Various Artists – The History Of Jazz – The New Orleans Joys (1994)

frontcover1This is a real fine compilation about the roots of Jazz, about the early Jazz in New Orleans:

The music of New Orleans assumes various styles of music which have often borrowed from earlier traditions. New Orleans, Louisiana, is especially known for its strong association with jazz music, universally considered to be the birthplace of the genre. The earliest form was dixieland, which has sometimes been called traditional jazz, ‘New Orleans’, and ‘New Orleans jazz’. However, the tradition of jazz in New Orleans has taken on various forms that have either branched out from original dixieland or taken entirely different paths altogether. New Orleans has also been a prominent center of funk, home to some of the earliest funk bands such as The Meters.

The African influence on New Orleans music can trace its roots at least back to Congo Square in New Orleans in 1835, when slaves would congregate there to play music and dance on Sundays. African music was played as well as local music, including that of such local white composers as Louis Moreau Gottschalk. Along with such popular European musical forms popular in the city, perhaps most notably the brass band traditions, the cultural mix laid the groundwork for the New Orleans musical art forms to come.
By 1838 the local paper—the daily Picayune—ran a scathing article complaining about the emergence of brass bands in the city, which it stated could be found on every corner.
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Caricature of an African-American band playing in New Orleans in 1890. New Orleans writer Al Rose has called this “The earliest known illustration of a jazz band”. While the instrumentation of cornet or trumpet, trombone, clarinet, and drums is suggestive of the early jazz bands of some 15 years later, how close this music was to what would be known as “jazz” is speculative.

The term “jazz” (early on often spelled “jass”) did not become popular until the mid and late 1910s, when New Orleans musicians first rose to prominence in other parts of the USA and the New Orleans style needed a new name to differentiate it from the nationally popular ragtime. Before then, the New Orleans style was frequently simply called “ragtime” (Sidney Bechet continued to call his music “ragtime” throughout his life), along with such local terms as “hot music” and “ratty music”.

The local New Orleans dance music style was already distinctive in the 19th century. When this style became what was later known as “jazz” remains a matter of debate and definition, although most New Orleans music historians believe what became known as New Orleans style jazz was the product of a series of developments, probably reaching its famous form no earlier than the 1890s and no later than the mid 1910s.
By the 1890s a man by the name of Poree hired a band led by cornetist Buddy Bolden, many of whose contemporaries as well as many jazz historians consider to be the first prominent jazz musician. The music was not called jazz at this time, consisting of marching band music with brass instruments and dancing. If anything, Bolden could be said to have been a blues player.
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The actual term “jazz” was first “jass”, the etymology of which is still not entirely clear. The connotation is sexual in nature, as many of the early performers played in rough working class venues. Despite colorful stories of mid-20th century writers, the prostitution district known as Storyville was no more important in the development of the music than the city’s other neighborhoods, but did play a role in exposing some out of town visitors to the style. Many instruments used were often acquired second-hand at pawn shops, including used military band instruments.

The Creole people of New Orleans also contributed greatly to the evolution of the artform, though their own music became heavily influenced by the pioneering work of Bolden. New Orleans-born musicians such as Louis Armstrong, Sidney Bechet and Jelly Roll Morton all recalled the influence Bolden had on the direction of the music of New Orleans. (Armstrong himself had no memory of Bolden, but was told about him by his mentor King Oliver), and jazz itself. (by wikipedia)

Enjoy this sentimental journey to the roots of (New Orleans) Jazz !
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Personnel:
see booklet for details
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Tracklist:
CD 1:
01. King Oliver and His Creole Jazz Band: Chimes Blues (Oliver) 2.53
02. Piron’s New Orleans Orchestra: Bouncing Around (Bocage/Piron) 2.45
03. Fate’s Society Orchestra Marable: Frankie & Johnny (Traditional) 2.47
04. Jelly Roll Morton: Tia Juana (Morton) 2.50
05. Clarence Williams Blue Five: Texas Moaner Blues (Barnes/Williams) 3.14
06. Red Onion Jazz Babies: Calke Walking Babies (Williams/Smith/Troy) 3.18
07. Celestin’s Original Tuxedo Jazz Orchestra: Original Tuxedo Rag (Celestin) 2.44
08. King Oliver & Jelly Roll Morton:King Porter Stomp (Morton) 2.31
09. Bertha “Chippie” Hill: Trouble in Mind (Jones) 2.52
10. Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five: Cornet Shop Suey (Armstrong) 3.01
11. Arthur Sims & His Creole Roof Orchestra: Soapstick Blues (Jones) 3.06
12. Cookie’s Gingersnaps: Here Comes the Hot Tamale Man (Rose/Harrison) 3.24
13. New Orleans Wanderers: Perdido Street Blues (Armstrong) 3.11
14. Jelly Roll Morton’s Red Hot Peppers: Doctor Jazz (Other) 3.26
15. Louis Dumaine Jazzola Eight: Franklin Street Blues (Dumaine/Jackson) 3.22
16. Sam Morgan Jazz Band: Mobile Stomp (Morgan) 3.00
17. Johnny’s  Dodds Black Bottom Stompers: New Orleans Stomp (Dodds) 2.44
18. King Oliver and His Dixie Syncopators: Willie The Weeper (Rymal/Melrose/Bloom) 2.54

