but most melodic and harmonic keyboard parts are performed on Farfisa electronic piano/organ. Flute and guitar are still much in evidence. The band was still without a drummer, and several tracks, particularly “Tanzmusik”, make use of a preset organ rhythm machine. “Kristallo” features a striking rhythmic electronic bassline (actually created on the EMS synthesizer with the aid of the vocoder), however, in general the album is much gentler and less rhythmically precise than Kraftwerk’s later electronic work.

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The LP included a “musicomic” poster insert of cartoons by Emil Schult, who had been playing electric violin live with the band (although he does not feature on the album recordings). Schult remained a collaborator of Kraftwerk’s. The cartoons illustrated each track on the album, as well as the city of Düsseldorf, with the caption “In Düsseldorf am Rhein, klingt es bald!”, which translates literally in English as “In Düsseldorf on the Rhine, it will sound soon” (perhaps the phrase “the sound gets around” captures the snappy feel of the maxim better). This is a reference to Kraftwerk’s Düsseldorf-based Kling Klang studio.

The album was a modest success in Germany. Drummer Wolfgang Flür was recruited to play with Ralf and Florian for a subsequent promotional TV appearance in Berlin, for the German WDR TV arts show Aspekte. He became a member of the group thereafter.

No material from this album has been performed in the band’s live set since 1976. Though the electronic sound of Ralf und Florian is more stylistically similar to Autobahn than it is to Kraftwerk’s first two albums, the band is seemingly reluctant to consider the album a part of its canon – Schneider in later interviews referred to the first three Kraftwerk albums as “archaeology”. The band hinted that the album may finally see a re-mastered CD release after issuing the boxed set The Catalogue in the autumn of 2009. (wikipedia)

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Continuing to work with Conny Plank, who once again provides a compelling job as producer and engineer, Kraftwerk went right ahead and named their new album after their two remaining members — an understandable enough move. Like the first two albums, Ralf and Florian still has not seen official re-release, for all that one can practically taste Kraftwerk’s leap into the beyond on it. Given that this was the last album before the most famous lineup was formed and Autobahn was released, it’s appropriate to listen to Ralf and Florian as a harbinger for the future, though perhaps all too easy. Take it on its own terms — a further investigation of electronic possibilities in a more open-ended, less constantly structured fashion than would be the case later — and Ralf and Florian becomes most enjoyable.

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“Kristallo” certainly shows how Kraftwerk was right on the verge — various sequencer-driven rhythms and pulses provide the bed for what sounds like a free-flowing harpsichord solo or its near equivalent. “Tanzmusik,” meanwhile, captures the sheer sense of beauty often present in the band’s glory days, complete with what sounds like celebratory handclaps and bells, though crucially lacking the elegant melancholy that gave later songs total heft. “Tongebirge” is another one of the tracks that shows Kraftwerk right on the cusp of future changes, Schneider’s swirling, lovely flute performance further treated with reverb and flange, while Hütter adds some immediately familiar (from later albums) synth tones. There’s still no core rhythm or melody, though, the immediate distinction between this era of the band and the later one. Parts of the lovely, piano/flute-led “Heimatklänge,” meanwhile, suggest some of David Sylvian’s early instrumental solo work in its sweet appeal. Another hint of the future appears with the final song, thanks to the electronically distorted opening vocals chanting the title of “Ananas Symphonie.” The inclusion of what sounds like steel guitar and banjo at the end is something else again. (by Ned Raggett)

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Personnel:
Ralf Hütter – vocals, keyboards, organ, electronics, bass guitar, guitar, zither, drums, percussion
Florian Schneider – vocals, keyboards, electronics, flute, violin, guitar, percussion

The UK edition:
UKEdition

Tracklist:
01. Elektrisches Roulette (“Electric Roulette”) 4.23
02. Tongebirge (“Mountain of Sound”) 2.51
03. Kristallo (“Crystals”) 6.17
04. Heimatklänge (“The Bells of Home”) 3.39
05. Tanzmusik (“Dance Music”) 6.37
06. Ananas Symphonie (“Pineapple Symphony”) 13.56
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07. Ananas Symphonie (“Pineapple Symphony”)  (incomplete) 4.41

Music is composed by Ralf Hütter & Florian Schneider.

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Many thanks to James Eldred for the high-quality scans of the ultra-rare cartoon poster, which was only included with the German first edition !

Edgar Froese – Epsilon In Malaysian Pale (1975)

GermanLPFrontCover1Edgar Willmar Froese (6 June 1944 – 20 January 2015) was a German musical artist and electronic music pioneer, best known for founding the electronic music group Tangerine Dream in 1967. Froese was the only continuous member of the group until his death. Although his solo and group recordings prior to 2003 name him as “Edgar Froese”, his later solo albums bear the name “Edgar W. Froese”.

Froese was born in Tilsit, East Prussia (now Sovetsk, Russia), on D-Day during World War II; members of his family, including his father, had been killed by the Nazis and after the war his mother and surviving family settled in Berlin. He took piano lessons from the age of 12, and started playing guitar at 15. After showing an early aptitude for art, Froese enrolled at the Academy of the Arts in Berlin to study painting and sculpture.

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One of his most lucrative jobs was to design advertising posters for the Berlin buses. He started an evening degree in psychology and philosophy and received his doctorate on Kant’s categorical imperative.[citation needed] Since his interpretation was not in accordance with the academic way of thinking, he left the college with the remark: “The dust of the universities is like a shroud over the truth.”

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In 1965, he formed a band called The Ones, who played psychedelic rock, and some rock and R&B standards. While playing in Spain, The Ones were invited to perform at Salvador Dalí’s villa in Cadaqués. Froese’s encounter with Dalí was highly influential, inspiring him to pursue more experimental directions with his music. The Ones disbanded in 1967, having released only one single “Lady Greengrass” (b/w “Love of Mine”) on Star Club Records. After returning to Berlin, Froese began recruiting musicians for the free-rock band that would become Tangerine Dream.

