Rory Gallagher – My Father´s Place (1979)

FrontCover1A class act is exactly what [My Father’s Place] got whenever Rory Gallagher came to town. Rory played at My Father’s Place on several occasions. This bootleg is from his performance there on September 7, 1979 during the American leg of his top priority tour. After doing a successful three-night stand at the Bottom Line that Robert Palmer calls, “creative and inspired,” Rory heads out to the quaint village of Roslyn, named after a Castle in Scotland, and part of what’s called the North Shore Gold Coast of Long Island… It’ll be a show you won’t want to miss.

With Gallagher’s death in 1995 at the age of 47, the world lost an ace guitarist and, for generations after, younger fans will think of Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page and RoryGallagherignore Gallagher when it comes to blues guitarist. This is what Gallagher said in a 1991 interview:

I have respect for Eric Clapton from the early days, but I’m surprised they always link his name with me. Maybe earlier on there might have been more of a comparison, but not at the moment. Clapton seems to be the icon of all guitarists including Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page. I suppose he’s the successful face of what the blues is and I’m probably the guy on the sidelines. He’s working in a different area from me now. And even in the blues field, I cover different blues tangents than Eric does. I work in country blues and even though I do some numbers that are in the B.B. King and Albert King area, I work in a lot of other influences in as well. My blues roots are all over the place, where Eric’s tend to be a little narrower. (shadowplays.com)

Listen to this great bootleg … That´s what I call high energy blues-rock !

What a concert !

RoryGallagher2

Personnel:
Rory Gallagher (guitar, vocals)
Gerry McAvoy (bass)
Ted McKenna (drums)

BackCover1

Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. Shinkicker (Gallagher) 3.38
02. Last Of The Independents (Gallagher) 5.41
03. Keychain (Gallagher) 5.53
04. Moonchild (Gallagher) 5.10
05. The Mississippi Sheiks (Gallagher) 5.45
06. I Wonder Who (Morganfield) 7.48
07. Tattoo’d Lady (Gallagher) 5.10
08. Pistol Slapper Blues (Allen) 3.03
08. Too Much Alcohol (Hutto) 3.48

CD 2:
09. Shadow Play (Gallagher) 5.43
10. Bought And Sold (Gallagher) 4.59
11. Walk On Hot Coals (Gallagher) 5.26
12. Messin’ With The Kid (London/Wells) 5.23
13. Bullfrog Blues (Traditional)) 2.51
14. Sea Cruise (Gallagher) 2.59

*
**

RoryGallagher3

Advertisements

Fresh Evidence – Volume No. 1/Issue No 1 (Rory Gallagher Fanzine) (1991)

FrontCoverI have a lot of fanzines in my archive … and here´s a very rare one … The first issue of the Rory Gallagher fanzine “Fresh Evidence”.

It was the “only official Rory Gallagher fanzine in the world”, as the publisher Noel Lackey wrote.

A fanzine (blend of fan and magazine or -zine) is a non-professional and non-official publication produced by enthusiasts of a particular cultural phenomenon (such as a literary or musical genre) for the pleasure of others who share their interest. (by wikipedia)

And this is the very first issue of “Fresh Evidence” (the titel comes from a Rory Gallagher album from 1990 (his  eleventh and last studio album).

As many fanzines, the print quality of this fanzine is more or less not so good … but that was not important in these days.

Much more important was, that Noel Lackey had contact with Rory Gallagher and his brother Donal and so he was able to present his “Question And Answers” column.

A real nice addition for every serious Rory Gallagher collection … a fanzine from a fan for the fans …

Example01

Example02

Example03

Example04

Example05

Example06

Example07

*
**

Rory Gallagher – Live In Europe (1972)

frontcover1Live in Europe is the third album by Irish blues guitarist Rory Gallagher, released in 1972. It is a series of live recordings made by Gallagher during his European tour. Unusual for a live album it contains only two previously released songs (“Laundromat” and “In Your Town”). All the other songs are either new Gallagher songs or Gallagher’s interpretation of traditional blues songs.

Live in Europe was released at the end of the British “blues boom” that began in the 1960s. Sparked by bands such as the Rolling Stones, Yardbirds, and Cream fans and musicians were fascinated by authentic Chicago blues artists such as Muddy Waters. Gallagher had an extensive knowledge of this kind of music. Although he tended to play down arguments about what was “pure” blues. In an interview at the time he said:

“If there was one fault with the boom in the 1960s, it was that it was very straight-faced and very pontificatory, or whatever the word is. It used to annoy me that there was an attitude of ‘Thou shalt not play the blues unless you know who played second acoustic guitar behind Sonny Boy Williamson the first on the B-side of whatever.’ That kind of thing gets music nowhere, it’s like collecting stamps. I mean, I buy books on the blues and I check out the B-sides and I know who plays on what records and that’s fine. But then you’ve got to open that up to the rest of the people. Because that kind of snobbery defeats the purpose; it kills the music.”

Rather than live versions of his most popular songs there are only two songs on the album that were previously recorded by Gallagher in the studio, “Laundromat” from his first album and “In Your Town” from his Deuce album. All the other songs are Gallagher’s versions of classic blues songs. The album starts with what was to become a signature song for Gallagher, Junior Wells’ “Messin’ With the Kid”. The song “I Could’ve Had Religion” was Gallagher’s salute to what he called the “redemption style blues” of the Robert Wilkins and Gary Davis. After hearing the song on this album Bob Dylan expressed interest in recording it and assumed it was a traditional blues number rather than an original song by Gallagher.

inlet01

Blind Boy Fuller’s “Pistol Slapper Blues” is next. Gallagher then shows his versatility, swapping his Stratocaster for a mandolin and performing the song “Going to My Home Town” with the audience stomping their feet and cheering in response as Gallagher sings “do you want to go?”. The finale is the straight ahead hard rocking “Bullfrog Blues” written by William Harris. Gallagher switches back to the electric guitar and the full band and gives bassist Gerry McAvoy and drummer Wilgar Campbell, a chance to solo. With the CD release two additional blues songs were added: “What in the World” and “Hoodoo Man”.

Most critics agree that Live in Europe is one of Gallagher’s finest albums. It was his highest charting album to date reaching 101 in the Billboard 200 for 1972. The album was his first major commercial success and provided his first solo top ten album. It won him his first Gold Disc. In the same year of 1972 he was Melody Maker’s Guitarist/Musician of the Year, winning out over Eric Clapton.

inlet02a

The live album Live in Europe/Stage Struck captures Rory Gallagher at his finest, as he tears his way through many of his very best songs. Though the performance quality is a little uneven, there are gems scattered throughout the record, including smoking versions of “Messin’ with the Kid” and “Laundromat.” (by Thom Owens)

gallagherlive1972

Personnel:
Wilgar Campbell (drums)
Rory Gallagher (guitar, harmonica, mandolin, vocals)
Gerry McAvoy (bass)

originalbackcover
Tracklist:
01. Messin’ With The Kid (Wells) 6.25
02. Laundromat (Gallagher) 5.12
03. I Could’ve Had Religion (Traditional) 8.35
04. Pistol Slapper Blues (Fuller) 2.54
05. Going To My Hometown (Traditional) 5.46
06. In Your Town (Gallagher) 10.03
07. Bullfrog Blues (Traditional) 6.47
+
08. What In The World (Traditional) 7.40
09. Hoodoo Man (Traditional) 6.02

labela1

*
**