Terry Gibbs – More Vibes On Velvet (1959)

FrontCover1erry Gibbs (born Julius Gubenko, October 13, 1924) is an American jazz vibraphonist and band leader.

He has performed or recorded with Tommy Dorsey, Chubby Jackson, Buddy Rich, Woody Herman, Benny Goodman, Alice Coltrane, Louie Bellson, Charlie Shavers, Mel Tormé, Buddy DeFranco, and others. Gibbs also worked in film and TV studios in Los Angeles.

In the 1950–1951 season, Gibbs was a popular guest on Star Time on the DuMont Television Network. Thereafter, he was a regular in 1953–1954 on NBC’s Judge for Yourself.

In the late 1950s, he appeared on NBC’s The Steve Allen Show, on which he regularly played lively vibraphone duets with the entertainer and composer. In 1997, he appeared on Steve Allen’s 75th Birthday Celebration on PBS. Gibbs was also the bandleader on the short-lived That Regis Philbin Show. As an instrumentalist, together with his big band, the Dream Band, Gibbs has won prestigious polls, such as those of Downbeat and Metronome.

When Gibbs moved from New York to California in 1958 he began planning for his next big band album. In early 1959 he booked extended residencies at two Los Angeles night clubs, the Seville and the Sundown for what became known as the Dream Band.

TerryGibbs02The band usually played on a Sunday, Monday or Tuesday night when the cream of Hollywood jazz and studio musicians would be available. The core band always remained stable with Mel Lewis holding down the drum chair.

Some of the key players were lead altoist Joe Maini, tenor saxists Bill Holman and Med Flory, trumpeters Al Porcino and Conte Candoli and trombonists Frank Rosolino and Bob Enevoldsen.

New arrangements were commissioned from Bill Holman, Marty Paich, Med Flory, Manny Albam and Al Cohn, among others, to feature Gibbs’ vibes in front of the band. The band released four albums from 1959 to 1961.
In the mid 1960s, Gibbs opened a music store in Canoga Park, California, with former Benny Goodman drummer Mel Zelnick. Terry Gibbs and Mel Zelnick Music Stop was also the first teaching facility of the drum guru Freddie Gruber and Henry Bellson, brother of Louie. (by wikipedia)

Terry Gibbs is sometimes deemed more the hard-driving swinger and jack-in-the-box of modern vibraharp than musician of sensitive feeling for a ballad.

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Clearly, his first Vibes On Velvet album (MG 36064) proclaimed the 34-year old Brooklynite (now resident in Southern California) one with a signal way with a pretty melody.

When the ballads are illumined by the perceptive arrangements of Manny Albam, the musical setting becomes such that the listener is presented a Terry Gibbs far removed indeed from the dazzling thrust-and-parry youngsters-in-jazz who erupted so potently in the Second Herd of Woody Herman during the ’40s. While the wisecracks and gum chewing remain indissolubly part of Gibbs personality, his maturity in musical expression has seldom been more evident than in his treatment of these ballads. Contrasting sharply with the bulk of his recorded output during the past decade, this subdued selection reveals a more restrained facet of Terry’s assertive jazz approach.

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“It’s very hard to play a straight melody on vibes,” mused Terry, listening to a playback. “You keep wanting to play little figures and things around the tune and it’s really tough to stay on the melody line.”

He lapsed into silence for awhile, then abruptly observed, “You know, my wife is right about my playing. She says I play best on the songs I don’t know. Take this one, What Is There To Say. It was new to me. I guess on new tunes you have to think more. You don’t have time to get lazy and fall into playing ideas you’re used to.” (taken from the original liner notes)

A superb album, smooth jazz from the late 50´s. Perfect for an evening in a small Jazz-Bar.

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Personnel:
Max Bennett (bass)
Med Flory (saxophone)
Terry Gibbs (vibraphone)
Bill Holman (saxophone)
Pete Jolly (piano)
Charlie Kennedy (saxophone)
Mel Lewis (drums)
Joe Maini (saxophone)
Jack Schwartz (saxophone)