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Froese declared himself to be vegetarian, teetotal, and a non-smoker; he also did not take drugs. Froese was married to artist and photographer Monika (Monique) Froese from 1974 until her death in 2000. Their son Jerome Froese was a member of Tangerine Dream from 1990 through 2006. In 2002, Edgar Froese married artist and musician Bianca Froese-Acquaye.

Froese died suddenly in Vienna on 20 January 2015 from a pulmonary embolism. He was posthumously awarded the Schallwelle Honorary Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2015. He was quoted by the BBC as having once said: “there is no death, there is just a change of our cosmic address”.

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Froese was a friend of such artists as David Bowie, Brian Eno, Iggy Pop, George Moorse, Volker Schlöndorff, Alexander Hacke and Friedrich Gulda.[10] Pop and Bowie lived with Froese and his family at their home in Schöneberg before moving to their apartment on Hauptstraße. Froese also helped Bowie with his recovery and introduced him to the Berlin underground scene. Bowie named Froese’s solo album Epsilon in Malaysian Pale as a big influence and a soundtrack to his life in Berlin.

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If you are familiar with Tangerine Dream’s typical sound developed during the “Phaedra”, “Rubycon” period you will be very enthusiastic by this second Edgar Froese’s solo album. The electronic / synth explorations are also clearly similar to “Aqua”. This record announces the colour with concrete sounds taken from ambient samples of monkeys. “Concrete” experiences were also delivered on the previous “Aqua” with aquatic, airplane sounds. Next to this brief and original introduction we fall into a hypnotic and contemplative electronic adventure, dominated by Mellotron parts, sometimes experimenting acoustic elements as the flute (already used in the sad, melancholic TD’s track “sequent C”).” Rubycon” & “Ricochet” fans will enjoy all the old analog synth melodic parts accompanied by heavy / rhythmic electronic arpeggios. Froese’s best effort in solo, a landmark and a memorable album of experimental / electronic prog music. (Philippe)

In other words: a masterpiece !

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Personnel:
Edgar Froese (electronics, all instruments)
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Tracklist:
01. Epsilon In Malaysian Pale 16.27
02. Maroubra Bay 16.57

Music: Edgar Froese

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The UK Labels:
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The official website:
Website

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Vangelis – Spiral (1977)

FrontCover1Evángelos Odysséas Papathanassíou (29 March 1943 – 17 May 2022), known professionally as was a Greek musician and composer of electronic, progressive, ambient, jazz, and orchestral music.

He was best known for his Academy Award-winning score to Chariots of Fire (1981), as well as for composing scores to the films Blade Runner (1982), Missing (1982), Antarctica (1983), The Bounty (1984), 1492: Conquest of Paradise (1992), and Alexander (2004), and for the use of his music in the 1980 PBS documentary series Cosmos: A Personal Voyage by Carl Sagan.

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Vangelis began his career working with several pop bands of the 1960s such as The Forminx and Aphrodite’s Child, with the latter’s album 666 (1972) going on to be recognized as a progressive-psychedelic rock classic. Throughout the 1970s, Vangelis composed scores for several animal documentaries, including L’Apocalypse des Animaux, La Fête sauvage, and Opéra sauvage; the success of these scores brought him into the film scoring mainstream. In 1975 he set up his new 16-track studio, Nemo Studios in London, which he named his “laboratory”, releasing many solo albums including Heaven and Hell and China among others. In the early 1980s, Vangelis formed a musical partnership with Jon Anderson, the lead singer of progressive rock band Yes, and the duo released several albums together as Jon & Vangelis; he had previously joined Yes as their keyboard player, but left the group before recording any material with them.

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In 1980, he composed the score for the Oscar-winning film Chariots of Fire, for which he won an Academy Award for Best Original Score. The soundtrack’s single, the film’s theme, also reached the top of the US Billboard Hot 100 chart and was used as the background music at the London 2012 Olympics winners’ medal presentation ceremonies. He also composed the official anthem of the 2002 FIFA World Cup held in Korea and Japan. In his last twenty years he collaborated with NASA and ESA on music projects Mythodea, Rosetta and Juno to Jupiter, which was his last studio album.

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Having had a career in music spanning over 50 years and having composed and performed more than 50 albums, Vangelis is considered to be one of the most important figures in the history of electronic music.

Vangelis died on 17 May 2022, aged 79, at a hospital in Paris due to heart failure while receiving treatment for COVID-19. (wikipedia)

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Spiral is a studio album by the Greek electronic composer Vangelis, released in December 1977. It was the third album produced by Vangelis in Nemo Studios, London, which was his creative base until the late 1980s. For the track “To the Unknown Man” Vangelis received the Midem International Instrumental award in 1978.

It is a concept album, thematically inspired by ancient Tao philosophy, exploring the nature of the universe moving in spirals. On the front cover is cited Tao Te Ching: “Going on means going far – Going far means returning”, while the sleeve notes state that the track “Dervish D” is “inspired by the Dervish dancer who by his whirling realises the spiralling of the universe”.

It was a less known and acclaimed album than the two which preceded in the 1970s, Heaven and Hell (1975) and Albedo 0.39 (1976).

The album reached #38 on the Dutch album charts in 1978.

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In 2011, the album was included, along with Heaven and Hell and Albedo 0.39, in a 3-CD box set series “Original Album Classics” by Sony, RCA and Legacy Recordings. In 2013, the album was released in a remastered and reissued digipak edition by Esoteric Recordings. It includes a bonus track, previously never issued on CD, “To The Unknown Man (II)”, which was released as a B-side of the single “To the Unknown Man” in 1977.

