Rory Gallagher – Blueprint (1973)

LPFrontCover1.jpgBlueprint is the fourth album by Irish guitarist Rory Gallagher, released as a vinyl record in 1973. With his first band Taste and with his solo band up to this point Gallagher was one of the first guitarists to lead a power trio lineup. With Blueprint Gallagher included a keyboardist for the first time.

For Blueprint Gallagher replaced drummer Wilgar Campbell with Rod de’Ath and decided to add Lou Martin, the keyboardist from de’Ath’s previous band Killing Floor. This four-piece lineup was to be one of Gallagher’s most successful resulting in many of his most popular songs and documented in live film and TV appearances on shows such as Rockpalast and the Old Grey Whistle Test. The band would play together for five years. Blueprint, as with all the studio albums recorded by the Gallagher quartet illustrated Gallagher’s eclectic musical influences.

The album title and artwork were taken from the blueprint of a Stramp “Power Baby” amplifier that had been custom designed for Gallagher in Hamburg. “It was compact enough to fit into the small luggage compartment of a Volkswagen Beetle” recalled Gallagher’s brother and manager Donal. (by wikipedia)

Booklet02A.jpg

Kicking off with the furious “Walk on Hot Coals” where Rory Gallagher’s stinging guitar and Lou Martin’s insistent piano pounding spar within the context of one of Rory’s classic rockers, the album presents a well rounded picture of Gallagher’s eclectic influences. A jaunty, acoustic run through Big Bill Broonzy’s “Banker’s Blues” (oddly credited to Gallagher), the ragtime “Unmilitary Two-Step” as well as an unusually straightforward country tune “If I Had a Reason” with Rory on lap-steel and Martin doing his best honky-tonk, effectively break up the blues-rock that remains the soul of the album. The album’s centerpiece, a brooding “Seventh Son of a Seventh Son” finds the band locked into a swampy groove for over eight minutes as Gallagher abbreviates his own solo providing room for Martin’s aggressive piano. On “Hands Off” the guitarist even picks up saxophone, and he shows off his spooky Muddy Waters’ inspired slide on the train chugging “Race the Breeze,” one of the guitarist’s best tunes.

AlternateFrontCover.jpgAlternate frontcover

The final two bonus tracks tacked on for this reissue don’t add much of interest; an early, shuffle version of “Stompin’ Ground” lacks the tension of the song that later showed up as the only studio tracks on the live Irish Tour 1974 album, and Roy Head’s “Treat Her Right” sounds like a soundcheck warm-up, which it probably was. Concise track-by-track liner notes from Rory’s brother Donal provide useful background information, and the remastered sound taken from the original tapes is a revelation, with Gallagher’s guitar parts and especially vocals, clear and precise in the spiffed up mix. (by Hal Horowitz)

Tourposter1.jpg

Personnel:
Rod De’Ath (drums, percussion)
Rory Gallagher (vocals, guitar, mandolin, saxophone, harmonica)
Lou Martin (keyboards, guitar)
Gerry McAvoy (bass)

LPBackCover.jpg
Tracklist:
01. Walk On Hot Coals (Gallagher) 7:00
02. Daughter Of The Everglades (Gallagher)  6:11
03. Banker’s Blues (Gallagher) 4:44
04. Hands Off (Gallagher) 4:32
05. Race The Breeze (Gallagher) 6:53
06. Seventh Son Of A Seventh Son (Gallagher) 8:25
07. Unmilitary Two – Step (Gallagher) 2:48
08. If I Had A Reason (Gallagher) 4:27
+
09. Stompin’ Ground (alternate version)  3:27
10. Treat Her Right (Head) 4.04

LinerNotes01.jpg

LabelB1.jpg

*
**

RoryGallagher.jpg

Sinnerboy – Down & Out In Hammersmith (2003)

FrontCover1.jpgSinner Boy is a Rory Gallagher tribute band:

