David Gilmour – About Face (1984)

LPFrontCover1About Face is the second solo studio album by the English musician David Gilmour. It was released in March 1984 by Harvest in the UK and Columbia in the United States. Co-produced by Bob Ezrin and Gilmour, the album was recorded in 1983 at Pathé Marconi Studio, in Boulogne-Billancourt, France. The lyrics of two tracks, “All Lovers Are Deranged” and “Love on the Air,” were written by Pete Townshend of the Who.

The album received positive reviews and peaked at #21 on UK Albums Chart and #32 on the US Billboard 200. Two singles were released: “Blue Light” peaked at #62 in the United States, while “Love on the Air” failed to chart. The album was certified gold by the RIAA. A remastered reissue was released in 2006 on EMI.

The album was recorded with engineer Andy Jackson at a time when Pink Floyd’s future was uncertain. It was mixed by James Guthrie at Mayfair Studios in London, England.

Gilmour said he wanted to take his time and make “a really good album” and “get the best musicians in the world that I could get hold of to play with me.”[8] Musicians on the album include drummer Jeff Porcaro, bass guitarist Pino Palladino, Deep Purple keyboardist Jon Lord, backing vocalists Roy Harper, and Sam Brown, orchestral arranger Michael Kamen (who had also worked on The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking and The Wall), and keyboardist Steve Winwood.

Gilmour01I think Pete feels some restrictions on what he would like to do with the Who, as I guess we all feel restrictions within everything we attempt [to do], just because of the types of personalities and role you’ve created for yourself. I know he’s felt uncomfortable about certain things— things he could express in solo stuff. For me, the restriction was the scale of what Pink Floyd had become more than anything. It’s nice to get out and do something on a slightly different scale; go out and do theatres, which is not really a possibility with Pink Floyd until we get a lot less popular. (David Gilmour)

When Roger Waters began production of the Pink Floyd album, The Final Cut, Gilmour claims, he requested Waters wait another month for Gilmour to develop some musical ideas himself, but Waters felt he was “on a roll” and already had plenty of material to complete the album, a very personal project about his father’s death in World War II, and the further victimization of those who survived it. Waters, seeing Gilmour and Mason’s lack of interest in the concept, offered to make The Final Cut as a solo album, but Gilmour and Mason still wanted a Pink Floyd album, of any kind, to sell. “[T]hey know [that] songs don’t grow on trees,” Waters told David Fricke of Rolling Stone magazine. “They wanted it to be a Floyd record.”

Gilmour was later interviewed by Texas-based DJ Redbeard, on the radio program, In the Studio during which the focus was his 2006 third album On an Island. He commented on About Face saying that, “looking back on it, it has some great moments on there but the whole flavor of it is too ’80s for my current tastes.”

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“Murder” was an outcry by Gilmour about the senseless killing of John Lennon, a longtime musical peer and inspiration to him. Gilmour embellished the song with a solo fretless bassline (played by Pino Palladino), adding an edgy funk groove to the acoustic beginning of the song, leading to an instrumental bridge, where the song picks up in the speed of the beat with more electric instruments. Gilmour collaborated with Townshend on the songs “Love on the Air” and “All Lovers Are Deranged,” as Gilmour recalled: “I sent him three songs and he sent back three sets of lyrics. Two of them suited me well. One didn’t. He did the two on About Face and he did the other one [‘White City Fighting’] on his White City album.” The lyrics for “Love on the Air” were written in a day, after Gilmour had asked for Townshend’s help. “You Know I’m Right” was written in a similar vein to Lennon’s “How Do You Sleep?” and was a dig towards to Waters.”Cruise” was about Ronald Reagan having cruise missiles stationed in Britain at the time.

