John Pizzarelli – John Pizzarelli meets The Beatles (1998)

FrontCover1Beatles fans love to explain that the key to the successful partnership of John Lennon and Paul McCartney was their contrasting songwriting personalities — Lennon was the tongue in cheek sardonic wit, McCartney the earnest balladeer. On John Pizzarelli Meets the Beatles, a sharply conceived tribute which sets the duo’s classics in a jazz trio with big-band arrangements, the singer/guitarist hits the mark more often when he’s taking on the Lennon persona. He approaches “Cant’ Buy Me Love,” “When I’m 64,” and “Get Back” with a playful wink, jumping off his speedy melody lines and the rising brass sections for extended improvisational tradeoffs with pianist Ray Kennedy, and adding colorful touches like scatting and even ad libbing his own lyrical verses based on the originals. Likewise, he attacks the all-instrumental “Eleanor Rigby” with a jumpy, swinging aggression. Pizzarelli, however, becomes overly schmaltzy in presenting ballads like “You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away” and “Long and Winding Road” too seriously, with maudlin, straightforward arrangements that grind the party to a halt. The one exception is the more percussive “Oh Darling,” where his intense vocal helps the tune rise above the hotel lounge mentality. (by Jonathan Widran)

John Pizarelli

This is probably the most talked about CD I have made. The idea was to place the songs into a different time as if someone else had performed them first. For instance, “Can’t Buy Me Love” was a Woody Herman tune (hence, the Woodchopper’s Ball references), “Things We Said Today” was in the Moondance groove, “Here Comes The Sun” was a Jobim/Getz tribute, and so on. It is really a CD I am proud of, from Don Sebesky’s great arrangements (once again) to the terrific performances from the string players, big band members, soloists and trio. This CD was also #1 on the Swing Journal jazz charts in Japan and was released with two different songs in Canada. The Canadian version features the songs “You Can’t Do That” and “Got To Get You Into My Life.” They were nixed from the American release in favor of “Eleanor Rigby” and “You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away.” We also did a terrific concert for Canadian TV of the Beatle CD live entitled John Pizzarelli Chante Les Beatles. It has run on the BET on Jazz channel and features a Canadian big band and strings conducted by Don Sebesky. (John Pizzarelli)

Beatles fans love to explain that one key to the successful partnership of John Lennon and Paul McCartney was their contrasting songwriting personalities: Lennon was the tongue-in-cheek, sardonic wit, McCartney, the earnest balladeer. On john pizzarelli’s John Pizzarelli Meets the Beatles (RCA Victor), a well-conceived tribute that sets the duo’s classics in jazz-trio and big-band arrangements, the singer/guitarist hits the mark most often when taking on McCartney’s tunes. He approaches “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “When I’m 64,” and “Get Back” with a playful wink, jumping off his speedy melody lines and the rising brass sections for extended improvisational tradeoffs with pianist Ray Kennedy. Pizzarelli adds colorful touches like scatting and even ad-libs his own lyrical verses based on the originals. Likewise, he treats an instrumental version of “Eleanor Rigby” with an aggressive sense of swing. And his intense vocal on a percussive “Oh, Darling” helps the tune rise above mere cover-band fare. However, when Pizzarelli presents ballads like “You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away” and “Long and Winding Road” with maudlin arrangements, he pretty well grinds the party to a halt. (by Jazziz Maganzine, 2000)
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Personnel:
Harry Allen (saxophone)
Sanford Allen (violin)
Wayne Andre (trombone)
Kenny Berger (saxophone)
Joseph Bongiorno (bass)
Alfred Brown (violin)
Avril Brown (violin)
Kenneth Burward-Hoy (viola)
Stephanie Cummins (cello)
Rick Dolan (violin)
Max Ellen (violin)
Sammy Figueroa (percussion)
Barry Finclair (violin)
Andy Fusco  (saxophone)
Peter Gordon (french horn)
Adam Grabois (cello)
Juliet Haffner (viola)
Evan Johnson (violin)
Karen Karlsrud (violin)
Tony Kadleck (trumpet)
Gary Keller (saxophone)
Chungsun Kim (cello)
Jeanne LeBlanc (cello)
Jesse Levy (cello)
Lisa Matricardi (violin)
Melissa Meel (cello)
John Miller (bass)
John Mosca (trombone)
Laura Oatts (violin)
Jim O’Connor (rrumpet)
Ken Peplowski (clarinet)
Joel Pitchon (violin)
John Pizzarelli (guitar, vocals)
Martin Pizzarelli (bass)
Jim Pugh (trombone)
Allen Ralph (trombone)
Barry Ries (trumpet)
Maxine Roach (viola)
Douglas Romoff (bass)
Laura Seaton (violin)
Don Sebesky  (accordion, flute)
Richard Sortomme (violin)
Mitsue Takayama (viola)
Tony Tedesco (drums)
Liuh-Wen Ting (viola)
Leslie Tomkins (viola)
Ron Tooley (trumpet)
Belinda Whitney-Barratt (violin)
Chuck Wilson (saxophone)
Xin Zhao (violin)