The biggest compliment I can pay the band is that I left the gig with a feeling of great satisfaction, that I had just heard Rory’s music played with huge affection & passion. These attributes coupled with superb musicianship led to a top class performance. No wonder this band is a particular favourite of Rory’s brother Donal, and are frequently asked to play many Rory Gallagher conventions, memorials etc. Upon taking the stage, frontman and lead guitarist Barry Barnes told the unfortunately sparse crowd “Don’t leave without having heard your favourite Rory track”. Yes, such is the confidence in their mastery of their subject, Sinnerboy took requests from the floor throughout their set. Did they subconsciously hold back due to the low turnout – not a chance!! (by Tony Whitley)

Sinnerboy

And here´s an high energy concert with lot´s of Rory Gallagerh songs… and Sinner Boy knows how to play Rory Gallagher.

What a great tribute concert !

Sinnerboy02.jpg

Sinnerboy in 2018

Personnel:
Barry Barnes (guitar, vocals)
Dave Burns (bass)
Stebve Richardson (drums)
+
Paul Westwell (harmonica)

BackCover1.jpg

Tracklist:
01. Shinkicker (Gallagher) 3.46
02. Cradle Rock (Gallagher) 6.33
03. Big Guns (Gallagher) 4.39
04. I Fall Apart (Gallagher) 5.54
05. Souped-Up-Ford (Gallagher) 6.48
06. Walk On Hot Coals (Gallagher) 10.54
07. Laundromat (Gallagher) 4.32
08. Follow Me (Gallagher) 5.23
09. To Much Alcohol (Hutto) 7.53
10. Tattoo’d Lady (Gallagher) 6.30
11. Going To My Home Town (Gallagher) 4.33
12. In Your Town (Gallagher) 8.21
13. Bullfrog Blues (‘Traditional) 8.52

Sinnerboy01.jpg

*
**

Rory Gallagher – Notes From San Francisco (2011)

FrontCover1.jpgNotes from San Francisco is a posthumous album by Irish musician Rory Gallagher. Released in 2011, It consists of two CDs. The first disc is a never released album that Gallagher recorded in San Francisco in December 1977. The album was to be a major shift for Gallagher. Rather than producing it himself, he worked with Elliot Mazer a successful producer who had a long track record with artists such as Bob Dylan, Janis Joplin and The Band. At the last minute — causing great distress to his manager and brother Dónal and to his record company — Gallagher decided to just pull the record. In an interview, Gallagher stated “it wasn’t because of the material or the musicians or anything like that. It was a song thing that I didn’t think on the technical side everything worked. So I scrapped the thing” After scrapping the album Gallagher reworked his band firing all the musicians except the bass player and hiring a new drummer. This new Gallagher power trio re-recorded the San Francisco songs with Gallagher producing and released them as Photo-Finish.  Shortly before his death, Rory reportedly gave Dónal permission to eventually release the original San Francisco versions of the songs if they were remixed. Dónal had his son Daniel remix the songs in 2011. The second disc is a live performance also recorded in San Francisco in December 1979.  Peter Notes from San Francisco is a posthumous album by Irish musician Rory Gallagher. Released in 2011, It consists of two CDs. The first disc is a never released album that Gallagher recorded in San Francisco in December 1977. The album was to be a major shift for Gallagher. Rather than producing it himself, he worked with Elliot Mazer a successful producer who had a long track record with artists such as Bob Dylan, Janis Joplin and The Band.

PostCardSet1

At the last minute — causing great distress to his manager and brother Dónal and to his record company — Gallagher decided to just pull the record. In an interview, Gallagher stated “it wasn’t because of the material or the musicians or anything like that. It was a song thing that I didn’t think on the technical side everything worked. So I scrapped the thing” After scrapping the album Gallagher reworked his band firing all the musicians except the bass player and hiring a new drummer. This new Gallagher power trio re-recorded the San Francisco songs with Gallagher producing and released them as Photo-Finish. [1] Shortly before his death, Rory reportedly gave Dónal permission to eventually release the original San Francisco versions of the songs if they were remixed. Dónal had his son Daniel remix the songs in 2011. The second disc is a live performance also recorded in San Francisco in December 1979.

