Joni Mitchell – Blue (1971)

FrontCover1Blue is the fourth studio album by Canadian singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell. Exploring the various facets of relationships from infatuation on “A Case of You” to insecurity on “This Flight Tonight”, the songs feature simple accompaniments on piano, guitar and Appalachian dulcimer. The album peaked at number 3 on the UK Albums Chart and number 15 on the Blllboard 200.Blue is the fourth studio album by Canadian singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell. Exploring the various facets of relationships from infatuation on “A Case of You” to insecurity on “This Flight Tonight”, the songs feature simple accompaniments on piano, guitar and Appalachian dulcimer. The album peaked at number 3 on the UK Albums Chart and number 15 on the Blllboard 200.
Today, Blue is generally regarded by music critics as one of the greatest albums of all time; Mitchell’s songwriting and compositions are frequent areas of praise. In January 2000, The New York Times chose Blue as one of the 25 albums that represented “turning points and pinnacles in 20th-century popular music”. In 2012, Blue was rated the 30th best album ever made in Rolling Stone’s list of the “500 Greatest Albums of All Time”, the highest entry by a female artist. In July 2017, Blue was chosen by NPR as the greatest album of all time made by a woman.

Despite the success of her first three albums and songs like “Woodstock”, January 1970 saw Mitchell make a decision to break from performing. In early spring 1970, she set off on a vacation around Europe. While on the island of Formentera, she wrote some of the songs that appear on Blue. This journey was the backdrop for the songs “Carey” and “California.” Some of the songs on Blue were inspired by Mitchell’s 1968-1970 relationship with Graham Nash. Their relationship was already troubled when she left for Europe, and it was while she was on Formentera that she sent Nash the telegram that let him know that their relationship was over.[ The songs “My Old Man” and “River” are thought to be inspired by their relationship.

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Another pivotal experience in Mitchell’s life that drove the emergence of the album was her relationship with James Taylor. She had begun an intense relationship with Taylor by the summer of 1970, visiting him on the set of the movie Two-Lane Blacktop, the aura of which is referred to in “This Flight Tonight”. The songs “Blue” and “All I Want” have specific references to her relationship with Taylor, such as a sweater that she knitted for him at the time, and his heroin addiction. During the making of Blue in January 1971, they were still very much in love and involved. Despite his difficulties, Mitchell evidently felt that she had found the person with whom she could pair-bond in Taylor. By March, his fame exploded, causing friction. She was reportedly devastated when he broke off the relationship.

The album was almost released in a somewhat different form. In March 1971, completed masters for the album were ready for production. Originally, there were three old songs that had not found their way onto any of her previous albums. At the last minute, Mitchell decided to remove two of the three so that she could add the new songs “All I Want” and “The Last Time I Saw Richard”. The two songs removed were:
“Urge for Going” – her first song to achieve commercial success when recorded by country singer George Hamilton IV. It was later released as the B-side of “You Turn Me On, I’m a Radio” and again on her 1996 compilation album, Hits.)    “Hunter (The Good Samaritan)”, which has never appeared on any of Mitchell’s albums.

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However, her live performance is now available on the Amchitka CD,[19] together with three other songs that later appeared on Blue, “A Case Of You”, “My Old Man” and “Carey”, which she morphs into Dylan’s “Mr. Tambourine Man” in a duet with her boyfriend at the time, James Taylor.    “Little Green”, composed in 1967, was the only old song that remained.

In 1979 Mitchell reflected, “The Blue album, there’s hardly a dishonest note in the vocals. At that period of my life, I had no personal defenses. I felt like a cellophane wrapper on a pack of cigarettes. I felt like I had absolutely no secrets from the world and I couldn’t pretend in my life to be strong. Or to be happy. But the advantage of it in the music was that there were no defenses there either.”

Mitchell continued to use alternate tunings on her guitar to allow easier access to augmented chords and notes in unexpected combinations. Due to the stark and bare revelations in the album, when it was first played for Kris Kristofferson he is reported to have commented, “Joni! Keep something of yourself!”

