Ewan MacColl with Peggy Seeger – Freeborn Man (1983)

FrontCover1Ewan MacColl may well have been the most influential person in the British folk song revival. From his early manhood until his death in 1989, he remained passionately committed to folk, though not exclusively; he was also a poet, playwright, organizer, activist, songwriter, husband, and father. MacColl was born James Henry Miller in Salford, England in 1915. His father was a lowland man who spoke Scots English, his mother a highlander who spoke Gaelic. Both of his parents were singers. MacColl left school at 14 to busk and act in the streets, and was quickly discovered by the BBC. Soon he was not only singing, but also writing programs for the radio. He founded the first folk club in England, the Ballads and Blues Club, as well as the Critic’s Group, an influential early singing group that included such singers as Frankie Armstrong, Anne Briggs, and John Faulkner.

MacColl was one of the foremost interpreters of traditional songs ever recorded. The most ambitious project he undertook was to record a representative sampling of Professor Francis James Child’s English and Scottish popular ballads. While his early repertoire was mainly of street songs and traditional material, he was also an important songwriter. Most impressive was his competence in producing expressions that had an appeal to all levels of society; his songs have been covered by performers as diverse as Dick Gaughan, the Pogues, Roberta Flack, and Elvis Presley, and many have been collected in several versions from the oral tradition. They range from savage political satire to tender love songs, and are supremely effective at producing the desired emotions.

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Beyond his activities as a singer and songwriter, MacColl was an actor and a playwright. In 1947, George Bernard Shaw commented, “Apart from myself, MacColl is the only man of genius writing for the theater in England today.” His playwriting and songwriting joined seamlessly in his “radio ballads,” radio plays that bordered on ballad operas. Many of his most lovely and best-remembered songs were written for these plays, some of which have been released in album form.

MacColl was married to Peggy Seeger, herself a singer of folk songs (and half-sister to American icon Pete Seeger). Together MacColl and Seeger, sometimes accompanied by their children, also skilled musicians and singers, recorded quite a few albums as well. Many of MacColl’s albums are out of print products of long-defunct record companies. Some, however, are readily available. All, like MacColl himself, are important factors in the history of the folk revival, to be cherished by all who encounter them. This great singer made many, many albums over many years. All of them are recommended for fans of great singing, though some may be a bit specialized (i.e., unaccompanied singing in broad Scots dialect) for some listeners. ( by Steve Winicka)

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And here´s a pretty good “Best Of” album … with new recordings of his finest songs (Recorded at Pathway Studios, London)

Acknowledged by the family and Ewan himself as the very best versions of his best known songs.

A very intimate album with his strong voice and wonderful music … listen to the jazzy “Dirty Old Town” !

Enjoy this brilliant album !

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Personnel:
Dill Katz (bass)
Calum MacColl (dulcimer, guitar, whistle, zither)
Ewan MacColl (vocals, guitar)
Neill MacColl (guitar, mandolin)
Peggy Seeger guitar, vocals,. autoharp, banjo, concertina)
Chris Taylor (harmonica)
Ian Telfer (fiddle)
Bruce Turner (clarinet)
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background vocals:
Calum MacColl – Hamish MacColl – Kirsty MacColl – Neill MacColl

Rounder Records front + backcover:
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Tracklist:
01. North Sea Holes 2.39
02. The Shoals Of Herring 3.52
03. The Lag’s Song 2.48
04. Come, Me Little Son 3.50
05. Moving-On Song 3.17
06. Sweet Thames, Flow Softly 4.57
07. I’m A Rambler 4.34
08. Freeborn Man 3.46
09. The Driver’s Song 2.09
10. The Ballad Of Springhill 3.21
11. Thirty-Foot Trailer 3.56
12. Down The Lane 3.05
13. The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face 2.21
14. The Big Hewer 3.05
15. The Battle Is Done With 3.05
16. Dirty Old Town 2.49

All songs written by Ewan MacColl
except on 09.: Peggy Seeger

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Amiga ( German Democratic Republic) front + backcover:
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Steve Goodman – Say It In Private (1977)

FrontCover1Steven Benjamin Goodman (July 25, 1948 – September 20, 1984) was an American folk music singer-songwriter from Chicago. He wrote the song “City of New Orleans,” which was recorded by Arlo Guthrie and many others including John Denver, The Highwaymen, and Judy Collins; in 1985, it received a Grammy award for best country song, as performed by Willie Nelson. Goodman had a small but dedicated group of fans for his albums and concerts during his lifetime, and is generally considered a musician’s musician. His most frequently sung song is the Chicago Cubs anthem, “Go Cubs Go”. Goodman died of leukemia in September 1984.

On September 20, 1984, Goodman died of leukemia at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle, Washington. He had anointed himself with the tongue-in-cheek nickname “Cool Hand Leuk” (other nicknames included “Chicago Shorty” and “The Little Prince”) during his illness. He was 36 years old.

Four days after Goodman’s death, the Chicago Cubs clinched the Eastern Division title in the National League for the first time ever, earning them their first post-season appearance since 1945, three years before Goodman’s birth. Eight days later, on October 2, the Cubs played their first post-season game since Game 7 of the 1945 World Series. Goodman had been asked to sing “The Star-Spangled Banner” before it; Jimmy Buffett filled in, and dedicated the song to Goodman. Since the late 2000s, at the conclusion of every home game, the Cubs play (and fans sing) “Go, Cubs, Go”, a song Goodman wrote for his beloved team.

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In April 1988, some of Goodman’s ashes were scattered at Wrigley Field, the home of the Chicago Cubs He was survived by his wife and three daughters.[9] His eldest daughter, Jesse, died in 2012.

In 2006, Goodman’s daughter, Rosanna, issued My Old Man, an album of a variety of artists covering her father’s songs.