Orchestra conducted by Don Sebesky

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Tracklist:
01. Can’t Buy Me Love 3.37
02. I’ve Just Seen A Face 2.49
03. Here Comes The Sun 5.05
04. Things We Said Today 4.16
05. You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away 3.26
06. Eleanor Rigby 5.03
07. And I Love Her 3.57
08. When I’m 64 2.46
09. Oh Darling 4.04
10. Get Back 4.03
11. Long And Winding Road 3.46
12. For No One 3.11

All songw written by John Lennon + Paul McCartney, except 03. which was written by George Harrison

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Various Artists – Percussion For Playboys (early 60´s)

frontcoveromega1A real strange LP …:

It starts with “Sports Car Races ” and you´ll hear the sounds of the motors of (Sport) cars …

And then you´ll hear a couple of unknown jazz bands like the Dick Marx Quintet … The Bay Big Band … The Frank Comstock Orchestra … and much more.

This one looks like it was released in… oh, say 1960/61. The LP is a compilation of whatever Omega had on the shelf at the moment… including several weird tracks that include a sound effects track from an automobile race and the track titled A Visit To A Hindu Monastery (that I tacked onto the sample track above)! There are no artist credits and there is precious little “percussion” on the album. Actually this is more of a “jazz” album. Omega slapped the provocative title and cheesecake photo on the cover and they were good to go. (by artworkbymanicmark.blogspot)

This is a sort of compilation from Omega record which is triply “lost” – it’s a long forgotten Album  on a long forgotten label  …

It´s jazz, it´s easy listening, it´s  a real strange Album and … it´s beautiful !

The UK version of the US compilation titled “Bedside Companion For Playboys”

This entry is dedicated to all the unknowns muscians from this golden era of Jazz !

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Tracklist:
01. Sports Car Races 1.51
02. Dick Marx Quintet:  Mickey Mouse Theme (Dodd) 2.37
03. Andre Montero: Take The “A” Train (Strayhorn) 3.47
04. Inez Jones with The Oscar Moore Quintet: Dancing On The Ceiling (Rodgers/Hart) 1:55
05. The Hi-Lo’s with The Frank Comstock Orchestra: Island Of Desire (Meyer/Jones) 2.39
06. The Lighthouse All-Stars: Coop Salutes (Cooper) 5.43
07. Los Gatos Ritmos: Return To Paradise (Tiomkin/Washington) 2.14
08. The Bay Big Band:  Latin Heat (Bolero) (Ravel) 3.22
09. Ernestine Anderson with Dick Marx Quintet Limehouse: Limehouse Blues (Farber/Braham)  4.18
10. Brussels World’s Fair Orchestra:  Laura (Raksin/Mercer 3.50
11. The Bay Big Band: Daybreak (Grafe) 2.25
12. Oscar Moore + Leroy Vinnegar: Angel Eyes (Dennis/Brent) 2.25
13. The John Evans Group:  It Ain’t Necessarily So (Gershwin) 3.46
14, A Visit To A Hindu Monastery 0.37