Today, Blue is generally regarded by music critics as one of the greatest albums of all time; Mitchell’s songwriting and compositions are frequent areas of praise. In January 2000, the New York Times chose Blue as one of the 25 albums that represented “turning points and pinnacles in 20th-century popular music”.

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The album was a commercial success. In Canada, the album peaked at number nine on the Canadian RPM Albums Chart. It the United Kingdom the album peaked at number three on the UK Albums Chart and was certified double platinum by the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) for sales over of 600,000 copies in the UK. In the US the album peaked at number 15 on the Billboard 200 chart. The album was later certified platinum for sales over a million copies. The single “Carey” reached #93 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. (by wikipedia)

Joni Mitchell

Sad, spare, and beautiful, Blue is the quintessential confessional singer/songwriter album. Forthright and poetic, Joni Mitchell’s songs are raw nerves, tales of love and loss (two words with relative meaning here) etched with stunning complexity; even tracks like “All I Want,” “My Old Man,” and “Carey” — the brightest, most hopeful moments on the record — are darkened by bittersweet moments of sorrow and loneliness. At the same time that songs like “Little Green” (about a child given up for adoption) and the title cut (a hymn to salvation supposedly penned for James Taylor) raise the stakes of confessional folk-pop to new levels of honesty and openness, Mitchell’s music moves beyond the constraints of acoustic folk into more intricate and diverse territory, setting the stage for the experimentation of her later work. Unrivaled in its intensity and insight, Blue remains a watershed. (by Jason Ankeny)

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Personnel:
Joni Mitchell (appalachian dulcimer, guitar, piano, vocals)
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Sneaky Pete Kleinow – pedal steel guitar on 06. + 07.)
Russ Kunkel (drums on 04., 06. + 09.)
Stephen Stills (bass, guitar on 04.)
James Taylor (guitar on 01., 06. + 09.)

Booklet

Tracklist:
01. All I Want 3.37
02. My Old Man 3.38
03. Little Green 3.31
04. Carey 3.07
05. Blue 3.09
06. California 3.56
07. This Flight Tonight 2.54
08. River 4.07
09. A Case Of You 4.27
10. The Last Time I Saw Richard 4.17

All songs written by Joni Mitchell

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Magna Carta – In Concert (1971)

OriginalFrontCover1One of the six Magna Carta albums that went gold in Europe, In Concert was recorded live in Amsterdam in 1971, and remains one of the most atmospheric concert recordings of its age.

A wonderful venue (the Concertgebouw), an appreciative audience, and a genuinely intimate selection of songs result in performances that cannot even be compared to their studio counterparts.

They’re not better, they’re not worse, they’re just delightfully different, spun with a spontaneity and warmth that truly place the listener stage center. “Airport Song” opens the proceedings, of course, but the band was preaching to the converted that night — every song is received as a conquering hero, and the band responds with equal generosity.

A playful “Banjo Man,” a haunting “Seven O’Clock Hymn,” an eerie “Ring of Stones” — every track is a highlight, while the newly arrived Davey Johnstone, making his recorded debut with the band, shines so brightly that it’s hard to believe he was still unknown at the time. (by Dave Thompson)

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Personnel:
Davey Johnstone (guitar, mandolin, sitar, banjo, vocals)
Vocals, Acoustic Guitar – Chris Simpson (vocals, guitar)
Glen Stuart (vocals, glockenspiel, harmonium)

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Tracklist:
01. Introduction by Liesbeth List 0.51
02. Airport Song (Simpson) 3.39
03. Speech 0.39
04. Time For The Leaving (Simpson) 4.25
05. Speech 0.26
06. The Boatman (Johnstone) 3.10
07. Speech 1.07
08. Sea And Sand (Simpson) 4.10
09. Speech 0.394.36
11. Speech 10.02
10. Banjo (Traditional)
11. Speech 1.02
11. Old John Parker (Simpson) 2.49
12. Speech 0. 47
13. Seven O’Clock Hymn / Midwinter (Simpson) 12.51
14. Speech 0.41
15. Country Jam (Simpson/Johnstone/Stuart) 1.48
16. Speech 0.21
17. Ring Of Stones (Simpson) 5.42

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Gordon Lightfoot – Summertime Dream (1976)

FrontCover1Summertime Dream is Canadian singer Gordon Lightfoot’s twelfth original album, released on the Reprise Records label in 1976. It peaked at #1 on the Canadian RPM national album chart, and #12 on the US Billboard pop chart.[1]Summertime Dream is Canadian singer Gordon Lightfoot’s twelfth original album, released on the Reprise Records label in 1976. It peaked at #1 on the Canadian RPM national album chart, and #12 on the US Billboard pop chart.

