Arlo Guthrie – Running Down The Road (1969)

LPFrontCover1Arlo Davy Guthrie (born July 10, 1947) is an American retired folk singer-songwriter. He is known for singing songs of protest against social injustice, and storytelling while performing songs, following the tradition of his father Woody Guthrie. Guthrie’s best-known work is his debut piece, “Alice’s Restaurant Massacree”, a satirical talking blues song about 18 minutes in length that has since become a Thanksgiving anthem. His only top-40 hit was a cover of Steve Goodman’s “City of New Orleans”. His song “Massachusetts” was named the official folk song of the state, in which he has lived most of his adult life. Guthrie has also made several acting appearances. He is the father of four children, who have also had careers as musicians.

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Running Down the Road is the second studio album by American folk singer Arlo Guthrie. Guthrie’s version of the traditional folk tune “Stealin'” was featured in the film Two-Lane Blacktop. The cover shows the artist upon a Triumph TR6 Trophy motorcycle which is also pictured in the album’s ‘gate’. (wikipedia)

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Although this album’s “Coming in to Los Angeles” crossed Guthrie over and into the rock LPBookletunderground, especially via its performance at Woodstock, most of his third record is actually far more laid-back country-rock. Very much a production of its time, in a slightly negative sense, Running Down the Road features Guthrie employing the cream of L.A.’s top country-rock players as session men: Ry Cooder, James Burton, Clarence White, Jim Gordon, Gene Parsons, Jerry Scheff, and Chris Etheridge. The tone is good-natured and easygoing — too good-natured and easygoing sometimes, in fact, as on the unexciting cover of “Stealin’.” Guthrie acknowledges his folk roots with covers of tunes by his father Woody Guthrie (“Oklahoma Hills”), Pete Seeger (“Living in the Country”), and Mississippi John Hurt. These are surrounded by originals that follow the Dylan “back to basics” mold of the late ’60s, both in musical and lyrical concerns (“My Front Pages” might even be taken as a gentle Dylan satire). As such, much of the record is inoffensive but inconsequential, although the drug smuggling ode “Coming into Los Angeles” adds a touch of much-needed urgency. The title track is entirely uncharacteristic of the album, with its harsh blasts of distorted psychedelic guitar and tough, walking-blues stance — for these reasons, it’s a standout. (by Richie Unterberger)

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Personnel:
James Burton (guitar)
Ry Cooder (guitar, mandolin, bass)
Chris Ethridge (bass)
Jim Gordon (drums)
Arlo Guthrie (vocals, guitar, piano)
Milt Holland (percussion)
Gene Parsons (drums, guitar, harmonica)
John Pilla (guitar)
Jerry Scheff (bass)
Clarence White (guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Oklahoma Hills (W.Guthrie/J.Guthrie) 3.27
02. Every Hand In The Land (A.Guthrie) 2.20
03. Creole Belle (Hurt) 3.46
04. Wheel Of Fortune (A.Guthrie)  2.31
05. Oh, In The Morning (A.Guthrie) 4.54
06. Coming Into Los Angeles (A.Guthrie) 3.07
07. Stealin’ (Cannon) 2.49
08. My Front Pages (A.Guthrie) 3.47
09. Living In The Country (Seeger) 3.18
10. Running Down The Road (A.Guthrie) 4.30

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Arlo Guthrie – Alice’s Restaurant (Original Motion Picture Score) (1969)

FrontCover1Arlo Davy Guthrie (born July 10, 1947)[1] is a retired American folk singer-songwriter.[2] He is known for singing songs of protest against social injustice, and storytelling while performing songs, following the tradition of his father Woody Guthrie. Guthrie’s best-known work is his debut piece, “Alice’s Restaurant Massacree”, a satirical talking blues song about 18 minutes in length that has since become a Thanksgiving anthem. His only top-40 hit was a cover of Steve Goodman’s “City of New Orleans”. His song “Massachusetts” was named the official folk song of the state, in which he has lived most of his adult life. Guthrie has also made several acting appearances. He is the father of four children, who have also had careers as musicians. (wikipedia)

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And here´s the soundtrack of the movie “Alice’s Restaurant”:

Alice’s Restaurant is a 1969 American comedy film directed by Arthur Penn. It is an adaptation of the 1967 folk song “Alice’s Restaurant Massacree”, originally written and sung by Arlo Guthrie. The film stars Guthrie as himself, with Pat Quinn as Alice Brock and James Broderick as Ray Brock. Penn, who resided in the story’s setting of Stockbridge, Massachusetts, co-wrote the screenplay in 1967 with Venable Herndon after hearing the song, shortly after directing Bonnie & Clyde.