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Tracklist:
01. Moonlight Serenade (Miller/Parrish) 3.03
02. Blues In The Night (Mercer/Arlen) 4.13
03. Impossible (Allen) 3.13
04. What Is There To Say (Harburg/Duke) 3.00
05. I Remember (D.Gibbs/T.Gibbs) 2.48
06. The Things We Did Last Summer (Cahn/Stynes) 3.17
07. You Make Me Feel So Young (Gordon/Myrow) 2.46
08. At Last (Gordon/Warren) 2.46
09. Lazy Sunday (D.Gibbs/T.Gibbs) 4.00
10. Every Day Is Spring With You (Legan/Gibbs)
11. With All My Love To You (D.Gibbs/T.Gibbs/Legan) 3.26
12. Don’t Cry (D.Gibbs/T.Gibbs) 3.59

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Michael Brecker – Live By The Sea (1997)

FrontCover1.jpgA remarkable technician and a highly influential tenor saxophonist (the biggest influence on other tenors since Wayne Shorter), Michael Brecker took a long time before getting around to recording his first solo album. He spent much of his career as a top-notch studio player who often appeared backing pop singers, leading some jazz listeners to overlook his very strong improvising skills.

Brecker originally started on clarinet and alto before switching to tenor in high school. Early on, he played with rock- and R&B-oriented bands. In 1969, he moved to New York and soon joined Dreams, an early fusion group. Brecker was with Horace Silver during 1973-1974, gigged with Billy Cobham, and then co-led the Brecker Brothers (a commercially successful funk group) with his brother, trumpeter Randy Brecker, for most of the 1970s. He was with Steps (later Steps Ahead) in the early ’80s, doubled on an EWI (electronic wind instrument), and made a countless number of studio sessions during the 1970s and ’80s, popping up practically everywhere (including with James Taylor, Yoko Ono, and Paul Simon).

Brecker03.jpgWith the release of his first album as a leader in 1987 (when he was already 38), Brecker started appearing more often in challenging jazz settings. He recorded additional sets as a leader (in 1988 and 1990), teamed up with McCoy Tyner on one of 1995’s most rewarding jazz recordings, and toured with a reunited Brecker Brothers band. Two Blocks from the Edge followed in 1998, and a year later Brecker returned with Time Is of the Essence. The early 2000s saw the release of Nearness of You: The Ballad Book and Wide Angles in 2001 and 2003, respectively.

However, after experiencing some mysterious back pain during a concert in 2005, Brecker was diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a cancer of the blood marrow. A failed search for a matching bone marrow donor eventually led to an experimental partially matching blood stem cell transplant via his daughter in late 2005. He passed away on January 13, 2007. Brecker’s final album, Pilgrimage, featuring pianists Herbie Hancock and Brad Mehldau, guitarist Pat Metheny, bassist John Patitucci, and drummer Jack DeJohnette, was, ironically, his first of all-original material. It was released a few months after his passing. (by Scott Yanow)

And here´s a brilliant bootleg (sound board recording), this man was reall one of the finest jazz musician of the last decades ! And … what a line-up !!!

Recorded live at the Tokyo Bay NK Hall, Tokyo, Japan, August 24, 1997

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Personnel:
Michael Brecker (saxophone)
Joey Calderazzo (piano)
Dave Holland (bass)
Jack DeJohnette (drums)
Pat Metheny (guitar, guitar synthesizer)

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Tracklist:
01. Slings And Arrows (Brecker) 9.39
02. Midnight Voyage (Calderazzo) 9.22
03. Song For Bilbao (Metheny) 12.37
04. Every Day (I Thank You) (Metheny) 12.53

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Michael Leonard Brecker (March 29, 1949 – January 13, 2007)

Keith Jarrett – The Melody At Night, With You (1999)

FrontCover1.jpgThe Melody at Night, with You is a solo album by American pianist Keith Jarrett recorded at his home studio in 1998 and released on the ECM label in 1999. It was recorded during his bout with chronic fatigue syndrome and was dedicated to Jarrett’s second and then-wife, Rose Anne: “For Rose Anne, who heard the music, then gave it back to me”.

In an interview in Time magazine in November 1999, he explained ″I started taping it in December 1997, as a Christmas present for my wife. I’d just had my Hamburg Steinway overhauled and wanted to try it out, and I have my studio right next to the house, so if I woke up and had a half-decent day, I would turn on the tape recorder and play for a few minutes. I was too fatigued to do more. Then something started to click with the mike placement, the new action of the instrument,… I could play so soft,… and the internal dynamics of the melodies… of the songs… It was one of those little miracles that you have to be ready for, though part of it was that I just didn’t have the energy to be clever.″

The album contains eight jazz standards, two traditional songs, and, uncharacteristically for Jarrett, only one improvisation (“Meditation”, the second half of track six).