The album marked Lightfoot’s commercial zenith in a remarkable period of popularity which began with the 1970 hit, “If You Could Read My Mind”. He would never again achieve the same level of commercial success.

The album shot to popularity on the back of the haunting ballad, “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald”, which told the story of the final hours of the SS Edmund Fitzgerald which had sunk on Lake Superior in November 1975. The song remains popular to this day and has been credited with making the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald the most famous maritime incident in the history of the Great Lakes.
“The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald” reached #1 in Canada on November 20, 1976. In the US, it peaked at #2 on the pop chart and #50 on the country chart while “Race Among the Ruins” peaked at #65 on the pop chart. (by wikipedia)

Gordon Lightfoot

With Summertime Dream, Gordon Lightfoot produced one of his finest albums, and wrapped up a six-year period of popularity that he would not recapture. Propelled by his second biggest hit, “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald,” Summertime Dream summed up the sound that had served Lightfoot so well in his post-“If You Could Read My Mind” days. This distinctive sound featured Lightfoot’s strummed six- or 12-string guitar complemented by Terry Clements’ electric guitar lines and Pee Wee Charles’ pedal steel guitar accents. The material here is excellent, and the singer’s voice is at its strongest. Mixing upbeat songs like “Race Among the Ruins,” “I’d Do It Again,” and the title track with beautiful ballads such as “I’m Not Supposed to Care” and “Spanish Moss,” Lightfoot and his band deliver a tasty smorgasbord of intelligent, grown-up music. As for “Edmund Fitzgerald,” its continued popularity more than 20 years after its release attests to the power of a well-told tale and a tasty guitar lick. (by Jim Newsome)

In other words: What a great singer/songwriter !

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Personnel:
Pee Wee Charles (pedal steel guitar)
Terry Clements (guitar)
Rick Haynes (bass)
Barry Keane (drums, percussion)
Gordon Lightfoot – vocals, guitar, piano)
Gene Martynec (synthesizer)
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Jim Gordon (drums on “The House You Live In”

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Tracklist:
01. Race Among The Ruins 3.18
02. The Wreck Of The Edmund Fitzgerald 6.29
03. I’m Not Supposed To Care 3.29
04. I’d Do It Again 3.12
05. Never Too Close 3.02
06. Protocol 4.01
07. The House You Live In 2.52
08. Summertime Dream 2.28
09. Spanish Moss 3.49
10. Too Many Clues In This Room 4.49

All songs written by Gordon Lightfoot
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Gordon Lightfoot

Davy Graham with Alexis Korner – 34 A.D. (1962)

OriginalFrontCover1Davy Graham’s debut EP was released in 1962, consisting of three acoustic guitar instrumentals. The first of these, “Angie” (written when he was only 19), is the one tune that Graham is best remembered for to this day, and with it he is often credited as single-handedly inventing the idea of the folk guitar instrumental (though John Fahey was doing something similar in America at the time). The legacy of this one song is vast, as it inspired a whole generation of acoustic guitarists (it was covered by Bert Jansch, Paul Simon and many others).

The title track “3/4 AD” was a duet with Alexis Korner, also on guitar, who helped discover Graham and organize this first recording. Korner also wrote the sleeve notes which praised Graham highly and called him “a genuinely gifted guitarist who rightly refuses to let himself be fenced into one field of music.” Stylistically, the EP could be comfortably called folk music, but there are strong shades of blues, jazz, and perhaps more in his playing. Indeed Graham never felt he had to be confined to one genre, and with his later releases he explored well outside the boundaries of folk music. Even from this early release it is obvious that he had to be one of the best acoustic guitarists of his age… and this was just the beginning! (by stuckinthepast,blogspot)

Alexis KornerExperiment, per se, has only a limited value. What is of importance is the confirmation of an emotionally valid step forward in music. Musicians or singers have to be fiercely aware of the ‘rightness’ in their music in order to make it last. They may appear to be reticent or shy but, in their private selves, they must be sure.