Alice’s Restaurant was released on August 19, 1969, a few days after Guthrie appeared at the Woodstock Festival. A soundtrack album for the film was also released by United Artists Records. The soundtrack includes a studio version of the title song, which was originally divided into two parts (one for each album side); a 1998 CD reissue on the Rykodisc label presents this version of the song in full, and adds several bonus tracks to the original LP.

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In 1965, Arlo Guthrie (as himself) has attempted to avoid the draft by attending college in Montana. His long hair and unorthodox approach to study gets him in trouble with local police as well as residents. He quits school, and subsequently hitchhikes back East. He first visits his father Woody Guthrie (Joseph Boley) in the hospital.

Arlo ultimately returns to his friends Ray (James Broderick) and Alice Brock (Pat Quinn) at their home, a deconsecrated church in Great Barrington, Massachusetts where they welcome friends and like-minded bohemian types to “crash”. Among these are Arlo’s school friend Roger (Geoff Outlaw) and artist Shelly (Michael McClanathan), an ex-heroin addict who is in a motorcycle racing club. Alice is starting up a restaurant in nearby Stockbridge. Frustrated with Ray’s lackadaisical attitude, she has an affair with Shelly, and ultimately leaves for New York to visit Arlo and Roger. Ray comes to take her home, saying he has invited a “few” friends for Thanksgiving.

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The central point of the film is the story told in the song: After Thanksgiving dinner, Arlo and his friends decide to do Alice and Ray a favor by taking several months worth of garbage from their house to the town dump. After loading up a red VW microbus with the garbage, and “shovels, and rakes and other implements of destruction”, they head for the dump. Finding the dump closed for the holiday, they drive around and discover a pile of garbage that someone else had placed at the bottom of a short cliff. At that point, as mentioned in the song, “… we decided that one big pile is better than two little piles, and rather than bring that one up we decided to throw ours down.”

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The next morning they receive a phone call from “Officer Obie” (Police Chief William Obanhein as himself), who asks them about the garbage. After admitting to littering, they agree to pick up the garbage and to meet him at the police officers’ station. Loading up the red VW microbus, they head to the police station where they are immediately arrested.

As the song puts it, they are then driven to the quote scene of the crime unquote where the police are engaged in a hugely elaborate investigation. At the trial, Officer Obie is anxiously awaiting the chance to show the judge the 27 8×10 color glossy photos of the crime but the judge (James Hannon as himself) happens to be blind, using a seeing eye dog, and simply levies a $25 fine, orders them to pick up the garbage and then sets them free. The garbage is eventually taken to New York and placed on a barge. Meanwhile, Arlo has fallen in love with a beautiful Asian girl, Mari-chan (Tina Chen).

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Later in the movie, Arlo is called up for the draft, in a surreal depiction of the bureaucracy at the New York City military induction center on Whitehall Street. He attempts to make himself unfit for induction by acting like a homicidal maniac in front of the psychiatrist, but fails (the incident actually gets him praise). Because of Guthrie’s criminal record for littering, he is first sent to wait along with the convicts on the Group W bench, then outright rejected as unfit for military service, not because of the littering incident, but because he makes a remark about the dubiousness of considering littering to be a problem when selecting candidates for armed conflict, making the officials suspicious of “his kind” and them to send his personal records to Washington, DC.

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Upon returning to the church, Arlo finds Ray and members of the motorcycle club showing home movies of a recent race. Shelly enters, obviously high, and Ray beats him until he reveals his stash of heroin, concealed in some art he has been working on. Shelly roars off into the night on his motorcycle to his death; the next day, Woody dies. Ray and Alice have a hippie-style wedding in the church, and a drunken Ray proposes to sell the church and start a country commune instead, revealing that he blames himself for Shelly’s death. The film ends with Alice standing alone in her bedraggled wedding gown on the church steps.(wikipedia)