Interest in Goodman’s career had a resurgence in 2007 with the publication of a biography by Clay Eals, Steve Goodman: Facing the Music. The same year, the Chicago Cubs began playing Goodman’s 1984 song “Go, Cubs, Go” after each home game win. When the Cubs made it to the playoffs, interest in the song and Goodman resulted in several newspaper articles about Goodman. Illinois Lieutenant Governor Pat Quinn declared October 5, 2007, Steve Goodman Day in the state. In 2010, Illinois Representative Mike Quigley introduced a bill renaming the Lakeview post office on Irving Park Road in honor of Goodman. The bill was signed by President Barack Obama on August 3, 2010 (wikipedia)

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Steve Goodman reached the charts with his first two albums for Asylum Records, Jessie’s Jig & Other Favorites (1975) and Words We Can Dance To (1976), and that may have convinced the label to spend more money on his next LP (money intended to be recoupable against royalties should the album take off, of course), because the sessions for Say It in Private appear to have been quite elaborate. For the first time since his second album, Somebody Else’s Troubles (1973), Goodman had a real producer (i.e., somebody who produced records for a living), Joel Dorn, and among the six dozen singers and players who contributed to the sessions were plenty of arrangers and string players. Nevertheless, Say It in Private ended up being a fairly typical Steve Goodman album. In a sense, the cover art told the story. It featured a painting by Howard Carriker that replicated Jacques Louis David’s famous 1793 portrait Death of Marat, in which French revolutionary and invalid Jean-Paul Marat was shown lying in his medicinal bath after having been assassinated. In Carriker’s version, the body belonged to Goodman, who was alive and smiling. So, here was an expensive-looking illustration that was making a macabre joke, and the album was more of the same, really. For all the production and all those musicians, Goodman was still doing what he loved to do, writing a few modest, entertaining songs and gathering other ones from various genres. The covers included the 1913 ballad “There’s a Girl in the Heart of Maryland,” which, despite the strings and chorus, was essentially a duet between Goodman’s voice and Jethro Burns’ mandolin; the 1936 country song “Is It True What They Say About Dixie?,” another frantic Goodman/Burns duet; Hank Williams’ “Weary Blues from Waitin'”; and Smokey Robinson’s account of romantic schizophrenia, “Two Lovers.”

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With his own pen, Goodman turned out a couple of warm love songs that were sequenced back to back at the start of the disc, “I’m Attracted to You” and “You’re the Girl I Love,” followed by a novelty, “Video Tape,” and then the four cover tunes. Next came two consecutive musical obituaries, both of them surprising. “Daley’s Gone” was this Chicago native’s lament for the late Mayor Richard J. Daley, a man much despised by those of Goodman’s generation in connection with his activities during the Democratic Convention of 1968. Even more personal was “My Old Man,” about Goodman’s own father. Some relief was needed after that, and it came in the form of a folk anthem co-written by Goodman and his pal John Prine, “The Twentieth Century Is Almost Over.” Again, there was a big vocal chorus, but again the song was in some ways just a duet between Goodman and an acoustic musical instrument played by another mentor, in this case the banjo of Pete Seeger. There may have been 73 musicians in the credits for Say It in Private, but it still ended up sounding like an old-fashioned folk collection most of the time. (by William Ruhlmann)

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Personnel:
David Amram (flute on 05.)
Ken Ascher (piano on 02. + 03.)
Erroll Bennett (percussion on 05.)
Saul Broudy (vocals, harmonica on 07.)
Peter Bunetta (drums on 01.)
Steve Burgh (guitar on 07.)
Jethro Burns (mandolin on 04. + 06.)
Francesco Centeño (bass on 02. + 03.)
Rick Chudacoff (guitar, piano, bass on 01.)
Tony Conniff (bass on 07.)
Steve Goodman (guitar, vocals)
Milton Grayson (vocals on 05.)
Scott Hamilton (saxophone on 01.)
Milt Hinton (bass on 04.)
Will Lee (bass on 05.)
Jimmy Maelen (percussion on 01. – 03.)
Cliff Morris (guitar on 05.)
Denny Morouse (saxophone on 02.)
Rob Mounsey (piano on 05.)
Gary Mure (drums on 05.)
Larry Packer  (fiddle on 07.)
Leon Pendarvis (piano on 05.)
Pete Seeger (vocals, banjo on 10.)
Allan Schwartzberg (drums on 02. + 03.)
Mauricio Smith (saxophone on 02.)
David Tofani (saxophone on 02.)
John Tropea (guitar on 05.)
Roger Rosenberg (saxophone on 02.)
Eric Weisberg (guitar on 02., pedal steel-guitar on 03.)
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strings:
Alan Shulman – Alfred Brown – Barry Finclair – Charles Libove – Charles McCracken – David Nadien – Guy Lumia – Harold Kohon – Harry Cykman – Joseph Malin – Julien Barber – Kathryn Kienke – Kermit Moore – Marvin Morgenstern – Max Ellen – Max Pollikoff -Ralph von Breda-Selz – Richard Sortomme – Sanford Allen – Selwart Clarke – Yoko Matsuo
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background vocals:
Andrew Holland – Arlene Martell – Benny Diggs – Bill Swofford – Chris King – Delores Hall – Ellen Bernfeld – Heather Wood – Helen Miles – Helene Edner – Jack Tobi – Jean Denise Quitman – John Prine – Kenny Vance – Linda November – Mary Sue Johnson – Michael Gray – Rob Mounsey – Sally Lloyd – Sheila Ellis – Thomas Dunn – Vivian Cherry – Yvonne Lewis

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Tracklist:
01. I’m Attracted To You (Chudacoff/Goodman) 3.17
02. You’re The Girl I Love (Goodman) 3.54
03. Video Tape (Goodman) 3.16
04. There’s A Girl In The Heart Of Maryland (MacDonald/Carroll) 1.55
05. Two Lovers (Robinson) 3.43
06. Is It True What They Say About Dixie? (Marks/Caesar/Lerner) 2.21
07. Weary Blues From Waitin’ (Williams) 3.49
08. Daley’s Gone (Goodman) 4.32
09. My Old Man (Goodman) 4.07′
10. The Twentieth Century Is Almost Over (Prine/Goodman) 5.09

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Back in 1899, when everybody sang “Auld Lang Syne”
A hundred years took a long, long time for every boy and girl
Now there’s only one thing that I’d like to know
Where did the 20th century go?
I’d swear it was here just a minute ago
All over this world

And now the 20th century is almost over
Almost over, almost over
The 20th century is almost over
All over this world
All over this world, all over this world
The 20th century is almost over, all over this world

Does anyone remember the Great Depression?
I read all about it in True Confession
I’m sorry I was late for the recording session
But somebody put me on hold
Has anybody seen my linoleum floors
Petroleum jelly, and two World Wars?
They got stuck in the revolving doors
All over this world

And now the 20th century is almost over
Almost over, almost over
The 20th century is almost over
All over this world
All over this world, all over this world
The 20th century is almost over, all over this world
The winter’s getting colder, summer’s getting hotter
Wishin’ well’s wishin’ for another drop of water
And Mother Earth’s blushin’ ’cause somebody caught her
Makin’ love to the Man in the Moon
Tell me how you gonna keep ’em down on the farm
Now that outer space has lost it’s charm?
Somebody set off a burglar alarm
And not a moment too soon
Because…