Most good performers are, to a large extent, self-centred. They do not have to be rude, arrogant or offhand – neither do they have to be bland and ingratiating. They may be incredibly weak in many respects, but they are firm in their music. These statements apply to both Davy and me.

Davy Graham is just over 21. He is a genuinely gifted guitarist who rightly, refuses to let himself be fenced into one field of music. The great traditional folk banjo and guitar pickers have influenced his playing. Josh White, who can hardly be fitted into this category, has also exerted considerable influence. But then, so have the great modern jazz players. The fierce belief of good Gospel groups, the great blues singers, all have influenced him as have the Baroque composers.

At times he has wanted to take up other instruments because he wanted the extra sound. Fortunately, he has always been too lazy to do anything about it, with the result that he has been forced to make these sounds on guitar. So something new emerges. He gets a chance to work out his ideas at Nick’s diner, in Fulham, where he works several nights a week. He has also played the streets of Paris and had it rough – and, in his way, he has had it good, with a crowd of worshipful fans sitting at his feet. What he has learned is that, to keep his music alive, he needs to play in front of audiences; he needs to communicate.

His approach to a tune seems to be basically through the tune itself. Both ‘Angi’ – Baroque or Modern Jazz Quartet influenced – and his ‘Train Blues’ – a piece of pure rhythmic impressionism – testify to this. This approach is probably why Davy is best as a soloist. Yet one of Davy’s most telling performances is in our duet, 3/4 A.D. (The title is derived from the time signature and our respective initials). Inspired by Miles Davis’ ‘Kind Of Blue’ and Charles Mingus’ ‘Better Git It In Your Soul’, with a definite bow towards Jimmy Giuffre in the second theme, it is simply the Blues. It is not folk, it is not jazz; it is just music the way we feel it when we are playing together.

Davy Graham

There is a lovely swoop at the beginning of Davy’s opening solo. It is completely Davy, playing you will notice, harmonies rather than single-note lines, sinuous but expansive. Then a complete change in the next chorus. That is me. A hammering, shouting gospel approach which I could never get rid of, even if I wanted to. In the second theme, the solo work is all Davy.

The solo voice, treble first, then bass, in the last two choruses, is by me. It is just the way it happened to work out. We certainly would not play it exactly the same way again; it was an experiment which we may never repeat. It was however an experiment which we ‘know’ was right. (taken from the original liner-notes, written by Alxis Korner)

The recording was made by Bill Leader at his home, ‘North Villas’ London in April 1961.Released in April 1962

Alternate frontcovers:
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Personnel:
Davy Graham (guitar)
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Alexis Korner (guitar on 03.)

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Tracklist:
01. Angi (Graham) 2.29
02. Davy’s Train Blues (Graham) 3.03
03. 3/4 A.D. (Korner/Graham) 4.40

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Don McLean – Live At Manchester (1975)

FrontCover1Famed for — and ultimately defined by — his perennial “American Pie,” singer/songwriter Don McLean was born October 2, 1945, in New Rochelle, New York. After getting his start in the folk clubs of New York City during the mid-’60s, McLean struggled for a number of years, building a small following through his work with Pete Seeger on the Clearwater, a sloop that sailed up and down the eastern seaboard to promote environmental causes.

Still, McLean was primarily singing in elementary schools and the like when, in 1970, he wrote a musical tribute to painter Vincent Van Gogh; the project was roundly rejected by a number of labels, although MediaArts did offer him a contract to record a number of his other songs under the title Tapestry. The album fared poorly, but Perry Como earned a hit with a cover of the track “And I Love You So,” prompting United Artists to pick up McLean’s contract. He returned in 1971 with American Pie; the title track, an elegiac eight-and-a-half-minute folk-pop epic inspired by the tragic death of Buddy Holly, became a number one hit, and the LP soon reached the top of the charts as well.