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The cover of the LP is a little wider than usual, approaching 12 1/2 inches. The inner sleeve bears lyrics and photographs of Gilmour, and exists in at least two variations. A sleeve for the UK Harvest edition has rounded corners and opens to the side; one for the USA Columbia edition has square corners and opens to the top, relative to the lyric text. Like the cover, the latter sleeve is wider than it is tall, and may not fit into the outer sleeve if turned 90 degrees. In one corner of both versions are printed the words “Fleudian slip,” a play on the words “Freudian slip” and “Pink Floyd.” (by wikipedia)

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David Gilmour released his second solo venture in 1984, following the apparent dissolution of Pink Floyd. He had released a record on his own in 1978, but About Face is much more accessible. Gilmour has a stellar band backing him, including Jeff Porcaro (drums), Pino Palladino (bass), and Anne Dudley (synthesizer). The songs on About Face show a pop sensibility that Pink Floyd rarely was concerned with achieving. Although the album didn’t attract the attention of a Floyd release, several cuts did manage to get airplay. “Until We Sleep” is rife with shimmering synthesizers and cavernous drums, and “Blue Light” was a minor pop hit, with Gilmour’s trademark delay-drenched guitar giving way to a driving, horn-laced rocker. Pete Townshend wrote two of the tracks: “Love on the Air” and the propulsive “All Lovers Are Deranged.” Of course, there’s more than enough of Gilmour’s fluid guitar playing to satisfy, including the gorgeous “Murder,” a gentle acoustic track that explodes with some fiery organ by Steve Winwood and concludes with a fierce coda. About Face is well-honed rock album that is riveting from beginning to end. (by Tom Demalon)

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Personnel:
David Gilmour (vocals, guitar, bass)
Ian Kewley (keyboards)
Pino Palladino (bass)
Jeff Porcaro (drums, percussion)
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Ray Cooper (percussion)
Anne Dudley (synthesiser)
Bob Ezrin (keyboards)
Luís Jardim (percussion)
Jon Lord (synthesiser)
Steve Rance (Fairlight CMI programming)
Steve Winwood (organ on 04., piano on 03.)
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The Kick Horns (brass)
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background vocals
Roy Harper – Sam Brown – Vicki Brown – Mickey Feat
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The National Philharmonic Orchestra conducted Michael Kamen

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01. Until We Sleep (Gilmour) 5.18
02. Murder (Gilmour) 5.01
03. Love On The Air (Gilmour/Townshend) 4.21
04. Blue Light (Gilmour) 4.38
05. Out Of The Blue (Gilmour) 3.38
06. All Lovers Are Deranged (Gilmour/Townshend) 3.17
07. You Know I’m Right (Gilmour) 5.08
08. Cruise (Gilmour) 4.42
09. Let’s Get Metaphysical (Gilmour) 4.12
10. Near The End (Gilmour) 5.36

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Jools Holland & His Rhythm & Blues Orchestra – Jools Holland & Friends (2011)

FrontCover1.jpgJulian Miles “Jools” Holland, OBE, DL (born 24 January 1958) is an English pianist, bandleader, singer, composer and television presenter. He was an original member of the band Squeeze and his work has involved him with many artists including Sting, Eric Clapton, Mark Knopfler, George Harrison, David Gilmour, Magazine, The The and Bono.

Since 1992, he has hosted Later… with Jools Holland, a music-based show aired on BBC2, on which his annual show Hootenanny is based.[1] Holland is a published author and appears on television shows besides his own and contributes to radio shows. In 2004, he collaborated with Tom Jones on an album of traditional R&B music.

Holland also regularly hosts the weekly programme Jools Holland on BBC Radio 2, which is a mix of live and recorded music and general chat and features studio guests, along with members of his orchestra.

Holland was educated at Shooters Hill Grammar School, a former state grammar school on Red Lion Lane in Shooter’s Hill (near Woolwich), in the Royal Borough of Greenwich in southeast London, from which he was expelled for damaging a teacher’s Triumph Herald.

Holland began his career as a session musician; his first studio session was with Wayne County & the Electric Chairs in 1976 on their track “Fuck Off”.

