Graham Bond Organisation – There´s A Bond Between Us (1965)

FrontCover1The Graham Bond Organisation were a British jazz/rhythm and blues group of the early 1960s consisting of Graham Bond (vocals, keyboards, alto-saxophone), Jack Bruce (bass), Ginger Baker (drums), Dick Heckstall-Smith (tenor/soprano saxophone) and John McLaughlin (guitar). They recorded several albums and further recordings were issued when the group’s members achieved fame in progressive rock and jazz fusion. The spelling of the band’s original name varied between releases, often depending on the intended audience. The British English spelled as “Organisation” or “ORGANisation” (Bond’s original plan), while in some other countries outside the UK spelled “Organization”.

At the start of the British rhythm and blues boom the Graham Bond Organisation earned a reputation for playing aggressive R & B with prominent jazz and blues. Bond was the primary songwriter but encouraged the other musicians to contribute material, including Dick Heckstall-Smith’s “Dick’s Instrumental” and Ginger Baker’s “Camels and Elephants”, in which the drummer explored ideas he eventually developed into his signature piece “Toad”. Jack Bruce’s harmonica-driven version of Peter Chatman’s “Train Time” would become a staple in Cream’s live performances.

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The first commercial recording by the original lineup of the Graham Bond Organisation was released under the name of singer Winston G. (real name Winston Gork). A protégé of expatriate Australian impresario Robert Stigwood, Winston had launched his career under the pseudonym “Johnny Apollo”. In early 1965 both Winston and the Graham Bond Organisation were part of Stigwood-promoted UK package tour headlined by Chuck Berry (on which Stigwood incurred heavy losses). Since they shared management, the Graham Bond Organisation backed Winston on the Parlophone single “Please Don’t Say” / “Like A Baby”; the A-side was credited “Arrangement directed by Graham Bond” and the B-side “Arrangement directed by Ginger Baker”. The band signed for Decca Records who released their dynamic version of the Don Covay composition “Long Tall Shorty” in 1964, backed with “Long Legged Girl” (“Long Tall Shorty” had been popularised by US singer/organist Tommy Tucker). Their best-known single, and the second released under their own name, was “Tammy” (Jay Livingston/Ray Evans) / “Wade in the Water” (trad. arr. group), recorded on 4 January 1965 at Olympic Sound Studios, London (EMI Columbia DB 7471, 29 January 1965). The track also appeared on their debut album The Sound of 65 (EMI Columbia, March 1965).

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In 1965 the band appeared as themselves in the film Gonks Go Beat, where they played two songs including “Harmonica”.

The band’s fourth 45 featured the single-only tracks “Lease on Love” / “My Heart’s in Little Pieces” (July 1965). The A-side is noteworthy for its pioneering use of the Mellotron, which Bond also played on several tracks on their second LP There’s A Bond Between Us (November 1965); the album also included studio versions of the two aforementioned instrumentals. The single and the album tracks are believed to be the first ‘popular’ recordings to feature the instrument, since “Lease on Love” appeared more than a year before the first UK chart hit to feature a Mellotron—Manfred Mann’s “Semi-Detached Suburban Mr. James” (October 1966)[2]—and at least 18 months before The Beatles made the Mellotron world-famous with “Strawberry Fields Forever” (January 1967).[3] The tracks recorded for the second album were also the last cut by the original Graham Bond Organisation lineup before Jack Bruce was fired in August 1965. On 7 August 1965 they played at the Richmond-on-Thames Jazz and Blues Festival which was televised on the Shindig TV show.

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The band gained minor attention after their ‘Waltz For a Pig’ (originally titled ‘Ode to a Toad’) was issued as the B-side of the Who’s 1966 single ‘Substitute’, which reached number 5 on the UK Singles Chart. The band was billed as ‘the Who Orchestra’ for this release and the track was written by Baker.

The group was plagued with problems because of substance abuse and Baker’s ongoing feud with Bruce. Retrospectives of Cream indicate that Bond deputised Baker to fire Bruce, who joined Manfred Mann for a short time until July 1966 when Baker formed Cream with Bruce and Eric Clapton. The group recorded “St. James’ Infirmary” without Bruce on 10 January 1966, which was released in the United States on the Ascot label and received indifferently. Another sideman was Mike Falana on trumpet.

Bond reformed the Organisation with Jon Hiseman on drums. As a trio, Bond, Heckstall-Smith and Hiseman recorded the single “You’ve Gotta Have Love Babe” / “I Love You” (both by Graham Bond) on 18 January 1967 for Page One records.[5] Bond left for the USA, releasing two albums there in 1969 with well-known session players.[5] Hiseman and Heckstall-Smith would leave to join John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers for Bare Wires (recorded April 1968)[6] before forming Colosseum in the summer of 1968, with Tony Reeves on bass and Dave Greenslade keyboards.