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CD 2:
01. Louis Armstrong and His Hot Seven: Wild Man Blues (Armstrong/Morton) 3.18
02. Louis Armstrong and His Hot Seven: Ory’s Creole Trombone (Ory) 3.08
03. The Chicago Footwarmers: Get ’em Again Blues (Barbarin/Russell) 2.54
04. Johnny Dodds: Too Tight (Armstrong) 2.59
05. Jabbo Smith’s Rhythm Aces: Sweet ‘n’ Low Blues (Smith) 4.23
06. Omer Simeon and Earl Hines: Beau Koo Jack (Simeon) 2.43
07. Jones & Collins Astoria Hot Eight: Duet Stomp (Collins/Jones) 2.53
08. New Orleans Feetwarmers: Maple Leaf Rag (Joplin) 2.59
09. Trixie Smith: He May Be Your Man (But He Comes To See Me Sometimes) (Fowler/Bradford) 2.50
10. Tommy Ladnier: Really the Blues (Mezzron) 3.39
11. Jelly Roll MortonNew Orleans Jazzmen: Oh, Didn’t He Ramble (Handy) 2.59
12. Louis Armstrong: 2.19 Blues (Desdume) 2.51
13. Zutty Singleton: Shimme-Sha-Wobble (Williams) 3.06
14, Henry “Red” Allen and His Orchestra: Down In Jungle Town (Morse/Madden) 2.50
15. Sidney Becher and His New Orleans Feetwarmers: Make Me A Pallet On The Floor (Traditional) 3.15
16. Johnny Dodds: Red Onion Blues (Williams) 2.54
17. Jimmie Noone: New Orleans Hop Scop Blues (Thomas) 2.55
18. Edmond Hall’s Blue Note Jazzmen: High Society (Piron) 4.05

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Chet Baker Sextet – Chet Is Back (1962)

frontcover1Chet Is back! is a 1962 studio album by jazz musician Chet Baker.
Chet Is Back! was recorded in Rome, Italy in 1962 at RCA’s Studios, showcasing bop-oriented tunes such as “Pent-Up House” and “Well, You Needn’t”. The Chet Baker Sextet consisted of a group of up-and-coming European jazz musicians, which included Belgian saxophonist Bobby Jaspar, Belgian guitarist Rene Thomas, Italian pianist Amedeo Tommasi, French bassist Benoit Quersin, and Swiss drummer Daniel Humair.
The album features an original composition, “Ballata in forma di blues” (A Ballad in Blues Style), by Amedeo Tommasi. Ballads are featured, including “Over the Rainbow”, “Star Eyes”, and “These Foolish Things”. Compositions by other jazz musicians are also featured, such as Thelonious Monk’s “Well, You Needn’t”, Sonny Rollins’ “Pent Up House”, Charlie Parker’s “Barbados”, and Oscar Pettiford’s “Blues in the Closet”.
On the 2003 CD reissue of Chet Is Back!, four orchestral pop bonus tracks Baker recorded with Ennio Morricone in Rome in 1962 are featured, “Chetty’s Lullaby”, “So che ti perderò”, “Motivo su raggio di luna”, and “Il mio domani”, which Baker co-wrote with lyricist Alessandro Maffei. Morricone arranged the songs and conducted the orchestra. Baker plays trumpet and sings lead vocals on these four tracks originally released as 45 singles by RCA Victor in 1962 in Italy. (by wikipedia)
Recorded in Italy in 1962, Chet Is Back! showcases the “cool” trumpeter cutting loose on such bop-oriented workouts as “Pent-Up House” and “Well, You Needn’t.” Backed skillfully by a young cadre of up-and-coming European musicians, including the stellar saxophonist Bobby Jaspar, Chet Baker may have never sounded better, including on the ballads. One listen to “Over the Rainbow” and it’s clear this is an overlooked Baker classic.
(by Matt Collar)
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Personnel:
Chet Baker (trumpet)
Daniel Humair (drums)
Bobby Jaspar (saxophone, flute)
Benoit Quersin (bass)
René Thomas (guitar)
Amedeo Tommasi (piano)
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Tracklist
01. Well, You Needn’t (Monk) 6.23
02. These Foolish Things (Remind Me Of You) (Link/Marvell/Strachey) 4.56
03. Barbados (Parker) 8.26
04. Star Eyes (Raye/de Paul) 6.58
05. Over The Rainbow (Arlen/Koehler) 3.30
06. Pent-Up House (Rollins) 6.51
07. Ballata in forma di blues (Tommasi) 10.06
08. Blues In The Closet (Pettiford) 7.41
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Al Jarreau – Look To The Rainbow (1977)