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Not to be confused with Guthrie’s 1967 debut album Alice’s Restaurant, the soundtrack to Arthur Penn’s 1969 film (as well as the movie itself) is built around Guthrie’s 16-minute folk-rock talking-blues narrative “Alice Restaurant’s Massacree,” which is included here — though this is a different recording from the classic one on Reprise Records, with slightly altered nuances and production, and every bit as funny (the original album had the title track in two parts, which have been reassembled here). The original soundtrack album was one of the finest non-orchestral soundtrack records of its era — no surprise, since Guthrie also helped play and write much of the instrumental background music in the film (Garry Sherman did some composing and arranging as well), much of which is pleasant, unassuming instrumental folk and folk-rock with some blues and country accents, broken up by a group a cappella version of “Amazing Grace” and a Joni Mitchell soundalike (Tigger Outlaw) singing Mitchell’s “Songs to Aging Children.” (Bruce Eder)

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Personnel:
Arlo Guthrie (guitar, vocals)
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Tigger Outlaw (vocals on 04.)
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a bunch of unknown studio musicians

Alternate frontcovers:
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Tracklist:
01. Traveling Music (Guthrie) 1.59
02. Alice’s Restaurant Massacree, Part 1 (Guthrie) 6.34
03. The Let Down (Sherman) 0.56
04. Songs To Aging Children (Mitchell) 2.46
05. Amazing Grace (Traditional) 3.20
06. Trip To The City (Guthrie) 2.16
07. Alice’s Restaurant Massacree, Part 2 (Guthrie) 8.29
08. Crash Pad Improvs (Guthrie) 2.14
09. You’re A Fink (Guthrie/Sherman) 2.09
10. Harps And Marriage (Sherman) 1.43

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Arlo Guthrie & Pete Seeger – Together In Concert (1975)

FrontCover1This is a live double CD recorded during a series of concerts in 1975. In the words of Harold Leventhal (Sometime manager of Pete, Arlo and Woody), “It took only two phone calls to get Pete Seeger and Arlo Guthrie to agree to perform together in concert. I rang Pete. “Listen, how about you and Arlo doing some concerts together?” Pete didn’t hesitate, “Sure,” he quickly replied. I then dialed Arlo. “Say, Arlo, how about you and Pete doing some concerts together?” His reply was as prompt as Pete’s. So concerts were lined up for New York, Chicago, Montreal, Boston, Denver and Tanglewood.

“Now the big problem was to get Pete and Arlo to meet, to decide on a program and to rehearse. Arlo hates to travel beyond the border of Berkshire County in Massachusetts and Pete is traveling all over the country doing benefits. Luckily, just one week before the first concert in Carnegie Hall, Arlo escaped from his farm and found his way to Pete’s place in Beacon, New York. They spent a couple of hours together, decided on a program, ran through a couple of songs…and they were ready.

Inlet“Pete Seeger had been singing with a Guthrie for some 35 years. Back in 1940, Woody Guthrie and Pete traveled cross country singing their way from state to state, and until the early 1950s Woody and Pete often shared singing in a union hall or at a political rally. In the mid-1960s, as Arlo became a “professional” singer, he was also beginning to share the same platform or concert hall with Pete, as they both participated at peace demonstrations or sang for the Farm Workers Union. The Seeger-Guthrie Union keeps going.

“There is no gap in the two generations of singers heard on this record. Rather, the music and songs express a continuity of understanding and a reflection of the world as it is and has been. The audience at these concerts- those who were lucky enough to get tickets- spanned several generations: grandfathers and grandmothers with their grandchildren, workers and students, young and old. A New York reviewer perhaps best summed up when he wrote,”It is another time, but the need for the Seegers and Guthries of whatever generation remains.” (Promo text)

Pete and Arlo’s Together In Concert is the first of their three concert albums. (More Together Again and Precious Friend are the other two). It differs from those albums. The audience sings more with Arlo than with Pete and Pete tells more stories than Arlo. “Hard to believe, but its true.”

Pete tells the story of Victor Jara’s death and reads his last poem, smuggled out of the detention camp. A story that is suspiciously similar to Joe Hill’s Last Will and Testament. (Another demonstration that folk singers know the difference between truth and factual accuracy.)