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Glenn Miller Orchestra (directed by Buddy de Franco) – Recorded Live Royal Festival Hall London (1971)

frontcover1Boniface Ferdinand Leonard “Buddy” DeFranco (February 17, 1923 – December 24, 2014) was an American jazz clarinet player. One of few clarinetists playing bebop, DeFranco was described by critic Scott Yannow as the leading American jazz musician on his instrument from the 1940s until Eddie Daniels came to prominence in the 1980s.[1] In addition to his own work as a bandleader, DeFranco led the Glenn Miller Orchestra for almost a decade in the 1960s and ’70s.
Born in Camden, New Jersey, DeFranco was raised in South Philadelphia. He was playing the clarinet by the time he was 9 years old and within five years had won a national Tommy Dorsey[2] swing contest.
He began his professional career just as swing music and big bands—many of which were led by clarinetists like Artie Shaw, and Benny Goodman—were in decline. While most jazz clarinet players did not adapt to this change, DeFranco successfully continued to play clarinet exclusively, and was one of the few bebop clarinetists.
In 1950, DeFranco spent a year with Count Basie’s Septet. He then led a small combo in the early 1950s which included pianist Sonny Clark and guitarist Tal Farlow. In this period, DeFranco recorded for MGM, Norgran and Verve; the latter two labels were owned by Norman Granz.
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During the years 1960-64, DeFranco released four innovative quartet albums as co-leader with the accordionist Tommy Gumina.
He was bandleader of the Glenn Miller Orchestra from 1966 to 1974, under the name, “The World Famous Glenn Miller Orchestra, Directed By Buddy DeFranco”. He also performed with Gene Krupa, Charlie Barnet, Art Tatum, Oscar Peterson, Billie Holiday and many others, and released dozens of albums as a leader.
DeFranco died in Panama City, Florida at the age of 91 (by wikipedia)
As far as I know, this Album was never released as Cd …
So enjoy another sentimental, listen to this brilliant Big Band Sound … ad you´ll hear some magic moments and much more !
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Personnel:
Bob Crea (saxophone, cornet)
Danny D’Imperio (drums)
Buddy de Franco (clarinet)
Bobby Hackett (trumpet, cornet)
Pat LaBarbera (Saxophone)
+
much more musicians
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Tracklist:
01. Medley: Moonlight Serenade (Miller/Parish)  + In The Mood (Garland) 4.05
02. A String Of Perls  (Gray) 3.36
03. Sunrise Serenade (Carle/Lawrence) 3.33
04. My Sentiment (Fischer/Guttmann) 2.54
05. Magic Moments (Bennett) 2.49
06. Bugle Call Rag (Myers/Schoebel/Pettis) 4.05
07. Tuxedo Junction (Feyne/Hawkins/Dash/Johnson) 3.06
08. Serenade In Blue (Warren) 3.24
09. The Odd Couple (Hefti) 5.00
10. American Patrol (Whitney/Gray) 3.07
11. St. Louis Blues March (Handy) 3.48
12. Moonlight Serenade (Miller/Parish) 0.42
+
13. The complete concert (in one take) 41.14

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Peter Appleyard Orchestra – Percussive Jazz (1960)

frontcover1Peter Appleyard, OC (26 August 1928 – 17 July 2013[1]) was a British–Canadian jazz vibraphonist, percussionist, and composer. He spent most of his life living and performing in the city of Toronto where for many years he was a popular performer in the city’s nightclubs and hotels. He also played and recorded with many of the city’s orchestras and been featured on Canadian television and radio programs. In the early 1970s he drew wide acclaim for his performances with Benny Goodman’s jazz sextet with which he toured internationally. In 1992, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada in recognition of his being an “internationally renowned vibraphonist [who] has represented the Canadian jazz community across North America, Europe, the Middle East and Australia”.
Born in Cleethorpes, Lincolnshire, Appleyard became apprenticed to a nautical instrument maker after being forced to leave school owing to economic reasons related to the Second World War. At that time the popularity of the American Big Bands was growing in England, particularly through a major influx in big band recordings from America by jazz musicians like Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, and Count Basie. These recordings had a strong influence on Appleyard and he decided to pursue a career as a jazz musician. He began his career in the early 1940s playing in the Boys Brigade, a youth organization. He performed as a drummer in several other British dance bands during the 1940s and, while a member of the Royal Air Force during in the mid-1940s, played in RAF bands.