The album was very successful commercially, becoming one of the best-selling jazz instrumental albums of the 2000s, and winning a number of awards; The second track, “I Got It Bad (and That Ain’t Good)”, was nominated for the 2001 Grammy Award for Best Jazz Instrumental Solo.

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The critical reception was more mixed, however, with some critics praising its intimacy, while others criticized its simplicity. On the negative side, the Allmusic review by Richard S. Ginell awarded the album 2½ stars (out of 5) and states, “these performances lack color, contrast and life; and while you pull for Jarrett to summon the energy to make music again, the results are touching for awhile [sic] but soon pall”. On the positive side, it was ranked the #2 Jazz album in the Down Beat “Critics Poll 2000”, and Entertainment Weekly rated it an “A”. (by wikipedia)

Tender is the night on what is, perhaps, Keith Jarrett’s most intimate album. It is comprised of solo piano renderings of jazz ballads and folk songs, recorded at home and played with unmistakable affection. Jarrett dispenses with the jazz soloist’s conventional emphasis on dexterity, the ‘clever’ phrase, the virtuosic sleight-of-hand. Instead he strips these songs to their melodic essence and, gently, lays bare their emotional core. (press release)

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Personnel:
Keith Jarrett (piano)

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Tracklist:
01. I Loves You, Porgy (Gershwin/Heyward) 5.46
02. I Got It Bad (And That Ain’t Good) (Ellington/Webster) 7.07
03. Don’t Ever Leave Me (Hammerstein II/Kern) 2.43
04. Someone To Watch Over Me (Gershwin) 5.04
05. My Wild Irish Rose (Traditional) 5.20
06. Blame It On My Youth/Meditation (Heyman/Levant/Jarrett) 7.15
07. Something To Remember You By (Dietz/Schwartz) 7.12
08. Be My Love (Brodszky/Cahn) 5.37
09. Shenandoah (Traditional) 5.49
10. I’m Through With Love (Kahn/Livingston/Malneck) 2.50

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Esperanza Spalding – Esperanza (2008)

FrontCover1.jpgEsperanza is the second studio album by the American bassist and vocalist Esperanza Spalding. It was released on May 20, 2008.

Being exposed to many different cultural impressions while growing up, Spalding sings in three different languages here: English, Spanish and Portuguese. After Spalding’s Grammy Award win in February 2011, the album entered the Billboard 200 at 138. 8ny wikipedia)

Bassist, vocalist, and composer Esperanza Spalding’s eponymous release on Heads Up International is touted on the Concord Label Group’s website as her debut recording. This is patently untrue. In fact, if it weren’t for her actual debut , 2006’s Junjo on Spain’s Ayva imprint, this set may not have existed at all. Junjo showcased Spalding as a leader, playing in an acoustic trio with pianist Aruan Ortiz and drummer Francisco Mela singing wordlessly over bubbling Latin and Afro-Cuban melodies and rhythms. Though written by Brazilian legend Milton Nasciemento and featuring backing vocalists and additional percussion to the bass, piano, and drum format, Esperanza’s opening track, “Ponta De Areia” resembles the sound and M.O. of the earlier album quite a bit. This is on purpose, as Spalding simply nods to one of the many places she comes from musically.

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The track, with its languid, nursery rhyme-like melody and beautifully understated instrumental accompaniment, gently opens the listener to an aural experience that’s quite unlike anything else out there. Spalding sings in three languages here — English, Spanish, and Portuguese — she plays bass, does the arranging, and acts as her own producer on this wildly diverse and exceptionally well-executed set. How does a 23-year-old get all that control? Simple: she’s a prodigy; she is a seasoned session player (she’s worked with Joe Lovano, Pat Metheny, and Patti Austin to name just three), and she’s a faculty member at the Berklee College of Music.

