Various Artists – A Twist Of Jobim (1997)

FrontCover1.jpgTwist of Jobim contains a single disc with 11 songs. The CD has an unusual multi-artist tribute to the music of Antonio Carlos Jobim. Some of the Twist of Jobim songs are made funky (but in a melodic and tasteful way), while others become quiet (but still passionate) ballads. Twist of Jobim are all jazz-oriented songs.

The debut release from the I.E. label (which is connected with Polygram) is an unusual multi-artist tribute to the music of Antonio Carlos Jobim. Some of his tunes are made funky (but in a melodic and tasteful way), while others become quiet (but still passionate) ballads. The treatments are all jazz-oriented, and there is plenty of solo space for the likes of guitarist Lee Ritenour (in one of his finest jazz efforts), pianists Dave Grusin and Alan Pasqua, altoist Eric Marienthal, bassist Christian McBride, and tenor saxophonist Ernie Watts. Plus, there are guest spots for Herbie Hancock (an excellent acoustic piano solo on “Stone Flower”), the sopranos of Art Porter (on “Dindi”) and Steve Tavaglione, the Yellowjackets (who team up with Ritenour on “Mojave”), singer El DeBarge (“Dindi”) and the vocal duo of Al Jarreau and Oleta Adams (“Waters of March” and a lightweight rendition of “The Girl from Ipanema”). Nearly every song holds one’s interest, the melodies are celebrated, and the fresh interpretations contain more than their share of surprises. (by Scott Yanow)

Lee Ritenour

Personnel:
Oleta Adams (vocals on 04. + 11.)
El DeBarge (vocals on 03.
John Beasley (synthesizer on 02. + 04.)
Paulinho da Costa (percussion on 01., 06., 07, 10. + 11.)
Melvin Davis (bass on 02., 03. + 07.)
Cassio Duarte (percussion on 02.- 05 + 09.)
Russell Ferrante (synthesizer on 06., piano on 10. + 11.)
Dave Grusin (piano on 01., 02., 04. + 05.)
Herbie Hancock (piano on 06.)
Jimmy Haslip (bass on 10.)
Jerry Hey (flugelhorn on 07., 08.)
Dan Higgins (flute on 01., 07. – 09.)
Al Jarreau (vocals on 04. + 11.)
Will Kennedy (drums on 10.)
Eric Marienthal (saxophone on 02., 04 – 07.)
Harvey Mason (drums on 02., 04., 08. + 09.)
Christian McBride (bass on 08., 09.)
Bob Mintzer (saxophone on 10.)
Gary Novak (drums on 06.)
Alan Pasqua (piano on 08. + 09.)
John Patitucci (bass on 06.)
Lee Ritenour (guitar on 01., 02., 04., 06. – 10., keyboards, synthesizer on 01., 03. 07., 11., bass on 01. + 11.)
Steve Tavaglione (saxophone on 06., electronic wind instrument on 08. + 09.)
Ernie Watts (saxophone on 08. + 09.)

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Tracklist:
01. Dave Grusin / Lee Ritenour: Water To Drink (Agua de Beber) (Jobim) 5.06
02. Dave Grusin / Eric Marienthal / Lee Ritenour: Captain Bacardi (Jobim) 5.05
03. El DeBarge / Art Porter: Dindi (Jobim) 4.57
04. Oleta Adams / Al Jarreau: Waters of March (Aguas de Março) (Jobim) 4.38
05. Dave Grusin: Bonita (Gilbert/Jobim/Santamaria) 4.04
06. Paulinho Da Costa / Herbie Hancock / Steve Tavaglione: Stone Flower (Jobim) 8.49
07. Eric Marienthal / Lee Ritenour: Favela (Gilbert/Jobim/de Moraes) 4.47
08. Alan Pasqua / Ernie Watts: Children’s Games (Jobim) 3.53
09. Christian McBride / Ernie Watts: Lamento (Jobim/de Moraes) 6.27
10. Lee Ritenour / Yellowjackets: Mojave (Jobim) 5.22
11. Oleta Adams / Al Jarreau: The Girl From Ipanema (Gimbel/Jobim/de Moraes) 429

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Herbie Hancock – Inventions and Dimensions (1963)

FrontCover1.jpgInventions & Dimensions is the third album by Herbie Hancock, recorded on August 30, 1963 for Blue Note Records. The album was also re-released in the mid-1970s as Succotash credited to Hancock and Willie Bobo.[4] Inventions & Dimensions is unusual in prominently featuring Latin percussion without being a Latin jazz album, rather being Hancock’s exploration of modal jazz and post-bop. (by wikipedia)

All too often the concept of a Latin jazz album by a musician without a history inside that genre implies bop solos over a heavy-handed polyrhythmic foundation. What makes pianist Herbie Hancock’s Inventions & Dimensions so utterly fresh and challenging, even decades after its original 1963 release, is his willingness to try a number of Latin-sounding gambits without resorting to a Drums of Passion rhythmic backdrop. Anyone who has appreciated Bud Powell’s forays into a kind of proto-Latin improvisation will appreciate Hancock’s inventiveness.

The four original compositions by Hancock are far from catchy, more like sketches than his most famous pieces. Yet from these patchy and meandering tunes Hancock works up a completely mesmerizing series of colors and textures and riffs, with mutated montunos dominant in the mix.

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The two percussionists, Osvaldo Martinez and Willie Bobo, are steady, yet seem to be more along for the ride with Hancock than inspiration for the pianist. The same might be said for bassist Paul Chambers. They all take tasteful solos, but the star of the session is completely Hancock.