In 1949 Appleyard moved to Bermuda where he lived for two years. While there he spent his holidays in Canada and picked up his first set of vibes. He was so impressed with Canada that, when the time came to leave Bermuda the choice of a new home was easy – he headed for Toronto. At first, unable to get a union card in Toronto, Appleyard worked as a room booking clerk at the King Edward Hotel and as a salesman at Simpson’s department store. He began studying music with Gordon Delamont and soon thereafter began playing the vibraphone in concerts with Billy O’Connor in the early 1950s. From 1954 to 1956 he played with a band at the Park Plaza Hotel and made numerous appearances on CBC Radio with jazz pianist Calvin Jackson. He formed his own jazz ensemble in 1957 which performed not only in Toronto but also toured throughout North America and appeared on American television during the 1960s. Among the ensemble’s original members was pianist and arranger Jimmy Dale. The group notably accompanied singer Gloria DeHaven for a year.
peter-appelyard01
From 1961 to 1962 Appleyard co-hosted, with singer Patti Lewis, the CBC Radio program Patti and Peter. He spent most of the mid-1960s on the road touring. In the late sixties, he ceased his busy touring schedule and returned to Toronto on a more permanent basis. He began playing once more at the Park Plaza Hotel. In 1969 he co-hosted the program Mallets and Brass with Guido Basso for CBC TV. In addition he began studying timpani and percussion and extended his musical expertise substantially.

In the early 1970s Appleyard gained wide international notice as a member of Benny Goodman’s jazz sextet. With the group he toured in Europe in 1972 and 1974 and in Australia in 1973. Afterwords, he played only periodically with the group for the remainder of the decade, notably playing three performances with the ensemble at Carnegie Hall in the mid to late 1970s. During these years he continued to live in Toronto where he remained a popular performer in nightclubs and hotel lounges, serving as music director for a number of local jazz bands. He was also a leading percussionist in the city’s orchestras for both theatre and studio work. Throughout the 1970s, he was a frequent guest to the Colorado Springs Invitation Jazz Party where he performed with numerous international famous jazz musicians. From 1977 to 1980 he had his own television program, Peter Appleyard Presents, a jazz and variety show syndicated in North America.

In 1976, Frank Sinatra requested Appleyard to join him in concert with the Count Basie Orchestra and Ella Fitzgerald at the Uris Theatre in New York City. Sinatra made this request based on Appleyard’s work with Goodman. Appleyard and Sinatra performed together several years later during a benefit concert in Ottawa that was arranged by Rich Little.
peter-appelyard02
In 1982 Appleyard formed the All Star Swing Band which specializes in performing old pop and jazz tunes, often in medley arrangements by Rick Wilkins. The ensemble’s 1982 release Swing Fever earned a gold record certification for sales of 50,000 units within Canada and was nominated for a Juno Award for Instrumental Artist of the Year. The ensemble toured throughout the world, including several appearances in New York City (notably appearing with Mel Tormé at Michael’s Pub), a 1987 tour to Great Britain, a 1998 tour to Switzerland, and at festivals like the Du Maurier Jazz Festival, Moncton Jazz Festival, the Ottawa Jazz Festival, and Dick Gibson’s Jazz Party in Colorado. The group has also performed in Chicago, Florida, Texas, Scandinavia, Germany, and Japan.

Following the death of Benny Goodman, Appleyard formed the Benny Goodman Tribute Band in 1985 which is composed of a number of Goodman alumni and some great Toronto musicians. Appleyard was also leader of the “Swing Fever Band”. He made several concert tours for NATO, most of which were at his own expense. He completed four tours at bases in Europe and three tours in Cyprus and the Gaza Strip and also performed for Canadian and American servicemen at the North Pole Christmas Show in Greenland.

Peter Appleyard performed as a special guest at Carnegie Hall on numerous occasions through the late 90’s and onwards under the direction of Skitch Henderson and the New Yorks Pops orchestra. He regularly toured overseas from London to Switzerland to Japan where he was asked by the Japanese Government to do a one-night performance at the Sapporo jazz festival. Appleyard said it was such a fantastic experience as the treatment and reception was first-class. He received the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee award on 18 June 2012. He spent his final years living on a farm at Rockwood, Ontario.

He died at his farm of natural causes on 17 July 2013 (by wikipedia)
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“Percussion, according to Merriam-Webster, is a striking or beating of sound on the ear. Percussion, according to Peter Appleyard and Sid Cooper, is the vital fundamental of creative jazz. They embellish it with new tonal essences and record it with a perspicacious ear for the vagaries of stereophonia. Their interpretation of the jazz beat goes a step further than just the feel of a swinging tempo. They add a variety of percussive colors, sometimes subtle tints, sometimes brash hues.  Twelve of New York’s top recording jazz artists walked into a 24th Street recording studio on an incogruously cool August evening and sat down behind these Cooper arrangements. Telefunken microphones were hung strategically to pick up every last overtone and nuance.