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The ambition on display on Esperanza is not blind; it’s deeply intuitive, and her focus brings out the adventure on the album in all the right ways. By a lesser musician, even attempting something like this would have been disastrous. A core band consisting of pianist Leo Genovese, percussionist Jamey Haddad, and drummer Otis Brown backs Spalding. She follows the Nasciemento cut with her own fingerpopping midtempo ballad “I Know You Know,” where her crystal clear contralto walks a phrasing tightrope between near scat, classic jazz, and Latin soul singing. The layers of hand percussion and knotty pianism fill the middle as her bassline and drums hold down a constant skittering thrum for the lyrics to balance on. But she can write and sing straight ballads as well. “Fall In,” a seemingly simple duet where her voice over Genovese’s piano are the only ornaments, is a stellar example and also displays a very sophisticated and slippery sense of wordcraft and a gorgeous melodic sensibility. “I Adore You,” featuring Horacio “El Negro” Hernandez in one of his two appearances on drums, offers another example of Esperanza Spalding03.jpgSpalding’s wordless vocalizing; it is a popping Brazilian samba-cum-rhumba with a snappy backing chorus of Brown, Gretchen Parlato, and Theresa Perez. They help her move the smoking piano and the shuffling, time-shifting drums of Hernandez on the choruses. Spalding’s bass part here is anything but basic, it’s startling in its rhythmic and lyric invention as it adds another harmonic counterpart to the piano and percussive textures. New Orleans saxophonist Donald Harrison performs in one of his two guest spots on the provocative and sassy jazz tune “She Got to You.” With a quick, even-burning tempo, there are traces of Betty Carter, Ella Fitzgerald, and even Blossom Dearie in Spalding’s phrasing. For all of the hard-driving percussion and the track’s boppish tempo, it is wonderfully accessible. “Precious,” played with her trio (including some nice Rhodes work by Genovese) is like a mirror image; it’s lithe, new-soul melody line flirts with jazz in the arrangement but stays on the pop side of the fence. If radio would get behind this it would be a monster. “Mela” is a wailing, post-bop instrumental with Hernandez on drums and guest Ambrose Akinmusire on trumpet. Check Spalding’s bass solo here, it, like the tune, is a burner. In sum, Esperanza sounds like the work of a much older, more experienced player, singer, and songwriter. Spalding not only has these gifts in natural abundance but is disciplined in her execution as well. On this recording she seeks to widen her musical adventure at every turn, but she does it with such with taste, refinement, and a playful sense of humor that virtually anyone who encounters this offering will find not only much to delight in, but plenty to be amazed by as well. (by Thom Jurek)

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Personnel:
Otis Brown (drums)
Leo Genovese (piano)
Jamey Haddad (percussion)
Esperanza Spalding (bass, vocals)
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Ambrose Akinmusire (trumpet on 08. + 11.)
Donald Harrison (saxophone on 06. + 11.)
Horacio Hernandez (drums on 04. + 08.)
Gretchen Parlato (background vocals on 01 + 04.)

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Tracklist:
01. Ponta de Areia (Nascimento/Brant) 5.39
02. I Know You Know (Spalding) 3.47
03. Fall In (Spalding) 3.57
04. I Adore You (Spalding) 7.27
05. Cuerpo y Alma (Body & Soul) (Heyman/Sour) 8.01
06. She Got To You (Spalding) 4.29
07. Precious (Spalding) 4.24
08. Mela (Spalding) 6.57
09. Love in Time (Spalding) 5.47
10. Espera (Spalding) 4.40
11. If That’s True (Spalding) 7.33
12. Samba em Preludio (de Moraes/Powell) 5.11

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Willie Nelson & Wynton Marsalis – Two Men With The Blues (2008)

FrontCover1.jpgTwo Men with the Blues is a live album by Willie Nelson and Wynton Marsalis. It was released on July 8, 2008 by Blue Note and sold 22,000 copies in it first week of release. It was recorded on January 12–13, 2007, at Jazz at Lincoln Center in New York City.

The album held the number one position in the Billboard Jazz Albums chart for four weeks. It spent a total of 67 weeks on that chart. It peaked at number 20 on both the Billboard 200 and the Billboard Digital Albums charts, spending eight weeks and one week on the charts respectively. (by wikipedia)

History has proven that Willie Nelson will duet with pretty much anybody who comes along, and while this open-hearted open mind sometimes backfires, more often than not it results in some of his most sublime recordings. Two Men with the Blues, his album with jazz trumpeter Wynton Marsalis recorded over a two-night stand at Jazz at Lincoln Center on January 12 and 13, 2007, belongs in the latter category, standing as truly one of the most special records in either Nelson’s or Marsalis’ catalog. If the pair initially seem like an odd match, it’s only because Wynton long carried the reputation of a purist, somebody who was adamant against expanding the definition of jazz, which cast him as the opposite of Willie, who never found a border he couldn’t blur.

