Lightnin’ Hopkins – A Legend In His Own Time (1969)

FrontCover1.JPGSamuel John “Lightnin'” Hopkins (March 15, 1912 – January 30, 1982) was an American country blues singer, songwriter, guitarist and occasional pianist, from Centerville, Texas. Rolling Stone magazine ranked him number 71 on its list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time.

The musicologist Robert “Mack” McCormick opined that Hopkins is “the embodiment of the jazz-and-poetry spirit, representing its ancient form in the single creator whose words and music are one act”.

Hopkins was born in Centerville, Texas, and as a child was immersed in the sounds of the blues. He developed a deep appreciation for this music at the age of 8, when he met Blind Lemon Jefferson at a church picnic in Buffalo, Texas. That day, Hopkins felt the blues was “in him”. He went on to learn from his older (distant) cousin, the country blues singer Alger “Texas” Alexander. (Hopkins had another cousin, the Texas electric blues guitarist Frankie Lee Sims, with whom he later recorded.) Hopkins began accompanying Jefferson on guitar at informal church gatherings. Jefferson reputedly never let anyone play with him except young Hopkins, and Hopkins learned much from Jefferson at these gatherings.

In the mid-1930s, Hopkins was sent to Houston County Prison Farm; the offense for which he was imprisoned is unknown. In the late 1930s, he moved to Houston with Alexander in an unsuccessful attempt to break into the music scene there. By the early 1940s, he was back in Centerville, working as a farm hand.

Lightnin' Hopkins02

Gold Star Records promotional photograph, 1948

Hopkins took a second shot at Houston in 1946. While singing on Dowling Street in Houston’s Third Ward (which would become his home base), he was discovered by Lola Anne Cullum of Aladdin Records, based in Los Angeles. She convinced Hopkins to travel to Los Angeles, where he accompanied the pianist Wilson Smith. The duo recorded twelve tracks in their first sessions in 1946. An Aladdin executive decided the pair needed more dynamism in their names and dubbed Hopkins “Lightnin'” and Wilson “Thunder”.

Hopkins recorded more sides for Aladdin in 1947. He returned to Houston and began recording for Gold Star Records. In the late 1940s and 1950s he rarely performed outside Texas, only occasionally traveling to the Midwest and the East for recording sessions and concert appearances. It has been estimated that he recorded between eight hundred and a thousand songs in his career. He performed regularly at nightclubs in and around Houston, particularly on Dowling Street, where he had been discovered by Aladdin. He recorded the hit records “T-Model Blues” and “Tim Moore’s Farm” at SugarHill Recording Studios in Houston. By the mid- to late 1950s, his prodigious output of high-quality recordings had gained him a following among African Americans and blues aficionados.

Lightnin' Hopkins03.jpg

In 1959, the blues researcher Mack McCormick contacted Hopkins, hoping to bring him to the attention of a broader musical audience engaged in the folk revival. McCormack presented Hopkins to integrated audiences first in Houston and then in California. He made his debut at Carnegie Hall on October 14, 1960, alongside Joan Baez and Pete Seeger, performing the spiritual “Mary Don’t You Weep”. In 1960, he signed with Tradition Records. The recordings which followed included his song “Mojo Hand” in 1960.

In 1968, Hopkins recorded the album Free Form Patterns, backed by the rhythm section of the psychedelic rock band 13th Floor Elevators. Through the 1960s and into the 1970s, he released one or sometimes two albums a year and toured, playing at major folk music festivals and at folk clubs and on college campuses in the U.S. and internationally. He toured extensively in the United States and played a six-city tour of Japan in 1978.

Lightnin' Hopkins04.jpg

Hopkins was Houston’s poet-in-residence for 35 years. He recorded more albums than any other bluesman.

Hopkins died of esophageal cancer in Houston on January 30, 1982, at the age of 69. His obituary in the New York Times described him as “one of the great country blues singers and perhaps the greatest single influence on rock guitar players.”

His Gibson J-160e “hollowbox” is on display at the Rock Hall of Fame in Cleveland, and his Guild Starfire at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in DC, both on loan from the Joe Kessler collection.