Holland was a founding member of the British pop band Squeeze, formed in March 1974, in which he played keyboards until 1981 and helped the band to achieve millions of record sales, before pursuing his solo career.

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Holland began issuing solo records in 1978, his first EP being Boogie Woogie ’78. He continued his solo career through the early 1980s, releasing an album and several singles between 1981 and 1984. He branched out into TV, co-presenting the Newcastle-based TV music show The Tube with Paula Yates. Holland used the phrase, “be there, or be an ungroovey fucker” in one early evening TV trailer for the show, live across two channels, causing him to be suspended from the show for six weeks. He referred to this in his sitcom The Groovy Fellers with Rowland Rivron.[citation needed] Holland also appeared as a guest host on MTV.

In 1983 Holland played an extended piano solo on The The’s re-recording of “Uncertain Smile” for the album Soul Mining. In 1985, Squeeze (which had continued in Holland’s absence through to 1982) unexpectedly regrouped including Holland as their keyboard player. Holland remained in the band until 1990, at which point he again departed to resume his solo career as a musician and a TV host.

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In 1987, Holland formed the Jools Holland Big Band, which consisted of himself and for the show Gilson Lavis from Squeeze. This gradually became the 18-piece Jools Holland’s Rhythm and Blues Orchestra. The Orchestra includes singers Louise Marshall and Ruby Turner and his younger brother, singer-songwriter and keyboard player, Christopher Holland.

Between 1988 and 1990 he performed and co-hosted along with David Sanborn during the two seasons of the music performance programme Sunday Night on NBC late-night television.[5] Since 1992 he has presented the music programme Later… with Jools Holland, plus an annual New Year’s Eve Hootenanny.

In 1996, Holland signed a recording contract with Warner Bros. Records,[3] and his records are now marketed through Rhino Records.

On 29 November 2002, Holland was in the ensemble of musicians who performed at the Concert for George, which celebrated the music of George Harrison. In January 2005 Holland and his band performed with Eric Clapton as the headline act of the Tsunami Relief Cardiff.

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On 29 August 2005, Holland married Christabel McEwen, his girlfriend of 15 years and daughter of artist Rory McEwen. Holland lives in the Westcombe Park area of Blackheath in southeast London, where he had his studio, Helicon Mountain, built to his design and inspired by Portmeirion, the setting for the 1960s TV series The Prisoner.[6] He also owns a manor house near medieval Cooling Castle in Kent.[7][8]

He appeared on the cover of Railway Modeller magazine in January 2019. In the attic of his house, Holland has spent ten years building a 100-foot (30 m) model railway. It is full of miniature buildings and landscapes that stretch from Berlin to London. He started with photographs and paintings from early 1960s London. “In the evenings, he builds some trains and buildings before switching on some music, pouring a glass of wine and switching on the trains to watch them move around the room.”

He received an OBE in 2003 in the Queen’s Birthday Honours list, for services to the British music industry as a television presenter and musician. In September 2006, Holland was appointed a Deputy Lieutenant for Kent. Holland was appointed an honorary fellow of Canterbury Christ Church University at a ceremony held at Canterbury Cathedral on 30 January 2009. On 1 February 2011 he was appointed honorary colonel of 101 (City of London) Engineer Regiment.

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In June 2006 Holland performed in Southend for HIV/AIDS charity Mildmay, and in early 2007 he performed at Wells and Rochester Cathedrals to raise money for maintaining cathedral buildings. He is also patron of Drake Music.

A fan of the 1960s TV series The Prisoner, in 1987 Holland demonstrated his love of the series and starred in a spoof documentary, The Laughing Prisoner, with Stephen Fry, Terence Alexander and Hugh Laurie. Much of it was shot on location in Portmeirion, with archive footage of Patrick McGoohan, and featuring musical numbers from Siouxsie and the Banshees, Magnum and XTC. Holland performed a number towards the end of the programme.