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Marsalis mellowed over the years, but it’s also true that he and Nelson share a common background in jazz and the Great American Songbook, so this pairing plays naturally, providing equal measures of comfort and surprise. The engine for this music is Marsalis’ band — pianist Dan Nimmer, drummer Ali Jackson, bassist Carlos Henríquez, and saxophonist Walter Blanding — with Nelson bringing his harmonica player Mickey Raphael along, which is enough to give this a flavor that’s quite distinct from a typical Marsalis session without being foreign. Similarly, this isn’t quite alien territory for Nelson either, as the repertoire relies heavily on blues standards, including a pair of tunes he cut on his jazzy breakthrough, Stardust (the title track and “Georgia on My Mind”), plus he’s always veered close to jazz in his vocal and guitar phrasings. All this means that Two Men with the Blues has the warm comfort of a reunion and the freshness of a new collaboration, feelings that are palpable as soon as the album kicks off with a loose yet nimble reading of Jimmy Reed’s “Bright Lights, Big City.” It’s a subtle arrangement that doesn’t draw attention to its unique touches, something that’s also true of the flashier take on Hank Williams’ “My Bucket’s Got a Hole in It,” which lurches and careens like a New Orleans marching band, coming to a highlight when Marsalis throws in a few lines from “Keep on Knockin'” for good measure.

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These sly spins on standards, along with a jump blues reworking of Merle Travis’ “That’s All” (first heard on a Willie Nelson record back in 1969), are balanced by numbers that are perhaps a bit more expected but are no less delightful, as “Night Life” is turned into a showcase for Wynton and the bandmembers sound as good skipping through “Caldonia” as they do laying back on “Basin Street Blues.” It’s music that flows so easily it’s perhaps easy to take for granted, but Two Men with the Blues is truly something special, as it captures two masters enjoying their common ground while spurring each other to hear old sounds in new ways. It’s a flat-out joy. (by Stephen Thomas Erlewine)

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Personnel:
Walter Blanding (saxophone)
Carlos Henriquez (bass)
Ali Jackson (drums)
Wynton Marsalis (trumpet, vocals)
Willie Nelson (vocals, guitar)
Dan Nimmer (piano)
Mickey Raphael (harmonica)

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Tracklist:
01. Bright Lights, Big City (Reed) 5.21
02. Night Life (Nelson) 5.44
03. Caldonia (Moore) 3.26
04. Stardust (Carmichael) 5.09
05. Basin Street Blues (Williams) 4.57
06. Georgia On My Mind (Carmichael/Gorrell) 4.41
07. Rainy Day Blues (Nelson) 5.44
08. My Bucket’s Got A Hole In It (Williams) 4.57
09. Ain’t Nobody’s Business (Grainger/Robbins) 7.28
10. That’s All (Travis) 6.08

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I would like to dedicate this entry to greygoose … a real enthusiastic fan of Willie Nelson

Cal Tjader – Plays The Contemporary Music Of Mexico And Brazil (1962)

FrontCover1.jpgCal Tjader Plays the Contemporary Music of Mexico and Brazil is a 1962 studio album by Cal Tjader.

This 1962 set by Cal Tjader, recorded at the beginning of the bossa nova craze in the United States (released in the same year and on the same label as the smash Jazz Samba by Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd), has one of the most boring titles imaginable, and it doesn’t begin to describe the laid-back yet magical innovations in the grooves. Produced by Creed Taylor, the date was arranged and orchestrated by the great pianist Clare Fischer (who also wrote the liner notes). Tjader set out to offer a very modern portrait of the music pouring out of Mexico City by showcasing selected Mario Ruíz Armengol compositions, and out of Brazil by spotlighting numbers by singers such as Elisete Cardoso and João Gilberto. Tjader’s vibes are placed in juxtaposition with Fischer’s piano and percussion by Changuito, Milt CalTjader01Holland, and Johnny Rae, with a woodwind section that included both Don Shelton and Paul Horn, and even some wordless exotica vocals by Ardeen DeCamp. In addition, Brazilian guitar star Laurindo Almeida helps out on about half the set and contributed “Chôro e Batuque,” while Fischer offers “Elisete,” named for the singer. The feel here is gentle with infectious rhythms and beautifully wrought woodwinds (check “Se é Tarde, Me Perdoa”), gorgeous piano, and spacious vibes. The arrangements by Fischer certainly represent the era, but they endure into the 21st century because of the shining example of interplay between the percussion and melodies (note the breezy “Silenciosa”). Tjader had been playing samba on records for a number of years by this point, and worked with Getz in 1957, but this was the first place he allowed his own complex yet delightfully subtle melodic (rather than just rhythmic) sensibilities to shine on the vibes. The most remarkable thing about this set is how effortlessly the two traditions blend. (by Thom Jurek)

