Richard Galliano & Jean-Charles Capon – Blues Sur Seine (1992)

FrontCover1Richard Galliano (born December 12, 1950, Cannes, Alpes-Maritimes) is a French accordionist of Italian heritage.

He was drawn to music at an early age, starting with the accordion at 4, influenced by his father Luciano, an accordionist originally from Italy, living in Nice.

After a long and intense period of study (he took up lessons on the trombone, harmony, and counterpoint at the Academy of Music in Nice), at 14, in a search to expand his ideas on the accordion, he began listening to jazz and heard records by the trumpet player Clifford Brown. “I copied all the choruses of Clifford Brown, impressed by his tone and his drive, his way of phrasing over the thunderous playing of Max Roach”. Fascinated by this new world, Richard was amazed that the accordion had never been part of this musical adventure. In this period, Galliano won twice the first prize in the “world accordion cap competition” which took place in Spain (1966) and France (1967). In the Spanish competition, the participants’ duty work was “Chaconne” by the Israeli accordionist Yehuda Oppenheimer. Galliano and Oppenheimer kept up their musical collaboration and personal friendship until Oppenheimer’s death in 2012.

Some later collaborations include Astor Piazolla, George Mraz, Brigitte Fontaine, Al Foster, Juliette Greco, Charles Aznavour, Ron Carter, Chet Baker, Enrico Rava, Martial Solal, Miroslav Vitouš, Trilok Gurtu, Jan Garbarek, Michel Petrucciani, Michel Portal, Eddy Louiss, Biréli Lagrène, Sylvain Luc, Renaud Garcia-Fons, Ivan Paduart, Anouar Brahem, Wynton Marsalis, and Toots Thielemans. He was a key member of Claude Nougaro’s band for several years as a pianist and accordionist. (by wikipedia)

Richard Galliano

And here´s a pretty good album featuring Jean-Charles Capon:

What a handsome couple ! From the first bars of this duo, the obviousness of this meeting captured in 1992 is essential. The accordionist and the cellist do wonders both as soloist and as accompanist. Without the bow, Jean-Charles Capon (“the Lester Young of the cello” according to his playmate) could even pass for a double bass player. Their “blues” is obvious. However, between one of the princely instruments of the classical repertoire and the symbol of popular music, there was, a priori, a world. A unity of tone emerges, between the light mood of the musette colors and the sobs contained in a virtuoso bow. (Renaud Czarnes)

Resumption of the famous duet Capon-Galliano, where the marriage of the cello and the accordion delivers us a real little music in which the charm is constant, where the tones, of the most mixed, give a very warm accent to these reunions of time . Both of them light up the blues and we can only thrill with happiness listening to this album which will soon be 10 years old and has not aged. (Jazz Notes)

Jean-Charles Capon
A CD published in 1992 but nevertheless appearing in the recent catalog of Frémeaux. A masterpiece that it was good to resuscitate. Accordion, yes, but not just any: that of Richard Galliano associated with the cello of Jean-Charles Capon. Curious mixture? Absolutely not. In addition to the original compositions of these two virtuoso artites (Blues sur Seine, Kitou, Neigerie, Bateau mouche), we should also mention the titles of Toots Thielemans or Henri Sauget. The icing on the cake, here are the words of Galliano, which appear in the booklet: “In the minds of a large part of the public, the accordion and the cellist belong to two very distinct social strata. Through this disc, we aim to demonstrate that these two instruments are as noble as each other ”. Bernard Deharbre)

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Personnel:
Jean-Charles Capon (cello)
Richard Galliano (accordeon)

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Tracklist:
01. Blues Sur Seine (Galliano) 4.44
02. For My Lady (Thielemans) 5.08
03. Un Pied Dans Le Caniveau (Capon) 4.29
04. Waltz For Debby (Evans/Lees) 3.36
05. Laura Et Astor (Galliano) 3.10
06. Kitou (Capon) 4.57
07. Les Forains (Sauguet) 4.10
08. Tears (Reinhardt) 3.53
09. Good Bye Miles (Capon) 5.00
10. Neigerie (Galliano) 4.09
11. Fou Rire (Galliano) 3.29
12. Bateau Mouche (Capon) 3.19

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In the minds of a large part of the public, the accordion and the cello belong to two distinct social strata which are very distant from each other. Through this disc we aim to demonstrate that these two instruments are as noble as each other, that their marriage is very rich, that the repertoire can be the most universal there is, and finally that the blues is a musical language in its own right, the content of which does not only go through Harlem. Paris I love you… (Richard Galliano)