Jon Hiseman, Graham Bond, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Mike Falana:
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The Graham Bond Organisation’s lack of commercial success, internal struggles and drug problems brought the band to an end in 1967, but its importance was soon recognised with the vogue for blues and progressive rock and the increased sales of albums. The double album Solid Bond, released by Warner Bros. Records in 1970, compiled live tracks recorded in 1963 by the Graham Bond Quartet (Bond, McLaughlin, Bruce and Baker) and a studio session from 1966 by the final trio version of the Graham Bond Organisation (Bond, Heckstall-Smith and Hiseman).

Graham Bond reunited with his former bandmates in the early 1970s, playing with Ginger Baker’s Air Force and also spending a short time touring with Jack Bruce’s band. He subsequently signed a contract with Vertigo Records and was reportedly off drugs by this time, although he was becoming increasingly obsessed with black magic. Bond died in May 1974, when he was hit by a train at London’s Finsbury Park underground station. (wikipedia)

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Their second album for Columbia in less than a year features more of the same, but with less impressive material.

Graham and the band returned to the studio quickly to record a second album. Too quickly, apparently, since There’s A Bond Between Us is a pale imitation of the first. Where the The Sound of 65 was downright sinister-sounding in spots, a good half of TABBU is merely competent R&B played with no more and no less passion than Them or any other R-and-wanna-B act at the time.

The record does include two really interesting “pop” songs: Jack Bruce’s “Hear Me Calling Your Name” and Bond’s “Baby Can It Be True?,” a cross between Tom Jones and Dracula that features one of the earliest appearances of the mellotron. An exciting version of Ray Charles’ “What’d I Say?” and Ginger Baker’s exotic-sounding “Camels And Elephants” (which anticipates his Air Force by several years) are also highlights. But there was something about hearing Bond sing “Hoochie Coochie Man” that set your hairs on end, while I’m pretty sure I actually yawned during the opening instrumental, “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?”

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This would be the last official album from The Graham Bond ORGANisation, with a few singles following. (Those singles are appended to the 2009 remaster, and “You’ve Gotta Have Love Baby” from 1967 is an ear-opening experience.) The organization had a world of talent (Dick Heckstall-Smith might have been the best horn player in a rock band at the time), they just didn’t have a clear roadmap. There’s A Bond Between Us will appeal to completists and Cream aficionados I suppose (who share a similar supply chain problem), but I’d definitely start out with their first. (

But … it´s still  a great album !

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Personnel:
Ginger Baker (drums)
Graham Bond (organ, mellotron, saxophone, vocals)
Jack Bruce (bass, harmonica, vocals)
Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone)

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Tracklist:
01. Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (Kirkpatrick/Knox) 2.03
02. Hear Me Calling Your Name (Bruce) 2.35
03. The Night Time Is The Right Time (Herman) 2.59
04. Walkin’ In The Park (Bond) 3.28
05. Last Night (Axton/Smith/Newman/Moman/Caple) 2.58
06. Baby Can It Be True? (Bond) 5.02
07. What’d I Say? (Charles) 4.13
08. Dick’s Instrumental (Heckstall-Smith) 2.31
09. Don’t Let Go (Stone) 2.42
10. Keep A’Drivin’ (Willis) 2.03
11. Have You Ever Loved A Woman? (Bond) 4.51
12. Camels And Elephants (Baker) 3.04

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Graham Bond (28 October 1937 – 8 May 1974)

Dick Heckstall-Smith – You Don’t Know Dick (2004)

DHSFrontCover1This book is a fascinating read and well worth the cover price of £16.95, because it includes a CD of 7 previously unreleased examples of Dick’s playing, with bands that cover a large spectrum of jazz and blues. The book shows Dick to be a well educated and highly intelligent individual, equally at home in Blues, Jazz and Contemporary Music bands.

In the semi-pro world where I played during the same period, it was the guys who could not hack the Jazz or Dance Band scene that formed the blues bands. The London scene must have been very different however, Dick and his contemporaries would have been capable of holding their own in any scene.

The life and times of musicians in any touring band are always interesting and Dick’s tales of his adventures, musical and otherwise, with The Graham Bond Organisation, Alexis Korner’s Blues Incorporated, John Mayall’s Bluesbrakers and Jon Hiseman’s Colosseum make for a most interesting read.

Dick’s commentaries on his life and times are frank and detailed, but interestingly although he opens up to his readers on some matters, there is a reserve that somehow prevents the reader from getting a real measure of Dick until the whole of the book has been read. Whether this is intentional or it just happened that way I don’t know.