aljarreaufrontcover1Look to the Rainbow is a live album by Al Jarreau, released on May 27, 1977 by Warner Bros. Records. It marked a breakthrough for his career in Europe and later also in the US. It won the 1978 Grammy Award for Best Jazz Vocal Album.
In 1976 Jarreau made his first live appearances in Europe, starting with concerts at the jazz festivals in Montreux and Berlin. The following year he began his first tour through 16 cities in Europe starting with a gig at Onkel Pö’s in Hamburg. Look to the Rainbow is a set of recordings from that tour.
The title song “Look to the Rainbow” is from the musical Finian’s Rainbow, a Broadway production from the late 1940s. The most recognized song on this album is Jarreau’s interpretation of Paul Desmond’s classic jazz number “Take Five”, which was also released as a single in an edited version in 1977.
Both tour and album brought him enthusiastic reviews in Germany, where he immediately became a darling of the public, while his recognition in the US remained low until he received his first Grammy in 1978.
Look to the Rainbow is a jazz-oriented album which is characterized by a unique light and open sound. With no guitar or brass instruments, accompanied by Tom Canning’s Fender Rhodes (in some places supported by an ARP String Ensemble) and Lynn Blessing’s vibraphone, Al Jarreau’s voice is the main lead instrument and he uses it intensely as such.
Allmusic states that of the albums from Jarreau’s Warner Brothers period, this is “easily the most jazz-oriented”. It further cites his abilities “as a brilliant scat singer (able to emulate practically any instrument)” and also a “superior ballad interpreter” as evident on this recording.
Reviews in the UK’s music press were mixed. Melody Maker was full of praise for the album, claiming that Jarreau “has taken the seemingly well-worn genre of the freely improvising jazz singer and conjured it, miraculously, back to life”. The review observed that “like all the best artists, Jarreau does not work in a vacuum, but as the successor to a great tradition. When he performs, you can hear the expected echoes of King Pleasure and Jon Hendricks, upon whose foundation he is building so sensationally, and you can also hear a number of contemporary singers, mostly black, with whom he is so obviously in touch.” It concluded, “There is not one second of the four sides that is not the purest magic… at last, [Jarreau] has an album worthy of his monster talent”.
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Sounds also gave the record a positive review, stating that “Al’s always crisply precise: intense but not passionate up until the climax of, say, ‘Take Five’, when his scat shoots blind/wild, like a flock of demented starlings whizzing round a cage”, and describing the album as “a great sophisticates’ record, sensual petals of music unfold and furl again with Cartier elegance”. However, NME was less enthusiastic, saying that “Look to the Rainbow is a good representation of Jarreau live. It’s relaxed and intimate, the mood hardly varies throughout and the pace never gets more frantic than a light, funky backbeat that creeps in for some of the songs… The result is homogenous and patently easy to listen to. Therein lies the problem. If you weren’t looking for a memento of Jarreau’s concert […] there wouldn’t be much here to attract attention. Jarreau’s unusual voice is at first beguiling, but soon becomes gimmicky, like a hipper male version of Cleo Laine. When he gets funky (as on ‘So Long Girl’) there’s little to complain about but on the slower songs the combination of his voice and the milky sentimentality becomes irritating… Look to the Rainbow is too close to MOR for comfort.”
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In Germany Der Spiegel stated, “In a deliberately confusing game of phrases and syllables tone-figures become meaning, words transform into pure sound”).
Die Zeit was also enthusiastic: “It wouldn’t surprise us if we’ve seen the new Sammy Davis Jr. arrive on the scene”). (by Wikipedia)
The Grammy-winning jazz singer Al Jarreau died on Sunday in a Los Angeles hospital, days after announcing his retirement from touring due to exhaustion.
Jarreau was taken to hospital earlier in the week and was said to have been improving slowly. His official Twitter account and website said he died around 6am local time. He was 76.
A statement posted to Facebook said Jarreau “passed away this morning. He was in the hospital, kept comfortable by his wife, son, and a few of his family and friends. A small, private service is planned, for immediate family only. No public service is planned yet this time”.(by theguardian.com)
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Personnel:
Lynn Blessing (vibraphone)
Tom Canning (keyboards)
Joe Correro (drums, Percussion)
Al Jarreau (vocals)
Abraham Laboriel (bass)
inlet
Tracklist:
01 Letter Perfect (Jarreau) 5.16
02. Rainbow In Your Eyes (Russell) 6.17
03. One Good Turn (Jarreau) 6.30
04. Could You Believe (Jarreau) 6.49
05. Burst In With The Dawn (Jarreau) 7.24
06. Better Than Anything (Loughborough/Wheat) 5.08
07. So Long Girl (Jarreau) 3.44
08. Look To The Rainbow (Harburg/Lane) 7.54
09. You Don’t See Me (Jarreau) 6.44
10. Take Five (Desmond) 7.20
11. Loving You (Jarreau) 5.00
12. We Got By (Jarreau) 6.57
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Arild Andersen – Kristin Lavransdatter (1995)