Hopkins’s style was born from spending many hours playing informally without a backing band. His distinctive fingerstyle technique often included playing, in effect, bass, rhythm, lead, and percussion at the same time.[citation needed] He played both “alternating” and “monotonic” bass styles incorporating imaginative, often chromatic turnarounds and single-note lead lines. Tapping or slapping the body of his guitar added rhythmic accompaniment.

Lightnin' Hopkins05

Much of Hopkins’s music follows the standard 12-bar blues template, but his phrasing was free and loose. Many of his songs were in the talking blues style, but he was a powerful and confident singer.[citation needed] Lyrically, his songs expressed the problems of life in the segregated South, bad luck in love and other subjects common in the blues idiom. He dealt with these subjects with humor and good nature. Many of his songs are filled with double entendres, and he was known for his humorous introductions to songs.(by wikipedia)

And here´s an album with previously unreleased recordings from 150/1951 published in the “Anthology Of The Blues – Archive Series”:

MoreAlbums

More albums from the “Anthology Of The Blues – Archive Series”

Initial a series launched approximately September 1970 by the Kent label. It includes 12 releases with sometimes a couple of unissued tracks, so not always clear whether this are compilations. Early releases still show the orange label design with white spot. The early versions had a gatefold cover with sometimes different colored background at later releases. It is still not clear how many releases were initial release with the orange label design. At least the later one was initial released with the hexagonal successor label design. Later reissues wear the purple United Records label design and have different covers. In the late 70s the label changed once more to the yellow Kent labels. Please state at least clear notes for the label design and the innerspread, possibly provides images.
Due to the linked Wirz-page the French reissues were released in 1976 throughout. The cover was very similar to the US releases and mention Musidisc-Europe as the distributor.

Without any question: Lightnin Hopkins was a legend of these early acoustic Blues … listen to all his guitar licks, listen to the voice of a man who knew what he is singing about.

AlternateFront+BackCover.JPG

Alternate front+ back cover

Personnel:
Lightnin’ Hopkins (vocals, guitar, piano on

BackCover1.JPG

Tracklist:
01. War News Blues 2:45
02. Black Cat 2:28
03. Bad Luck And Trouble 2:33
04. Mistreated Blues 2:38
05. Candy Kitchen 2:41
06. Needed Time 2:50
07. Appetite Blues 2:28
08. One Kind Favor 2:47
09. House Upon The Hill 2:33
10. Everyday I Have The Blues 2:20
11. Someday Baby 2:30
12. Ticket Agent 2:37

All songs credited to Lightnin’ Hopkins, but as we all know … most of the songs were Traditionals

LabelB1.JPG

 

*
**

Lightnin' Hopkins01

“Lightnin'” Hopkins (March 15, 1912 – January 30, 1982)

Some of his songs were of warning and sour prediction, such as “Fast Life Woman”:

You may see a fast life woman sittin’ round a whiskey joint,
Yes, you know, she’ll be sittin’ there smilin’,
‘Cause she knows some man gonna buy her half a pint,
Take it easy, fast life woman, ’cause you ain’t gon’ live always…

Various Artists – Blues, Blues Christmas Vol. 1 – 1925 – 1955 (2005)

FrontCover1.jpgThe idea of Christmas themed blues and gospel numbers stretches back to the very dawn of the recorded genres. “Hooray for Christmas” exclaims Bessie Smith to kick off her soon to be classic “At The Christmas Ball”, which inaugurated the Christmas blues tradition when it was recorded in November 1925 for Columbia. A year later, circa December 1926, the gospel Christmas tradition was launched when the Elkins-Payne Jubilee Singers recorded “Silent Night, Holy Night” for Paramount Records. After these recordings it was off to the races with numerous Christmas blues numbers recorded by singers of all stripes, a pace that continued as blues evolved into R&B and then rock and roll. For some reason there’s far fewer gospel Christmas songs although there were plenty of Christmas sermons in the 1920’s and 1930’s when recorded sermons rivalled blues in popularity among black audiences.