Holland was an interviewer for The Beatles Anthology TV project, and appeared in the 1997 film Spiceworld as a musical director.

In 2008, Holland commissioned TV series Bangla Bangers (Chop Shop) to create a replica of the Rover JET1 for personal use. Holland is a greyhound racing supporter and has previously owned dogs. (by wikipedia)

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And here´his first “Friends” album including a lot of great artists (see tracklist) … and you will her this great mixture between Big Bnd Jazz and Rhythm & Blues…

It´s hot, baby !!!

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Personnel:
Mark Flanagan (guitar)
Roger Goslyn (trombone, accordion)
Lisa Graham (saxophone)
Christopher Holland (organ)
Jools Holland (piano)
Gilson Lavis (drums, percussion)
Nick Lunt (saxophone)
Jason McDermid (trumpet)
Derek Nash (saxophone)
Rico Rodriguez (trombone)
Winston Rollins (trombone)
Michael Bammi Rose (saxophone)
Jon Scott (trumpet)
Chris Storr (trumpet)
Dave Swift (bass)
Phil Veacock (saxophone)
Fayyaz Virji (trombone)
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background vocals:
Sam Brown – Ruby Turner
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a lot of guests (see tracklist)

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Tracklist:
01. Horse To The Water (feat. George Harrison) (G.Harrison/D.Harrison) 4.57
02. Marie (feat. Herbert Grönemeyer) (Newman) 3.14
03. The Informer (feat. Ruby Turner) (Holland) 3.33
04. Wohin die Liebe fällt (Wheel Of Fortune) (feat. Valerie) (Holland/Bronner) 4.01
05. Seventh Son (feat. Sting) (Dixon) 3.04
06. Out Of This World (feat. Melanie C) (Holland/Brown/Hynde) 3.38
07. I Love Every Little Thing About You (feat. Roger Cicero) (Wonder) 5.17
08. Übers Meer (feat. Ina Müller) (Reiser) 4.17
09. Mabel (feat. Eric Clapton & Solomon Burke) (Burke/Clapton/Holland) 4.52
10. I Put A Spell On You (feat. David Gilmour & Mica Paris) (Hawkins) 4.08
11. Think (feat. Tom Jones) (Malone/Cracklin) 4.00
12. I Went By (feat. Louise Marshall) (Ash Howes Radio Mix) (Holland) 2.59
13. Ba-Ba Boo-Boo (Into Your Heart) (feat. The Baseballs) (Brans) 4.14
14. The Kiss Of Love (feat. Nick Cave & Sam Brown) (Holland/Brown) 4.23
15. Let The Boogie Woogie Roll (feat. Robert Plant) (Ertegun/Wexler) 2.37
16. Just To Be Home With You (feat. Herbert Grönemeyer) 2.29
17. Tuxedo Junction (Dash/Feyne/Hawkins/Johnson) 3.35
18. Miniatur Wunderland (feat. Axel & Torsten Zwingenberger) (Holland/ A.Zwingenberger)) 2.40
19. Say Hello, Wave Goodbye (feat. Marc Almond) (Almond/Ball) 4.33
20. If You Wear That Velvet Dress (feat. Bono) (Clayton/Evans/Mullen/Hewson) 6.15

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Jokers Wild (feat. Dave Gilmour) – Same (1964)

FrontCover1.jpgJokers Wild were an English Rock band formed in Cambridge in 1964. The line-up included guitarist David Gilmour and saxophonist Dick Parry. Gilmour went on to join the band Pink Floyd and Parry went on to become a session musician, playing on three Pink Floyd studio albums and one live album. Parry also went on to join Gilmour’s 2006 solo tour.

Their only releases were a privately pressed, single-sided studio album (carrying catalogue number RSLP 007) and single (RSR 0031), of which only forty or fifty copies each were made. These were recorded at Regent Sound studio in Denmark Street, London. A tape recording of the LP is held by the British Library’s British Library Sound Archive.