frontcover1Arild Andersen (born 27 October 1945) is a Norwegian jazz musician bassist, known as the most famous Norwegian bass player in the international jazz Scene.
Andersen was born in Lillestrøm, Norway. He started his musical career as jazz guitarist in the Riverside Swing Group in Lillestrøm (1961–63), started playing double bass in 1964, and soon became part of the core jazz bands in Oslo. He was a member of Roy Hellvin Trio, was in the backing band at Kongsberg Jazz Festival in 1967 and 68, was elected Best Bassist by Jazznytt in 1967, and started as bass player in the Jan Garbarek Quartet (1967–1973), including Terje Rypdal and Jon Christensen. After completing his technical education in 1968, he became a professional musician and collaborated with Karin Krog, George Russell, and Don Cherry (Berlin 1968), and with visiting American musicians Phil Woods, Dexter Gordon, Bill Frisell, Hampton Hawes, Johnny Griffin, Sonny Rollins, Sheila Jordan, and Chick Corea. During the same period he worked with Ferenc Snétberger and Tomasz Stańko.
In the early 1970s, Andersen collaborated with Norwegian musicians Magni Wentzel, Jon Eberson, Ketil Bjørnstad, and Terje Rypdal, before leaving for an eventful visit to the U.S. in the winter of 1973–1974, and has since 1974 led his own bands, at first a quartet (1974–79). He worked with the Radka Toneff Quintet (1975–81) and has recorded more than a dozen albums as band leader for ECM Records, founded the critically acclaimed band arildandersen01Masqualero, and appeared as side man on a series of recordings. In January 2009 he was named “Musicien Europeen 2008” by the French Academie du Jazz, In 2010, Andersen received the Ella Award at the Oslo Jazzfestival. (by Wikipedia)
This one was written by Andersen for a play based on Sigrid Undset’s Nobel Prize-winning novel. I have seen this release slandered in an on-line review as inconsequential music but I would like to argue that it actually develops the ideas from “Arv” and “Sagn” further. Not as immediately arresting as those two masterpieces, Andersen here creates a less flashy, more pastoral sound. The inspiration is drawn from medieval ballads, instrumental folk tunes and jazz. However, this all new band (Andersen and Vinaccia plus Tore Brunborg on saxophone, wooden flutes and ocarina, and Reidar Skaar on keyboards) deliver compositions where the folk element is more subtly incorporated in the music and the musicians’ roots in the European free-jazz tradition much more to the front. This is especially true for tracks like “Erlends Flukt” and “Erlend” which would not have been out of place on Andersen’s normal ECM releases.
If one approaches this record like a movie-soundtrack – not expecting the combination of breathtaking instrumental virtuosity and characteristic folk singing on the previous gabriellekillandalbums – one will find that the band actually has managed to create an even more homogenous fusion between folk music and jazz. Besides functioning as illustration to scenes in the play this music definitely can stand alone as a separate, highly evocative, piece of work. In addition to the band, the CD-version includes contributions from0 the Oslo Chamber Choir, Kjetil Bjerkestrand on organ and a string quartet.
This is one of the finest jazz Albums from the Scandinavian Jazz Scene … If you like Jan Garbarek then is this Album a must.
The booklet contains many ilustrations by Gabrielle Kielland (Born 1945), a real fine Artist from Norweg
That´s what I call a jazz & art highlight !
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Personnel:
Arild Andersen (bass)
Kjetil Bjerkestrand (organ)
Tore Brunborg (Saxophone, flute, ocarina)
Kjell Arne Jørgensen (violin)
Kari Ravnan (cello)
Reidar Skår (Keyboards)
Atle Sponberg (violin)
Nora Taksdal (viola)
Paolo Vinaccia (Percussion)
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Oslo Kammerkor (choir) conducted by Grete Helgerød
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Gabrielle Kielland (booklet illustrations)
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Tracklist:
01. Kristin Og Alvemoen (Andersen) 3.53
02. Hamarkirken (Andersen) 2.35
03. Simons Festemø (Andersen) 3.28
04. Kristin Og Erlend (Andersen) 5.32
05. Isvind (Andersen/Vinaccia/Skår/Brunborg) 2.33
06. Bryllupsmarsj (Andersen) 2.00
07. Pilgrimssang (Andersen) 4.44
08. Nidaros (Andersen) 3.21
09. Erlends Flukt (Andersen) 3.31
10. Erlend (Andersen) 3,38
11. Sunniva (Andersen/Vinaccia/Skår/Brunborg) 2.41
12. Dans (Andersen) 2.05
13. Flommen (Andersen) 4.11
14. Simons Død (Andersen) 4.37
15. Tidlig Morgen (Andersen/Vinaccia/Skår/Brunborg) 2.21
16  Kristin (Andersen) 3.51
17. Pesten (Andersen/Vinaccia/Skår/Brunborg) 2.33
18. Ved Steingjerdet (Andersen) 2.07
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Pat Halcox All Stars – 7th Avenue (1979)