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Arlo encourages the audience to join in Walking Down The Line, hilariously, as only Arlo can.
The audience’s voice isn’t prominent in Lonesome Valley, but from there are three voices from the stage (I wonder who sung the bass line). A different sound than any of my other versions.
Well May The World Go is so typical of optimistic 60’s folk, one wonders if it’s a parody, sung with a straight face.
The album contains Arlo/Pete favorites like Guantanamera, City Of New Orleans, Deportee and Joe Hill.
It has obscure songs, like the Red Army’s Three Rule Of Discipline and The Eight Rules of Attention as well as two songs written by pre-school children.
Arlo’s covers Don’t Think Twice, It’s Allright and Stealin’. Pete quotes his father on the folk process, “plagiarism is basic to all culture”.

If Precious Friend and More Together Again are “must have” albums. Together In Concert is a “really, really should have” album. (by MikeE)

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Personnel:
Arlo Guthrie (guitar, vocals, piano, banjo)
Pete Seeger (banjo, vocals, guitar)

Arlo Guthrie, Pete Seeger
Tracklist:
01. Way Out There (Nolan) 3.47
02. Yodeling (Traditional) 1.21
03. Roving Gambler (Houston) 2.22
04. Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right (Dylan) 3.13
05. Declaration Of Independence (Gibbs/Dougherty) 2.32
06. Get Up And Go (Seeger) 2.43
07. City Of New Orleans (Goodman) 4.37
08. Estadio Chile (Jara) 3.19
09. Guantanamera (Angulo/Marti/Seeger) 4.24
10. On A Monday (Ledbetter) 3.00
11. Presidential Rag (A.Guthrie) 4.59
12. Walkin’ Down The Line (Dylan) 4.38
13. Well May The World Go (Seeger) 2.19
14. My Son (Traditional) 2.
15. The Queen Of My Heart (Bryant/Rogers) 3.21
16. Deportee (Plane Wreck At Los Gatos) (W.Guthrie/Hoffman) 4.01
17. Joe Hill (Robinson/Hayes) 3.19
18. May There Always Be Sunshine (Oshanin/Ostrovsky/Batting) 1.58
19. Three Rules Of Discipline And The Eight Rules Of Attention (unknown) 2.29
20. Stealin’ (Cannon) 2.35
21. Golden Vanity (Traditional) 4.12
22. Lonesome Valley (Traditional) 4.35
23. Quite Early Morning (Seeger) 4.34
24. Sweet Rosyanne (Bright Light Quartette/Lomax) 6.00

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Arlo Guthrie & Pete Seeger – Together In Concert (1975)

FrontCover1.jpgThis is a live double album recorded during a series of concerts in 1975. In the words of Harold Leventhal (Sometime manager of Pete, Arlo and Woody), “It took only two phone calls to get Pete Seeger and Arlo Guthrie to agree to perform together in concert. I rang Pete. “Listen, how about you and Arlo doing some concerts together?” Pete didn’t hesitate, “Sure,” he quickly replied. I then dialed Arlo. “Say, Arlo, how about you and Pete doing some concerts together?” His reply was as prompt as Pete’s. So concerts were lined up for New York, Chicago, Montreal, Boston, Denver and Tanglewood.

“Now the big problem was to get Pete and Arlo to meet, to decide on a program and to rehearse. Arlo hates to travel beyond the border of Berkshire County in Massachusetts and Pete is traveling all over the country doing benefits. Luckily, just one week before the first concert in Carnegie Hall, Arlo escaped from his farm and found his way to Pete’s place in Beacon, New York. They spent a couple of hours together, decided on a program, ran through a couple of songs…and they were ready.

GuthrieSeegerLive2.jpg

“Pete Seeger had been singing with a Guthrie for some 35 years. Back in 1940, Woody Guthrie and Pete traveled cross country singing their way from state to state, and until the early 1950s Woody and Pete often shared singing in a union hall or at a political rally. In the mid-1960s, as Arlo became a “professional” singer, he was also beginning to share the same platform or concert hall with Pete, as they both participated at peace demonstrations or sang for the Farm Workers Union. The Seeger-Guthrie Union keeps going.

“There is no gap in the two generations of singers heard on this record. Rather, the music and songs express a continuity of understanding and a reflection of the world as it is and has been. The audience at these concerts- those who were lucky enough to get tickets- spanned several generations: grandfathers and grandmothers with their grandchildren, workers and students, young and old. A New York reviewer perhaps best summed up when he wrote,”It is another time, but the need for the Seegers and Guthries of whatever generation remains.”