Not only is this album a thoughtful entertainment for anyone focused on the best Blue Note releases of the ’60s, I hope it will be carefully studied by young musicians desiring to mine Latin jazz with seriousness and a bold spirit. (by Norman Weinstein)

Herbie Hancock 1963A

Personnel:
Willie Bobo (drums, timbales)
Paul Chambers (bass)
Herbie Hancock (piano)
Osvaldo “Chihuahua” Martinez (percussion)

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Tracklist:
01. Succotash 7.41
02. Triangle 11.02
03. Jack Rabbit 5.58
04. Mimosa 8.39
05. A Jump Ahead 6.34
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Mimosa (alternate take) 10.07

All compositions by Herbie Hancock

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Herbie Hancock – Dedication (1974)

OriginalFrontCover1Dedication is the sixteenth album by Herbie Hancock. It was recorded in Japan in 1974 while Hancock was touring and first released on the Japanese CBS Sony label in September 21, 1974. Hancock performs “Maiden Voyage” and “Dolphin Dance” acoustically, while “Nobu” and “Cantaloupe Island” were performed on electric keyboards. It wasn’t released in CD outside Japan until 2013, as part of the “Herbie Hancock the complete Columbia album collection 1972-1988” box set. The track “Nobu” is regarded by many (including As One) as the first ever techno track, due to its other-worldly repetitive electronic groove.

This is a unique experiment in the Hancock discography, recorded in Tokyo in just one day during a tour of Japan. The first side contains two introspective, complex solo acoustic Posterpiano tracks, “Maiden Voyage” and “Dolphin Dance,” which are notable since they date from a period when Hancock was supposedly totally immersed in electronics. Side two has two even more unusual pieces — “Nobu,” a one-man show recorded in real time with the sample-and-hold feature of an ARP 2600 synthesizer providing a rhythm section for Hancock’s electric keyboards, followed by “Cantaloupe Island” with a pre-recorded synth bassline. Side two is a fascinating look back at the charms and stringent limitations of mid-’70s analog keyboards, as well as a challenge to Hancock’s on-the-wing inventiveness — and despite some inevitable stiffness in the rhythm, he comes through with some colorful work. This would be the first of several Japan-only Hancock albums from the ’70s, an indication that Japanese jazz fans were (and perhaps still are) far more open-minded and free-spending than their American counterparts. (by Richard S. Ginell)

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Personnel:
Herbie Hancock (keybooards)

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Tracklist:
01. Maiden Voyage 7.44
02. Dolphin Dance  11.18
03. Nobu 7.39
04. Cantaloupe Island 13.57

All compositions by Herbie Hancock

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Various Artists – Jazz Fusion (1996)

FrontCover1Jazz fusion, fusion, or jazz rock is a musical genre that developed in the late 1960s from mixing funk and rhythm and blues rhythms with the electric instruments, amplified sound, electronic effects and playing styles of rock music together with jazz’s complex time signatures (which were derived from non-Western music) and jazz’s complex chord progressions and altered and extended chords. Fusion musicians typically create extended instrumental compositions based around a melody and a chord progression and lengthy solo improvisations. Fusion songs use brass instruments such as trumpet and saxophone as melody and soloing instruments. The rhythm section typically consists of electric bass (in some cases fretless), electric guitar, electric piano/synthesizer (in contrast to the double bass and piano used in earlier jazz) and drums. As with jazz forms that preceded fusion, all of the instruments–including the rhythm section instruments–are used as soloing instruments and all demonstrate a high level of instrumental technique.

FusionJazzThe term “jazz-rock” is often used as a synonym for “jazz fusion” as well as for music performed by late 1960s and 1970s-era rock bands that added jazz elements to their music. It is different from the UK Canterbury Scene’s progressive rock (“prog”) and other forms of prog-jazz fusion, in which extended prog instrumentals use improvisation and take on a jazz-influenced feel. After a decade of popularity during the 1970s, fusion expanded its improvisatory and experimental approaches through the 1980s, in parallel with the development of a radio-friendly style called smooth jazz. Experimentation continued in the 1990s and 2000s. Fusion albums, even those that are made by the same group or artist, may include a variety of musical styles. Rather than being a codified musical style, fusion can be viewed as a musical tradition or approach. (by wikipedia)

And this is just a sampler with Jazz Fusion … maybe it´s time for you to discover this kind of music … certainly not the worst idea. ! Most of the tracks were recorded during the Seventies … a golden decade for Fusion Jazz !

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01. George Benson: Take Five (1974) (Desmond) 3.43
02. Herbie Hancock: Watermelon Man (1974) (Hancock) 5.00
03. Earth Wind & Fire: Love Music (1978) (Scarborough) 3.57
04. Astrud Gilberto: Zazueira (1971) (Ben) 3.42
05. Keith Jarrett: Common Mama (1972) (Jarrett) 8.12
06. Ned Doheny: To Prove My Love (1976) (Doheny) 4.50
07. Ramsey Lewis: Tequila Mockingbird (1977) (Dunn) 5.27
08. George Duke: Look Waht You Find (1979) (Duke) 4.46
09. Deodato: Super Strut (1973) (Deodato) 4.58
10. Stanley Clarke: Rock N Roll Jelly (1979) (Clarke) 2.36
11. Hubert Laws: Family (1980) (Laws) 7.30
12. Lee Ritenour: Theme From Three Day Of The Condor (1976) (Grusin) 4.07
13, Bill Withers: Use (1985) (Withers) 3.49
14. Santana: Tales Of Kilimanjaro (1981) (Santana/Peraza/Rekow/Pasqua) 3.29
15. Weather Report: Black Market (1976) (Zawinul) 6.14
16. Grover Washington Jr.: Love Like This (1992) (Roman/Cox) 4.49

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