The 20th century is almost over
Almost over, almost over
The 20th century is almost over
All over this world
All over this world, all over this world
Now the 20th century is almost over, all over this world

Old Father Time has got his toes a tappin’
Standing in the window, grumblin’ and a rappin’
Everybody’s waiting for something to happen
Tell me if it happens to you!
The Judgment Day is getting nearer
There it is in the rear view mirror
If you duck down I could see a little clearer
All over this world!
And now the 20th century is almost over
Almost over, almost over
The 20th century is almost over
All over this world
All over this world, all over this world
The 20th century is almost over, all over this world

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Steve Goodman (July 25, 1948 – September 20, 1984)

Bob Dylan – Folk Rogue (1998)

FrontCover1This album is one to grab for several reasons. First of all, The Newport shows from Freebody Park are essential both to any serious Dylan collection, as well as to any music historian. This set compares the sublime acoustic folk ’64 show to the infamous ‘Electric’ ’65 show that forever changed the face of folk, rock, and folk-rock music. The entire CD is soundboard recordings, and this is the best sounding Newport recordings ever. The filler material is of fascinating historical importance as well. The two missing songs from the newly discovered Hollywood Bowl show. Finally, the aesthetics are nice andthe venue information is complete. (bobsboots.com)

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In the span of exactly 365 days, from his July 26, 1964, appearance at the famed Newport Folk Festival to his return on July 25, 1965, Bob Dylan rocketed from folk luminary to lightning rod. After first abandoning the protest themes of his classic early anthems to focus on more poetic, personal subjects, Dylan next forsook the rigid traditions of roots music to go electric, drawing on the spirit of rock & roll to forge a revolutionary and controversial sound all his own. The must-have bootleg release Folk Rogue 1964-1965 contains both Newport sets in their entirety, and the contrast is extraordinary: while the 1964 audience treats sublime, introspective songs like “It Ain’t Me, Babe” and “All I Really Want to Do” with reverence and awe, the 1965 crowd seems poised on the brink of anarchy, and regardless of whether the catalyst was the elemental ferocity of the music, the inadequate sound system, or the brevity of the three-song set, the tension is palpable, and it elevates Dylan and his band to remarkable heights.

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Adding a pair of songs from Dylan’s September 3, 1965, show at Los Angeles’ Hollywood Bowl for good measure, Folk Rogue 1964-1965 remains the definitive single-disc presentation of this landmark material. Soundboard-quality fidelity and tasteful packaging complete an essential collection, although Dandelion’s two-disc From Newport to the Ancient Empty Streets in LA adds the Hollywood Bowl show in its entirety while subtracting “It Ain’t Me Babe” from the 1964 Newport appearance, so comparison shopping is recommended. (by Jason Ankeny)

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Personnel:
Bob Dylan (guitar, vocals, harmonica)
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The Paul Butterfield Blues Band (08. – 10.)
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Joan Baez (background vocals on 01.)

Inlay

Tracklist:
01. It Ain’t Me, Babe 3.39
02 All I Really Want To Do 4.09
03. To Ramona 4.33
04. Mr. Tambourine Man 7.27
05. Chimes Of Freedom 8.00
06. Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright 3.33
07. All I Really Want To Do 1.37
08. Maggies Farm 6.47
09. Like A Rolling Stone 5.54
10. Phantom Engineer 4.13
11. Tombstone Blues 4.45
12. It Ain’t Me, Babe 4.38
13. We Want Bobby 1.56
14. It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue 5.33
15. Mr. Tambourine Man 6.55

All songs written by Bob Dylan

Track 1 recorded July 24, 1964 at the Newport Folk Festival with Joan Baez
Tracks 2-5 recorded July 26, 1964 at the Newport Folk Festival
Track 6 recorded May 6, 1965 at City Hall, Newcastle, U.K.
Track 7 recorded July 24, 1965 at the Newport Folk Festival afternoon workshop
Tracks 8-10 recorded July 25, 1965 at the Newport Folk Festival with the Butterfield Blues Band
Tracks 11-12 recorded September 3, 1965 at the Hollywood Bowl, Hollywood, California
Tracks 13-15 recorded July 25, 1965 at the Newport Folk Festival

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More Bob Dylan:
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Steve Goodman – Words We Can Dance To (1976)

FrontCover1Steven Benjamin Goodman (July 25, 1948 – September 20, 1984) was an American folk music singer-songwriter from Chicago. He wrote the song “City of New Orleans,” which was recorded by Arlo Guthrie and many others including John Denver, The Highwaymen, and Judy Collins; in 1985, it received a Grammy award for best country song, as performed by Willie Nelson. Goodman had a small but dedicated group of fans for his albums and concerts during his lifetime, and is generally considered a musician’s musician. His most frequently sung song is the Chicago Cubs anthem, “Go Cubs Go”. Goodman died of leukemia in September 1984.

Born on Chicago’s North Side to a middle-class Jewish family, Goodman began writing and performing songs as a teenager, after his family had moved to the near north suburbs. He graduated from Maine East High School in Park Ridge, Illinois, in 1965, where he was a classmate of Hillary Clinton. Before that, however, he began his public singing career by leading the junior choir at Temple Beth Israel in Albany Park. In the fall of 1965, he entered the University of Illinois and pledged the Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity, where he, Ron Banyon, and Steve Hartmann formed a popular rock cover band, “The Juicy Fruits”. He left college after one year to pursue his musical career. In the early spring of 1967, Goodman went to New York, staying for a month in a Greenwich Village brownstone across the street from the Cafe Wha?, where Goodman performed regularly during his brief stay there. Returning to Chicago, he intended to restart his education but he dropped out again to pursue his musical dream full-time after discovering the cause of his continuous fatigue was actually leukemia, the disease that was present during the entirety of his recording career, until his death in 1984. In 1968 Goodman began performing at the Earl of Old Town and The Dangling Conversation coffeehouse in Chicago and attracted a following.

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By 1969, Goodman was a regular performer in Chicago, while attending Lake Forest College. During this time Goodman supported himself by singing advertising jingles.

In September 1969 he met Nancy Pruter (sister of R&B writer Robert Pruter), who was attending college while supporting herself as a waitress. They were married in February 1970. Though he experienced periods of remission, Goodman never felt that he was living on anything other than borrowed time, and some critics, listeners and friends have said that his music reflects this sentiment. His wife Nancy, writing in the liner notes to the posthumous collection No Big Surprise, characterized him this way:

Basically, Steve was exactly who he appeared to be: an ambitious, well-adjusted man from a loving, middle-class Jewish home in the Chicago suburbs, whose life and talent were directed by the physical pain and time constraints of a fatal disease which he kept at bay, at times, seemingly by willpower alone . . . Steve wanted to live as normal a life as possible, only he had to live it as fast as he could . . . He extracted meaning from the mundane.