The album is entirely instrumental, apart from Vangelis’ processed vocals on “Ballad”. Vangelis plays synthesizer, sequencers, electric piano, electronic organ, harmonica, brass, timpani, percussion. It is the first album on which Vangelis used the Yamaha CS-80 synthesizer, on which he would come to rely heavily in subsequent work, and is the most sequencer-based album of his career.

Henri Stirk from Background Magazine rated the 2013 edition by Esoteric Recordings 4/5 stars.

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In December 1977, the follow-up album ‘Spiral’ was released. It was inspired by ancient Tao philosophy, exploring the nature of the universe moving in spirals. The album oozes with a myriad of spectacular sounds. It featured the unforgettable marching track ‘To the Unknown Man’, for which Vangelis was awarded the Midem International Instrumental of the year 1978.In December 1977, the follow-up album ‘Spiral’ was released. It was inspired by ancient Tao philosophy, exploring the nature of the universe moving in spirals. The album oozes with a myriad of spectacular sounds. It featured the unforgettable marching track ‘To the Unknown Man’, for which Vangelis was awarded the Midem International Instrumental of the year 1978. (www.nemostudios.co.uk)

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As far as Vangelis’ early work is concerned (pertaining to the five years of his solo career), Spiral stands up quite well, although it’s almost always regarded as an inessential effort. Although the structures and the overall dynamics of the pieces are less complicated and less sophisticated, Spiral’s keyboard utilization is still extremely effectual, even if it does take awhile to get off the ground. The five tracks that make up the album aren’t as atmospheric or as elaborately shifting as 1975’s Heaven and Hell or 1976’s Albedo 0.39, but his musical movement does seem to transgress toward full, complete soundscapes, especially in “To the Unknown Man,” the album’s best example of Vangelis’ artistry. The album is based on a dancer’s appreciation of the universe and how it spirals into infinity, a concept which came to him through his own pirouettes. Both “Spiral” and “Ballad” touch ever so lightly on melody, appropriately relating to the album’s theme, while the lengthy “3+3” begins to unveil Vangelis’ creativity and sense of electronic exploration. After Spiral, Vangelis’ style changed somewhat, with more of a smoother, more melodic approach to the synthesizer, implemented to create a closer relationship between classical and electronic music. Albums such as Beauborg and China lay claim to this, also employing stronger ties between the theme and the music, while 1981’s Chariots of Fire has him merging the two styles completely. (by Mike DeGagne)

I can´t agree with Mike DeGagne:

An often overlooked masterpiece that all of his fans should listen to. (Jake Roberts)

Or: A fascinating journey through the possibilities of electronic music !

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Personnel:
Vangelis (synthesizer, keyboards and other instruments)

Booklet

Tracklist:
01. Spiral 6:55
02. Ballad 8:27
03. Dervish D 5:21
04. To The Unknown Man 9:01
05. 3+3 9:43
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06. To the Unknown Man (Part Two) 2.55

Music composed by Vangelis

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More from Vangelis:
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Richard Wahnfried – Time Actor (1979)

FrontCover1Klaus Schulze (born 4 August 1947) is a German electronic music pioneer, composer and musician.

He also used the alias Richard Wahnfried and was briefly a member of the Tangerine Dream and Krautrock bands Ash Ra Tempel and The Cosmic Jokers before launching a solo career consisting of more than 60 albums released across five decades.

Richard Wahnfried, then simply Wahnfried after 1993, is the long-time and only real alias for Klaus Schulze – originally a pseudonym, later an official side project name. Seven albums were released under this name between 1979 and 1997.

The main characteristics of the Wahnfried albums (as opposed to Schulze’s regular works) are:

Often being oriented towards more mainstream genres (some would say “more commercial”), such as rock, dance, techno, and trance.
Always allowing for collaborative and less electronic albums, with known or unknown guest musicians performing along Schulze’s synths.

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The pseudonym’s etymology stems from Schulze’s love for Richard Wagner:

Richard, evidently from Wagner’s first name. Richard is also the name of Schulze’s first son.
Wahnfried (“Peace from delusion and/or madness”, in German), from the name Wagner gave to his villa in Bayreuth (and where he was later buried).

In his 1975 album Timewind (four years before the first alias use), Schulze had already named a track “Wahnfried 1883” (in reference to Wagner’s death and burial in his Wahnfried’s garden in 1883). The other track on Timewind is called “Bayreuth Return”. After 1993, the albums are simply credited to “Wahnfried”, and namedrop Schulze (“featuring Klaus Schulze”, “Produced by Klaus Schulze”).

“Wahnfried” is the only known alias of Schulze (albeit on the 1998 Tribute to Klaus Schulze album, among 10 other artists, Schulze contributed one track barely hidden behind the “Schulzendorfer Groove Orchester” pseudonym). (wikipedia)

“Time Actor” was the result of a collaboration between legendary Crazy World & Kingdom Come visionary Arthur Brown and German synthesizer and ambient genius Klaus Schulze, recording under the pseudonym of his alter-ego Richard Wahnfried. “Richard” is the name of Klaus’ son born in 1979, and the first name of the German composer Wagner. “Wahnfried” is the name of Richard Wagner’s house, from the German “wähnen Frieden fand” (that his search and hopes will find peace). The album was a unique fusion of Brown’s eccentric musical vision and Schulze’s mastery of synthesis. The album was originally released in 1979 on the German Innovative Communication label.