I have known other very highly talented musicians who have difficulty in coping with those things that us mere mortals find easy, one who springs directly to mind and may have been known to Dick was Brian Gray Brian was an enormously talented saxophone player but he struggled to make a living and eventually gave the business up. Dick on the other hand has ploughed on but always had to live from hand to mouth.

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Pete Grant’s part of the book attempts to analyse why this should have happened to someone as talented as Dick. His conclusion that the public are never sure whether he is in the blues world or the contemporary music world is probably correct. Before the UK public hand over their money, they want to be more certain of what they are going to get. The fact that a very large sector of the public prefer the Tenor playing of Stan Getz and Zoot Sims to that of John Coltrane, may also be a contributing factor.

The clearest insight into Dick that we get is where he writes about racism and proves quite rightly in my opinion that there can be no alternative but to classify people as those we like and those we don’t, colour race and creed have nothing to do with it. Having said that however people like people like themselves! (by Don Mather) (*)

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And here´s this very rare CD (“not for sale seperately from the book”). Maybe I will scan this book later ..

And this is not onyl a very rare CD, bit a great tribute to one of he finest Bristish Jazz musicians ever: Mister Dick Heckstall-Smith.

Listen and enjoy !

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Tracklist:
01. The Deluxe Blues Band: Heatwave (McGrath/Heckstall-Smith) 4.10
02. Dick Heckstall-Smith: Aquamarine (1) (Heckstall-Smith) 10.46
03. Jon T-Bone Taylor’s Bop Brothers: Try (Green/Plotel) 5.13
04. Dick Heckstall-Smith:  Il Collingdale (1) (Heckstall-Smith) 20.26
05. The Hamburg Blues Band: Woza Nasu (2) (Heckstall-Smith) 16.14
06. The Wentus Blues Band: Looking Back (3) (unknown) 4.38
07. The Graham Bond Organisation: Only Sixteen (4) (Bond) 3.20

(1): previously unreleased live recording, Newcastle, 1991 (Heckstall-Smith)
(2): previously unreleased live recording, Flensburg/Germany, 2002
(3): previously unreleased live recording, Helsinki/Finland, 2002
(4): previously unreleased live recording, Broadcat, 1965

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(*) Don Mather plays Tenor Sax and Clarinet and runs a Big Band and a Quartet and Quintet in Coventry, he was for five years Chairman of the Coventry Jazz Festival Committee, during which time the festival joined the big league. Don is a member of the Musicians Union and a Coventry Branch Committee man. His jazz tastes are catholic, but he confesses to be sometimes bemused by some so called ‘contemporary jazz’.

Various Artists – Rock Invasion (1956 – 1969) (1978)

FrontCover1This is a very rare sampler from 1978 released by London Records (I guess this album should promote their “Collectors Edition; in this edition London Records published many samplers of British acts like “Savoy Brown”, “Ten Years After”, David Bowie, “Them”, John Mayall or “Thin Lizzy” amongst others.

You can hear more or less rare recordings by musicians like Joe Cocker (“I’ll Cry Instead”), Rod Stewart (“Good Morning Little School Girl “), “Unit Four + Two” (“Concrete And Clay”) or “The Graham Bond Organisation” (“Long Tall Shorty”).

Listen and enjoy this music, from the days when we were young … Reflections of my life … And songs like ” Watcha Gonna Do About It”, “Long Tall Shorty” or “Tobacco Road” stands the test of time ! And maybe it´s time, to discover this period of music again … who knows ?

BackCoverTracklist:
01. Rod Stewart: Good Morning Little School Girl (Williamson) (1964) 2.12
02. The Fortunes: You’ve Got Your Troubles (Greenaway/Cook) (1965)  3.28
03. Lonnie Donegan: Rock Island Line (Donnegan) (1956) 2.34
04. Los Bravos: Black Is Black (Hayes/Wadey/Grainger) (1966)
05. Graham Bond Organisation: Long Tall Shorty (Covay/Abramson) (1964) 2.27
06. The Andrew Loog Oldham Orchestra: Da Doo Ron Ron (Spector/Greenwich/Barry) (1964) 2.28
07. The Nashville Teens: Tobacco Road (Loudermilk) (1964) 2.32
08. Joe Cocker: I’ll Cry Instead (Lennon/McCartney) (1964)1.47
09. Small Faces: Watcha Gonna Do About It (Samwell/Porter) (1965) 2.04
10. The Marmalade: Reflections Of My Life (Campbell/McAleese) (1969) 4.21
11. Unit Four + Two: Concrete And Clay (Parker/Moeller) (1965) 2.23
12. The Zombies: Tell Her No (Argent) (1965) 2.11

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