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Goodman’s songs first appeared on Gathering at The Earl of Old Town, an album produced by Chicago record company Dunwich in 1971. As a close friend of Earl Pionke, the owner of the folk music bar, Goodman performed at The Earl dozens of times, including customary New Year’s Eve concerts. He also remained closely involved with Chicago’s Old Town School of Folk Music, where he had met and mentored his good friend, John Prine.

Later in 1971, Goodman was playing at a Chicago bar called the Quiet Knight as the opening act for Kris Kristofferson. Impressed with Goodman, Kristofferson introduced him to Paul Anka, who brought Goodman to New York to record some demos.[3] These resulted in Goodman signing a contract with Buddah Records.

All this time, Goodman had been busy writing many of his most enduring songs, and this avid songwriting would lead to an important break for him. While at the Quiet Knight, Goodman saw Arlo Guthrie and asked him to sit and let him play a song for him. Guthrie grudgingly agreed on the condition that Goodman buy him a beer first; Guthrie would then listen to Goodman for as long as it took Guthrie to drink the beer.[3] Goodman played “City of New Orleans”, which Guthrie liked enough that he asked to record it.

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Guthrie’s version of Goodman’s song became a Top-20 hit in 1972 and provided Goodman with enough financial and artistic success to make his music a full-time career. The song, about the Illinois Central’s City of New Orleans train, would become an American standard, covered by such musicians as Johnny Cash, Judy Collins, Chet Atkins, Lynn Anderson, and Willie Nelson, whose recorded version earned Goodman a posthumous Grammy Award for Best Country Song in 1985. A French translation of the song, “Salut Les Amoureux”, was recorded by Joe Dassin in 1973. A Dutch singer, Gerard Cox, heard the French version while on holiday and translated it into Dutch, titled “‘t Is Weer Voorbij Die Mooie Zomer” (“And again that beautiful summer has come to an end”). It reached number one on the Dutch Top 40 in December 1973 and has become a classic which is still played on Dutch radio. A Hebrew version of the song “Shalom Lach Eretz Nehederet” was sung by famous Israeli singer Yehoram Gaon in 1977 and became an immediate hit. Lyrically, the French, Dutch and Hebrew versions bear no resemblance to Goodman’s original lyrics. According to Goodman, the song was inspired by a train trip he and his wife took from Chicago to Mattoon, Illinois.[4] According to the liner notes on the Steve Goodman anthology No Big Surprise, “City of New Orleans” was written while on the campaign trail with Senator Edmund Muskie.

In 1974, singer David Allan Coe achieved considerable success on the country charts with Goodman’s and John Prine’s “You Never Even Called Me by My Name”, a song which good-naturedly spoofed stereotypical country music lyrics. Prine refused to take a songwriter’s credit for the song, although Goodman bought Prine a jukebox as a gift from his publishing royalties. Goodman’s name is mentioned in Coe’s recording of the song, in a spoken epilogue in which Goodman and Coe discuss the merits of “the perfect country and western song.”

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Goodman’s success as a recording artist was more limited. Although he was known in folk circles as an excellent and influential songwriter,[3] his albums received more critical than commercial success. One of Goodman’s biggest hits was a song he didn’t write: “The Dutchman”, written by Michael Peter Smith. He reached a wider audience as the opening act for Steve Martin while Martin was at the height of his stand-up popularity.

During the mid and late seventies, Goodman became a regular guest on Easter Day on Vin Scelsa’s radio show in New York City. Scelsa’s personal recordings of these sessions eventually led to an album of selections from these appearances, The Easter Tapes.

In 1977, Goodman performed on Tom Paxton’s live album New Songs From the Briarpatch (Vanguard Records), which contained some of Paxton’s topical songs of the 1970s, including “Talking Watergate” and “White Bones of Allende”, as well as a song dedicated to Mississippi John Hurt entitled “Did You Hear John Hurt?”

During the fall of 1979, Goodman was hired to write and perform a series of topical songs for National Public Radio. Although Goodman and Jethro Burns recorded eleven songs for the series, only five of them, “The Ballad of Flight 191” about a plane crash, “Daley’s Gone”, “Unemployed”, “The Twentieth Century is Almost Over”, and “The Election Year Rag”, were used on the air before the series was cancelled.

Hoyt Axton, Odetta, Tom Paxton and Steve Goodman backstage at The Greek Theatre in 1981 in Berkeley, California:
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Goodman wrote and performed many humorous songs about Chicago, including three about the Chicago Cubs: “A Dying Cub Fan’s Last Request”, “When the Cubs Go Marching In” and “Go, Cubs, Go” (which has frequently been played on Cubs broadcasts and at Wrigley Field after Cubs wins). He wrote “Go, Cubs, Go” out of spite after then GM Dallas Green called “A Dying Cub Fan’s Last Request” too depressing. The Cubs songs grew out of his fanatical devotion to the team, which included many clubhouse and on-field visits with Cubs players. He wrote other songs about Chicago, including “The Lincoln Park Pirates”, about the notorious Lincoln Towing Service, and “Daley’s Gone”, about Mayor Richard J. Daley. Another comic highlight is “Vegematic”, about a man who falls asleep while watching late-night TV and dreams he ordered many products that he saw on infomercials. He could also write serious songs, most notably “My Old Man”, a tribute to Goodman’s father, Bud Goodman, a used-car salesman and World War II veteran.

Goodman won his second Grammy, for Best Contemporary Folk Album, in 1988 for Unfinished Business, a posthumous album on his Red Pajamas Records label.

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Many fans become aware of Goodman’s work through other artists such as Jimmy Buffett. Buffett has recorded several of Goodman’s songs, including “Banana Republics”, “Door Number Three” and “Woman Goin’ Crazy on Caroline Street”.[7] Jackie DeShannon covered Goodman’s “Would You Like to Learn to Dance” on her 1972 album, Jackie.
Death

On September 20, 1984, Goodman died of leukemia at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle, Washington. He had anointed himself with the tongue-in-cheek nickname “Cool Hand Leuk” (other nicknames included “Chicago Shorty” and “The Little Prince”) during his illness. He was 36 years old.