Going hand in hand with Christmas is quite a number of New Year’s songs, a good vehicle for juxtaposing the problems of the past year with the glimmer of hope that the upcoming year will bring better fortune. Whether these artists sung these numbers as part of their regular repertoire is unclear but it’s almost certainly the case that many of Illustrations01.jpgthese songs were recorded at the prompting of the record companies. Like any business they were always looking for a new angle or gimmick to sell records and advertised these boldly, often with full-page ads, in black newspapers like the Chicago Defender.

Perhaps you think this is a bit cynical but then you probably still believe in Santa Clause and good will towards men! Well, sit back, tip a glass of holiday cheer and enjoy our survey of yuletide classics spanning the 1920’s through the 1950’s, a simpler, more wholesome time – right! (by thedocumentrecordsstore.com)

Christmas and the blues might seem at first like a strange combination, given that the music of the holiday season is usually joyful, hopeful, and bright, but no other time of the year is so good at showing you what you don’t have, and what you can’t get, and if you have the blues at Christmas, well, it’s going to be a pretty heavy dose. This generous two-disc set from Document Records features 52 tracks of vintage African-American Christmas-themed blues and gospel pieces (with a couple of street sermons thrown in) recorded between 1925 and 1955, ranging from down-and-out laments and jailhouse moans to surprising (and occasionally risqué) requests for what Santa can bring down the chimney. Highlights on the first disc include the opening track, the joyous “Christ Was Born on Christmas Morn,” recorded in 1925 by comedian and female impersonator Frankie “Half Pint” Jaxon; Harry Crafton’s “Bring That Cadillac Back” (a Cadillac might not be the best gift if your girlfriend likes to ramble) from 1947; Tampa Red’s amazing, Illustrations02.jpgringing slide guitar tone on “Christmas and New Year’s Blues” from 1936; and the bizarre, disturbing field recording of “Junior’s a Jap Girl’s Christmas for His Santa Claus,” sung by Willie Blackwell for Alan Lomax in Arkansas in 1942. Other high points include the charming “Christmas Boogie,” recorded in 1950 by piano prodigy (he was only ten years old when this recording was made) Frankie “Sugar Chile” Robinson and the intense, bottled-up street-corner sermon “The Wrong Way to Celebrate Xmas,” recorded by Rev. Edward Clayborn in 1928. The second disc yields even more holiday gems, including the bottleneck guitar attack of Black Ace (Babe Karo Lemon Turner) on 1937’s “Christmas Time Blues (Beggin’ Santa Claus)”; Leroy Carr’s stark and brilliant “Christmas in Jail” from 1929; a breezy, bouncing “When Jesus Was Born” by gospel harmony quartet the Sons of Heaven (who were really the Selah Jubilee Singers doing a little moonlighting — which they did often, also recording as the Jubilators, the Southern Harmonaires, and the Larks) from 1948; and the sparse, stunning “Christmas Time Blues” by the mysterious Boll Weavil (Willie McNeil), also from 1948. A marvelous collection, Blues, Blues Christmas is a refreshing addition to the more standard holiday material that prevails during the season. (by Steve Leggett)