PostCardSet2

It’s surprising, considering the interesting back story on the studio portion of this posthumous Rory Gallagher release, that there are no notes on the actual packaging to chronicle its eventual appearance in 2011, nearly 33 years after being recorded in December 1977. According to the press release though, Gallagher clashed with producer Elliot Mazer about the mix on these dozen tunes and not only shelved the tapes, but broke up his longtime band after the San Francisco session ended. Out went keyboardist Lou Martin and drummer Rod de’Ath, replaced by skinsman Ted McKenna (bassist Gerry McAvoy remained) to strip down the sound for his next phase. About half these songs, such as “Mississippi Sheiks,” “Fuel to the Fire,” “Brute Force & Ignorance,” “Cruise on Out,” and “Overnight Bag” appeared on 1978’s Photo Finish in different performances. Some, like the closing “Out on the Tiles” and “B Girl,” will be new to all but the most ardent Gallagher followers. Shortly before his death, the guitarist apparently mentioned to his brother Donald that he’d like the tapes to be released someday if they were remixed, which is exactly what Donald’s son Daniel did in 2011, resulting in these long-lost tracks finally seeing the light of day.

Rory Gallagher01

Despite Gallagher’s reservations, everything here is up to his usual high standard, and he obviously respected the material enough to re-record the bulk of it with a different band and producer later that year. The electric violin on “Mississippi Sheiks” is a new twist on both Gallagher’s blues-rock style and the song, which helps differentiate this version from the more famous one that appeared on Photo Finish. Saxophone, played by Martin Fiero, enhances two cuts, also bringing a unique groove, especially to the lumbering “Brute Force and Ignorance.” The package includes a December 1979 live show, also recorded in San Francisco, that finds Gallagher and his two-piece in typically fine fettle. They revisit the Taste-era chestnut “Bullfrog Blues” and tear into the rarity “I’m Leavin'” with their notorious paint-peeling approach. He digs back some years for a tough take on “Tattoo’d Lady,” but most of the set is derived from his mid- to late-’70s albums Top Priority, Photo Finish, and Calling Card. A breathless “Sea Cruise” closes the set, and is probably a nod to Jerry Lee Lewis, on whose album Gallagher guested. It caps off a roaring, electrifying show that, along with the studio disc, makes a worthwhile addition to any Gallagher lover’s collection. Even lacking detailed liner notes, this is a keeper and an important historical document in Rory Gallagher’s short but eventful career. (by Hal Horowitz)

Rory Gallagher02

Personnel:
Rod de’Ath (drums on CD 1)
Rory Gallagher (guitar, vocals, harmonica)
Lou Martin (keyboards)
Gerry McAvoy (bass)
Ted McKenna (drums on CD 2)
+
Martin Fiero (saxophone on CD 1 – 01.)
Joe O’Donnell (violin on CD 1 – 08.)

BackCover1
Tracklist:

CD 1 (studio recordings):
01. Rue The Day 4.26
02. Persuasion 4.45
03. B Girl 4.42
04. Mississippi Sheiks 5.56
05. Wheels Within Wheels 3.40
06. Overnight Bag 4.46
07. Cruise On Out 5.19
08. Brute Force & Ignorance 5.45
09. Fuel To The Fire 5.43
10. Wheels Within Wheels (alternate version) 3.55
11. Cut A Dash 3.49
12. Out On The Tiles 4.22

CD 2 (live recordings):
01. Follow Me (from Top Priority) 6.25
02. Shinkicker (from Photo-Finish) 3.42
03. Off The Handle (from Top Priority) 7.01
04. Bought And Sold (from Against the Grain) 4.43
05. I’m Leavin’ 4.35
06. Tattoo’d Lady (from Tattoo) 6.49
07. Do You Read Me (from Calling Card) 6.11
08. Country Mile (from Calling Card) 3.51
09. Calling Card (from Calling Card) 5.51
10. Shadow Play (from Photo-Finish) 5.11
11. Bullfrog Blues  (from Live in Europe) (Traditiional) 5.38
12. Sea Cruise 3.29