Four days after Goodman’s death, the Chicago Cubs clinched the Eastern Division title in the National League for the first time ever, earning them their first post-season appearance since 1945, three years before Goodman’s birth. Eight days later, on October 2, the Cubs played their first post-season game since Game 7 of the 1945 World Series. Goodman had been asked to sing “The Star-Spangled Banner” before it; Jimmy Buffett filled in, and dedicated the song to Goodman. Since the late 2000s, at the conclusion of every home game, the Cubs play (and fans sing) “Go, Cubs, Go”, a song Goodman wrote for his beloved team.

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In April 1988, some of Goodman’s ashes were scattered at Wrigley Field, the home of the Chicago Cubs. He was survived by his wife and three daughters. His eldest daughter, Jesse, died in 2012.

In 2006, Goodman’s daughter, Rosanna, issued My Old Man, an album of a variety of artists covering her father’s songs.

Interest in Goodman’s career had a resurgence in 2007 with the publication of a biography by Clay Eals, Steve Goodman: Facing the Music. The same year, the Chicago Cubs began playing Goodman’s 1984 song “Go, Cubs, Go” after each home game win. When the Cubs made it to the playoffs, interest in the song and Goodman resulted in several newspaper articles about Goodman. Illinois Lieutenant Governor Pat Quinn declared October 5, 2007, Steve Goodman Day in the state. In 2010, Illinois Representative Mike Quigley introduced a bill renaming the Lakeview post office on Irving Park Road in honor of Goodman. The bill was signed by President Barack Obama on August 3, 2010 (by wikipedia)

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And here´s his 5th solo-album:

A typical Steve Goodman mix of eclectic stylings and clever wordplay, Words We Can Dance To roams far and wide. The music ranges from a cover of the rock & roll classic “Tossin’ and Turnin'” to the Western swing of “Between the Lines,” and from the country shuffle of “Death of a Salesman” to the solo acoustic blues guitar pickin’ on the standard “The Glory of Love.” Within this broad musical spectrum, Goodman delivers his original lyrics, both humorous and heartfelt. “Banana Republics” became a staple of Jimmy Buffett’s repertoire after its inclusion on Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes. In “Old Fashioned,” Goodman tells of being “out of date and born too late” as he seeks the love of an “old fashioned girl,” but in fact the lines probably described his music as well. Both “Between the Lines” and “That’s What Friends Are For” offer compelling, personal looks at the elusiveness of love, while on “Death of a Salesman” Goodman goes for the laughs in a retelling of the old traveling salesman story. (by Jim Newsom)

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Personnel:
Saul Broudy (harmonica)
Steve Burgh (guitar)
Jethro Burns )mandolin)
Peter Ecklund (clarinet, cornet)
Johnny Frigo (bass, violin)
Ruth Goodman (violin)
Steve Goodman (vocals, guitar)
Jeff Gutcheon (clavinet, keyboards)
Harold Klatz (viola)
Kenny Kosek (fiddle)
Lew London (dobro, mandolin)
Hugh McDonald (bass)
Steve Mosley (drums, tambourine)
Tom Radtke (drums, timbales)
Bobby Rossi (accordion)
Jim Rothermel (arp strings, recorder, saxophone)
Sid Sims (bass)
Winnie Winston (banjo, pedal steel-guitar)
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background vocals:
Mark Gaffney – Mary Gaffney – Bill Swofford – Raun MacKinnon – Diane Holmes – Jim Post

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Tracklist:
01. Roving Cowboy (Smith) 4.39
02. Tossin’ and Turnin’ (Adams/Rene) 3.24
03. Unemployed (Goodman) 2.27
04. Between The Lines (Burgh/Goodman) 3.27
05. Old Fashioned (Ballan/Burgh/Chamberlain/Goodman) 3.07
06. Can’t Go Back (Burgh/Goodman) 3.26
07. Banana Republics (Burgh/Goodman/Rothermel) 3.49
08. Death Of A Salesman (Broudy/Burgh/Goodman/Gutcheon/London/Rothermel) 2.53
09. That’s What Friends Are For (Burgh/Goodman/Gutcheon/Rothermel) 4.18
10. The Glory Of Love (Hill) 2.07

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When I got up this morning I walked down to the plant
I wanted to go to work but they said you can’t
And when I asked the boss why I got canned
He said somethin’ ’bout the laws of supply and demand
Well that’s the kind of thing
That gets a man annoyed
When the wolf is knocking
And you’re unemployed

And I filled out those forms they had in personnel
There’s twenty men applying for every job to fill
Some boys in line are just bums like me
And some of them got sheepskins and PhD’s
It’s a sorry situation that you can’t avoid
When you’re over educated and unemployed

I don’t want to be told how long I have to wait
And I don’t want to be no number in no jobless rate
Don’t want no welfare from no welfare state
I just want to put the groceries on my baby’s plate

When I die then I’ll get my just reward
When the devil makes me chairman of the board
Whenever they had hard times in this land before
Then they said the way you stop it is to start a war
Well I don’t want to hear none of that from no politicians no more
Or next election day they’ll be unemployed

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Steven Benjamin Goodman (July 25, 1948 – September 20, 1984)

The New Lost City Ramblers – Gone To The Country (1963)

FrontCover1The New Lost City Ramblers, or NLCR, is an American contemporary old-time string band that formed in New York City in 1958 during the folk revival. Mike Seeger, John Cohen and Tom Paley were its founding members. Tracy Schwarz replaced Paley, who left the group in 1962. Seeger died of cancer in 2009, Paley died in 2017, and Cohen died in 2019. NLCR participated in the old-time music revival, and continued to directly influence many later musicians.

The Ramblers distinguished themselves by focusing on the traditional playing styles they heard on old 78rpm records of musicians recorded during the 1920s and 1930s, many of whom had earlier appeared on the Anthology of American Folk Music. The New Lost City Ramblers refused to “sanitize” these southern sounds as did other folk groups of the time, such as the Weavers or Kingston Trio. Instead, the Ramblers have always strived for an authentic sound.[4] However, the Ramblers did not merely copy the old recordings that inspired them. Rather, they would use the various old-time styles they encountered while at the same time not becoming slaves to imitation.

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The Ramblers named themselves in response to a request by Moe Asch, based on an amalgam of a favorite tune, J. E. Mainer’s “New Lost Train Blues”; a favorite group, Charlie Poole and the North Carolina Ramblers; and a reference to the urban settings in which they played old-timey music.