SONY DSCThis is the story of Pat Halcox:
Pat Halcox’s stature as one of the best trumpeters this country has produced is undoubted, but because he has played with Chris Barber for fifty years, he is almost unknown as a player in his own right. (This is not unusual: Trummy Young was never asked to record for anyone else during his long tenure in the Louis Armstrong All Stars.) The band plays over two hundred dates a year, and this leaves little time for doing much else. However, as I shall show, over the years Pat has had many other musical adventures. This brief survey is by no means complete, but aims to give a flavour of some of the guest appearances and other activities he has enjoyed.
It was only some two months after the Chris Barber Band started that Pat took part in his first non-Barber recording. Ian Wheeler had requested John R.T. Davies (he of the Temperance Seven, maestro of 78 rpm record restoration, and now co-producer of the Chris Barber Collection CDs on the Timeless label) to record a session with his colleagues in the Barber Band (minus Chris). This took place in the London Jazz Centre in Soho on 8 August 1954. It was possibly the only time Ian and Monty Sunshine played together, prior to the 1990s reunions of the old and new Chris Barber bands. There have been many requests for this session to be issued; so far no joy, a great pity. (Click here for session details.)
Pat has on occasion been asked to deputise for other band leaders. Two notable times occurred in 1964 and 1978. In 1964 Pat was asked to sit in for Alex Welsh when his band did pathalcox01a club session at the Georgian Jazz Club in Cowley. In the band were Roy Crimmins on trombone, John Barnes on saxes and clarinet (he later joined Humph’s band), the excellent Fred Hunt on piano, Jim Douglas on banjo and guitar (more of Jim later), Ron Mathewson on bass, and the slightly eccentric Lennie Hastings on drums. A marvellous session.
Humphrey ‘Humph’ Lyttelton was asked to appear at the 1978 Prague Jazz Festival (7 April) but had to pull out two days before flying out to Prague, and asked Pat to take over. This meant that Pat had to rush around sorting out a visa (it was in the days of the Iron Curtain) and a flight, but he made it, and joined Bruce Turner (again we will meet Bruce later), Malcolm Everson (baritone sax), Mick Pyne (piano), Dave Green (bass), and Tony Mann (drums). What Pat had not expected was to have to make all the introductions! He thought Bruce Turner would do those, but Bruce quietly reminded Pat that as Humph normally made them, and he was Humph’s dep it was Pat’s job! Another excellent performance.
The first album to include Pat away from the Barber band was Don Ewell Quintet. (Click here for session details.) Don was an American pianist, much recorded by George Buck for both his Jazzology and GHB labels. The recording was by Dave Bennett (at the time a school teacher, but now a full time record producer and recording engineer), recorded in February 1971 at the White Hart, Willesden. Besides Pat, some other familiar jazzmen were in the group: on clarinet was ‘Creole’ John Defferray, now a member of the Big Chris Barber band; on bass was Jackie Flavelle, at the time a member of the Chris Barber band; and on drums was Barry Martyn, who later moved to New Orleans, where he still lives.
In 1974 Pat played the first gigs with his ‘Summer Band’, basically a busman’s holiday. The idea was to play a few gigs during the Barber Band’s summer break. The first year it was the normal personnel of the time without Chris. The band played a more mainstream-slanted repertoire, and this become more pronounced as the personnel changed over the next few years. In 1974, the band brought back such items as ‘Worksong’, and added titles such as the Hodges tune ‘Squatty Roo’, and an acoustic guitar piece, ‘Plenty of Nothing’. Guests at the New River Club in Andover that year included local band leader Dave Morgan (trombone) and his banjo player Roger Dee
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The personnel in 1975 and 1976 remained as before except that Pete York replaced Graham Burbidge on drums. 1975 tracks included ‘Shanty in Old Shanty Town’, ‘That Old Feeling’, and ‘Your Eyes Say Yes But…’ Guests at The Lord Raglan in Wolverhampton were vocalist and band leader Sheila Colyer, and pianist-vocalist Tommy Burton. 1976 gave us ‘All My Eggs In One Basket’, ‘Looks Like Another Winter’s Here’ (Jackie vocal), ‘Sam’ (Jackie again) and ‘Cowbell Blues’. There was a change in personnel in 1977: Campbell Burnap was added on trombone and vocals, and Jackie Flavelle was replaced by Roger Limb on bass (he worked for the BBC Radiophonic Workshop on projects such as Doctor Who). Numbers included ‘Blues in the Closet’ (a feature for Roger Limb), ‘Hot Step And Jump’, ‘What’s The Racket’, ‘Theme From Black Orpheus’, and two Campbell vocals, ‘I Want A Little Girl’ and ‘Lock My Heart’.
In 1978 an album, Pat Halcox All Stars, was recorded by Nigel Pegrum, who at the time was a member of Steeleye Span. That year the personnel had changed again, with Johnny Parker added on piano, and Vic Pitt replacing Roger Limb; also John Slaughter dropped out. In 1979 the band remained the same, and new tracks included ‘High on An Open Mike’, ‘5 O’clock Drag’, ‘Rag Time Dance’, and ‘Three Four The Blues’.
An added attraction during some of the 1980 shows was the inclusion of the vocal group Sweet Substitute (at this time they were Angie Masterson, Terri Leggett and Kate McNab, with their musical director and altoist Andy Leggett, Terri’s husband). Sweet Substitute were a Bristol group who were quite well known. They had recorded for Decca and Black Lion. I have always thought that they never achieved the success they deserved. Sweet Substitute sang Ellington tracks, show tunes, and pieces from the Swing Era. Numbers included ‘Uncle In Harlem’, ‘Sleepy Suzy’, ‘The Monkey Song’, ‘Heebie Jeebies’, and ‘I’ve pathalcox02Got Ford Engine Movements In My Hips’, among many others. Pete York was unavailable, and Jimmy Garforth took the drum stool. New band numbers included ‘Charlie The Chula’, a Johnny Parker piece, ‘Tribute To Big Bill (Broonzy)’, and a clarinet feature, ‘Dusk’. The mix was similar in 1981, but without Campbell Burnap. Mel Thorpe joined on reeds, and Roger Munns replaced Johnny Parker (Mel and Roger were members of Pete York’s Band at the time). The band name became The Pat Halcox-Pete York All Stars. Sweet Substitute were as the previous year. Further new titles included ‘Cherry’ and ‘Take It Upstairs’.
The final year that Pat took the band on tour was 1982, and the members of the band were Pat, John Crocker, Mel Thorpe, Roger Munns, Johnny McCallum, Bill Coleman (bass), and Pete on drums. Bill Coleman was Helen Shapiro’s bass player at the time. Sweet Substitute again sang at some of the gigs. The programme was far removed from the music and style as played in 1974! Titles included ‘The Hawk Talks’, ‘An Ordinary Thing’, ‘Apple Honey’, and ‘Segue In C’. This was the end of a long run of very different concerts, which I and many others enjoyed during our younger years! There were at least two specials, the first in 1978, at the Chris Barber Party Night on 30 December at the 100 Club, Oxford Street, London. Pat’s band that night was Pat, John, Jim Shepperd (trombone), Johnny Parker, Johnny, Vic, and Pete. They signed off with their signature tune, ‘The Theme From The Flintstones’. The other appearance was at the Repertory Theatre, Birmingham, on 13 December 1981. The reissued album is on Lake and should be available through them.
Returning to guest spots and other appearances, on 17 December 1977 the Chris Barber Band were at the Rep in Birmingham. The Strathallan Hotel ran a very successful weekly jazz club at the time, and issued a series of limited issue cassettes on the Neovox label. They hosted a session with well-known, mainly local, musicians, including Norman Field (reeds) and Ray Foxley (piano). Pat and Pete rushed over to the hotel and joined in on the last number, ‘Bourbon Street Parade’.
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In 1989 George Buck asked Pat to put a band together to record an album, There’s Yes! Yes! In Your Eyes, again for Jazzology. He was free to choose his own musicians. The album was recorded over two sessions, 16 June and 14 July. The second session was required as the piano at The Bull’s Head, Barnes, was flat — hence the final blues on the record, ‘Joanna’s Flat Blues’! The producer and engineer was our old friend Dave Bennett. This is a wonderful album, and we find Bruce Turner in fine form, but only playing clarinet. John Beacham on trombone had played with many bands, including a long stint in the 1970s as part of the horn section of the pop group ‘The Kinks’. Dick Smith’s brother Ray Smith was on piano (Dick was a member of the Chris Barber band for ten years from 1956). Jim Douglas (previously noted in the Alex Welsh Band), Vic Pitt on bass, and Geoff Downes on drums rounded out the personnel.
Pat has continued to guest with bands both in the UK and abroad (the Lake Records All Stars, and with John Service of the Piccadilly Six in Switzerland, among many others). (by Julian Purser)
Pat Halcox’s “Autobiography”, written in about 1961:
We always had a piano at home, and, although neither of my parents were particularly musical, there’s always been an interest. They tell me that when I was four years old I would sit at the piano and pick out phrases and actually copy out music, even before I could write. So they sent me to a series of lessons that resulted in my passing an exam when I was four and a half. This was too good to last, of course, and I soon slowed down to a more normal rate of progress. In fact, by the time I was six, I’d stopped playing altogether, and it wasn’t until I was nearly fifteen that I found out what a social asset playing the piano could be.
When I did start again, I’d become involved loosely in jazz. I would try and rattle out ‘Cow Cow PatHalcox05.jpgBoogie’. Pete Johnson’s ‘Roll ‘Em Pete’ was the first disc in my collection. I’ve always been fascinated by Boogie and the Blues ever since. It’s funny how the first influences stick hardest.
I first tried playing jazz in a band with Bob Dawbarn and a crowd of friends, including Mick Mulligan. It was one of those back-room-when-mother’s-out sort of bands. We used to make some terrible rows.
A friend of mine worked at Boosey and Hawkes, and he’d bring home lots of battered old instruments. I finally chose trombone, because that was what we needed. When I got into the RAF I played trombone there as well. I told them that I could read trombone music, which I couldn’t, so at first I had to sit at the back and fake. By the time that I came out as a fully competent trombone player I discovered that the band needed a trumpet player, so I had to switch again. As it happened it was a good job I did.
Leaving the musical side for a minute: I’d been training all this time to become a chemist, and I’d taken a job in a chemical laboratory, and was working away at nights, whenever my jazz would allow me. So, when I came out of the RAF in 1950, I went back to my chosen career of chemistry. Unfortunately for these studies a band called the Brent Valley Jazz Band was formed by my friend Colin Kingwell and myself, and it started to get odd jobs. We even went in for a talent competition organised by a detergent called Whisk, and got through a couple of semi-finals at various cinemas. We won enormous quantities of Whisk and five guineas, which we spent immediately in the nearest pub. After that I moved to the Albermarle Jazz Band – also playing in the West of London – and for about two years we played at Don Short’s club at the White Hart, Southall.
 