More than the unusual sound mixture, it is the meeting of two musical personalities that interests me, and twelve years ago, I proposed to Richard to form this duo. How in the business impose in France an accordion which is not only musette and a cello which is not only classical? Two extraordinary instruments that want to be jazz but French. As Brassens said, “good people don’t like to follow a different route than they do”. We met in Paris and we both live near the Canal Saint-Martin. “Atmosphere, atmosphere?” Blues … on the Seine. Jean-Charles Capon

Oregon – Live In NYC (1994)

FrontCover1Oregon is an American jazz and world music group formed in 1970 by Ralph Towner, Paul McCandless, Glen Moore, and Collin Walcott.

Towner and Moore had been friends and occasional collaborators since meeting in 1960 as students at the University of Oregon. By 1969, both were working musicians living in New York; while collaborating with folksinger Tim Hardin they were introduced to world music pioneer Paul Winter’s “Consort” ensemble, particularly member Collin Walcott, with whom Towner began improvising as an informal duo. By 1970 Towner and Moore had joined the Winter Consort and met fellow member McCandless; the four began exploring improvisation on their own, while their contributions continued to be seminal in redefining the Winter Consort “sound” in compositions like Towner’s “Icarus”.

The four musicians made their first group recording in 1970, but the label, Increase Records, went out of business before it could be released (it eventually was issued by Vanguard in 1980 as Our First Record). Oregon made its “formal” debut in NYC in 1971 (originally named “Thyme — Music of Another Present Era”, the name change to Oregon was suggested by McCandless).

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The group’s first release Music of Another Present Era was issued on Vanguard in 1972 (the four also recorded for ECM, though the recording, 1973’s Trios Solos, was billed as “Ralph Towner with Glen Moore”). With those initial recordings and the follow-ups Distant Hills (1973) and Winter Light (1974) (all on Vanguard), Oregon established itself as one of the leading improvisational groups of its day, blending Indian and Western classical music [1] with jazz, folk, space music [2] and avant-garde elements. The group released numerous albums on Vanguard throughout the 1970s, also making three records for Elektra/Asylum between 1978 and 1980 (including the highly acclaimed Out of the Woods and a live recording taken from performances at Carnegie Hall and in Canada in late 1979).

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After a couple years’ hiatus devoted to individual projects (including the birth of Walcott’s daughter in 1980), the group reassembled, recording for ECM, releasing the eponymous Oregon in 1983 and Crossing in 1984. Before the latter’s release, however, during a 1984 tour Walcott was killed in an automobile accident in the former East Germany. Oregon temporarily disbanded, but regrouped in May 1985 at a memorial concert for Walcott in NYC, with Indian percussionist Trilok Gurtu sitting in (Walcott’s own choice for his replacement should it become necessary). In 1986 Gurtu was invited to join Oregon; the band resumed touring and released three albums during his five years as a member.

After Trilok Gurtu’s departure, the group continued as a trio, issuing two albums during that period. The 1997 album Northwest Passage marked a return to the inclusion of percussion, featuring either drummer Mark Walker or Turkish Armenian percussionist Arto Tunçboyacıyan on most tracks; subsequently, Walker was taken on as a full member.

Paul McCandless

In 1999 the ensemble traveled to Moscow, Russia to record with the Tchaikovsky Symphony Orchestra of Moscow Radio, premiering orchestral compositions that had been in development for years, some dating back to their first days with the Winter Consort; that project’s 2000 release Oregon in Moscow garnered four Grammy nominations. 2002 saw the release of Live at Yoshi’s, recorded in San Francisco, the first live Oregon recording in two decades.

In March 2015, it was announced that Glen Moore was departing from the group, with bassist Paolino Dalla Porta replacing him.

As of 2019, Oregon has no further plans to exist as a touring ensemble. (by wikipedia)

And here´s a wonderful bootleg, a radio concert to promote their album “Troika”, another hightlight in the grat history of this group.

Taken from a live radio broadcast originally recorded onto cassette tape. This is from the bands brief period where they were only a trio, after founding member Collin Walcott’s death and after his replacement, percussionist Trilok Gurtu, departed after being in the band for several years. During this period the band did record two albums as a trio, “Troika” and “Beyond Words” before adding percussion (and a forth member) back into the group.