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Time Actor stands out amongst Schulze’s massive catalog as a masterwork of avant garde new age. Schulze helms the project on electronics, and guests include Michael Shrieve on percussion, Vincent Crane on keyboards, and vocalist Arthur Brown, who sings – or should we say, speaks – on top of it all. Schulze describes the Wahnfried project in the liner notes as “the collective pseudonym of an idea: Time-Electronic, an experiment between avantgarde and muzak: Utility-music for sound-covered environment, in which a new generation grows up: Richard Wahnfried is this generation: Music between genius and nonsense: New ideas transported by an old medium to your ear.” (Press release)

Richard Wahnfried is not a person, it’s a pseudonym /project-name for certain endeavours by Klaus Schulze. This first LP under the moniker is basically a Schulze collaboration with art prog terrorist (and Crazy World leader) Arthur Brown. If there was an instrumental version of the album it would be an essential proto-IDM DJ weapon. As it stands, it’s still pretty great. (roundandroundrecords.com)

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Klaus Schulze uses the alias Richard Wahnfried to record different music with notable guests. Time Actor is one of his best Wahnfried discs. The featured guests are Arthur Brown (as in ” … I am the god of hell fire and I bring you …”) on vocals, Michael Shrieve on percussion and Vincent Crane on keyboards. Of course, Schulze is on electronics. Brown’s vocals are the perfect compliment toSchulze’s manipulations and ministrations. His vocals — often spoken — with his heavy English accent is an extra instrument in the sound design. The music is pure Berlin school electronica. Nobody does that better than Schulze. Because of Brown’s unique contribution, this disc has no peer. (by Jim Brenholts)

This is a dehumanised, cold, aseptic technoid ambient album from Klaus Schulze (with Arthur Brown as singer). Each composition is almost the same, developping similar synth waves floating in a spacious environnement, insistent repetitive electronic pulses and Arthur Brown’s narratives, partly excentric vocals. It contains no variations, suffering of a lack of creativity and invention, very mechanical and definitely uni dimentional. The musical style is pretty similar to face B from Dune but less consistent and without emotion (despite an honest and glacial-seductive “charming the wing” with Arthur Brown’s great lyrical voice). This is a ryhtmical, electronic beat album, linear and without reliefs. The musical background is very minimal and doesn’t enable Arthur Brown to express his genius. Klaus Schulze should have been concentrated on dark, gothic, haunted organ chords (similar to Irrlicht and Cyborg), Arthur Brown would give the best on it. “Time Actor” is terribly conformist, empty and non human. To avoid! (philippe)

??  .. a real strange album … ??  … Make your own decision !

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Personnel:
Arthur Brown (vocals)
Vincent Crane (keyboards)
Klaus Schulze (electronics)
Michael Shrieve (percussion)
Wolfgang Tiepold (cello)

Alternate frontcover:
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Tracklist:
01. Time Actor (Wahnfried/Brown) 8.59
02. Time Factory (Wahnfried/Brown) 10.40
03. Charming The Wind (Wahnfried/Brown) 4.50
04. Grandma’s Clockwork (Wahnfried) 4.10
05. Distorted Emission (Wahnfried/Brown) 5.30
06. The Silent Sound Of The Ground (Wahnfried/Brown) 15.02
07. Time Echoes (Wahnfried/Brown) 8.22
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08. Agamemory (taken from the LP Megatone, 1984) (Wahnfried) 8.24

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Günter Schickert – Samtvogel (1974)

OriginalFrontCover1Though his name barely registers among most of the Krautrock intelligentsia, Gunter Schickert was both prolific in the background and an important artist. Along with the better-known Achim Reichel, Schickert pioneered the echo guitar, where the repeated guitar tones create unique, multi-layered textures that take the instrument quite beyond the ordinary.

Schickert was active through much of the ’60s in the Berlin free jazz scene, though it wasn’t until 1974 that his first album, Samtvogel, came out, self-released by Schickert in a small batch. The album was unique enough that it was quickly snatched up by the legendary Brain label, and they reissued the record the next year. Samtvogel is quite similar to Manuel Göttsching’s solo-guitar album, Inventions for Electric Guitar, where guitar sounds are layered and layered on top of each other to create new hypnotic textures.

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In 1973, Schickert founded the trio GAM, with guitarist Axel Struck and percussionist Michael Aleska, and with Schickert on guitar, vocals, and trumpet, this group created a unique sort of freaked-out space rock. GAM recorded some jam sessions in 1976, which were finally released on cassette in 1986 and titled Gam 1976, and an unreleased album called Eiszeit in 1978.

At this time Schickert was also creating music for a theater company, and even performing live on-stage in some of the productions. He also served as a roadie for electronic music pioneer Klaus Schulze, and sometimes played live with Schulze as well. Schickert’s second solo album, Uberfallig, came out in 1979 on Sky Records, this time with Charles Heuer on drums to augment Schickert’s echoed guitar textures.

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In the ’80s, Schickert’s work in theater production continued, and he also took part in a couple of bands, No Zen Orchestra and Ziguri Ego Zoo. A third album under his own name, this one a completely solo effort with him on guitar, tapes, vocals, percussion, and trumpet, 1993’s Kinder der Wildnes only came out on cassette, though it showed that Schickert was expanding into a wider range of musical styles. Another collection, Somnabal, was released in 1995 on CD with music from throughout the decade-and-a-half before that. Though his recordings are few and hard to track down, especially the debut Samtvogel, Schickert is an innovative music creator who deserves more notice. (by Rolf Semprebon)GünterSchückert5An album considerably closer to the krautrock sound and very early Tangerine Dream albums than Gunter Schickert’s second album.

Samtvogel (Velvet Bird) is a bit more electronic sounding than the follow up album, but also displays much more of a krautrock type of compositional development. “Apricot Brandy” and “Kriegsmaschinen, Fahrt Zur Hölle” both echo the Can album Future Days mainly because of the repetitive traditional krautrock guitar playing and dreamy incomprehensible vocals that sounds more like another instrumental touch than true vocalizing. Almost the entire first half of “Kriegsmaschinen, Fahrt Zur Hölle” is mostly Conrad Schnitzler-inspired experimental industrial gurgling that gradually builds up into an explosive guitar loop that has a somewhat avant tone.