On cue from Peter Appleyard, Bobby Rosengarden counted off an integrated swinging beat. In the control room, amid the usual, partially-drained coffee containers, Sid Frey, young company President of Audio Fidelity, now wearing his Artist and Repertoire ‘hat’, hovered over audio engineer Ernie Oelrich who set his myriad dials with an inimitably deft touch. In the subsequent paroxysms that rent the studio air, every last note was brought to account for volume, position, dynamics, presence and tonal quality. The result is an audiophile’s dream-the happy blend of superlative jazz in the modern idiom with percussive treatments, brilliant virtuosity and engineering wizardry. On a competent play-back system, the dynamics of the 1812 Overture are bland by comparision. Just listen!” (taken from the original liner notes)

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Personnel:
John Abney (organ)
Robert Alexander (trombone)
Peter Appleyard (vibraphone)
Sidney Block (bass)
Philip Bodner (flute, reeds)
Edwin Costa (percussion)
Melvyn Davis (trumpet)
Harold Gayler (bass)
Sol Gubin (drums)
Philip Kraus (percussion)
Sy Mann (organ)
Sam Most (flute, Saxophone)
Romeo Penque (flute, reeds)
John Rae (percussion)
Bob Rosengarden (drums)
Beril Rubinstein (fortepiano)
Carl Severinsen (trumpet)
Raymond Starling (saxophone)
Nicholas Tagg (organ)
Harold Weed (fortepiano)
Earl Zinders (percussion)
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Tracklist:
01  The Man With The Golden Arm (Bernstein) 2.25
02. The Man That Got Away (Arlen) 2.34
03. Dragnet (Schumann) 3.10
04. Witchcraft (Coleman) 3.22
05. Harlem Nocturne (Hagen) 3.20
06. There Will Never Be Another You (Warren) 3.07
07. Peter Gunn (Mancini) 2.28
08. Mack The Knife (Weill) 2.45
09. Why Don’t You Do Right (McCoy) 2.55
10. Tenderly (Gross) 2.35
11. Mambo Inn (Bauza) 2.33
12. Undecided (Shavers) 1.58

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Various Artists – The History Of Jazz – The New Orleans Joys (1994)

frontcover1This is a real fine compilation about the roots of Jazz, about the early Jazz in New Orleans:

The music of New Orleans assumes various styles of music which have often borrowed from earlier traditions. New Orleans, Louisiana, is especially known for its strong association with jazz music, universally considered to be the birthplace of the genre. The earliest form was dixieland, which has sometimes been called traditional jazz, ‘New Orleans’, and ‘New Orleans jazz’. However, the tradition of jazz in New Orleans has taken on various forms that have either branched out from original dixieland or taken entirely different paths altogether. New Orleans has also been a prominent center of funk, home to some of the earliest funk bands such as The Meters.

The African influence on New Orleans music can trace its roots at least back to Congo Square in New Orleans in 1835, when slaves would congregate there to play music and dance on Sundays. African music was played as well as local music, including that of such local white composers as Louis Moreau Gottschalk. Along with such popular European musical forms popular in the city, perhaps most notably the brass band traditions, the cultural mix laid the groundwork for the New Orleans musical art forms to come.
By 1838 the local paper—the daily Picayune—ran a scathing article complaining about the emergence of brass bands in the city, which it stated could be found on every corner.
jelly-roll-morton

Caricature of an African-American band playing in New Orleans in 1890. New Orleans writer Al Rose has called this “The earliest known illustration of a jazz band”. While the instrumentation of cornet or trumpet, trombone, clarinet, and drums is suggestive of the early jazz bands of some 15 years later, how close this music was to what would be known as “jazz” is speculative.

The term “jazz” (early on often spelled “jass”) did not become popular until the mid and late 1910s, when New Orleans musicians first rose to prominence in other parts of the USA and the New Orleans style needed a new name to differentiate it from the nationally popular ragtime. Before then, the New Orleans style was frequently simply called “ragtime” (Sidney Bechet continued to call his music “ragtime” throughout his life), along with such local terms as “hot music” and “ratty music”.