Recorded live at the Symphony Space, New York City, May 26, 1994
excellent braodast recording

Glen Moore

Personnel:
Paul McCandless (saxophone, oboe)
Glen Moore (bass)
Ralph Towner (guitar, piano, synthesizer)

Oregon03Tracklist:
01. Waterwheel 25.28
02. Dialogue / Interview 4.36
03. Nightfall 12.23
04. Mariella 7.42
05. Charlotte’s Tangle 5.29

Music composed by Ralph Towner

Ralph Towner

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Philip Catherine – End Of August (1982)

FrontCover1Philip Catherine (born 27 October 1942) is a Belgian jazz guitarist.

Philip Catherine was born in London to an English mother and Belgian father and was raised in Brussels. His grandfather played violin in the London Symphony Orchestra. Catherine started on guitar in his teens, and by seventeen he was performing professionally at local venues.

He released his debut album, Stream, in 1972. During the next few years, he studied at Berklee College of Music in Boston and with Mick Goodrick and George Russell. In 1976, he and guitarist Larry Coryell recorded and toured as an acoustic duo. The following year he recorded with Charles Mingus, who dubbed him “Young Django”. In the early 1980s, he toured briefly with Benny Goodman. He was in PhilipCatherine01trio with Didier Lockwood and Christian Escoudé, then in a trio with Chet Baker. During the 1990s, he recorded three albums with trumpeter Tom Harrell.

Catherine has also worked with Lou Bennett, Kenny Drew, Dexter Gordon, Stéphane Grappelli, Karin Krog, Paul Kuhn, Sylvain Luc, Michael Mantler, Charlie Mariano, Palle Mikkelborg, Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen, Enrico Rava, Toots Thielemans, and Miroslav Vitous. (by wikipedia)

“He is one of the most accomplished and rewarding guitarists now playing jazz. (Downbeat)

“Philip Catherine is one of the last ‘romantics’ in jazz. Philip Catherine doesn’t play music: he ís music. A lyricism that hits the unconscience. Music, music, sometimes with an air of simplicity that makes you believe nothing is easier than observe a photon in it’s course. Great art.” (Francis Marmande. Le Monde)

Listen to this album and you´ll know why he is one the most important jezz guitar player from Europe.

On this album you an also hear another giant of Jazz … Charlie Mariano on saxophone !

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Personnel:
Philip Catherine (guitar)
Nicolas Fiszman (guitar, bass)
Trilok Gurtu (percussion, cymbals, tabla)
Charlie Mariano (saxophone, bamboo flute)
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Toots Thielemans (harmonica on 05. + 08.)

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Tracklist:
01. Petit Nicolas (Catherine) 5.08
02. Grand Nicolas (Catherine) 5.06
03. Janet (Catherine) 9.17
04. September Start (Catherine) 6.14
05. Goodbye (Jenkins) 4.52
06. Birth Of August (Catherine) 2.47
07. End Of August (Catherine) 3.11
08. Presque (Thielemans/Catherine) 0.47

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Chicago – Night & Day – Big Band (1995)

FrontCover1Night & Day: Big Band is the eighteenth studio album by the American band Chicago, and twenty-second overall, released in 1995. It is a departure from Top 40 material for a more thematic project, with a focus on classic big band and swing music.

Chicago left Reprise Records and started their own imprint, Chicago Records, to re-distribute their music. This album was carried by Giant Records, a subsidiary of Warner Music, who also distributes Reprise.

With producer Bruce Fairbairn, Chicago recorded Night & Day: Big Band from late 1994 to early 1995 and released it that May. Although Bruce Gaitsch played guitar on the sessions, the guitar slot would eventually be filled that year by Keith Howland, who remains Chicago’s present guitarist. Joe Perry of Aerosmith was brought in to add a solo to “Blues in the Night.”

The album reached #90 in the US, on the Billboard 200 chart.