SinglePack1.jpg

Personnel:
see booklet

Booklet.jpg

Tracklist:
CD 1:
01. Frankie ‘Half-Pint’ Jaxon: Christ Was Born On Christmas Morn 3.25
02. Titus Turner: Christmas Morning Blues 2.31
03. The Cats & The Fiddle: Hep Cat’s Holiday 2.31
04. Ralph Willis: Christmas Blues 2.36
05. Willie Blackwell: Junior’s A Jap Girl’s Christmas For His Santa Claus 4.55
06. Butterbeans & Susie: Papa Ain’t No Santa Claus (And Mama Ain’t No Christmas Tree) 3.16
07. Jimmy Butler: Trim Your Tree 1.54
08. Gatemouth Moore: Christmas Blues 2.54
09. Harry Crafton with Doc Bagby Orchestra: Bring That Cadillac Back 2.38
10. Bertha ‘Chippie’ Hill: Christmas Man Blues 2.57
11. Cecil Gant: Hello Santa Claus 2.52
12. Bumble Bee Slim: Christmas And No Santa Claus 3.04
13. Felix Gross: Love For Christmas 2.35
14. Lonnie Johnson: Happy New Year Darling 2.36
15. Tampa Red: Christmas & New Year’s Blues 3.22
16. Amos Milburn: Let’s Make Christmas Merry, Baby 2.52
17. Julie Lee & Her Boyfriends: Christmas Spirit 2.45
18. Bessie Smith: At The Christmas Ball 3.23
19. Rev. A. W. Nix: How Will You Spend Christmas 3.20
20. Harmon Ray: Xmas Blues 2.40
21. Jimmy Witherspoon: How I Hate To See Xmas Come Around 3.01
22. Joe Turner With Pete Johnson & His Orchestra: Christmas Date Boogie 2.32
23. Sugar Chile Robinson: Christmas Boogie 2.12
24. Leadbelly: The Christmas Song 2.41
25. Lighnin’ Hopkins: Happy New Year 3.12
26. Rev. Edward Clayborn: The Wrong Way To Celebrate Xmas 2.25

CD 2:
01. Bo Carter: Santa Claus 3.12
02. Black Ace: Christmas Time Blues (Beggin’ Santa Claus) 2,.44
03. Mary Harris: Happy New Year Blues 3.08
04. Charlie Jordan: Christmas Christmas Blues 3.23
05. Johnny Otis Orchestra: Happy New Year, Baby 2.43
06. Little Esther & Mel Walker With Johnny Otis: Faraway Christmas Blues 3.18
07. Sonny Boy Williamson I: Christmas Morning Blues 3.22
08. Leroy Carr: Christmas In Jail 3.10
09. Kansas City Kitty: Christmas Mornin’ Blues 3.08
10. Rev. J.M. Gates: Did You Spend Christmas Day In Jail 2.52
11. Rev. J.M. Gates: Death Might Be Your Santa Claus 2.59
12. Blind Lemon Jefferson: Happy New Year Blues 2.53
13. Smokey Hogg: New Year’s Eve Blues 2.40
14. Larry Darnell: Christmas Blues 2.52
15. Sons Of Heaven: When Was Jesus Born 2.39
16. J.B. Summers With Doc Bagby’s Orchestra: I Want A Present For Christmas 2.28
17. Sonny Parker With Lionel Hampton Orchestra: Boogie Woogie Santa Claus 2.41
18. Roy Milton Solid Serenaders: New Year’s Resolution Blues 2.27
19. Sonny Boy Williamson II & His Harmonica & Houserockers: Sonny Boy’s Christmas Blues 2.32
20. Roosevelt Sykes: Let Me Hang My Stockings In Your Christmas Tree 2.53
21. Elzadie Robinson: The Santa Claus Crave 3.18
22. Walter Davis: Santa Claus 3.00
23. Victoria Spivey: Christmas Morning Blues 3.24
24. Boll Weevil: Christmas Time Blues 3.09
25. Floyd Dixon: Empty Stocking Blues 3.01
26. Mabel Scott With Les Welch & His Orchestra: Boogie Woogie Santa Claus 2.13

BookletBackCover1.jpg

*
**

SinglePack2.jpg

 

Various Artists – A Love Song For Bobby Long (OST) (2005)