The follow-up, “Vincent,” was also a smash, and McLean even became the subject of the Roberta Flack hit “Killing Me Softly with His Song”; however, to his credit — and to his label’s horror — the singer refused to let the success of “American Pie” straitjacket his career. Subsequent records like 1972’s self-titled effort and 1974’s Playin’ Favorites deliberately avoided any attempts to re-create the “American Pie” flavor; not surprisingly, his sales plummeted, and the latter release even failed to chart. After 1974’s Homeless Brother and 1976’s Solo, United Artists dropped McLean from his contract; he resurfaced on Arista the next year with Prime Time, but when it, too, fared poorly, he spent the next several years without a label.

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McLean enjoyed a renaissance of sorts with 1980’s Chain Lightning; his first Top 30 LP in close to a decade, it spawned a Top Ten smash with its cover of Roy Orbison’s classic “Crying,” and his originals “Castles in the Air” and “Since I Don’t Have You” both also reached the Top 40. However, 1981’s Believers failed to sustain the comeback, and after 1983’s Dominion, he was again left without benefit of label support. McLean spent the remainder of his career primarily on the road, grudgingly restoring “American Pie” to his set list and drawing inspiration from the country market; in addition to a number of live sets and re-recordings of old favorites, he also returned to the studio for projects like 1990’s For the Memories (a collection of classic pop, country, and jazz covers) and 1995’s River of Love (an LP of original material). (by Jason Ankeny)

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And here´s a great broadrecording from 1975:

The shutdown of Megaupload; and other cyberlockers such as Filesonic and Fileserve becoming pale shadows of what they once were, music fans will once again recall the immortal words of Don McLean.

But the lyrics to McLean’s Bronco Bill’s Lament are no less poignant and apt for these times:

Well you may not recognize my face, I used to be a star,
A cowboy hero known both near and far.
I perched upon a silver mount and sang with my guitar,
But the studio of course,
owned my saddle and my horse…

All the voyeurs and the lawyers who can pull a fountain pen,
And put you where they choose,
With the language that they use,
And enslave you till you work your youth away,
Oh god how I worked my youth away.

Thanks to Otto who shared these tracks on the net in 2010.

Recorded live at The Hardrock Concert Theatre, Manchester, UK; May 25, 1975;
Excellent FM broadcast.

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Personnel:
Don McLean (guitar, vocals, banjo)

Tracklist:
01. Bronco Bill’s Lament 3.22
02. Empty Chairs 3.38
03. La La Love You 4.25
04. American Pie 10.03
05. Homeless Brother 4.16
06. Respectable 4.04
07. The Legend Of Andrew McCrew 6.20
08. Babylon 5.00
09. This Little Light Of Mine 2.58
10. Vincent 4.04

All songs written by DonMcLean

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Bob Dylan – The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan (1963)

FrontCover1The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan is the second studio album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released on May 27, 1963 by Columbia Records. Whereas his self-titled debut album Bob Dylan had contained only two original songs, Freewheelin’ represented the beginning of Dylan’s writing contemporary words to traditional melodies. Eleven of the thirteen songs on the album are Dylan’s original compositions. The album opens with “Blowin’ in the Wind”, which became an anthem of the 1960s, and an international hit for folk trio Peter, Paul & Mary soon after the release of Freewheelin’. The album featured several other songs which came to be regarded as among Dylan’s best compositions and classics of the 1960s folk scene: “Girl from the North Country”, “Masters of War”, “A Hard Rain’s a-Gonna Fall” and “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right”.

Dylan’s lyrics embraced news stories drawn from headlines about the Civil Rights Movement and he articulated anxieties about the fear of nuclear warfare. Balancing this political material were love songs, sometimes bitter and accusatory, and material that features surreal humor. Freewheelin’ showcased Dylan’s songwriting talent for the first time, propelling him to national and international fame. The success of the album and Dylan’s subsequent recognition led to his being named as “Spokesman of a Generation”, a label Dylan repudiated.