All songs written by Rory Gallagher except as indicate

CD2A
*
**

Rory Gallagher03

Rory Gallagher (2 March 1948 – 14 June 1995)

Rory Gallagher – My Father´s Place (1979)

FrontCover1A class act is exactly what [My Father’s Place] got whenever Rory Gallagher came to town. Rory played at My Father’s Place on several occasions. This bootleg is from his performance there on September 7, 1979 during the American leg of his top priority tour. After doing a successful three-night stand at the Bottom Line that Robert Palmer calls, “creative and inspired,” Rory heads out to the quaint village of Roslyn, named after a Castle in Scotland, and part of what’s called the North Shore Gold Coast of Long Island… It’ll be a show you won’t want to miss.

With Gallagher’s death in 1995 at the age of 47, the world lost an ace guitarist and, for generations after, younger fans will think of Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page and RoryGallagherignore Gallagher when it comes to blues guitarist. This is what Gallagher said in a 1991 interview:

I have respect for Eric Clapton from the early days, but I’m surprised they always link his name with me. Maybe earlier on there might have been more of a comparison, but not at the moment. Clapton seems to be the icon of all guitarists including Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page. I suppose he’s the successful face of what the blues is and I’m probably the guy on the sidelines. He’s working in a different area from me now. And even in the blues field, I cover different blues tangents than Eric does. I work in country blues and even though I do some numbers that are in the B.B. King and Albert King area, I work in a lot of other influences in as well. My blues roots are all over the place, where Eric’s tend to be a little narrower. (shadowplays.com)

Listen to this great bootleg … That´s what I call high energy blues-rock !

What a concert !

RoryGallagher2

Personnel:
Rory Gallagher (guitar, vocals)
Gerry McAvoy (bass)
Ted McKenna (drums)

BackCover1

Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. Shinkicker (Gallagher) 3.38
02. Last Of The Independents (Gallagher) 5.41
03. Keychain (Gallagher) 5.53
04. Moonchild (Gallagher) 5.10
05. The Mississippi Sheiks (Gallagher) 5.45
06. I Wonder Who (Morganfield) 7.48
07. Tattoo’d Lady (Gallagher) 5.10
08. Pistol Slapper Blues (Allen) 3.03
08. Too Much Alcohol (Hutto) 3.48

CD 2:
09. Shadow Play (Gallagher) 5.43
10. Bought And Sold (Gallagher) 4.59
11. Walk On Hot Coals (Gallagher) 5.26
12. Messin’ With The Kid (London/Wells) 5.23
13. Bullfrog Blues (Traditional)) 2.51
14. Sea Cruise (Gallagher) 2.59

*
**

RoryGallagher3

Fresh Evidence – Volume No. 1/Issue No 1 (Rory Gallagher Fanzine) (1991)

FrontCoverI have a lot of fanzines in my archive … and here´s a very rare one … The first issue of the Rory Gallagher fanzine “Fresh Evidence”.

It was the “only official Rory Gallagher fanzine in the world”, as the publisher Noel Lackey wrote.

A fanzine (blend of fan and magazine or -zine) is a non-professional and non-official publication produced by enthusiasts of a particular cultural phenomenon (such as a literary or musical genre) for the pleasure of others who share their interest. (by wikipedia)

And this is the very first issue of “Fresh Evidence” (the titel comes from a Rory Gallagher album from 1990 (his  eleventh and last studio album).

As many fanzines, the print quality of this fanzine is more or less not so good … but that was not important in these days.

Much more important was, that Noel Lackey had contact with Rory Gallagher and his brother Donal and so he was able to present his “Question And Answers” column.