Chicago made its “television variety debut” in February 1973 on a television special honoring Duke Ellington, “Duke Ellington … We Love You Madly,” which aired on CBS. They performed the Ellington composition, “Jump for Joy.” They were the only rock musicians invited to appear on the show. Walter Parazaider cited the group’s participation in the television special, and Duke Ellington’s comments to them afterwards, as important factors in their decision to record this album (by wikipedia)

Chicago 1995

Generally, when contemporary performers have taken on retro projects like this one, they have tended to emphasize their fidelity to the sources — consider Linda Ronstadt hiring arranger/conductor Nelson Riddle to recreate his string backgrounds for albums like What’s New. Chicago takes a different approach to the swing band classics it tackles here — it Chicago-izes them. The arrangements are by trombonist James Pankow, who manages to make everything from Duke Ellington’s “Caravan” to Glenn Miller’s theme “Moonlight Serenade” sound like a lost Chicago track. Those familiar with the originals, many of which were instrumental hits, may be surprised to hear the lyrics to songs like “Sing, Sing, Sing.” Clearly, the group is aiming more at pleasing contemporary fans than evoking nostalgia, and it succeeds in reinventing some well-established standards, even if older fans may find some of these versions radically altered. (by William Ruhlmann)

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Great production and very high musicianship. If you are of a certain age and don’t want to hear stylistically different versions of the classics then this is not for you. These are not covers, but rather they are versions of this great music. I had to listen a couple of times before I really started to appreciate these reimagined arrangements. Moonlight Serenade, Chicago, In The Mood, and Take The A Train are highlights. One of my very favorite Chicago recordings. It reminded me of when they were great once upon a time. Only thing that would have made this better is if Danny Seraphine with his jazz-fusion style were the drummer. Tris Imboden is a good drummer, but not suited to this type of music. The band swings, but Tris doesn’t. (Ralph Longo)

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Personnel:
Bill Champlin (keyboards, guitar, vocals)
Bruce Gaitsch (guitar)
Tris Imboden (drums, harmonica)
Robert Lamm (keyboards, vocals)
Lee Loughnane (trumpet, flugelhorn)
James Pankow (trombone)
Walter Parazaider (woodwinds)
Jason Scheff (bass, vocals)
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Luis Conte (percussion)
Jack Duncan (percussion on 06.)
Sal Ferreras (percussion on 06.)
Jade (vocals on 03.)
Joe Perry (guitar on 07.)
Paul Shaffer (piano on 03.)
Bruce Fairbairn (trumpet solo on 01.)
Tonino Baliardo (guitar on 08.)
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The Gipsy Kings:
Nicolas Reyes and Patchai Reyes (vocals, rumba flamenco guitar)

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Tracklist:
01. Chicago (Fisher/Lamm) 3.07
02. Caravan (Ellington/Mills/Tizol) 3.23
03. Dream A Little Dream Of Me (André/Kahn/Schwandt) 3.13
04. Goody Goody (Malneck/Mercer) 4.04
05. Moonlight Serenade (Miller/Parish) 4.26
06. Night And Day (Porter) 5.36
07. Blues In The Night (Arlen/Mercer) 6.05
08. Sing, Sing, Sing (Prima) 3.22
09. Sophisticated Lady (Ellington/Mills/Parish) 5.11
10. In The Mood (Garland/Razaf) 3.44
11. Don’t Get Around Much Anymore (Ellington/Russell) 3.39
12. Take The “A” Train (Strayhorn) 5.36

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Herbie Hancock – Takin’ Off (1962)

FrontCover1Takin’ Off is the debut album by jazz pianist Herbie Hancock released in 1962 by Blue Note Records. The recording session features Freddie Hubbard on trumpet and Dexter Gordon on tenor saxophone. The album is in the hard bop idiom, with its characteristic two horns and a rhythm section. The bluesy track “Watermelon Man” made it to the Top 100 of the singles charts, and went on to become a jazz standard. The album has been called “one of the most accomplished and stunning debuts in the annals of jazz.”[7] It was released on CD in 1996 with three alternate takes and then remastered in 2007 by Rudy Van Gelder. The 2007 edition includes new liner notes by Bob Blumenthal. (b wikipedia)

Herbie Hancock’s debut as a leader, Takin’ Off, revealed a composer and pianist able to balance sophistication and accessibility, somewhat in the vein of Blue Note’s prototype hard bopper Horace Silver. Yet while Hancock could be just as funky and blues-rooted as Silver, their overall styles diverged in several ways: Hancock was lighter and more cerebral, a bit more adventurous in his harmonies, and more apt to break his solos out of a groove (instead of using them to create one). So even if, in retrospect, Takin’ Off is among Hancock’s most conventional albums, it shows a young stylist already strikingly mature for his age, and one who can interpret established forms with spirit and imagination. Case in point: the simple, catchy “Watermelon Man,” which became a Hancock signature tune and a jazz standard in the wake of a hit cover by Latin jazz star Mongo Santamaria.