The main attraction of Samtvogel is the 21+ minute long closer track “Wald” which is exceptionally aquatic in nearly the same way that Edgar Froese’s Aqua except with Schickert’s delayed guitar loops. It’s quite a proggy track with plenty of development while remaining hypnotically repetitive, maintaining it’s under-water adventure type of atmosphere that fans of Boris’ Flood should find comforting. An aura of mystery surrounds the rather gloomy intermittent build-ups with dark melodicism in the guitar loops, until the track eventually gives way to lonely delayed staccato guitar plucking.

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To pick a favorite between Gunter Schickert’s two albums, I would have to choose Samtvogel for its much more mysterious and slightly avant electronic approach to krautrock styled early electronic music. It contains everything that I’d expect and hope for from a German electronic artist in the ’70s, plus the incredibly soothing aquatic elements and the chord choices made result in an extremely delightful album and one I’ve the best I’ve experienced in a while. While I hesitate to call it a masterpiece, this is definitely an album to be recommended to all fans of this type of music and I’d personally place this album beside Edgar Froese’s best work in terms of quality. (by colorofmoney91)

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Personnel:
Günter Schlickert (guitar, vocals, echo device)

The Brain Label Edition:
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Tracklist:
01. Apricot Brandy 5.56
02. Kriegsmaschinen, fahrt zur Hölle 16.31
02.1. Komm doch in meine Fabrik
02.2.Sagt der Personalchef
02.3. Kriegsmaschinen bau’n
02.4. Dafür gibt’s das meiste Geld
03. Wald 21.18

Music: Günter Schickert

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The reissue on Brain Records, 1980:
Brain(RI)Edition

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Harold Budd – The Pavilion Of Dreams (1978)

FrontCover1Harold Montgomory Budd (May 24, 1936 – December 8, 2020) was an American avant-garde composer and poet. Born in Los Angeles and raised in the Mojave Desert, Budd became a respected composer in the minimalist and avant-garde scene of Southern California in the late 1960s, and later became better known for his work with figures such as Brian Eno and Robin Guthrie. Budd developed what he called a “soft pedal” technique for playing piano.

Budd was born in Los Angeles, California and spent his childhood in Victorville, California by the Mojave Desert. Drafted into the army, he joined the regimental band where he played drums. Jazz saxophonist Albert Ayler was drafted at the same time and was also a member of the band. Budd joined him in gigs around the Monterey area. Budd’s experience of the army made him determined to get an education.

After working as “everything from cowboy to mailman,” including a stint at Douglas Aircraft, Budd enrolled in a course in architecture at Los Angeles Community College. He switched to a course in harmony and his musical talent was spotted by a teacher who encouraged him to compose. He began to attend performances by artists like Chet Baker and Pharoah Sanders.

Harold Budd03Budd’s career as a composer began in 1962. In the following years, he gained a notable reputation in the local avant-garde community. Budd studied music at the University of Southern California, under the tutelage of Ingolf Dahl, graduating in 1966. Budd’s work of this period was primarily minimalist drone music influenced by John Cage and Morton Feldman, as well as the abstract expressionist painter Mark Rothko, with whom he corresponded.

After completing his degree in composition in 1969, Budd took up a teaching position at the California Institute for the Arts.[8] In 1970, he released his first piece, The Oak of the Golden Dreams, which he recorded with an early model Buchla modular synthesizer at the institute.

Soon afterwards, Budd gave up composition, disgusted by the “academic pyrotechnics” of the avant-garde community.

The road from my first colored graph piece in 1962 to my renunciation of composing in 1970 to my resurfacing as a composer in 1972 was a process of trying out an idea and when it was obviously successful abandoning it. The early graph piece was followed by the Rothko orchestra work, the pieces for Source Magazine, the Feldman-derived chamber works, the pieces typed out or written in longhand, the out-and-out conceptual works among other things, and the model drone works (which include the sax and organ Coeur d’Orr and The Oak of the Golden Dreams, the latter based on the Balinese ‘Slendro’ scale which scale I used again 18 years later on ‘The Real Dream of Sails’).

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In 1972, while still retaining his teaching career at the California Institute for the Arts, he resurfaced as a composer. Spanning from 1972 to 1975, he created four individual works under the collective title The Pavilion of Dreams. The style of these works was an unusual blend of popular jazz and the avant-garde. His 1972 work Madrigals of the Rose Angel was sent to English composer Gavin Bryars who passed it on to Brian Eno. Eno contacted Budd and brought him to London to record for his Obscure Records label.

I owe Eno everything, OK? That’s the end of that… I was plucked from the tree, and suddenly I had flowered. I was just waiting. I couldn’t do it on my own. I didn’t know anything.

Budd resigned from the institute in 1976 and began recording his new compositions, produced by Eno. Two years later, Harold Budd’s debut album, The Pavilion of Dreams (1978), was released. The first performance of the piece was at a Franciscan church in California conducted by Daniel Lentz.”

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The work with Eno led Budd to shift his focus to studio-led projects, characterised by use of synthesisers and electronic treatments, often collaborating with other musicians. Budd developed a style of piano playing he deemed “soft pedal,” which can be described as slow and sustained. While he is often placed in the Ambient category, he emphatically declared that he was not an Ambient artist, and felt that he got “kidnapped” into the category.

His two collaborations with Eno, 1980’s The Plateaux of Mirror and 1984’s The Pearl, established his trademark atmospheric piano style. On Lovely Thunder, he introduced subtle electronic textures. His thematic 2000 release The Room saw a return to a more minimalist approach. In 2003, Daniel Lanois, a producer for U2 and Bob Dylan, and occasional collaborator with Brian Eno, recorded an impromptu performance of Budd playing the piano in his Los Angeles living room, unaware; it was released in 2005 as the album La Bella Vista.