The local New Orleans dance music style was already distinctive in the 19th century. When this style became what was later known as “jazz” remains a matter of debate and definition, although most New Orleans music historians believe what became known as New Orleans style jazz was the product of a series of developments, probably reaching its famous form no earlier than the 1890s and no later than the mid 1910s.
By the 1890s a man by the name of Poree hired a band led by cornetist Buddy Bolden, many of whose contemporaries as well as many jazz historians consider to be the first prominent jazz musician. The music was not called jazz at this time, consisting of marching band music with brass instruments and dancing. If anything, Bolden could be said to have been a blues player.
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The actual term “jazz” was first “jass”, the etymology of which is still not entirely clear. The connotation is sexual in nature, as many of the early performers played in rough working class venues. Despite colorful stories of mid-20th century writers, the prostitution district known as Storyville was no more important in the development of the music than the city’s other neighborhoods, but did play a role in exposing some out of town visitors to the style. Many instruments used were often acquired second-hand at pawn shops, including used military band instruments.

The Creole people of New Orleans also contributed greatly to the evolution of the artform, though their own music became heavily influenced by the pioneering work of Bolden. New Orleans-born musicians such as Louis Armstrong, Sidney Bechet and Jelly Roll Morton all recalled the influence Bolden had on the direction of the music of New Orleans. (Armstrong himself had no memory of Bolden, but was told about him by his mentor King Oliver), and jazz itself. (by wikipedia)

Enjoy this sentimental journey to the roots of (New Orleans) Jazz !
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Personnel:
see booklet for details
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Tracklist:
CD 1:
01. King Oliver and His Creole Jazz Band: Chimes Blues (Oliver) 2.53
02. Piron’s New Orleans Orchestra: Bouncing Around (Bocage/Piron) 2.45
03. Fate’s Society Orchestra Marable: Frankie & Johnny (Traditional) 2.47
04. Jelly Roll Morton: Tia Juana (Morton) 2.50
05. Clarence Williams Blue Five: Texas Moaner Blues (Barnes/Williams) 3.14
06. Red Onion Jazz Babies: Calke Walking Babies (Williams/Smith/Troy) 3.18
07. Celestin’s Original Tuxedo Jazz Orchestra: Original Tuxedo Rag (Celestin) 2.44
08. King Oliver & Jelly Roll Morton:King Porter Stomp (Morton) 2.31
09. Bertha “Chippie” Hill: Trouble in Mind (Jones) 2.52
10. Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five: Cornet Shop Suey (Armstrong) 3.01
11. Arthur Sims & His Creole Roof Orchestra: Soapstick Blues (Jones) 3.06
12. Cookie’s Gingersnaps: Here Comes the Hot Tamale Man (Rose/Harrison) 3.24
13. New Orleans Wanderers: Perdido Street Blues (Armstrong) 3.11
14. Jelly Roll Morton’s Red Hot Peppers: Doctor Jazz (Other) 3.26
15. Louis Dumaine Jazzola Eight: Franklin Street Blues (Dumaine/Jackson) 3.22
16. Sam Morgan Jazz Band: Mobile Stomp (Morgan) 3.00
17. Johnny’s  Dodds Black Bottom Stompers: New Orleans Stomp (Dodds) 2.44
18. King Oliver and His Dixie Syncopators: Willie The Weeper (Rymal/Melrose/Bloom) 2.54

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CD 2:
01. Louis Armstrong and His Hot Seven: Wild Man Blues (Armstrong/Morton) 3.18
02. Louis Armstrong and His Hot Seven: Ory’s Creole Trombone (Ory) 3.08
03. The Chicago Footwarmers: Get ’em Again Blues (Barbarin/Russell) 2.54
04. Johnny Dodds: Too Tight (Armstrong) 2.59
05. Jabbo Smith’s Rhythm Aces: Sweet ‘n’ Low Blues (Smith) 4.23
06. Omer Simeon and Earl Hines: Beau Koo Jack (Simeon) 2.43
07. Jones & Collins Astoria Hot Eight: Duet Stomp (Collins/Jones) 2.53
08. New Orleans Feetwarmers: Maple Leaf Rag (Joplin) 2.59
09. Trixie Smith: He May Be Your Man (But He Comes To See Me Sometimes) (Fowler/Bradford) 2.50
10. Tommy Ladnier: Really the Blues (Mezzron) 3.39
11. Jelly Roll MortonNew Orleans Jazzmen: Oh, Didn’t He Ramble (Handy) 2.59
12. Louis Armstrong: 2.19 Blues (Desdume) 2.51
13. Zutty Singleton: Shimme-Sha-Wobble (Williams) 3.06
14, Henry “Red” Allen and His Orchestra: Down In Jungle Town (Morse/Madden) 2.50
15. Sidney Becher and His New Orleans Feetwarmers: Make Me A Pallet On The Floor (Traditional) 3.15
16. Johnny Dodds: Red Onion Blues (Williams) 2.54
17. Jimmie Noone: New Orleans Hop Scop Blues (Thomas) 2.55
18. Edmond Hall’s Blue Note Jazzmen: High Society (Piron) 4.05