I almost joined Chris during that time when he was forming the band that later was joined and led by Ken Colyer, but I still hoped to make a career out of chemistry, and so I turned down the opportunity (or gamble as it was then) to turn pro, and had to wait until 1954 before I got my second chance to join Chris. Now I’m sure about what I want to do: play trumpet with the Chris Barber Band.
Looking back on the seven years that I’ve been with Chris, I think that one of the highlights was making the soundtrack for Look Back In Anger. I was absolutely fascinated, possibly because my strongest interest outside of jazz is photography. I’m working on building a darkroom in the house that I’ve just moved into with my wife. But of course there have been endless series of wonderful things with the band: New Orleans, the Hollywood Bowl, Denmark, Berlin, Sister Rosetta.
I suppose that my early influences on cornet were Muggsy Spanier and Tommy Ladnier. Now I like lots of people. In the early jazz club days I was a violent anti-modern, but now I like some of it. Mainly the people with roots, I think – Parker, John Lewis, Gillespie and Ellington, especially Ellington. I wouldn’t say that I’m content with the way things are at the moment – no musician ever really is content unless he’s lost all ambition, but I’m very happy with the way things are going. The Band is a happy place to work, and I love playing trumpet. That’s why you’ll find me creeping off to places like Wood Green to sit in with the Alex Welsh Band or Kenny Ball my nights off.
Pat Halcox
And this is his extremley rare and wonderful solo album … What can I say ? If you like the British jazz … it´s a must, if you like Chris Barber … it´s a must … if you like Music .. it´s a must … Listen and enjoy !
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Alternate front + backcover
Tracks 1-10 at Bray Studios, Windsor, 21 November 1978.
Tracks 11-14 at The Crown Jazz Club, Codsall, 15 July 1978
except
Track 13 recorded at The Crown Jazz Club, Codsall, 7 July 1979
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Personnel:
Campbell Burnap (trombone, vocals)
John Crocker (clarinet, Saxophone)
Pat Halcox (trumpet)
Johnny McCallum (guitar)
Johnny Parker (piano)
Vic Pitt (bass)
Pete York (drums)
SONY DSC
Tracklist:
01. Flintstones (Bryson/Goldberg/Shows) 3.49
02. Blue & Sentimental (Basie/David/Livingstone) 4.29
03. I’m Gonna Lock My Heart & Throw Away The Key (Eaton/Shand) 3.05
04. China Boy (Winfrey/Boutiljie) 3.07
05. I Wanna Little Girl (Moll/Mencher) 6.30
06. What’s The Racket? (York) 5.06
07. Jeepers Creepers (Warren/Mercer) 2.59
08. You Took Advantage Of Me (Rodgers & Hart) 4.35
09 Three Four The Blues (Parker) 2.25
10 Dusk (Ellington) 4.26
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11. 5 O’clock Drag (Ellington/Adamson) 5.41
12. Fidgety Feet (LaRocca/Shields) 8.40
13. Deed I Do (Hirsch/Rose) 9.05
14. Dr. Jazz (Oliver/Melrose) 6.43
SONY DSC