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He had a long-running collaboration with guitarist Robin Guthrie. They worked together initially when Budd worked with Guthrie’s band The Cocteau Twins on their 1985 collaboration The Moon and the Melodies. The record was released by 4AD under all the collaborator’s names (rather than being a Cocteau Twins/Harold Budd record), with Budd being listed first as it was an alphabetical listing. In November 1986, the record charted on the UK Top 75 album chart, spending a week at number 46. Budd and Guthrie subsequently released several albums together, including two soundtracks to the Greg Araki films Mysterious Skin (2004) and White Bird in a Blizzard (2014), with the last, 2020’s Another Flower, released four days before Budd’s death.

Budd also collaborated with Andy Partridge of XTC on the album Through the Hill (1994), John Foxx on the album Translucence/Drift Music (2003) and work with Jah Wobble on the Solaris concert and live album in 2002.

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He composed music for the score of the 2020 miniseries I Know This Much Is True.

Brian Eno called Budd “a great abstract painter trapped in the body of a musician”.

The Guardian said, “The core Budd sound of yearning piano motifs and reverb-laden impressionism is often called minimalism. But compared with the cyclical craft of Steve Reich and early Philip Glass, his low-key, expansive forays felt deftly maximalist. This has made Budd’s craft synonymous with the dreamworld. An heir to Satie and Debussy, his music was treated and poetic, never kneejerk nor incautious.”

Budd died on December 8, 2020, aged 84, due to complications from COVID-19. (wikipedia)

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The Pavilion of Dreams is the second album from minimalist composer Harold Budd and produced by Brian Eno. Billed as “an extended cycle of works begun in 1972,” it was recorded in 1976 but not released until 1978 on Eno’s label Obscure Records. It was later re-released on Editions EG in 1981. (wikipedia)

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Mixing ethereal melodies communicated by voice or saxophone with glissando accompaniment, Harold Budd creates a series of siren songs on The Pavilion of Dreams that shimmer like light reflected on the water’s surface. Billed as “an extended cycle of works begun in 1972,” Budd’s debut apparently took a while to see the light of day itself, having been recorded in 1976, released on the aptly titled Obscure label in 1978, and re-released in 1981 on Editions EG. The minimalist composer had gained some attention in avant-garde circles with the piece “Madrigals of the Rose Angel”; featured here, it reveals the unhurried and unfolding nature of Budd’s melodies as well as his penchant for clusters of bell-like notes. “Two Songs” was written in the years that followed, adapting works from Pharoah Sanders and John Coltrane with arrangements that feature only mezzo-soprano Lynda Richardson and harpist Maggie Thomas; unless you thought the theme song to the Star Trek TV series was high art, you can skip this.

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The opening “Bismillahi ‘Rhahmani ‘Rrahim” is the musical equivalent of a bubble bath; led by the soulful saxophone of Marion Brown, it’s initially lovely, yet the circumspect arrangement saps the piece of its spellbinding effect before long. The last piece composed here, “Juno,” is also the most passionate, foreshadowing the warmth and presence that would appear on subsequent works like “The Plateaux of Mirror.” As with most minimalist works, The Pavilion of Dreams requires patience and open-mindedness on the part of the listener, only more so. Harold Budd achieved an evocative and succinct style on subsequent albums, and these songs are simply the rudimentary steps that led there. (by Dave Connolly)

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Personnel:
Richard Bernas (piano, celeste)
Marion Brown (saxophone)
Harold Budd (piano, voice)
Gavin Bryars (glockenspiel, voice)
Brian Eno (voice)
Jo Julian (marimba, vibraphone, voice)
Michael Nyman (marimba, voice)
Howard Rees (marimba, vibraphone)
Nigel Shipway (percussion)
Maggie Thomas (harp)
John White (marimba, percussion, voice)
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chorus:
Lynda Richardson – Margaret Cable – Lesley Reid – Ursula Connors – Alison MacGregor –  Muriel Dickinson

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Tracklist:
01. Bismillahi ‘Rrhamani ‘Rrahim 18.17
02. Two Songs 6.19
02.1. Let Us Go Into The House Of The Lord Budd Rate
02.2. Butterfly Sunday (After The Rain) , Harold Budd Rate
03. Madrigals Of The Rose Angel 14.28
03.1. Rosetti Noise
03.2. The Crystal Garden
04. Juno 8.06

Music composed by Harold Budd
except 02.2. composed by Harold Budd & John Coltrane

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More from Harold Budd:
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Walter (Wendy) Carlos – The Well-Tempered Synthesizer (1969)

FrontCover1Wendy Carlos (born Walter Carlos; November 14, 1939) is an American musician and composer best known for her electronic music and film scores. Born and raised in Rhode Island, Carlos studied physics and music at Brown University before moving to New York City in 1962 to study music composition at Columbia University. Studying and working with various electronic musicians and technicians at the city’s Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center, she helped the development of the Moog synthesizer, the first commercially available keyboard instrument created by Robert Moog.

Carlos came to prominence with Switched-On Bach (1968), an album of music by Johann Sebastian Bach performed on a Moog synthesizer which helped popularize its use in the 1970s and won her three Grammy Awards. Its commercial success led to several more keyboard albums from Carlos of varying genres including further synthesized classical music adaptations and experimental and ambient music. She composed the score to two Stanley Kubrick films, A Clockwork Orange (1971) and The Shining (1980), and also Tron (1982) for Walt Disney Productions.

In 1979, Carlos was one of the first public figures to disclose having undergone gender reassignment surgery.