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Chet Baker Sextet – Chet Is Back (1962)

frontcover1Chet Is back! is a 1962 studio album by jazz musician Chet Baker.
Chet Is Back! was recorded in Rome, Italy in 1962 at RCA’s Studios, showcasing bop-oriented tunes such as “Pent-Up House” and “Well, You Needn’t”. The Chet Baker Sextet consisted of a group of up-and-coming European jazz musicians, which included Belgian saxophonist Bobby Jaspar, Belgian guitarist Rene Thomas, Italian pianist Amedeo Tommasi, French bassist Benoit Quersin, and Swiss drummer Daniel Humair.
The album features an original composition, “Ballata in forma di blues” (A Ballad in Blues Style), by Amedeo Tommasi. Ballads are featured, including “Over the Rainbow”, “Star Eyes”, and “These Foolish Things”. Compositions by other jazz musicians are also featured, such as Thelonious Monk’s “Well, You Needn’t”, Sonny Rollins’ “Pent Up House”, Charlie Parker’s “Barbados”, and Oscar Pettiford’s “Blues in the Closet”.
On the 2003 CD reissue of Chet Is Back!, four orchestral pop bonus tracks Baker recorded with Ennio Morricone in Rome in 1962 are featured, “Chetty’s Lullaby”, “So che ti perderò”, “Motivo su raggio di luna”, and “Il mio domani”, which Baker co-wrote with lyricist Alessandro Maffei. Morricone arranged the songs and conducted the orchestra. Baker plays trumpet and sings lead vocals on these four tracks originally released as 45 singles by RCA Victor in 1962 in Italy. (by wikipedia)
Recorded in Italy in 1962, Chet Is Back! showcases the “cool” trumpeter cutting loose on such bop-oriented workouts as “Pent-Up House” and “Well, You Needn’t.” Backed skillfully by a young cadre of up-and-coming European musicians, including the stellar saxophonist Bobby Jaspar, Chet Baker may have never sounded better, including on the ballads. One listen to “Over the Rainbow” and it’s clear this is an overlooked Baker classic.
(by Matt Collar)
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Personnel:
Chet Baker (trumpet)
Daniel Humair (drums)
Bobby Jaspar (saxophone, flute)
Benoit Quersin (bass)
René Thomas (guitar)
Amedeo Tommasi (piano)
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Tracklist
01. Well, You Needn’t (Monk) 6.23
02. These Foolish Things (Remind Me Of You) (Link/Marvell/Strachey) 4.56
03. Barbados (Parker) 8.26
04. Star Eyes (Raye/de Paul) 6.58
05. Over The Rainbow (Arlen/Koehler) 3.30
06. Pent-Up House (Rollins) 6.51
07. Ballata in forma di blues (Tommasi) 10.06
08. Blues In The Closet (Pettiford) 7.41
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Al Jarreau – Look To The Rainbow (1977)