On Songs from the Depression, the New Lost City Ramblers performed a variety of popular political songs from the New Deal days, all but one of them taken from commercially issued 78s, and that one is “Keep Moving”, identified in the album notes only as “from Tony Schwartz’s collection — singer unidentified” [6] when actually it is by Agnes “Sis” Cunningham, the full title being “How Can You Keep On Moving (Unless You Migrate Too)”. The omission later caused Ry Cooder, who listened to the Ramblers album, to record the song as Traditional on the first edition of his Into the Purple Valley album, an omission he gladly corrected when informed of it. Cooder also covered another song from the same New Lost City Ramblers album, which he may have heard on a poorly labeled cassette copy: “Taxes on the Farmer Feeds Us All” which the New Lost City Ramblers credit to Fiddling John Carson but which the Cooder notes still list as “traditional”.[7] The same is true of the track “Boomer’s Story”, covered by the Ramblers—Cooder credits it as “traditional”, but the song was written by Carson Robison and first recorded by him in 1929 under the title “The Railroad Boomer”.

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The group drifted apart during the latter half of the 1960s. Schwarz and Seeger performed with different musicians and together formed the short lived Strange Creek Singers.

The New Lost City Ramblers’ extensive recordings for the Folkways label became, after the death of Moe Asch, part of the Smithsonian Institution, which reissues Folkways titles on CD.

John Cohen is said to have inspired the titular John of the Grateful Dead’s 1970 song “Uncle John’s Band”. (by wikipedia)

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When Tracy Schwarz replaced Paley in 1962, the NLCR added solo songs from the Appalachian folk repertoire, religious and secular, educating a large segment of the American population about traditional music. ( by David Vinopal)

Joined on this recording by fiddler Tracy Schwarz, this album explores new musical territory “at least ten years in either direction,” including unaccompanied ballad singing and bluegrass. Of especial note is the variety of banjo styles represented, from drop thumb frailing to Ralph Stanley’s style of early bluegrass three-finger picking. (folkways.si.edu)

Enjoy this unique sound of one of the most importants bands of the new folk boom in these days.

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Personnel:
John Cohen (vocals, guitar, banjo)
Tracy Schwarz (fiddle. vocals, spoons)
Mike Seeger (vocals, autoharp, mandolin, fiddle, guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Hello John D. 1.12
02. Grey Cat On The Tennessee Farm 2.22
03. Liza Jane 2.33
04. Buck Dancer’s Choice 1.47
05. Long Lonesome Road 3.00
06. Danville Girl 2.53
07. Tom Sherman’s Bar Room 3.30
08. Little Glass Of Wine 3.01
09. Sinking In The Lonesome Sea 4.09
10. Riding On That Train 45 2.22
11. Wild And Western Hobo 3.11
12. Pretty Little Miss Out In The Garden 3.23
13. Rambler’s Blues 2.13
14. She Tickles Me 2.58
15. The Little Carpenter 2.52
16. Down South Blues 2.49
17. Ain’t No Bugs On Me 2.29

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John Prine – Austin City Limits (2018)

FrontCover1John Prine, who for five decades wrote rich, plain-spoken songs that chronicled the struggles and stories of everyday working people and changed the face of modern American roots music, died Tuesday April 7 at Nashville’s Vanderbilt University Medical Center. He was 73. The cause was complications related to COVID-19, his family confirmed to Rolling Stone.

Prine, who left behind an extraordinary body of folk-country classics, was hospitalized last month after the sudden onset of COVID-19 symptoms, and was placed in intensive care for 13 days. Prine’s wife and manager, Fiona, announced on March 17th that she had tested positive for the virus after they had returned from a European tour.

As a songwriter, Prine was admired by Bob Dylan, Kris Kristofferson, and others, known for his ability to mine seemingly ordinary experiences – he wrote many of his classics as a mailman in Maywood, Illinois – for revelatory songs that covered the full spectrum of the human experience. There’s “Hello in There,” about the devastating loneliness of an elderly couple; “Sam Stone,” a portrait of a drug-addicted Vietnam soldier suffering from PTSD; and “Paradise,” an ode to his parents’ strip-mined hometown of Paradise, Kentucky, which became an environmental anthem. Prine tackled these subjects with empathy and humor, with an eye for “the in-between spaces,” the moments people don’t talk about, he told Rolling Stone in 2017. “Prine’s stuff is pure Proustian existentialism,” Dylan said in 2009. “Midwestern mind-trips to the nth degree.” (Rolling Stone)

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Forty years ago, John Prine made his Austin City Limits debut in the venerable music series’ third season. Prine has since returned to the ACL stage several times and will do so again this weekend, performing a mix of classic material and new songs from his most recent (and last) album, The Tree of Forgiveness.

An emotional highlight of the singer-songwriter’s 2018 LP is “Summer’s End,” a bittersweet tune that comes to terms not with the change of seasons, but with grief, loss and alienation. Those themes are beautifully brought to life… need only Prine’s sage vocal delivery to convey their gravitas with compassion and warmth. (Stephen L Betts, rollingstone.com)

Thanks to indykid for sharing the HDTV webcast at Dime.

Recorded live at The Moody Theater, Austin, Texas; June 5, 2018
Very good audio (ripped from HDTV webcast)

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Personnel:
Kenneth Blevins (drums)
David Jacques (bass, vocals)
Fats Kaplin (fiddle, pedal steel-guitar, mandolin, guitar, vocals)
John Prine (vocals, guitar)
Jason Wilber (guitar, vocals)
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Tyler Childers (vocals, guitar on 08., 09. + 12.)

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Tracklist:
01. Intro/Knockin’ On Your Screen Door (Prine/McLaughlin) 4.49
02. Egg & Daughter Nite, Lincoln, Nebraska, 1967 (Crazy Bone) (Prine) 3.53
03. Summer’s End (Prine/McLaughlin) 4.06
04. Caravan Of Fools (Prine/McLaughlin/Auerbach) 4.06
05. Lonesome Friends Of Science (Prine) 4.51
06. Boundless Love (Prine/McLaughlin/Auerbach) 3.51
07. Illegal Smile (Prine) 4.19
08. Please Don’t Bury Me (Prine) 4.00
09. Lady May (Prine) 3:07
10. Lake Marie (Prine) 7.27
11. When I Get To Heaven (Prine) 4.02
12. Paradise (Prine) 5.36

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John Prine (October 10, 1946 – April 7, 2020)

Harry Chapin – Coffee With Harry (Remastered Edition) (1979)

FrontCover1Harry Forster Chapin (December 7, 1942 – July 16, 1981) was an American singer-songwriter, humanitarian, and producer best known for his folk rock and pop rock songs, who achieved worldwide success in the 1970s and became one of the most popular artists and highest paid performers. Chapin is also one of the best charting musical artists in the United States. Chapin, a Grammy Award winning artist and Grammy Hall of Fame inductee, has sold over 16 million records worldwide and has been described as one of the most beloved performers in music history.