Together with record producer Jonathan King, they recorded what was to have been a UK cover version of Sam & Dave’s “Hold On, I’m Comin'”, but the original was released in the UK, so Jokers Wild’s version was not released.

Wills later played with, Peter Frampton, Foreigner and Bad Company. Both he and Wilson played on David Gilmour’s eponymous first solo album; Parry played on four Pink Floyd records, Dark Side of the Moon, Wish You Were Here, Division Bell and the live double album Pulse and had a career as a session musician.

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Wilson later played drums and bass on Syd Barrett’s solo albums, The Madcap Laughs and Barrett, the later sessions of which were produced by Gilmour. He also was a surrogate drummer on the live shows and soundtrack for Is There Anybody Out There? The Wall Live 1980–81 which came out in 2000. Between 1973 and 1978 he was a member of Quiver. (by wikipedia)

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David Gilmore, before getting into Pink Floyd in 1968, began to play in the Cambridge group of Jokers Wild. The group existed from 1964 to 1966., Managed to produce only a single disc in 1965 This is 11 minutes released in the form of one-sided LP.

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“…Jokers Wild never made an official record, but are remembered as a band that included David Gilmour before the guitarist joined Pink Floyd. From the scant evidence that does survive, it seems rather incredible that Gilmour could have made the transition. Jokers Wild did not entertain lofty artistic ambitions, but played covers of pop-rock material, often emphasizing harmonies in the style of the Four Seasons and the Beach Boys…” (by musicofsixties.blogspot)

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Single 1964 (private edition)

Personnel:
David Altham (vocals)
Dave Gilmour (guitar)
John Gordon (guitar)
Tony Sainty (bass)
Clive Welham (drums)

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Tracklist:
01. Why Do Fools Fall In Love (Lymon/Santiago/Merchant) 1.51
02. Walk Like A Man (Crewe/Gaudio) 2.12
03. Don’t Ask Me (What I Say) (Jones) 2.58
04. Big Girls Don’t Cry (Crewe/Gaudio) 2.15
05. Beautiful Delilah (Berry) 2.01

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50 copies were pressed of this 5-track, 1-sided LP featuring David Gilmour of Pink Floyd.
Did not come with a sleeve. B-side features silent groove and a plain label.

David Gilmour – On An Island (2006)

FrontCover1On An Island is the third solo album by Pink Floyd member David Gilmour. It was released in the UK on 6 March 2006, Gilmour’s 60th birthday, and in the US the following day. It was his first solo album in twenty two years since 1984’s About Face and twelve years since 1994’s Pink Floyd album The Division Bell.On an Island is the third solo album by Pink Floyd member David Gilmour. It was released in the UK on 6 March 2006, Gilmour’s 60th birthday, and in the US the following day. It was his first solo album in twenty two years since 1984’s About Face and twelve years since 1994’s Pink Floyd album The Division Bell.

The album features Robert Wyatt, Jools Holland, Georgie Fame, David Crosby, Graham Nash, late Pink Floyd keyboardist Richard Wright, early Pink Floyd member Bob Klose and Pink Floyd session and touring musician Guy Pratt. Chris Thomas and Roxy Music’s Phil Manzanera assisted with production. The lyrics were principally written by Gilmour’s wife, Polly Samson.

Much of the album was recorded in Gilmour’s private studio aboard his houseboat Astoria. The track “Smile” was heard briefly in an unmastered form on the BBC2 show Three Men in a Boat which retraced a trip on the River Thames that passed the houseboat. Other sections were recorded at David’s farm in Sussex and Mark Knopfler’s British Grove Studios
Orchestrations on the album were arranged by noted Polish film composer Zbigniew Preisner and conducted by Robert Ziegler. The orchestra was recorded at Abbey Road Studios by Simon Rhodes.