frontcover1A Love Song for Bobby Long is a 2004 American drama film written and directed by Shainee Gabel. The screenplay is based on the novel Off Magazine Street by Ronald Everett Capps.
Eighteen-year-old Purslane (Pursy) Hominy Will leaves a Florida trailer park where she lives with her abusive boyfriend to return to her hometown of New Orleans following the drug overdose death of her jazz singer mother Lorraine, a free spirit whom Pursy had not seen for several years. The girl is startled to discover one-time Auburn University professor of literature Bobby Long and his protégé and former teaching assistant, struggling writer Lawson Pines, living in her mother’s dilapidated fixer-upper home. Both men are heavy drinkers who spend their days smoking numerous cigarettes, quoting Dylan Thomas, Benjamin Franklin, and T.S. Eliot, playing chess, and spending time with the neighbors while Bobby strums a guitar and sings melancholy country-folk songs. The two convince Pursy her mother left the house to all three of them, although in reality she is the sole heir and the time they legally are allowed to remain in it is limited by the terms of the will.
Pursy moves in and proves to be the most responsible and sensible member of the dysfunctional family the three create. The men’s efforts to drive her away gradually abate as they grow fond of her with the passing of time. Bobby – unshaven, slovenly, and suffering from ailments he prefers to ignore – attempts to improve the lot of the young girl by introducing her to The Heart is a Lonely Hunter and encouraging her to return to high school and get her diploma. Lawson, suffering from writer’s block, finds himself attracted to Pursy but hesitant to complicate his life further by becoming involved with her. Memories of Lorraine linger for all of them, especially Pursy, who vividly recalls her mother ignoring her in favor of pursuing a career. Her sense of who her mother was is altered somewhat when she finds a cache of letters Lorraine wrote her but never mailed, letters that lead her to discover not only how her mother really felt about her, but the true identity of her father as well. (by wikipedia)
still02
And here´s the Soundtrack of this movie:
The soundtrack to Shainee Gabel’s directorial debut, A Love Song for Bobby Long, is steeped in the regional sounds of New Orleans. Based on the novel Off Magazine Street by Everett Capps, the film, starring Scarlett Johansson, Gabriel Macht, and John Travolta — the latter performs two cuts (“Barbara Allen” and the Howard Barnes/Don Robertson hit “I Really Don’t Want to Know”) — focuses on the grittier, blue-collar side of the Big Easy. Capps’ son, singer/songwriter Grayson Capps, provides three of the compilation’s most affective tracks, “Washboard Lisa,” “Love Song for Bobby Long,” and a gorgeous duet with Theresa Andersson called “Lorraine’s Song (My Heart Was a Lonely Hunter) — both have cameos in the film. Nathan Larson’s brief but powerfully atmospheric score appears twice, casting a long shadow of melancholy that permeates classic cuts from celebrated bluesman Lonnie Pitchford, Lightnin’ Hopkins, Magic Slim, and Big Bill Morganfield. Other highlights include Los Lobos’ previously unreleased “Someday,” an outtake from 1990’s Neighborhood, and Nada Surf’s achingly nostalgic “Blonde on Blonde,” rounding out a collection that effortlessly and continuously provides the listener with dusk-tipped emotionality and a succinct sense of place. (by James Christopher Monger)
still03
Not only the perfect background music, but the backbone of a little and precious independent movie that blends together love, life, death, literature, music, loneliness, friendship, failures, heavy hungovers, redemption…
Young and talented songwriters (Grayson Capps, Nathan Larson), indie acts (Nada Surf, Trespassers William), blues legends (Lightnin’ Hopkins, Magic Slim & the Teardrops) and John Travolta himself (singin’ a couple of numbers including the traditional Barbara Allen) all cooperate to give birth to a collection of trembling and at the same time intimate songs that accompanies the story of the tortured existence of Mr Bobby Long & his Friends in a New Orleans never as charming and mysterious as here.
An hidden gem not to be missed. (by tenentedrogo)
backcover1
Tracklist:
01. Los Lobos: Someday (Hidalgo/Perez) 3.44
02. Grayson Capps & Theresa Andersson:  Lorraine’s Song (My Heart Was A Lonely Hunter) (Capps) 4.50
03. Thalia Zedek: Bone (Zedek) 4.35
04. Nathan Larson, Joan Wasser & Lyle Molzan:  Bobby (Original Score) (Larson) 1.48
05. Trespassers William: Different Stars (Williams) 4.45
06. Lonnie Pitchford: Lonesome Blues (Pitchford) 5.34
07. Magic Slim & The Teardrops:  Early Every Morning (Holt) 5.08
08. John Travolta: I Really Don’t Want To Know (Barnes/Robertson) 0.54
09. John Travolta: Barbara Allen (Traditional) 1.02
10. Giant Drag: This Isn’t It (Hardy) 3.00
11. Nathan Larson, Joan Wasser & Lyle Molzan:  Daughter Like Mother (Larson) 1.59
12. Big Bill Morganfield: Rising Son (Morganfield) 4.18
13. Grayson Capps: Washboard Lisa (Capps) 3.24
14. Nada Surf: Blonde On Blonde (Caws) 4.30
15. Lightnin’ Hopkins: Praying Ground Blues (Ellen) 2.59
16. Grayson Capps: Love Song For Bobby Long (Capps) 4.52
cd
*
**
still01
Thanks to greygoose for the tip !