Chapin recorded a total of 11 albums from 1972 until his death in 1981. All 14 singles that he released became hit singles on at least one national music chart.

As a dedicated humanitarian, Chapin fought to end world hunger; he was a key participant in the creation of the Presidential Commission on World Hunger in 1977.[2] Chapin is credited with being the most politically and socially active American performer of the 1970s. In 1987, Chapin was posthumously awarded the Congressional Gold Medal for his humanitarian work. (by wikipedia)

Originally released as Simple Man Productions SMP 009 (only as a CD-R trade)

Phase and Pitch corrected version by Remasters Workshop

This was posted on Usenet in early 2003. In its original incarnation, it ran quite fast. I slowed it down to A=440 in March 2003 and reposted it to the same lossless groups. In doing some research on the net in preparation to torrent it, I discovered a Russian website selling mp3s of my Usenet post! The uncorrected version is still being traded and has been torrented elsewhere and on TTD as recently as 01-12-08 by Dylan (now inactive).

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I haven’t found any reference to the remastered edition being torrented. Before sending it in, I opened up the .wav files from my backup CD-ROM in Audition 3 and ran automatic phase correction on the lot, then resplit the tracks on sector boundaries, and converted to FLAC with TLH. Revised artwork is included, to indicate the new track times and the additional step of phase correction, otherwise it’s the same as the previous artwork (which is still out there on the web, too – both versions). This is a really nice show. Harry is funny and engaging as usual, and uses some language that must have been bleeped in the broadcast!

Note: Track 1, which is mistitled “God Babe, You’ve Been Good For Me” on the back insert, is actually called “All The Ones I Counted On Are Gone.” (nots from the original uploader)

Oh yes, a wonerul bootleg with the music of a more than wonderful singer/songwriter …

Recorded live at the Agora Ballroom, Cleveland, December 5, 1979
for WMMS “Coffee Break Concerts”

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Personnel:
Harry Chapin (guitar, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. God You’ve Been Good For Me, Babe 6.14
02. W*O*L*D 6.35
03. Cats In The Cradle 8,46
04. Flowers Are Red 7.01
05. I Wanna Learn A Love Song 3.53
06. Odd Job Man 5.50
07. 30,000 Pounds Of Bananas 13.00
08. Taxi 6.13
09. Circle 5.22

All songs written by Harry Chapin

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More Harry Chapin:

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Johnny Rivers – Rivers Rocks The Folk (1965)

OriginalFC1Johnny Rivers is a unique figure in the history of rock music. On the most obvious level, he was a rock star of the 1960s and a true rarity as a white American singer/guitarist who made a name for himself as a straight-ahead rock & roller during the middle of that decade. Just as important behind the scenes, his recordings and their success led to the launching, directly and indirectly, of at least three record labels and a dozen other careers whose influence extended into the 1970s, 1980s, and beyond. (by Bruce Eder)

When the folk-rock ship arrived, Rivers was ready to jump aboard, with assistance from producer Lou Adler (then also handling Barry McGuire and the Mamas and the Papas). “Twelve Greatest Folk Songs in His A Go-Go Style” reads the subtitle, and it’s an accurate description of a set dominated by some of the most familiar folk songs of the era: “Tom Dooley,” “Michael (Row the Boat Ashore),” “Blowin’ in the Wind,” “Green, Green,” “Where Have All the Flowers Gone,” “If I Had a Hammer,” and “500 Miles.” More contemporary material gets a nod via versions of Donovan’s “Catch the Wind” and Bob Dylan’s “Mr. Tambourine Man.” Basically, however, it sounds like a mid-’60s Johnny Rivers album: nearly unvarying mid-tempo, easy-to-handclap-along-with rhythms, soulful female backup harmonies, and easy-rocking lead vocals.

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Quality folk-rock took the best of both genres to create something greater than the sum of the parts, but Rivers just laid his own (pretty derivative) commercial pop/rock style on a set of folk material. That means this LP lacks the imagination necessary to rate as interesting folk-rock, though it’s adequately pleasant. A historical curiosity, it bears some similarity to the first hit albums by Trini Lopez, though with a heavier rock feel. That similarity is not unexpected given that drummer Mickey Jones had played with Lopez (and, in a more surprising twist, would soon go on to play with future Band members in the group that backed Bob Dylan on his famous 1966 world tour). (by Richie Unterberger)

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Personnel:
Chuck Day (bass)
Mickey Jones (drums)

Johnny Rivers (guitar, vocals)

Alternate frontcover:
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Tracklist:
01.Tom Dooley (Traditional) 2.47
02. Long Time Man (Traditional) 3.33
03. Michael (Row The Boat Ashore) (Traditional) 2.13
04. Blowin In The Wind (Dylan) 2.46
05. Green, Green (McGuire/Sparks) 2.07
06. Where Have All The Flowers Gone (Seeger) 3.55
07. If I Had A Hammer (Hays/Seeger) 3.00
08. Tall Oak Tree (Burnette) 2.24
09. Catch The Wind (Leitch) 2.59
10. 500 Miles (West) 3.01
11. Mr. Tambourine Man (Dylan) 3.32
12. Jailer Bring Me Water (Darin) 2.19

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More Johnny Rivers:
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The Sidewalk Swingers – Folk Swingin’ Harpsichord With 12 String Guitar (1964)

FrontCover1The Sidewalk Swingers were a studio aggregation consisting of Russell Bridges on harpsichord, Jimmy Bond on bass, Hal Blaine on drums, Bill Cunningham on banjo and mandolin, and a young Glen Cambell on 12-string guitar. This album is a delightful collection of instrumental versions of 14 folkie standards like “Cotton Fields”, “Green Green”, “This Land is Your Land”, Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the Wind” and “Don’t Think Twice”, and several others both traditional (“All My Trials”, “Stewball”, “Jamaica Farewell”, “Betty and Dupree”) and songs written by prominent folk writers of the day (“If I Had a Hammer”, “Freight Train”, “Greenback Dollar”, “Saturday Night”, “Walk Right In”). The harpsichord actually lends itself quite well to these lively tunes. Released in 1964 to cash in on the folk and hootenanny craze (or perhaps to keep it alive a bit longer after the onset of Beatlemania), it’s really quite a tasty production. If you like the popular folk style of the early ’60s and pleasant instrumental music, this one is worth getting.

