Dick Hyman – Moog – The Electric Eclectics Of Dick Hyman (1969)

frontcover1In the late ’60s, pianist Dick Hyman, famous for “Moritat, Theme from Threepenny Opera,” aexperimented with various keyboard instruments, including Baldwin and Lowrey organs. This release was his first with what was then a completely newfangled machine, the Moog synthesizer. Hyman took the Moog by the horns and milked it for all it was worth on nine originals, including the monster hit single “The Minotaur” (which inspired Emerson, Lake and Palmer’s “Lucky Man”).

The first few tracks are in a pop-song mold, but they are pop songs composed as only a jazz musician with two decades of experience under his belt could. Hyman then hits the listener with a few spacier, improvised numbers that come off as very accessible avant-garde music. Following the “The Minotaur” are two improvised pieces. Moog: The Electric Eclectics of Dick Hyman ends with “Evening Thoughts,” an impressionistic track reminiscent of “Ebb Tide” by Earl Grant, on which the sounds of the seashore are conjured up on various keyboard instruments. Hyman writes about his intentions for each track in the liner notes.

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Aside from some other Moog tracks sprinkled throughout DCC Compact Classics’ Music for a Bachelor’s Den series, it’s surprising that it’s taken this long in the lounge reissue bonanza for the Moog to finally appear (not counting The Moog Cookbook, a fab spinning of modern rock nuggets into string cheese.) Moog features three bonus tracks from Hyman’s next album Age of Electronicus; his recasting of James Brown’s “Give It Up or Turn It Loose” is well worth the price of admission.

Though this album could easily be tossed into the novelty or “period piece” category, it was not originally intended as that. Hyman recorded a showcase what this new instrument could do, and in the process made an enjoyable album. (by Jim Powers)

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Personnel:
Dick Hyman (synthesizer)

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Tracklist:
01. The Topless Dancers Of Corfu 3.01
02. The Legend Of Johnny Pot 2.04
03. The Moog And Me 3.00
04. Tap Dance In The Memory Banks 2.30
05. Four Duets In Odd Meter 4.28
08. The Minotaur 8.26
09. Total Bells And Tony 2.01
10. Improvisation In Fourths 2.24
11. Evening Thoughts 3.20

Composed by Dick Hyman

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Review in “Variety”, 1969

 

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Dick Hyman – Provocative Piano (1960)

FrontCover1Richard “Dick” Hyman (born March 8, 1927) is an American jazz pianist/keyboardist and composer, best known for his versatility with jazz piano styles. Over a 60-year career, he has functioned as a pianist, organist, arranger, music director, and, increasingly, as a composer.

Hyman was born in New York City. He trained classically by his mother’s brother, the concert pianist Anton Rovinsky, a fixture of the pre-war art scene in New York, noted for having premiered some of Charles Ives’s works, such as The Celestial Railroad in 1928. Hyman said of Rovinsky, “He was my most important teacher. I learned touch from him and a certain amount of repertoire, especially Beethoven. On my own I pursued Chopin. I loved his ability to take a melody and embellish it in different arbitrary ways, which is exactly what we do in jazz. Chopin would have been a terrific jazz pianist. His waltzes are in my improvising to this day.” Dick’s older brother, Arthur, introduced him to the music of Bix Beiderbecke, Louis Armstrong, Teddy Wilson, and others. By high school, he was playing in dance bands throughout Westchester County.

Hyman completed his freshman year at Columbia University, and in June 1945, he enlisted DickHyman01in the Army, transferred to the Navy, and began playing in the band department. When he returned to Columbia, he won an on-air piano competition, earning him 12 free lessons with Teddy Wilson, the Swing Era pianist who a decade earlier had broken the race barrier as a member of the Benny Goodman Trio. A few years later, Hyman himself became Goodman’s pianist.

While developing a facility for improvisation in his own piano style, Hyman has also investigated ragtime and the earliest periods of jazz and has researched and recorded the piano music of Scott Joplin, Jelly Roll Morton, James P. Johnson, Zez Confrey, Eubie Blake and Fats Waller which he often features in his frequent recitals. Hyman recorded two highly regarded ragtime albums under the pseudonym “Knuckles O’Toole”, and included two original compositions.[citation needed] In 1952, he played with Charlie Parker on the only television appearance Parker ever made; the band included Dizzy Gillespie and played Hot House.

In the 1960s, he was regularly seen on NBC-TV’s weekly musical series Sing Along with Mitch. Other solo recordings include the music of Irving Berlin, Harold Arlen, Cole Porter, George Gershwin, and Duke Ellington. He recorded as a member of the Dick Hyman Trio, including a 78 rpm hit called ‘Baubles Bangles and Beads.’ During the 1970s, he was also member of Soprano Summit.

Hyman served as artistic director for the Jazz in July series at New York’s 92nd Street Y for twenty years, a post from which he stepped down in 2004. (He was succeeded in that post by his cousin, Bill Charlap, a jazz pianist.) He continues his Jazz Piano at the Y series as well as his post as jazz advisor to The Shedd Institute’s Oregon Festival of American Music. In 1995, he was inducted into the Jazz Hall of Fame of the Rutgers Institute of Jazz Studies and the New Jersey Jazz Society.