Recorded in Hollywood, Calif., March 5, 6 and 7, 1962

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Personnel:
Laurindo Almeida (guitar)
Ardeen de Camp (vocals)
Changuito (percussion)
Clare Fischer (piano)
Milt Holland (percussion)
Johnny Rae (drums, timbales)
Freddie Schreiber (bass)
Cal Tjader (vibraphone)
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woodwind:
Bernie Fleischer – Don Shelton – Gene Cipriano – John Lowe – Paul Horn

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Tracklist:
01. Vai Querer (Almeida/Lobo) 3.04
02. Qué Tristeza (Armengol) 2.50
03. Meditação (Meditation) (Mendonça/Jobim/Gimbel) 3.33
04. Soñé (Armengol) 3.09
05. Se é Tarde, Me Perdoa (Bôscoli/Lyra) 2.51
06. Não Diga Nada (Carlita/Mercenes) 2.48
07. Silenciosa (Armengol) 3.28
08. Elizete (Fischer) 2.31
09. Imagen (Armengol) 2.41
10. Tentaço do Incoveniente (da Conceição/Mesquita) 2.33
11. Preciosa (Armengol) 2.41
12. Chôro e Batuque (Almeida) 5.02

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Callen Radcliffe Tjader, Jr. (July 16, 1925 – May 5, 1982)

Larry Coryell & Philip Catherine – Twin House (1977)

LPFrontCover1Twin House is an album by American guitarist Larry Coryell and Belgian guitarist Philip Catherine that was released by Atlantic Records in 1977. The duo recorded a second album, Splendid, in 1978. (by wikipedia)

The first of two fine guitar duet recordings with Phillip Catherine. Of the two, Catherine’s sound is more rooted in the tradition of Django Reinhardt and tends to be more introspective. Coryell is his usual incorrigible self; however, Catherine’s presence seemed to inspire more experimentation and intelligent playing on Coryell’s part. As expected, this session will appeal primarily to guitarists — and for good reason, as both players exploit their chops — but it should be noted that the compositions here are quite memorable. Whether soloing over one riff (“Mortgage on Your Soul”), playing the blues (“Twin House”), or showing off (“Airpower”), this is an excellent collaboration and one of Coryell’s most ambitious performances. (by Robert Taylor)

I heard Larry Coryell and Philip Catherine together for the first time at the Berlin Jazz ConcertPoster.jpgFestival in 1975. Their creative compability, the enthusiasm and mutual understanding inspired me to take them into the Olympic Sound Studios in London to cut “Twin House” in just one day. This was only possible because both the music and the artists were ready to go on.

“Twin House” became one of those rare jazz records well recieved by both the record buying public and the critics. Two years later we were back in the studio recording the “Splendid Sessions”.

Both records were never before released on CD. I am grateful to the artists an my ex-colleagues at WEA, Germany, to let me release what I believe is the best of “Twin House” and “Splendid” on my ACT label. “Mortgage of Your Soul” was taken off and replaced by the previously unreleased track “Dance Dream”.

This record is dedicated to the memory of the great gipsy guitar player Django Reinhardt. (by Siegfried E. Loch, producer)

Excellent! Exceded Expectations!

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Personnel:
Philip Catherine (guitar)
Larry Coryell (guitar)
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Joachim Kühn (piano on 10.)

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Tracklist:
01. Ms. Julie (Coryell) 5.28
02. Homecomings (Catherine) 6.00
03. Airpower (Catherine) 4.05
04. Twin House (Catherine) 5.19
05. Gloryell (Webb) 7.20
06. Nuages (Reinhardt) 5.19
07. Twice A Week (Catherine) 4.46
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08. Dance Dream (Mikkelborg) 5.26
09. Snowshadows (Coryell) 3.32
10. Deus Xango (Piazzolla) 5.29
11. My Serenade (Reinhardt) 4.54
12. Father Christmas (Catherine) 2.40
13. The Train And The River (Giuffre) 4.49

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