GuthrieSeegerLive3.jpg

Pete and Arlo’s Together In Concert is the first of their three concert albums. (More Together Again and Precious Friend are the other two). It differs from those albums. The audience sings more with Arlo than with Pete and Pete tells more stories than Arlo. “Hard to believe, but its true.”

Pete tells the story of Victor Jara’s death and reads his last poem, smuggled out of the detention camp. A story that is suspiciously similar to Joe Hill’s Last Will and Testament. (Another demonstration that folk singers know the difference between truth and factual accuracy.)
Arlo encourages the audience to join in Walking Down The Line, hilariously, as only Arlo can.
The audience’s voice isn’t prominent in Lonesome Valley, but from there are three voices from the stage (I wonder who sung the bass line). A different sound than any of my other versions.
Well May The World Go is so typical of optimistic 60’s folk, one wonders if it’s a parody, sung with a straight face.
The album contains Arlo/Pete favorites like Guantanamera, City Of New Orleans, Deportee and Joe Hill.
It has obscure songs, like the Red Army’s Three Rule Of Discipline and The Eight Rules of Attention as well as two songs written by pre-school children.
Arlo’s covers Don’t Think Twice, It’s Allright and Stealin’. Pete quotes his father on the folk process, “plagiarism is basic to all culture”.

If Precious Friend and More Together Again are “must have” albums. Together In Concert is a “really, really should have” album. (by Mike E.)

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This album is an old friend. Like others, I bought (and still have!) the vinyl version of this. It’s an old friend too in the relationship between Pete, Arlo, and the audience, which will include you. I had the honor of talking with Arlo once. He told we that they still get together now and then to jam. The Carnegie Hall sessions are merely an extension of those family get-togehers.

Pete Seeger is Americana. He gave to an America that took unjustly from him. Pete was black-listed during the McCarthy Era and struggled to feed his family. Yet he worked to bring dignity to migrants and the family man on the assembly line. Pete marched with Martin Luther King Jr., stood with him at the Lincoln Memorial, and introduced him to “We Shall Over Come.” Pete cleaned up the Hudson River and taught thousands to play banjo with his cult classic “How To Play The 5 String Banjo”, more than just a book on banjo, its about us. Pete belongs in the Smithsonian, and he is! Via Folkway Records.

Arlo…. Arlo talks a lot! And people like to listen. Woody Guthries son who played at Woodstock. Arlos version of Steve Goodmans “City of New Orleans” was played on the moon. Arlo brings soul to his fathers poem (turned into the song) “Deportee”, the rage of Nixon’s betrayal in “Presidential Rag”, and a sad longing to Dylans “Don’t Think Twice”.

These are songs of a great America by great Americans. (by James Kopf)

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Personnel:
Arlo Guthrie (guitar, vocals)
Pete Seeger (banjo, vocals)

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Tracklist:
01. Way Out There (Nolan) 3.47
02. Yodeling (Traditional) 1.21
03. Roving Gambler (Houston) 2.22
04. Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right (Dylan) 3.13
05. Declaration Of Independence (Gibbs/Dougherty) 2.32
06. Get Up And Go (Seeger) 2.43
07. City Of New Orleans (Goodman) 4.37
08. Estadio Chile (Jara) 3.19
09. Guantanamera (Angulo/Marti/Seeger) 4.24
10. On A Monday (Ledbetter) 3.00
11. Presidential Rag (A.Guthrie) 4.59
12. Walkin’ Down The Line (Dylan) 4.38
13. Well May The World Go (Seeger) 2.19
14. Henry My Son (Traditional) 2.14
15. Mother, The Queen Of My Heart (Bryant/Rogers) 3.21
16. Deportee (Plane Wreck At Los Gatos) (W.Guthrie/Hoffman) 4.01
17. Joe Hill (Robinson/Hayes) 3.19
18. May There Always Be Sunshine (Oshanin/Ostrovsky/Batting) 1.58
19. Three Rules Of Discipline And The Eight Rules Of Attention (unknown) 2.29
20. Stealin’ (Cannon) 2.35
21. Golden Vanity (Traditional) 4.12
22. Lonesome Valley (Traditional) 4.35
23. Quite Early Morning (Seeger) 4.34
24. Sweet Rosyanne (Bright Light Quartette/Lomax) 6.00
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25. Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right (Dylan) / Freight Train (Traditional) 6.39

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