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The Well-Tempered Synthesizer is the second studio album from the American musician and composer Wendy Carlos, originally released under her birth name, Walter Carlos, in November 1969 on Columbia Masterworks Records. Following the success of her previous album, Switched-On Bach (1968), Carlos proceeded to record a second album of classical music performed on a modular Moog synthesizer from multiple composers, including Johann Sebastian Bach, Claudio Monteverdi, Domenico Scarlatti, and George Frideric Handel. Its title is a play on words from Bach’s set of preludes and fugues named The Well-Tempered Clavier.

Upon its release, the album peaked at No. 199 on the US Billboard 200 chart and was nominated for two Grammy Awards.

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In 1969, during the unexpected commercial success of her debut studio album Switched-On Bach (1968), Carlos and her friend, collaborator, and producer Rachel Elkind started work on a follow-up using the same formula as Switched-On Bach: performing selections of classical music on a modular Moog synthesizer. Carlos planned to record an “ambitious 19th-century work”, but the lack of sufficient multitrack recording capabilities at the time did not allow such an undertaking. Ideas for Carlos to record her own compositions seemed “untimely” and was shelved for potential future albums. The two decided on a “new switched on Baroque album” featuring multiple composers, including Johann Sebastian Bach, Claudio Monteverdi, Domenico Scarlatti, and George Frideric Handel.

Like Switched-On Bach, the album was recorded on an 8-track Ampex tape recorder using numerous takes and overdubs. Carlos chose pieces from Handel’s Water Music suites as the music contained passages that suited to the limitations of the Moog synthesizer.

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Canadian pianist Glenn Gould spoke about Carlos’ rendition of Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 in G major: “To put it bluntly, the finest performance of any of the Brandenburgs—live, canned, or intuited—I’ve ever heard.”

The Well-Tempered Synthesizer was released in November 1969. It peaked at No. 199 on the Billboard 200 chart and was nominated for two Grammy Awards. In February 1974, Billboard reported that the album had sold around 200,000 copies in the US. (by wikipedia)

The soundtrack of my life (Steve Morse, Deep Purple):

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Pressed for a sequel to Switched-On Bach, the unexpectedly hot-selling breakthrough album for the synthesizer, Wendy Carlos temporarily shelved plans to move out of the 18th century and instead came up with an album that is, in some ways, even better than its famous predecessor. Her instrument rack had grown larger and more flexible and her technical abilities even sharper in the year since SOB came out — and the improvements are audible in the thicker harmonies and more sophisticated timbres, all without losing the zest and experimental zeal of the earlier record. Here, she revisits J.S. Bach and imaginatively translates the music of Monteverdi, Handel, and especially Domenico Scarlatti into the electronic medium. Excerpts from Monteverdi’s “Orfeo” and “1610 Vespers” serve as the gateway and closing benediction, respectively, to this collection, and four Scarlatti keyboard sonatas are given dazzling treatments (the sonata in G became well-known in the ’90s on a Christmas TV commercial). There is a mini-suite from Handel’s “Water Music” at the center of the album, and the densely orchestrated yet still dancing treatment of Bach’s “Brandenburg Concerto No. 4” serves as a signpost as to how far Carlos had come in only a year. (by Richard S. Ginell)

BackCover1Personnel:
Wendy Carlos (synthesizer)

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Tracklist:
01. Orfeo Suite (Toccata; Ritornello I; Choro II; Ritornello II; Choro II; Ritornello II) (Monteverdi) 3.22
02. Sonata in G major, L. 209/K. 455 (Scarlatti) 1.42
03. Sonata in D major, L. 164/K. 491 (Scarlatti) 3.55
04. Water Music: “Bourrée (Händel) 0.48
05. Water Music: Air (Händel) 2.47
06. Water Music: Allegro Deciso (Händel) 3.01
07. Sonata in E major, L. 430/K. 531 (Scarlatti) 1.56
08. Sonata in D major, L. 465/K. 96 (Scarlatti) 2.31
09. Brandenburg Concerto #4 in G major: Allegro (Bach) 8.06
10. Brandenburg Concerto #4 in G major: Andante (Bach) 3.37
11. Brandenburg Concerto #4 in G major: Presto (Bach) 4.46
12. Domine ad adjuvandum (from the 1610 Vespers) (Monteverdi) 2.22+
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13. Stereo Alignment Tones 0.10
14. Well Tempered Experiments (Wendy Carlos talks about her / his music) 9.08

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Faithless – Sunday 8PM (1998)

FrontCover1.jpgSunday 8PM is Faithless’ second album, released on 28 September 1998. The album contains the hit singles “Bring My Family Back”, “Take the Long Way Home”, and “God Is a DJ”. The album reached #10 place in the UK charts. In 1999, Sunday 8PM was one of twelve albums to make the shortlist for the Mercury Prize.

In 1998, there was a special release in the Netherlands: The Pinkpop Edition, which included a bonus CD with four live recordings (“God Is a DJ”, “Bring My Family Back”, “Do My Thing”, and “If Lovin’ You Is Wrong”) from the Pinkpop festival of June 1998.

In 1999, the album was re-released as Sunday 8PM / Saturday 3AM, containing an extra CD with mixed versions.