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The album also produced two singles; the title track “On an Island” and “Smile”, the latter peaking at #72 on the UK Singles Chart. “On an Island” also peaked at #27 on the Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks chart.
Promo Single edits of “Take a Breath” and “This Heaven” were issued to coincide with the US leg of the tour, while “Smile” was the second single in the UK.

On an Island entered the UK charts at #1, giving Gilmour his first ever chart-topping album outside of Pink Floyd. It reached #1 on the European Chart, and #2 in Canada, Portugal and Iceland. It has also provided Gilmour with his first US Top 10 album, reaching #6. The album has achieved platinum status in Canada and has sold over 1,000,000 copies worldwide.

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Gilmour toured the album with Richard Wright, Phil Manzanera and long-time members of the live Pink Floyd band, Guy Pratt and Jon Carin. Steve DiStanislao was brought in as drummer. The shows included the entire On an Island album plus Pink Floyd songs such as “Shine On You Crazy Diamond”, “Echoes”, “Arnold Layne”, “High Hopes”, “Wish You Were Here” and “Comfortably Numb” among others. No songs from Gilmour’s two previous solo albums were played. The tour is documented on the DVD/Blu-ray Remember That Night and the live album & DVD Live in Gdansk. (by wikipedia)

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To think that David Gilmour waited 22 years to record his third solo album is a pretty solid indicator that he’s not the kind of bloke to merely cash in on his name. After all, he’s the guy who sold his house for four million English pounds and gave the money to charity. Perhaps now that the Pink Floyd reunion happened and he and Roger Waters are at least civil to one another, the Floyd enigma can finally find its way into the annals of history and rock legend. This catches listeners up to On an Island. Those desiring something edgy and dramatic will have to wait. Gilmour wrote six of these ten tunes with his wife, Polly Samson, who also plays a bit of piano and sings. Musically, On An Island is mostly a laid-back, utterly elegant English record. It has the feel of taking place between twilight and dawn. There are a few rumblers to upset the overall balance of tranquility and stillness, like flashes of heat lightning across the dark skies; they add dimension and a quiet power to these proceedings. Produced by Gilmour, Phil Manzanera (who appears on keyboards), and Chris Thomas, the album features guest spots from the likes of Richard Wright, Robert Wyatt, B.J. Cole, Floyd/Sly Stone drummer Andy Newmark, Georgie Fame, David Crosby and Graham Nash, Jools Holland, Willie Wilson, and many others.

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The set opens with “Castellorizon,” a moody showcase with Gilmour’s guitars backed by the orchestral arrangements of Zbigniew Preisner as conducted by Robert Zeigler. Preisner’s arrangements throughout are wonderful and not quite as dark as one might expect, given his track record. Atmospheric and dramatic, it offers a lovely if off impression of the album. The title track, which follows, is all breezy strummed chords, keyboards by Wright, and dreamy vocals with Gilmour backed by Crosby and Nash. It’s a slow, textured, and spacy love song. “The Blue” follows suit; it too is so utterly full of air that one can hear the wind rustling through the palms. Wright’s backing vocals lend a slight PF “Echoes” slant (as does the Hammond organ); the instrumentation just shimmers, hovers, and floats the track along. There are rockers here, though — “Take a Breath” features chunky razor-wire chords, Leszek Mozdzer’s piano, and Manzanera’s synth work winding around one another, and the mood is wonderfully plodding, dramatic, and futuristically “heavy.” On the gauzy wee-hours instrumental “Red Sky at Night,” Gilmour plays sax as well as guitars, and it gives way to “This Heaven,” a bluesy stroller that’s given deluxe organ treatment by Fame.