Lightnin’ Hopkins – Lightnin’ (1969)

frontcover1Sam “Lightnin'” Hopkins was one of the most influential musicians in modern days blues music. Born and raised in Texas, Hopkins lived early life as a rambler, playing music for most of his career on street corners and in local bars. As blues and folk music took the world by storm in the early 1960s, Hopkins became famous for his contributions, having recorded a number of widely popular albums and gaining a worldwide fan base. His music changed the way the world viewed blues music. (by highbeam.com)

“This is a twin LP package of twenty tracksby the great blues singer and guitarist and includes many of his older classics as well as a lot of new material. It is excellently recorded and is one of the best blues packages of the year.” (by Ralph J. Gleason, Rolling Stone)

“Lightnin’ Hopkins may have made more records than any other bluesman and with a few exceptions those records were remarkably consistent. There were peaks and valleys but the general form remained the same: a solid rhythmic accompaniment in E or A broken by bright fierce guitar runs and that amazing voice.

Hopkins always sounds relaxed sometimes almost asleep but with an underlying edge that goes right to the heart and gut. He invites comparison with John Lee Hooker that other master of the dark brooding vocal but his guitar work has a sophistication that Hooker’s lacks and his tunes stay closer to the standard 12-bar framework (although in Hopkins’s hands that could shrink to 11 or stretch to 13 1/2 bars).

lightin-hopkinsHopkins had an endless ability to improvise new songs but he had a few favorites that he came back to again and again. Virtually all those favorites are here played by Hopkins either solo or with a drummer nailing down the rhythm and on one track with a full band. Hopkins plays his acoustic guitar through a magnetic pickup and amplifier giving his playing a bite and sustain that his pure acoustic recordings lack.
Drummer Francis Clay though listed on 16 tracks appears on only bout half of them. On classics like his trademark `Baby Please Don’t Go’ his reinvention of Ray Charles’ `What’d I Say’ and the humorous boogie romp `Ain’t It Crazy’ Hopkins appears solo allowing free rein to his unique sense of pacing and dynamics. When the drums do come in on a driving `Mojo Hand’ and a fine version of `See That My Grave Is Kept Clean’ (here called `One Kind Favor I Ask Of You’) Hopkins takes advantage of their presence to extend his high note runs leaving Clay to hold down the rhythm.

The one band cut `Rock Me Baby’ shows Hopkins flawlessly adopting the Muddy Waters Mississippi/Chicago sound with results Waters must have admired. For lagniappe one cut `I Hear You Calling Me’ gives an extremely rare glimpse of Hopkins playing slide. Hopkins was one of the true greats a master artist whose work transcended the blues genre and this album is an unmatched sampler of his music.” (Elijah Wald, SingOut!)

A superb blues album !

backcover1

Personnel:
Jeffrey Carp (harmonica)
Franis Clay (drums)
Sam “Lightnin'” Hopkins (guitar, vocals)
Geno Scaggs (bass)