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Albert Mangeldsdorff & Giancarlo Schiaffini – Roma (1980)

frontcover1One of the few shows organized by the Italian RAI in 1980. I had doubts on how to credit this set, from an idea of Pasquale Santoli to unite some famed soloists with RAI Big Band, playing Ellington tunes or tunes dedicated to Ellington composed by the soloists: the Incostant Sol blogspot lists this as “Albert Mangelsdorff Quintet with RAI Big Band”, which could be correct since Mangelsdorff’s name is top of the official bill included here, BUT all spoken intros are by Schiaffini, a couple of his own tunes are played too, and track, Saint James Infirmary, is played by a trio featuring him as the only soloist, so it seems he is the actual leader of the “group”. Quite probably, this was a one-off affair [actually, there was a second date played in Mestre the following day], since Mangelsdorff at the time was mainly playing solo or in duos, and not with a quintet. The show took form in two diferent sets: only the early part of the second set is here (re)broadcast [Incostant Sol has a longer version of this]. This program is introduced by a short speech by Schiaffini (recorded late) remembering the show. (survivor69)

Recorded live at the Teatro dell’Opera di Roma, Roma, Italy; April 21, 1980

Thanks to survivor69 for sharing the show at Dime.

concertposter

Personnel:
Paolo Damiani (bass)
Billy Higgins (drums)
Albert Mangelsdorff (trombone)
Giancarlo Schiaffini (trombone)
Manfred Schoof (tromba, flugelhorn)
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RAI Big Band
Gennaro Baldino (trombone)
Giancarlo Beccattini (trombone)
Doriano Beltrame (trumpet)
Beppe Carrieri (saxophone, flute)
Alberto Corvini (trumpet)Michele Lacerenza (trumpet)
Sal Genovese  (saxophone, flute)
Baldo Maestri (saxophone, flute)
Maurizio Majorana (bass)
Carlo Metallo (saxophone)
Gianni Oddi (saxophone, flute)
Marco Pellacani (trombone)
Dino Piana (trombone)
Roberto Pregadio (piano)
Pino Rucher (guitar)
Cicci Santucci (trumpet)
Roberto Zappulla (drums)

giancarlo-schiaffini
Giancarlo Schiaffini

Tracklist:

CD 1:
01. Interview – Schiaffini 2.10
02. Supraconductivity 10:08
03. Spoken Introductions 1:00
04. Introduction / March of The Jazz Aspects 13.42
05. Horizon 15.47

CD 2:
01. Mood Indigo 6.59
02. Saint James Infirmary 10.28
03. Band introductions 1.36
04. Duke of Medley 20.49
05. Radio Outros 0.30
06. Mood Azur 3.42

albert-mangelsdorffAlbert Mangelsdorff

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Miles Davis – Miles Ahead (1957)

frontcover1Miles Ahead is an album by Miles Davis that was released in 1957 by Columbia Records. It was Davis’ first collaboration with arranger Gil Evans following the Birth of the Cool sessions. Along with their subsequent collaborations Porgy and Bess (1959) and Sketches of Spain (1960), Miles Ahead is one of the most famous recordings of Third Stream, a fusion of jazz, European classical, and world musics. Davis played flugelhorn throughout.