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There’s a delightfully nocturnal feel that makes the track feel a bit sinister, but really it’s the sound of eros making itself heard, and Gilmour contributes a biting solo and fills amid the drum samples and strings. Wyatt appears on the back-porch spacehead soundtrack-like tripnotica of “Then I Close My Eyes.” His and Gilmour’s wordless voices slip under and around the considerable space between instruments — which include Wyatt on cornet and percussion as well as Cole playing a Weissenborn guitar, Caroline Dale’s cello, a pair of harmonicas, and of course Gilmour’s high-register blues twang. The set ends on a gentle note in “Where We Start” — so much so that it may make some scratch their heads and wonder where the cranky, diffident Gilmour has wandered off to, but others will be drawn into this seductive, romantic new place where musical subtlety, spacious textures, and quietly lyrical optimism hold sway. (by Thom Jurek)

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Personnel:
BJ Cole (guitar on 07.)
David Crosby (vocals on 02.)
Caroline Dale (cello on 04., 05. + 07.)
Ilan Eshkeri (programming on 05. + 09.)
Georgie Fame (organ on 06.)
David Gilmour (guitar, vocals, lap steel guitar, keyboards, percussion, bass, saxophone, cümbüş, harmonica)
Jooly Holland (piano on 03.)
Rado Klose (guitar on 02, +  03.)
Chris Laurence (bass on 05. + 09.)
Alasdair Malloy (glass harmonica on 07. + 09.)
Phil Manzanera (guitar on 04., 06. + 07.)
Leszek Możdżer (piano on 04. + 09.)
Graham Nash (vocals on 02.)
Andy Newmark (drums on 02.,03., 96. + 10., percussion on 07.)
Guy Pratt (bass on 02. + 04.)
Polly Samson (piano on 03., background vocals on 08.)
Chris Stainton (organ on 03.)
Chris Thomas (keyboards on 09.)
Lucy Wakeford (harp on 09.)
Willie Wilson (drums on 08.)
Richard Wright (organ on 02., vocals on 03.)
Robert Wyatt (cornet, percussion, vocals on 07.)
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Zbigniew Preisner (orchestration)

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Tracklist:
01. Castellorizon (Gilmour) 3.54
02. On An Island (Gilmour/Samson) 6.47
03. The Blue (Gilmour/Samson) 5.26
04. Take A Breath (Gilmour/Samson) 5.46
05. Red Sky At Night (Gilmour) 2.51
06. This Heaven (Gilmour/Samson) 4.24
07. Then I Close My Eyes (Gilmour/Samson) 5.26
08. Smile (Gilmour/Samson) 4.03
09. A Pocketful Of Stones (Gilmour/Samson) 6.17
10. Where We Start (Gilmour) 6.45

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David Gilmour – Same (1978)

FrontCover1David Gilmour is the debut solo studio album by Pink Floyd guitarist and co-lead vocalist David Gilmour. The album was released in May and June 1978 in the United Kingdom and the United States, respectively. The album reached number 17 in the UK and number 29 on the Billboard US album charts; it was certified Gold in the US by the RIAA. The album was produced by Gilmour, and consists mostly of blues, guitar oriented rock songs except for the piano-dominated ballad “So Far Away”.

The tracks used for the album were recorded between February and March 1978 with engineer John Etchells at Super Bear Studios in France. They were then mixed at the same studio by Nick Griffiths. Session musicians included bass guitarist Rick Wills and drummer Willie Wilson, both of whom (with Gilmour) used to be part of Jokers Wild.Album’s cover artwork.

The album cover used for the first EMI pressings of the album LP was done by Hipgnosis and Gilmour; Gilmour was credited on the cover for contributing “Keyboards, Vocals” although he played guitar. The CBS/Columbia pressings (outside Europe) listed Gilmour as contributing “Guitars, Keyboards, Vocals”. Among those depicted on the sleeve was Gilmour’s then-wife, Ginger.

The album’s only single was “There’s No Way Out of Here.” The single flopped in Europe, but became popular on Album-oriented rock radio stations in the US. The song was originally recorded by the band Unicorn (as “No Way Out of Here”) for their 1976 album Too Many Crooks (Harvest Records, US title Unicorn 2), which Gilmour produced. It was also recorded later by New Jersey stoner rock band Monster Magnet on their Monolithic Baby! album.