Dylan1963_02The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan reached number 22 in the US (eventually going platinum), and became a number-one album in the UK in 1964. In 2003, the album was ranked number 97 on Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. In 2002, Freewheelin’ was one of the first 50 recordings chosen by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Registry. (by wikipedia)

It’s hard to overestimate the importance of The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan, the record that firmly established Dylan as an unparalleled songwriter, one of considerable skill, imagination, and vision. At the time, folk had been quite popular on college campuses and bohemian circles, making headway onto the pop charts in diluted form, and while there certainly were a number of gifted songwriters, nobody had transcended the scene as Dylan did with this record. There are a couple (very good) covers, with “Corrina Corrina” and “Honey Just Allow Me One More Chance,” but they pale with the originals here. At the time, the social protests received the most attention, and deservedly so, since “Blowin’ in the Wind,” “Masters of War,” and “A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall” weren’t just specific in their targets; they were gracefully executed and even melodic.

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Although they’ve proven resilient throughout the years, if that’s all Freewheelin’ had to offer, it wouldn’t have had its seismic impact, but this also revealed a songwriter who could turn out whimsy (“Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right”), gorgeous love songs (“Girl From the North Country”), and cheerfully absurdist humor (“Bob Dylan’s Blues,” “Bob Dylan’s Dream”) with equal skill. This is rich, imaginative music, capturing the sound and spirit of America as much as that of Louis Armstrong, Hank Williams, or Elvis Presley. Dylan, in many ways, recorded music that equaled this, but he never topped it. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

Bob Dylan On The Ed Sullivan Show

Personnel:
Bob Dylan (vocals, guitar, harmonica)
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on 11:
Howie Collins (guitar)
Leonard Gaskin (bass)
Bruce Langhorne (guitar)
Herb Lovelle (drums)
Dick Wellstood (piano)

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Tracklist:
01. Blowin’ In The Wind (Dylan) 2.47
02. Girl From The North Country (Dylan) 3.22
03. Masters Of War (Dylan) 4.33
04. Down The Highway (Dylan) 3.25
05. Bob Dylan’s Blues (Dylan) 2.24
06. A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall (Dylan) 6.53
07. Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right (Dylan) 3.40
08. Bob Dylan’s Dream (Dylan) 5.03
09. Oxford Town (Dylan) 1.50
10. Talking World War III Blues (Dylan) 6.26
11. Corrina, Corrina (Thomas) 2.42
12. Honey, Just Allow Me One More Chance (Dylan) 2.00
13. I Shall Be Free (Dylan) 4.48

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Come, you masters of war
You that build the big guns
You that build the death planes
You that build all the bombs

You that hide behind walls
You that hide behind desks
I just want you to know
I can see through your masks

You that never done nothin’
But build to destroy
You play with my world
Like it’s your little toy

You put a gun in my hand
And you hide from my eyes
And you turn and run farther
When the fast bullets fly

Like Judas of old
You lie and deceive
A world war can be won
You want me to believe

But I see through your eyes
And I see through your brain
Like I see through the water
That runs down my drain

You fasten all the triggers
For the others to fire
Then you sit back and watch
While the death count gets higher

You hide in your mansion
While the young peoples’ blood
Flows out of their bodies
And is buried in the mud

You’ve thrown the worst fear
That can ever be hurled
Fear to bring children
Into the world

For threatenin’ my baby
Unborn and unnamed
You ain’t worth the blood
That runs in your veins

How much do I know
To talk out of turn?
You might say that I’m young
You might say I’m unlearned

But there’s one thing I know
Though I’m younger than you
That even Jesus would never
Forgive what you do

Let me ask you one question
Is your money that good?
Will it buy you forgiveness?
Do you think that it could?

I think you will find
When your death takes its toll
All the money you made
Will never buy back your soul

And I hope that you die
And your death will come soon
I’ll follow your casket
On a pale afternoon

I’ll watch while you’re lowered
Down to your deathbed
And I’ll stand over your grave
‘Til I’m sure that you’re dead

Spencer Bohren – Karlstorbahnhof, Heidelberg (2007)

FrontCover1Spencer Ward Bohren (born 1950, Casper, Wyoming) is an American roots musician, singer, songwriter, teacher, and visual artist. He plays guitar, lap steel guitar, banjo, and percussion, and utilizes the roots of American traditional music to write songs in blues, country, gospel and folk styles. He has released fourteen albums since 1984.