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Hancock’s original version is classic Blue Note hard bop: spare, funky piano riffing and tight, focused solo statements. The other compositions are memorable and well-constructed too (if not quite hit material); all have their moments, but particular highlights include the ruminative ballad “Alone and I,” the minor-key “The Maze” (which features a little bit of free improvisation in the rhythm section), and the bluesy “Empty Pockets.” The backing group includes then up-and-coming trumpeter Freddie Hubbard, tenor saxophonist Dexter Gordon, bassist Butch Warren, and drummer Billy Higgins. All in all, Takin’ Off is an exceptional first effort, laying the groundwork for Hancock to begin pushing the boundaries of hard bop on his next several records. (by Steve Huey)

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Personnel:
Dexter Gordon (saxophone)
Herbie Hancock (piano)
Billy Higgins (drums)
Freddie Hubbard (trumpet)
Butch Warren (bass)

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Tracklist:
01. Watermelon Man 7.09
02. Three Bags Full 5.27
03. Empty Pockets 6.12
04. The Maze 6.49
05. Driftin’ 6.58
06. Alone and I 6.30
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07. Watermelon Man (alternate take) 6.35
08. Three Bags Full (alternate take) 5.32
09. Empty Pockets (alternate take) 6.28

Music composed by Herbie Hancock.

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This album brought Herbie to the attention of Miles Davis, who was looking for a keyboard player at the time.

He then joined the Miles Davis Quintet in 1963, with whom he remained for five years, whilst continuing to release his solo material for Blue Note Records.

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Connie Francis – Who´s Sorry Now (1958)

LPFrontCover1.jpgWho’s Sorry Now? is the first studio album recorded by U. S. Entertainer Connie Francis.

By 1957, none of Connie Francis’ first nine solo singles had charted. Her duet single with Marvin Rainwater, “The Majesty Of Love”, b/w “You, my Darlin’ You” had only been a minor hit, peaking at # 93 (though it sold over one million copies). As a result of these failures, the managers at MGM Records had decided not to renew her contract after the last scheduled single release.

During what was supposed to be her last recording session for MGM Records in October 1957, Francis recorded a cover version of the song “Who’s Sorry Now?”. For quite some time, Francis’ father, George Franconero, Sr., had wanted his daughter to record this song with a contemporary arrangement, but the discussion had become heated and Francis had refused to record it, considering the song old fashioned and corny. Her father persisted and Francis agreed.

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As her father had predicted, “Who’s Sorry Now?”, released as MGM Records Single K 12588, became a huge hit. With this success, MGM Records renewed the contract with Francis. The recording sessions for a new album, which would include the breakthrough hit, began in March 1958 and were completed in April 1958.

The album’s formula is clearly inspired by the arrangement of its title song: Choose Standards from the time between the 1910s and 1940s, but present them in a contemporary arrangement. To give the album some diversity in music styles, there were two exceptions: “My Melancholy Baby” and “How Deep is the Ocean,” which featured grand orchestra arrangements. When the album was released in May 1958, it failed to chart. The album was re-packaged with a new cover design and re-released in March 1962. (by wikipedia)

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The music for the brilliant song Who’s Sorry Now? was written by Ted Snyder with lyrics by Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby, and published in 1923. Snyder (1881-1965) gave Irving Berlin his start in the music business by hiring him in 1909 as a song plugger for his publishing company, as I wrote here. Kalmar (1884-1947) ran away from his home in New York at the age of ten and worked in a travelling tent show as a magician. He performed in vaudeville mainly as a comedian and began writing material for his own and other performers. He did not have much success until he met Ruby and they began working together. Ruby (1895-1959), also from New York, failed at his early ambition to become a professional baseball player. He then toured the vaudeville circuit as a pianist. Kalmar and Ruby were a successful songwriting team for nearly three decades.