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One unused tune he wrote and demoed at the time would evolve, via collaboration with Roger Waters, into Pink Floyd’s “Comfortably Numb” from The Wall. However, a song included on this album, the piano ballad “So Far Away”, uses a chorus progression not unlike the chorus to “Comfortably Numb”, albeit in a different key.
Likewise, the song “Short and Sweet” can be seen as a musical precursor to “Run Like Hell” (also from The Wall), with its shifting chords over a D pedal point, using a flanged guitar in Drop D tuning.[6] “Short and Sweet” was written in collaboration with Roy Harper, who recorded his own version for his 1980 album The Unknown Soldier.

A five-song promotional film was made to promote the album. The band comprised Gilmour himself on guitars and vocals plus the two musicians on the album (bass player Rick Wills and drummer Willie Wilson) plus David Gilmour’s brother Mark on rhythm guitar and Ian McLagan on keyboards and performed “Mihalis”, “There’s No Way Out of Here”, “So Far Away”, “No Way”, and “I Can’t Breathe Anymore”. There were two female backing singers on “There’s No Way Out of Here” and “So Far Away”. It was recorded live at the The Roxy, London.
Also, Gilmour promoted the album with his first ever interviews with North American media and FM rock radio stations. The promotion paid off as the album made a respectable showing on the Billboard album charts peaking at number 29, which – until 2006’s On an Island – was Gilmour’s highest charting solo album in the US, eventually going Gold.Song variations.

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The performances of the tracks in the promotional film differed to the album versions. “Mihalis” had an extended ending guitar solo. “There’s No Way Out of Here” was slightly shorter as one of the verses was deleted but the ending guitar solo was different from that on the album and had a clean ending instead of fading out like on album version. “So Far Away” had an extended ending guitar solo on this performance and ended in a faster tempo than the album version.
The performance of “No Way” had Gilmour playing regular lead guitar solos at the end of the track on his Fender Esquire (with distortion) instead of the lap steel guitar solos (with distortion) that had appeared on the album version and had a clean ending instead of fading out like on the album (the remastered CD version of the album had Gilmour’s lap steel solo extended this time to feature a duel between himself playing high notes on his lap steel and lower notes on his trademark Stratocaster during the fadeout on the remaster). The middle part of the album version, for where the first of two lap steel guitar solos were on the album version, was deleted.

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“I Can’t Breathe Anymore” had Gilmour playing a regular guitar solo at the end of this song’s performance while on the album version (and on the remastered CD in an extended coda), a distorted lap steel guitar countered the ending guitar solo. The ending of the promo performance of “I Can’t Breathe Anymore” was longer than on the album.

In an interview with Circus in 1978, Gilmour said: “This album was important to me in terms of self-respect. At first I didn’t think my name was big enough to carry it. Being in a group for so long can be a bit claustrophobic, and I needed to step out from behind Pink Floyd’s shadow.” (by wikipedia)

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Personnel:
David Gilmour (vocals, guitar; keyboards,  lap steel guitar on 07. + 09., piano on 04. harmonica on 02.)
Willie Wilson (drums, percussion)
Rick Wills (bass, background vocals)
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Mick Weaver (piano on 04.)
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background vocals on 02. + 04.:
Carlena Williams – Debbie Doss – Shirley Roden

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Tracklist:
01. Mihalis (Gilmour) 5.47
02. There’s No Way Out Of Here (Gilmour/Baker) 5.23
03. Cry From The Street (Gilmour/Stuart) 5.14
04. So Far Away (Gilmour) 6.05
05. Short And Sweet (Gilmour/Harper) 5.31
06. Raise My Rent (Gilmour) 5.52
07. No Way (Gilmour) 5.32
08. It’s Deafinitely (Gilmout) 4.28
09. I Can’t Breathe Anymore (Gilmour) 3.41

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