booklet

Tracklist:
01. Hold Up Your Hand (Corley) 3.26
02. My Starter Won’t Start This Morning  3.20
03. What’d I Say (Charles) 2.46
04. One Kind Favor (Hopkins) 4.30
05. Baby Please Don’t Go (Broonzy) 3.00
06. Trouble In Mind (Jones) 3.13
07. Annie’s Blues (Hopkins) 2.31
08. Baby (Hopkins) 2.35
09. Little And Low (Hopkins) 3.33
10. I Hear You Calling (Hopkins) 2.06
11. Mojo Hand Part 1 (Hopkins/Robinson/Lewis) 3.06
12. Mojo Hand Part 2 Hopkins/Robinson/Lewis) 2.59
13. Have You Ever Had A Woman (Hopkins) 4.15
14. Ain’t It Crazy (Hopkins) 2.30
15. Black And Evil (Hopkins) 3.09
16. Rock Me Baby (King/Josea) 3.34
17. Hello Central (Hopkins) 4.35
18. Back Door Friend (Hopkins) 1.51
19. Little Girl, Little Girl (Hopkins) 6.03
20. It’s Better Down The Road (Hopkins) 2.36

label

*
**

 

Various Artists – New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival (1976)

FrontCover1This wonderful set of live recordings may have a few flaws audio-wise here and there, but there’s something in the excitement of the proceedings captured here that nullifies all of that. For sheer class, it’s hard to beat Irma Thomas’ or Allen Toussaint’s turns with the crowd, just as it’s impossible to ignore the loose and jagged performances of legends like Lightnin’ Hopkins and Professor Longhair, perhaps the centerpieces of this unheralded work of genius. The real thing in front of the hometown crowd, this is one modern-day live album with some spirit to it. (by Cub Koda)

Once a year, during the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, some of the greatest artists the Crescent City has to offer get together to revel in their colourful past and give fans a sample of what’s in store for the future. The 1976 Jazz & Heritage Festival was no exception to this tradition. The music contained within is not only indicative of the time it was recorded but also transcends time by affecting the popular music being produced today by bands like Galactic.

Most of the tracks on this album were recorded on April 9, 10, and 11 at the R&B segment of the festival. The album contains performances by jazz progenitors and New Orleans greats such as, Professor (‘Fess) Longhair, Allen Toussaint, Irma Thomas, Lee Dorsey, Ernie K-Doe, Robert Parker, Earl King, and Lightnin’ Hopkins.

This is some of the most heartfelt and feel-good music I’ve heard in a while and it’s bound to make you feel the same way. (onepointeightseconds.blogspot)

AlternateFrontCoverAlternate frontcover

In 1989 this album was re-rleased by Rhino Records with a complete different cover and artwork.

Tracks 1 to 5 rec. on riverboat “President” 9/4/1976.
Tracks 8, 9, 12 to 14 & 17 to 21 rec. New Orleans Fairgrounds 11/4/1976.
Tracks 6, 7, 15 & 16 rec. Sea-Saint Recording Studio 11/9/1976.
Tracks 10 & 11 rec. Sea-Saint Recording Studio 26/9/1976.

Booklet1Tracklist:

Allen Toussaint:
01. High Life (Toussaint) 1.56
02. Sweet Touch Of Love (Toussaint) 3.09
03. Play Something Sweet (Toussaint) 3.48
04. Shoorah, Shoorah (Toussaint) 3.33
05. Freedom For The Stallion (Toussaint) 3.33

Lee Dorsey:
06. Workin’ In A Coal Mine (Toussaint) 2.40
07. Holy Cow (Toussaint) 3.24

Ernie K-Doe:
08. Ain’t It The Truth (K-Doe) 4.09
09. Mother-In-Law (Toussaint) 3.01

Robert Parker:   
10. Barefootin’ (Parker) 3.17
11. Country Side Of Life (Parker) 2.56

Irma Thomas & The Tommy Ridgley Band:
12. You Can Have My Husband But Please Don’t Mess With My Man (La Bostrie) 3.29
13. Cry On (Neville) 3.08
14. I Done My Part (Neville) 2.43

Earl King: 
15. Mama & Papa (Johnson) 4.36
16. Trick Bag (Johnson) 4.39

Lightnin’ Hopkins:  
17. Mojo Hand (Hopkins) 3.13
18. Baby Please Don’t Go (Hopkins) 3.27
19. All Night Long (Hopkins) 3.42

Professor Longhair:   
20. Tipitina (Byrd) 3.29
21. Mardi Gras In New Orleans (Byrd) 2.56

LabelD1*
**

Logo