aljarreaufrontcover1Look to the Rainbow is a live album by Al Jarreau, released on May 27, 1977 by Warner Bros. Records. It marked a breakthrough for his career in Europe and later also in the US. It won the 1978 Grammy Award for Best Jazz Vocal Album.
In 1976 Jarreau made his first live appearances in Europe, starting with concerts at the jazz festivals in Montreux and Berlin. The following year he began his first tour through 16 cities in Europe starting with a gig at Onkel Pö’s in Hamburg. Look to the Rainbow is a set of recordings from that tour.
The title song “Look to the Rainbow” is from the musical Finian’s Rainbow, a Broadway production from the late 1940s. The most recognized song on this album is Jarreau’s interpretation of Paul Desmond’s classic jazz number “Take Five”, which was also released as a single in an edited version in 1977.
Both tour and album brought him enthusiastic reviews in Germany, where he immediately became a darling of the public, while his recognition in the US remained low until he received his first Grammy in 1978.
Look to the Rainbow is a jazz-oriented album which is characterized by a unique light and open sound. With no guitar or brass instruments, accompanied by Tom Canning’s Fender Rhodes (in some places supported by an ARP String Ensemble) and Lynn Blessing’s vibraphone, Al Jarreau’s voice is the main lead instrument and he uses it intensely as such.
Allmusic states that of the albums from Jarreau’s Warner Brothers period, this is “easily the most jazz-oriented”. It further cites his abilities “as a brilliant scat singer (able to emulate practically any instrument)” and also a “superior ballad interpreter” as evident on this recording.
Reviews in the UK’s music press were mixed. Melody Maker was full of praise for the album, claiming that Jarreau “has taken the seemingly well-worn genre of the freely improvising jazz singer and conjured it, miraculously, back to life”. The review observed that “like all the best artists, Jarreau does not work in a vacuum, but as the successor to a great tradition. When he performs, you can hear the expected echoes of King Pleasure and Jon Hendricks, upon whose foundation he is building so sensationally, and you can also hear a number of contemporary singers, mostly black, with whom he is so obviously in touch.” It concluded, “There is not one second of the four sides that is not the purest magic… at last, [Jarreau] has an album worthy of his monster talent”.
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Sounds also gave the record a positive review, stating that “Al’s always crisply precise: intense but not passionate up until the climax of, say, ‘Take Five’, when his scat shoots blind/wild, like a flock of demented starlings whizzing round a cage”, and describing the album as “a great sophisticates’ record, sensual petals of music unfold and furl again with Cartier elegance”. However, NME was less enthusiastic, saying that “Look to the Rainbow is a good representation of Jarreau live. It’s relaxed and intimate, the mood hardly varies throughout and the pace never gets more frantic than a light, funky backbeat that creeps in for some of the songs… The result is homogenous and patently easy to listen to. Therein lies the problem. If you weren’t looking for a memento of Jarreau’s concert […] there wouldn’t be much here to attract attention. Jarreau’s unusual voice is at first beguiling, but soon becomes gimmicky, like a hipper male version of Cleo Laine. When he gets funky (as on ‘So Long Girl’) there’s little to complain about but on the slower songs the combination of his voice and the milky sentimentality becomes irritating… Look to the Rainbow is too close to MOR for comfort.”
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In Germany Der Spiegel stated, “In a deliberately confusing game of phrases and syllables tone-figures become meaning, words transform into pure sound”).
Die Zeit was also enthusiastic: “It wouldn’t surprise us if we’ve seen the new Sammy Davis Jr. arrive on the scene”). (by Wikipedia)
The Grammy-winning jazz singer Al Jarreau died on Sunday in a Los Angeles hospital, days after announcing his retirement from touring due to exhaustion.
Jarreau was taken to hospital earlier in the week and was said to have been improving slowly. His official Twitter account and website said he died around 6am local time. He was 76.
A statement posted to Facebook said Jarreau “passed away this morning. He was in the hospital, kept comfortable by his wife, son, and a few of his family and friends. A small, private service is planned, for immediate family only. No public service is planned yet this time”.(by theguardian.com)
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Personnel:
Lynn Blessing (vibraphone)
Tom Canning (keyboards)
Joe Correro (drums, Percussion)
Al Jarreau (vocals)
Abraham Laboriel (bass)
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Tracklist:
01 Letter Perfect (Jarreau) 5.16
02. Rainbow In Your Eyes (Russell) 6.17
03. One Good Turn (Jarreau) 6.30
04. Could You Believe (Jarreau) 6.49
05. Burst In With The Dawn (Jarreau) 7.24
06. Better Than Anything (Loughborough/Wheat) 5.08
07. So Long Girl (Jarreau) 3.44
08. Look To The Rainbow (Harburg/Lane) 7.54
09. You Don’t See Me (Jarreau) 6.44
10. Take Five (Desmond) 7.20
11. Loving You (Jarreau) 5.00
12. We Got By (Jarreau) 6.57
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