Hyman has had an extensive career in New York as a studio musician and won seven Most DickHyman02Valuable Player Awards from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. He acted as music director for such television programs as Benny Goodman’s final appearance (on PBS) and for In Performance at the White House. For five years (1969–1974), he was the in-studio organist for the stunt game show Beat the Clock. He received an Emmy Award for his original score for Sunshine’s on the Way, a daytime drama, and another for musical direction of a PBS Special on Eubie Blake. He continues to be a frequent guest performer with The Jim Cullum Jazz Band on the long-running public radio series Riverwalk Jazz, and has been heard on Terry Gross’ Fresh Air. He has also collaborated with Ruby Braff extensively on recordings at Arbors Records.

Dick Hyman’s Century of Jazz Piano, an encyclopedic series of solo performances, has been released on Arbors Records. Other new recordings include Thinking About Bix and E Pluribus Duo with Ken Peplowski.

Hyman has served as composer/arranger/conductor/pianist for the Woody Allen films Zelig, The Purple Rose of Cairo, Broadway Danny Rose, Stardust Memories, Hannah and Her Sisters, Radio Days, Bullets Over Broadway, Everyone Says I Love You, Sweet and Lowdown, The Curse of the Jade Scorpion and Melinda and Melinda. He was also the music coordinator, arranger, and conductor for Allen’s multi-Oscar-winning Mighty Aphrodite, which featured the Dick Hyman Orchestra and Chorus.[citation needed]

His other film scores include Moonstruck, Scott Joplin, The Lemon Sisters and Alan and Naomi. His music has also been heard in Mask, Billy Bathgate, Two Weeks Notice, and other films. He was music director of The Movie Music of Woody Allen, which premiered at the Hollywood Bowl.

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Hyman composed and performed the score for the Cleveland/San Jose Ballet Company’s Piano Man, and Twyla Tharp’s The Bum’s Rush for the American Ballet Theatre. He was the pianist/conductor/arranger in Tharp’s Eight Jelly Rolls, Baker’s Dozen, and The Bix Pieces and similarly arranged and performed for Miles Davis: Porgy and Bess, a choreographed production of the Dance Theater of Dallas. In 2007, his Adventures of Tom Sawyer, which had been commissioned by the John G. Shedd Institute for the Arts, and set by Toni Pimble of the Eugene Ballet, premiered in Eugene, Oregon.

In the 1960s, Hyman recorded several innovative pop albums on Enoch Light’s Command Records. At first, he used the Lowrey organ, on the albums Electrodynamics, Fabulous, Keyboard Kaleidoscope and The Man From O.R.G.A.N. He later recorded several albums on the Moog synthesizer which mixed original compositions and cover versions, including Moog: The Electric Eclectics of Dick Hyman, and The Age of Electronicus. The former has now been reissued on CD by Varese Sarabande with some, but not all, of the tracks from The Age of Electronicus.

The track “The Minotaur” from The Electric Eclectics charted in the US top-40,[5] (#20 Canada) becoming the first Moog single hit (although, as originally released on 45, it was labeled as the B-side to the shorter “Topless Dancers of Corfu”). Some elements from the track “The Moog And Me” (most notably the whistle that serves as the song’s lead-in) on the same album were sampled by Beck for the track “Sissyneck” on his 1996 album Odelay. (by wikipedia)

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Dick Hyman and His Orchestra pretty much stick to jazz-flavored, though often upbeat, easy listening arrangements on this studio session. No matter how flashy his piano is, the musical backgrounds are rather monotonous and the amount of actual improvising at the keyboard is minimal. The music includes reworkings of Chopin’s “Polonaise” and his “Nocturne in E Flat,” an excerpt from the first movement of Tchaikovsky’s “Piano Concerto No. 1,” as well as pretty if hardly memorable treatments of “Autumn Leaves,” “Canadian Sunset,” and Claude Thornhill’s “Autumn Nocturne.” Although Dick Hyman is a first-rate musician who is always dependable in a true jazz setting, this long unavailable LP will be of little interest to jazz fans. (by Ken Dryden)

But it´s a high class “easy listening” album !

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Personnel:
Dick Hyman (piano)
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unknown orchestra

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Tracklist:
01. Cumana (Spino/Hillman/Allen) 3.12
02. Near You (Craig/Goell) 2.51
03. Polonaise (Traditional) 2.17
04. Autumn Leaves (Kosmo/Mercer/Prevert) 3.13
05. Piano Concerto (Tschaikowsky) 2.19
06. Canadian Sunset (Heywood) 3.19
07. Warsaw Concerto (Addinsell) 3.25
08. Sunrise Serenade (Carle/Lawrence) 3.00
09. Miserlou (Wise/Leeds/Roubanis/Arkuss) 3.04
10. Nocturne (Chopin) 3.14
11. Nola (Arndt/Skylar) 2.55
12. Autumn Nocturne (Myrow/Gannon) 3.15

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