The image on the album/CD cover is the Bluebird Theatre in Denver, Colorado, United States. (by wikipedia)

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The second album from U.K. electronic dance collective Faithless, Sunday 8pm has neither the rampant grooves nor the arrogant idealism to qualify it as anything more than a random, standard dancefloor record with redundant beats and hoary ideas. Clearly, though, more was intended; the theme running throughout Sunday 8pm is one that celebrates club life with an almost religious enthusiasm. The dreamy soundscapes here alternate between elegantly spiritual (and very new age) drifts and dull, tuneless forays into spacy nowhereland — and the occasional misguided R&B trips lack soul (not all that surprising, considering the coldness of this band’s electronica). The one keeper is “God Is a DJ,” eight minutes of club worship that repeats the refrain “This is my church” so relentlessly that you begin to wonder if the Faithless altar includes a turntable and synthesizer along with the usual celebratory offerings. (by Michael Gallucci)

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Personnel:
Sister Bliss (keyboards)
Jaime Catto (vocals, guitar)
Maxi Jazz (guitar, vocals)
Rollo (electronics)
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Rachael Brown (background vocals on 02., 03., 07.)
Dido (vocals on 09., background vocals on 03.)
Debbie French (background vocals on 06.)
Andy Gangadeen (drums on 06.)
Boy George (vocals on 06.)
Sudha (drums, percussion)
Dave Randall (guitar)
Imani Saleem (background vocals on 06.)
Shannon Stewart (background vocals on 06.)
Pauline Taylor (vocals on 07., background vocals on 10.)
Ibi Tijani (programming on 01.)

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Tracklist:
01. The Garden /Rollo/Sister Bliss) 4.26
02 Bring My Family Back (Maxi Jazz/Rollo/Sister Bliss) 6.22
03. Hour Of Need (Catto/Rollo/Sister Bliss) 4.36
04. Postcards (Dido/Catto/Maxi Jazz/Rollo/Sister Bliss) 4.01
05. Take The Long Way Home (Catto/Maxi Jazz, Rollo/Sister Bliss) 7.13
06. Why Go? (George/Rollo/Sister Bliss) 3.57
07. She’s My Baby (Maxi Jazz/Rollo/Sister Bliss) 5.49
08.  God Is A DJ (Catto/Maxi Jazz/Rollo/Sister Bliss) 8.01
09.  Hem Of His Garment (Randall/Dido/Maxi Jazz/Rollo/Sister Bliss) 4.07
10. Sunday 8PM (Rollo/Sister Bliss) 2.43
11. Killer’s Lullaby (Maxi Jazz/Rollo/Sister Bliss) 6.08

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Chorus Of Tribes – Myth (1998)

FrontCover1.jpgChorus of Tribes is New Age music project from the UK. Símon Hulbert wrote all the tracks found on the project’s first and only album, Myth (1998).Chorus Of Tribes – Myth is a relatively unknown new age / ambient album from Etherean Records.

The album was released in 1998 in the UK. The album has a rather ironic story behind it. Late 1997 it was released as a bootleg across the internet and various p2p sites as an album by “Deep Forest and Enigma”, and not by “Chorus Of Tribes”.

Who dubbed “Chorus Of Tribes” to “Deep Forest and Enigma” is unknown, but musically it recembles the two artists in a fair amount, which makes the assumption understandable. This made some people confused, and the album was later rejected as any form of collaboration between the two famous new age artist groups from both sides. However, the songs on this album, independent of whoever made it, became more or less famous. In 1998 it was released on the label Etherean Music.

Now, musically the album is impressive. Into Morocco and Rain Song remain two of the most relaxing and best New Age / Tribal songs Símon Hulbert.jpgI’ve heard. The mood changes a great deal over the course of the album, from almost pure trance to groovy chilled beats, and tribal chants accompanied by soothing beats and vocals.

If Deep Forest and Enigma is up your alley, then this is just for you. (by www.last.fm)

Myth is a union between tribal vocals, instrumentals and popular dance music. Strong tribal/techno rhythms, featuring samples from numerous African tribes. Myth creates a musical hybrid between roots Africa and contemporary electronic.

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Personnel:
Símon Hulbert (all instruments)

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Tracklist:
01. Into Morroco 6.05
02. Inception 7.09
03. LoLo 5.16
04. Rain Song 7.21
05. Ikkijungle 2.52
06. Lullaby 5.59
07. Marakesh 5.59
08. Shackera 5.03
09. Hiyahiyahey 4.16
10. Myth 2.53
11. New Dawn 7.47

Music composed by Símon Hulbert

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Syrinx – Same (1970)

FrontCover1.jpgI found a very personal review about this debut album of Syrinx:

It’s hard to describe what a deep and massive impact I got from this record. Syrinx were active only for two years from 1970 to 1972, but their legacy contains 2 LPs and one 7inch and it’s really indelible. I will try to tell you about the first Syrinx’ album, which is their best in my opinion. I’m trying to avoid this dusty, flacid and absolutely useless word Record in this occasion. The trio of maestro John Mills-Cockell, Alan Wells and Doug Pringle created a stream of Universal energy, powerful, tender and intimate at the same time. All seven songs-pearls are the embodiment of eternity, hope and despair. And what is the most intertesting: the album sounds absolutely solid, it is the canvas of the highest mark, which can be viewed from any angle, you can wallow in it, as in a waterfall. You feel yourself in the place, where some sort of ritual is happening, you hear quiet whisper of the wind, gigantic mountains are talking about ancient times, forest is echoing. Syrinx LP is the album of size of the Life for me.

Syrinx

You will back to it again and again after the first listen. There are absolute freedom and purification along with the feeling af unbelievable drama and otherworldly eternity at the same time in the Moog-messages of Mills-Cockell. Their music is from the era of real emotions, Syrinx are drawing their masterpiece not about pointless and pathetic emotions. The song of Syrinx is about Eternal. (by krossfingers.com)

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Personnel:
John Mills-Cockell (keyboards, synthesizer)
Doug Pringle (saxophone)
Alan Wells (drums, percussion)

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Tracklist:
01. Melina’s Torch 2.59
02. Journey Tree 4.51
03. Chant For Your Dragon King 10.26
04. Field Hymn 1.49
05. Hollywood Dream Trip 4.59
06. Father Of Light 2.03
07. Appalosa – Pegasus 11.17

Music composed by John Mills-Cockell

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More about Syrinx here