Bohren’s maternal ancestry is Scots-Irish, and his father’s family came from Alsace-Lorraine. He grew up in a Baptist family in Wyoming and spent time in Denver and Boulder, Colorado, southern Oregon, and Seattle, Washington in the early part of his career. In 1976 he began raising a family with his wife, Marilyn, in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Bohren has performed throughout the United States as well as in Canada, England, Ireland, Scotland, France, Italy, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Switzerland, Spain, Mexico, and Japan. He has performed on the A Prairie Home Companion radio program and at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. He has also taught at the Fur Peace Ranch. In the late 1970s and early 1980s he hosted a weekly Monday-night jam session at the Tipitina’s music club in New Orleans.

SpencerBohren01Although he most often works as a soloist, he has performed in several bands, including the Funston Brothers, the Eagle-Ridin’ Papa, Butterfat, Rufus Krisp, the Earthtones, and Gone Johnson. He has collaborated with folk blues performer Judy Roderick, diesel-billy guitarist Bill Kirchen, opera singer Karen Clift, Dr. John, the Blind Boys of Alabama, and the vocal duo The Tremors.

In the academic world, Bohren presents a musical overview of American roots music, a lecture-performance entitled Down the Dirt Road Blues, which traces the journey of a single song, “Dirt Road Blues,” from Africa to the days of slavery in the American South, through the modern age. He uses appropriate vintage instruments to orchestrate the story as the song evolves from a simple vocal melody to a blues song, a dance number, a hillbilly banjo piece, a country hit, and into the age of rock ‘n’ roll.

His CD Carry the Word was named “Best CD of the Year 2000 by a Louisiana Artist” by The Times-Picayune of New Orleans, and he has won the New Orleans Gambit Weekly’s “Big Easy Award for Best Folk Artist” several times.

He has recorded for the Virgin, Sony/France, Valve, Zephyr, Public Road, Last Call, Loft, Alpha, Great Southern, and New Blues labels.

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Also a visual artist, Bohren creates artworks that he calls “Reliquaries” and shares his philosophy and techniques with interested students of all ages.

Spencer Bohren and his wife Marilyn live in New Orleans and have home-schooled their four children. The family home suffered significant damage during Hurricane Katrina and Bohren wrote the song “Long Black Line” about the experience. (by wikipedia)

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And here´s an excellent soundboard recording from his concert in Heidelberg in 2007.

And it was a magical night !!! A blend of 60´s Folk,Singer Songwriter,Blues,Country Folk,Dylan,New Orleans,History…….

THINGS,YOU CAN`T GET ON THE BIG STAGE ANYMORE – !!!

Spencer is a real Master…..he did set the place on fire that night,again !!!

This concert was a part of the “For the sake of the song” Concert series…the 1st night.

It´s time to discoverSpencer Bohren !

Spencer Bohren… a musician, educator, artist, guitarist and storyteller !

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Personnel:
Spencer Bohren (guitar, vocals, percussion, lap steel guitar)

Handbill

Tracklist:
01. People Get Ready (Mayfield) 7.04
02. Beulah Land (Traditional) 6.30
03. Cairo Blues (Urban) 7.16
04. Hey Hey Daddy Blues (Blake) +Maple Leaf Rag (Joplin) 9.18
05. Somebody On Your Bond (Traditional) 7.00
06. Wings Of An Angel (Bohren) 5.14
07. Darkness (Bohren) 6.13
08. Deportees (Guthrie/Hoffman) 8.48
09. The Long Black Line (Bohren)
10. Ode To Billy Jo (Gentry)
11. Ain´t Nobodys Business (Grainger/Robbins) 5.48
12. Weary Blues (Williams) 4.25
13. I´ll Be Your Baby Tonight (Dylan) 4.57
14. Watermelon (
15. Ring Them Bells……. (In Memoriam Of Sven) (Dylan) 8.00
16. Natchez Blues (Traditional) 5.16
17. Bound For Glory (Traditional) 6.23
18. Working On A Building (Traditional) 6.59
19. Deep Ellum Blues (Traditional) 6.34
20. Night Is Falling (Bohren) 7.18
SpencerBohren05

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