Evans combined the ten pieces that make up the album into a suite, each flowing into the next without interruption; the only exception to this rule was on the title track since it was placed last on side A (this has been corrected on the CD versions). Davis is the only soloist on Miles Ahead, which features a large ensemble consisting of sixteen woodwind and brass players. Art Taylor played drums on the sessions and the then current Miles Davis Quintet member Paul Chambers was the bassist.

A fifth recording date involved Davis alone (re-)recording material to cover or patch mistakes or omissions in his solos using overdubbing. The fact that this album originally was produced in mono makes these inserted overdubbings rather obvious in the new stereo setting.

originalfrontcover

Original frontcover

Miles reportedly was unhappy about the album’s original cover, which featured a photograph of a young white woman and child aboard a sailboat. He made his displeasure known to Columbia executive George Avakian, asking, “Why’d you put that white bitch on there?”[10] Avakian later stated that the question was made in jest. For later releases of the record, however, the original cover-photo has been substituted by a photograph of Miles Davis.

The Penguin Guide to Jazz gave Miles Ahead a four-star rating out of a possible four stars, and called the album “a quiet masterpiece… with a guaranteed place in the top flight of Miles albums.”[8] Of Davis’ flugelhorn, Kevin Whitehead of Cadence wrote that it “seemed to suit [Davis] better than trumpet: more full-bodied, less shrill, it glosses over his technical deficiencies.”[9] The Penguin Guide, on the other hand, opined that “the flugelhorn’s sound isn’t so very different from his trumpet soloing, though palpably softer-edged…. [S]ome of the burnish seems to be lost.” (by wikipedia)

evansdavis

Gil Evans + Miles Davis

This album is perhaps most significant for the process it set in motion — the collaboration between Gil Evans and Miles Davis that would produce Porgy and Bess and Sketches of Spain, two of Davis’ best albums. That said, this album is a miracle in itself, the result of a big gamble on the part of Columbia Records, who put together Evans and Davis, who hadn’t worked together since recording the critically admired but commercially unsuccessful sides that would later be issued as The Birth of the Cool. Columbia also allowed Evans to assemble a 19-piece band for the recordings, at a time when big bands were far out of fashion and also at a time when the resulting recordings could not be released until two years in the future (because of Davis’ contractual obligations with Prestige). Davis was also expected to carry the album as its only soloist, and manage not to get lost among a cast of supporting musicians that included a huge horn section. To a large extent, he succeeds. Evans’ arrangements in particular are well-suited to the format, and cd1he and Davis formed a deep and close partnership where ideas were swapped back and forth, nurtured, and developed long before they were expressed in the studio. Davis gets off to a great start, with the hyper-kinetic “Springsville,” which seems to almost perfectly embody Evans’ and Davis’ partnership with its light, flexible exchanges between soloist and orchestra. He is strongest on the ballads, though, where his subdued and wistful tone rises high above the hushed accompaniment, especially on “Miles Ahead” and “Blues for Pablo” (which foreshadows the bluesy, Latin-tinged sound of Sketches of Spain). The upbeat “I Don’t Want to Be Kissed (By Anyone but You)” is another strong song, but shows the weakness of the format as Davis intersperses a charming, bright, technically challenging solo with a blasting horn section that occasionally buries him. It is a fine end, however, to an album that gave a hint of the greatness that would come as Evans and Davis fine-tuned their partnership over the course of the next several years. (by Stacia Proefrock)

milesdavislive1957

Barney Wilen (ts), Miles Davis (t), René Urtreger (p, hidden), Pierre Michelot (b), Kenny Clarke (d)
during the concert in  the Concertgebouw, Amsterdam, December 8, 1957

Personnel:
Danny Bank (clarinet)
Bill Barber (tuba)
Joe Bennett (trombone)
Jim Buffington (french horn)
John Carisi (trumpet)
Paul Chambers (bass)
Jimmy Cleveland (trombone)
Sid Cooper (flute, clarinet)
Miles Davis (flugelhorn)
Bernie Glow (trumpet)
Taft Jordan (trumpet)
Wynton Kelly (piano)
Lee Konitz (saxophone)
Tony Miranda (french horn)
Tom Mitchell (trombone)
Louis Mucci (trumpet)
Romeo Penque (flute, clarinet)
Frank Rehak (trombone)
Ernie Royal (trumpet)
Willie Ruff (french horn)
Art Taylor (drums)

Arranged and conducted by Gil Evans

backcover

Tracklist:
01. Springsville (Carisi) 3.27
02. The Maids Of Cadiz (Delibes) 3.53
03. The Duke (Brubeck) – 3:35
04. My Ship (Weill) – 4:28
05. Miles Ahead (Davis/Evans) – 3:29
06. Blues For Pablo (Evans) – 5:18
07. New Rhumba (Jamal) – 4:37
08. Medley Pt. 1: The Meaning Of The Blues (Troup/Worth) 2.48
09. Medley Pt. 2: Lament (Johnson) 2.14
10. I Don’t Wanna Be Kissed (By Anyone but You) (Elliot/Spina) 3.05
+
11. Springsville (Remake take 7) (Carisi) 3.16
12. Blues For Pablo (Take 1) (Evans) 3.32
13. Meaning Of The Blues-Lament (Rehearsal) (Troup/Worth) 5.10
14. I Don’t Wanna Be Kissed (By Anyone But You) (Alternate take) (Elliot/Spina) 3.11

labelb1

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