A real nice addition for every serious Rory Gallagher collection … a fanzine from a fan for the fans …

Example01

Example02

Example03

Example04

Example05

Example06

Example07

*
**

Rory Gallagher – Live In Europe (1972)

frontcover1Live in Europe is the third album by Irish blues guitarist Rory Gallagher, released in 1972. It is a series of live recordings made by Gallagher during his European tour. Unusual for a live album it contains only two previously released songs (“Laundromat” and “In Your Town”). All the other songs are either new Gallagher songs or Gallagher’s interpretation of traditional blues songs.

Live in Europe was released at the end of the British “blues boom” that began in the 1960s. Sparked by bands such as the Rolling Stones, Yardbirds, and Cream fans and musicians were fascinated by authentic Chicago blues artists such as Muddy Waters. Gallagher had an extensive knowledge of this kind of music. Although he tended to play down arguments about what was “pure” blues. In an interview at the time he said:

“If there was one fault with the boom in the 1960s, it was that it was very straight-faced and very pontificatory, or whatever the word is. It used to annoy me that there was an attitude of ‘Thou shalt not play the blues unless you know who played second acoustic guitar behind Sonny Boy Williamson the first on the B-side of whatever.’ That kind of thing gets music nowhere, it’s like collecting stamps. I mean, I buy books on the blues and I check out the B-sides and I know who plays on what records and that’s fine. But then you’ve got to open that up to the rest of the people. Because that kind of snobbery defeats the purpose; it kills the music.”

Rather than live versions of his most popular songs there are only two songs on the album that were previously recorded by Gallagher in the studio, “Laundromat” from his first album and “In Your Town” from his Deuce album. All the other songs are Gallagher’s versions of classic blues songs. The album starts with what was to become a signature song for Gallagher, Junior Wells’ “Messin’ With the Kid”. The song “I Could’ve Had Religion” was Gallagher’s salute to what he called the “redemption style blues” of the Robert Wilkins and Gary Davis. After hearing the song on this album Bob Dylan expressed interest in recording it and assumed it was a traditional blues number rather than an original song by Gallagher.

inlet01

Blind Boy Fuller’s “Pistol Slapper Blues” is next. Gallagher then shows his versatility, swapping his Stratocaster for a mandolin and performing the song “Going to My Home Town” with the audience stomping their feet and cheering in response as Gallagher sings “do you want to go?”. The finale is the straight ahead hard rocking “Bullfrog Blues” written by William Harris. Gallagher switches back to the electric guitar and the full band and gives bassist Gerry McAvoy and drummer Wilgar Campbell, a chance to solo. With the CD release two additional blues songs were added: “What in the World” and “Hoodoo Man”.

Most critics agree that Live in Europe is one of Gallagher’s finest albums. It was his highest charting album to date reaching 101 in the Billboard 200 for 1972. The album was his first major commercial success and provided his first solo top ten album. It won him his first Gold Disc. In the same year of 1972 he was Melody Maker’s Guitarist/Musician of the Year, winning out over Eric Clapton.

inlet02a

The live album Live in Europe/Stage Struck captures Rory Gallagher at his finest, as he tears his way through many of his very best songs. Though the performance quality is a little uneven, there are gems scattered throughout the record, including smoking versions of “Messin’ with the Kid” and “Laundromat.” (by Thom Owens)

gallagherlive1972

Personnel:
Wilgar Campbell (drums)
Rory Gallagher (guitar, harmonica, mandolin, vocals)
Gerry McAvoy (bass)

originalbackcover
Tracklist:
01. Messin’ With The Kid (Wells) 6.25
02. Laundromat (Gallagher) 5.12
03. I Could’ve Had Religion (Traditional) 8.35
04. Pistol Slapper Blues (Fuller) 2.54
05. Going To My Hometown (Traditional) 5.46
06. In Your Town (Gallagher) 10.03
07. Bullfrog Blues (Traditional) 6.47
+
08. What In The World (Traditional) 7.40
09. Hoodoo Man (Traditional) 6.02

labela1

*
**