This album is a delightful collection of instrumental versions of 14 folkie standards (by Derrick Phillips)

Glen Campbell in the early Sixites:
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This one’s perfect for your next hootenany cocktail party. I’m not sure who’s idea it was to play a bunch of folk tunes (both new and old) on harpsichord with 12-string guitar accompaniment but they had a certain demented genius in their plan. The producer also got some fine session players to perform: Russell Bridges (harpsichord), Glen Campbell (guitar), Jimmy Bond (bass), Hal Blaine (drums), and Bill Cunningham (banjo & mandolin). Tracks include Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the Wind” and “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right” and some old chestnuts like “If I Had a Hammer” and “Greenback Dollar.” I don’t expect this one to rock your world but it is a pleasant enough excursion into instrumental folk with a bit of country twang (playitagainmax.blogspot.com)

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Personnel:
Hal Blaine (drums)
Jimmy Bond (bass)
Russell Bridges (harpsichord)
Glen Campbell (guitar)
Bill Cunningham (banjo, mandolin)

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Tracklist:
01. Saturday Night (Sparks) 2.09
02. Freight Train (Traditional) 2.38
03. Blowin’ In The Wind (Dylan) 2.58
04. All My Trials (Traditional) 2.42
05. Stewball (Traditional) 2.02
06. Betty And Dupre (Traditional) 2.31
07. If I Had A Hammer (Seeger/Hayes) 2.10
08. Swingers Cotton Fields (Traditional) 2.16
09. Green Green (McGuire/Sparks) 2.04
10. This Land Is Your Land (Guthrie) 2.08
11. Walk Right In (Cannon/Woods) 2.23
12. Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right (Dylan) 2.18
13. Jamaica Farewell (Ain’t That Loving You Baby) (Traditional) 3.01
14. Greenback Dollar (Axton) 2.21

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Arlo Guthrie & Pete Seeger – Together In Concert (1975)

FrontCover1This is a live double CD recorded during a series of concerts in 1975. In the words of Harold Leventhal (Sometime manager of Pete, Arlo and Woody), “It took only two phone calls to get Pete Seeger and Arlo Guthrie to agree to perform together in concert. I rang Pete. “Listen, how about you and Arlo doing some concerts together?” Pete didn’t hesitate, “Sure,” he quickly replied. I then dialed Arlo. “Say, Arlo, how about you and Pete doing some concerts together?” His reply was as prompt as Pete’s. So concerts were lined up for New York, Chicago, Montreal, Boston, Denver and Tanglewood.

“Now the big problem was to get Pete and Arlo to meet, to decide on a program and to rehearse. Arlo hates to travel beyond the border of Berkshire County in Massachusetts and Pete is traveling all over the country doing benefits. Luckily, just one week before the first concert in Carnegie Hall, Arlo escaped from his farm and found his way to Pete’s place in Beacon, New York. They spent a couple of hours together, decided on a program, ran through a couple of songs…and they were ready.

Inlet“Pete Seeger had been singing with a Guthrie for some 35 years. Back in 1940, Woody Guthrie and Pete traveled cross country singing their way from state to state, and until the early 1950s Woody and Pete often shared singing in a union hall or at a political rally. In the mid-1960s, as Arlo became a “professional” singer, he was also beginning to share the same platform or concert hall with Pete, as they both participated at peace demonstrations or sang for the Farm Workers Union. The Seeger-Guthrie Union keeps going.

“There is no gap in the two generations of singers heard on this record. Rather, the music and songs express a continuity of understanding and a reflection of the world as it is and has been. The audience at these concerts- those who were lucky enough to get tickets- spanned several generations: grandfathers and grandmothers with their grandchildren, workers and students, young and old. A New York reviewer perhaps best summed up when he wrote,”It is another time, but the need for the Seegers and Guthries of whatever generation remains.” (Promo text)

Pete and Arlo’s Together In Concert is the first of their three concert albums. (More Together Again and Precious Friend are the other two). It differs from those albums. The audience sings more with Arlo than with Pete and Pete tells more stories than Arlo. “Hard to believe, but its true.”

Pete tells the story of Victor Jara’s death and reads his last poem, smuggled out of the detention camp. A story that is suspiciously similar to Joe Hill’s Last Will and Testament. (Another demonstration that folk singers know the difference between truth and factual accuracy.)

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Arlo encourages the audience to join in Walking Down The Line, hilariously, as only Arlo can.
The audience’s voice isn’t prominent in Lonesome Valley, but from there are three voices from the stage (I wonder who sung the bass line). A different sound than any of my other versions.
Well May The World Go is so typical of optimistic 60’s folk, one wonders if it’s a parody, sung with a straight face.
The album contains Arlo/Pete favorites like Guantanamera, City Of New Orleans, Deportee and Joe Hill.
It has obscure songs, like the Red Army’s Three Rule Of Discipline and The Eight Rules of Attention as well as two songs written by pre-school children.
Arlo’s covers Don’t Think Twice, It’s Allright and Stealin’. Pete quotes his father on the folk process, “plagiarism is basic to all culture”.

If Precious Friend and More Together Again are “must have” albums. Together In Concert is a “really, really should have” album. (by MikeE)

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Personnel:
Arlo Guthrie (guitar, vocals, piano, banjo)
Pete Seeger (banjo, vocals, guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Way Out There (Nolan) 3.47
02. Yodeling (Traditional) 1.21
03. Roving Gambler (Houston) 2.22
04. Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right (Dylan) 3.13
05. Declaration Of Independence (Gibbs/Dougherty) 2.32
06. Get Up And Go (Seeger) 2.43
07. City Of New Orleans (Goodman) 4.37
08. Estadio Chile (Jara) 3.19
09. Guantanamera (Angulo/Marti/Seeger) 4.24
10. On A Monday (Ledbetter) 3.00
11. Presidential Rag (A.Guthrie) 4.59
12. Walkin’ Down The Line (Dylan) 4.38
13. Well May The World Go (Seeger) 2.19
14. My Son (Traditional) 2.
15. The Queen Of My Heart (Bryant/Rogers) 3.21
16. Deportee (Plane Wreck At Los Gatos) (W.Guthrie/Hoffman) 4.01
17. Joe Hill (Robinson/Hayes) 3.19
18. May There Always Be Sunshine (Oshanin/Ostrovsky/Batting) 1.58
19. Three Rules Of Discipline And The Eight Rules Of Attention (unknown) 2.29
20. Stealin’ (Cannon) 2.35
21. Golden Vanity (Traditional) 4.12
22. Lonesome Valley (Traditional) 4.35
23. Quite Early Morning (Seeger) 4.34
24. Sweet Rosyanne (Bright Light Quartette/Lomax) 6.00

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