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Who’s Sorry Now? was featured in the 1946 Marx Brothers film A Night in Casablanca, but was best known as a hit for Connie Francis. She had released nine records which all flopped when she went into the studio in October 1957 for the last session in her ten-record contract with MGM. Her father wanted her to record Who’s Sorry Now? but she didn’t like the song, and deliberately took so long at the session with other numbers that there was almost no time left. She recorded Who’s Sorry Now? with just a few seconds to spare on the tape. In April 1958, it reached No 4 in the US and No 1 in Britain. (am-records.com)

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Personnel:
Connie Francis (vocals)
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Joe Lipman Orchstra

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Tracklist:
01. Who’s Sorry Now (Snyder/Kalmar/Ruby) 2.20
02. I’m Nobody’s Baby (Davis/Ager/Santly) 2.24
03. It’s The Talk Of The Town (Livingston/Neiburg/Symes) 2.55
04. I Miss You So (Henderson/Robin/Scott) 2.35
05. I Cried For You (Arnheim/Freed/Lyman) 2.59
06. Heartaches (Hoffman/Klenner) 2.34
07. I’m Beginning To See The Light (Ellington/Hodges/James/George) 2.41
08. My Melancholy Baby (Burnett/Norton) 3.54
09. You Always Hurt The One You Love (Fisher/Roberts) 2.26
10. How Deep Is The Ocean (Berlin) 2.25
11. If I Had You (King/Shapiro) 2.48
12. I’ll Get By (Ahlert/Turk) 2.48
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13. Too Young (Dee/Lippman) 2.56
14. That´s My Desire (Kressa/Loveday) 3.22
15. April Love (Webster/Fain) 3.57

(taken from the Connie Francis album “One For The Boys” (1959)

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Louis Armstrong – I Will Wait For You (1968)

FrontCover1.jpgLouis Armstrong (1901–1971), nicknamed Satchmo[1] or Pops, was an American trumpeter, composer, singer and occasional actor who was one of the most influential figures in jazz and in all of American popular music. His career spanned five decades, from the 1920s to the 1960s, and different eras in jazz.

Coming to prominence in the 1920s as an “inventive” trumpet and cornet player, Armstrong was a foundational influence in jazz, shifting the focus of the music from collective improvisation to solo performance. With his instantly recognizable gravelly voice, Armstrong was also an influential singer, demonstrating great dexterity as an improviser, bending the lyrics and melody of a song for expressive purposes. He was also skilled at scat singing.

Renowned his charismatic stage presence and voice almost as much as for his trumpet-playing, Armstrong’s influence extends well beyond jazz music, and by the end of his career in the 1960s, he was widely regarded as a profound influence on popular music in general. Armstrong was one of the first truly popular African-American entertainers to “cross over”, whose skin color was secondary to his music in an America that was extremely racially divided. He rarely publicly politicized his race, often to the dismay of fellow African-Americans, but took a well-publicized stand for desegregation in the Little Rock Crisis. His artistry and personality allowed him socially acceptable access to the upper echelons of American society which were highly restricted for black men of his era. (by wikipedia)

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Recorded late in Louis Armstrong’s life, this obscure LP finds his All-Stars of the period (which included trombonist Tyree Glenn and clarinetist Joe Muranyi) joined by several studio musicians and a choir, arranged and conducted by Dick Jacobs. At this point in time, Armstrong’s trumpet solos were quite brief and basic, although usually effective. The emphasis throughout is on his vocalizing, mostly on then-current show tunes such as “Talk to the Animals” (from Doctor Dolittle), “Willkommen” (from Cabaret) and “Sunrise, Sunset.” The choir weighs down the music; the extra musicians (which often include a banjo) water down the sound of the All-Stars; and the material is largely forgettable. Only the charm of Louis Armstrong makes this long-out-of-print album worthwhile. (by Scott Yanow)

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Personnel:
Louis Armstrong (trumpet, vocals)
Danny Barcelona  (drums)
Everett Barksdale (guitar)
Buddy Catlett (bass)
Joe Muranyi  (clarinet)
Marty Napoleon (piano)
Jimmy Notthingham (trumpet)
Art Ryerson (banjo)
Tyree Glenn (trombone)
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unknown choir

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Tracklist:
01. I Will Wait For You (Legrand/Gimbel/Demy) 3.17
02. Talk To The Animals (Bricusse) 4.18
03. The Gypsy In My Soul (Boland/Jaffe) 2.51
04. The Happy Time (Kander/Ebb) 2.25
05. I Believe (Drake/Shirl/Graham) 3.23
06. Wilkommen (Kander/Ebb) 2.53
07. You’ll Never Walk Alone (Rodgers/Hammerstein) 2.50
08. Sunrise, Sunset (Bock/Hornick) 2.57
09. Rosie (Mercer/Warren) 2.52
10. That’s My Desire (Kresa/Loveday) 2.58

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Inlet

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Louis Daniel Armstrong (August 4, 1901 – July 6, 1971)