Various Artists – Flamenco For Beginners (2006)

FrontCover1Okay, I´m back from my trip to Andalusian … a real excellent destination (as Chris wrote) even we had many rainy days …

And I´ll start my spanish weeks with a fine compilation album called  “Flamenco For Beginners”:

Flamenco (Spanish pronunciation: [flaˈmeŋko]) is an artform native to the Spanish regions of Andalusia, Extremadura and Murcia. It includes cante (singing), toque (guitar playing), baile (dance), jaleo (vocalizations), palmas (handclapping) and pitos (finger snapping).

First mentioned in literature in 1774, the genre originates in Andalusian music and dance styles. Flamenco is strongly associated with the gitanos (Romani people of Spain)—however, unlike Romani music of eastern Europe, the style is distinctively Andalusian and the fusion of the various cultures of southern Spain is clearly perceptible in Flamenco music. Although there are many theories on its influences and origins, the most widespread highlights a Morisco heritage, the cultural melting pot that was Andalusia at the time (Andalusians, Moors, Castilian settlers, Romanis and Jews) fostering its development over time. Flamenco music, as a theatrical representation of Andalusian musical tradition, was first recorded in the late 18th century but the genre underwent a dramatic development in the late 19th century.

In recent years, flamenco has become popular all over the world and is taught in many non-Hispanic countries, especially United States and Japan. In Japan, there are more flamenco academies than there are in Spain. On November 16, 2010, UNESCO declared flamenco one of the Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity.

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There are many suggestions for the origin of the word flamenco as a musical term (summarized below) but no solid evidence for any of them. The word was not recorded as a musical and dance term until the late 18th century.

The Spanish word flamenco could have been a derivative of “fire” or “flame”, as it is connected to the ‘Cante’ and the dance’s solemn, passionate nature. The word flamenco may have come to be used for certain behaviour in general, which could possibly have come to be applied to the Gitano players and performers.

Another theory, proposed by Andalusian historian Blas Infante in his 1933 book Orígenes de lo Flamenco y Secreto del Cante Jondo suggests that the word flamenco comes from the Hispano-Arabic term fellah mengu, meaning “expelled peasant”; Infante argued that this term referred to the ethnic Andalusians of the Islamic faith, the Moriscos, who in order to avoid forced exile and religious persecution, joined with the Roma newcomers.

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Palos (formerly known as cantes) are flamenco styles, classified by criteria such as rhythmic pattern, mode, chord progression, stanzaic form and geographic origin. There are over 50 different palos and a detailed description of them can be found in the main article. Some are sung unaccompanied while others have guitar or other accompaniment. Some forms are danced while others are not. Some are reserved for men and others for women while some may be performed by either, though these traditional distinctions are breaking down: the Farruca, for example, once a male dance, is now commonly performed by women too.

There are many ways to categories Palos but they traditionally fall into three classes: the most serious is known as cante jondo (or cante grande), while lighter, frivolous forms are called cante chico. Forms that do not fit either category are classed as cante intermedio.[citation needed] Cante jondo has clear traces of Arabic and Spanish folk melodies, as well as vestiges of Byzantine, Christian and Jewish religious music. (by wikipedia)

Let´s discover this fascinating music !

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Tracklist:
01. El Camarón de la Isla: Un Un Tiro Al Aire (1987) (Monge/Pachon) 4.41
02. La Paquera de Jerez: Que Dolor De Mare Mia (1975) (Traditional) 3.08
03. Paco de Lucía: Monasterio De Sal (1981) (Gómez/Lucía) 4.51
04. Ramon Algeciras + Paco Toronjo: De Mi Mismo Me Reia (1971) (Sanchez) 3.06
05. Juan Habichuela + Rancapino: La Pureza (1999) (Habichuela) 3.59
06. Paco de Lucía: Recuerdos (1971) (Sanchez) 3.06
07. Carmen Linares: Y Doy Suspiros Al Aire (1996) (Traditional) 5.32
08. Sernita De Jerez: A La Mare De Mi Alma (1959) (Traditional) 4.10
09. Terremoto Jerez: Yo Ya No Soy Quien Era (1969) (Traditional) 2.05
10. Paco de Lucía: Mi Nino Curro (1987) (R.Gomez/S.Gómez) 3.27
11. Bambino: Bambino, Piccolino (1969) (Molina) 2:13
12. José Mercé: Me Cierren los Ojos (1983) (Pernia) 1.57
13. Salmarina: A La Yala Yala (1994) (Evora/Muñoz) 3.29
14. Antonio Mairena: Por Tu Causa (1973) (Garcia) 5.32
15. Juan Peña: Lo Mismo Que Un Loco (1973) (Peña) 3.38
16. El Camarón de la Isla: Romance De La Luna, Luna (1983) (Bermejo/Lorca) 4.00
17. Fosforito: Te Quiero Más Cada Día (1980) (Diaz) 2.49
18. Jacinto Almaden + Justo Badajoz: Hablo Con Mi Dios Y Le Digo (1971) (Traditional) 3.45 19. Rafael Romero: Los Olivaritos Del Valle (1967) ( (Traditional) 1.16
20. Rosa Duran: Zapateado De Las Campanas (1956) (Traditional) 4.07

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