Quincy Jones – In The Heat Of The Night (OST) (1967)

FrontCover1In the Heat of the Night is a 1967 American mystery drama film directed by Norman Jewison. It is based on John Ball’s 1965 novel of the same name and tells the story of Virgil Tibbs, a black police detective from Philadelphia, who becomes involved in a murder investigation in a small town in Mississippi. It stars Sidney Poitier and Rod Steiger, and was produced by Walter Mirisch. The screenplay was by Stirling Silliphant.

The film won five Academy Awards, including the 1967 awards for Best Picture and Rod Steiger for Best Actor.

The quote “They call me Mister Tibbs!” was listed as number 16 on the American Film Institute’s 100 Years…100 Movie Quotes, a list of top film quotes. In 2002, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

In 1966, a wealthy industrialist named Phillip Colbert has moved from Chicago to Sparta, Mississippi, to build a factory there. Late one night, police officer Sam Wood discovers Colbert’s murdered body lying in the street.

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Chief Gillespie leads the investigation. A doctor estimates that Colbert had been dead for a few hours. At the train station, Wood finds a black man, Virgil Tibbs, and arrests him. Gillespie accuses Tibbs of the murder, and is embarrassed to learn Tibbs is a police officer from Philadelphia. Gillespie phones Tibbs’s chief, who informs Gillespie that Tibbs is a top homicide detective and recommends that he should assist the investigation. The idea does not appeal to either Gillespie or Tibbs, but for reasons of their own they reluctantly agree. Tibbs examines Colbert’s body and concludes the murder happened earlier than the doctor had estimated, that the killer was right-handed, and that the victim had been killed elsewhere and then moved to where the body was found.

Gillespie arrests another suspect, who protests his innocence. The police are planning to MoviePosterbeat him into confessing, but Tibbs reveals he is left-handed and has an alibi backed up by witnesses. Colbert’s widow is frustrated by the ineptitude of the police and impressed by Tibbs. She threatens to halt construction of the factory unless Tibbs leads the investigation, and the town’s leading citizens are forced to go along with her wish. The two policemen begin to respect each other as they are forced to work together.

Tibbs initially suspects plantation owner Endicott, a genteel racist and one of the most powerful individuals in town, who publicly opposed the new factory. When Tibbs interrogates Endicott, Endicott slaps him in the face and Tibbs slaps him back. Endicott sends a gang of thugs after Tibbs. Gillespie rescues Tibbs and tells him to leave town for his safety, but Tibbs is convinced he can solve the case.

Tibbs asks Wood to re-trace his car patrol route on the night of the murder, and Gillespie joins them. Tibbs reveals that Wood has changed the route of his patrol. Gillespie discovers that Wood made a sizable deposit into his bank account the day after the murder. He starts to suspect Wood and arrests him, despite Tibbs’s protests. Purdy, a hostile local, brings his 16-year-old sister Delores to the police station and files charges against Wood for getting her pregnant. Tibbs insists on being present when Delores is questioned. Purdy is offended that a black man was present at his sister’s questioning, and gathers a mob to attack Tibbs. Meanwhile, Tibbs tells Gillespie that the murder was committed at the site of the planned factory, which clears Wood of the murder charge, because he couldn’t have driven both his and Colbert’s cars back into town. Tibbs adds that he knows why Wood changed his route: at night Delores likes to display her naked body to whoever is outside, and Wood, who watches her while on duty, did not want Tibbs to see a white woman in the nude.

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Tibbs visits a backstreet abortionist, who under pressure reveals that she is about to perform an abortion on Delores. Delores arrives, sees Tibbs, and runs away. Tibbs follows her and comes face to face with her armed boyfriend, Ralph, a cook from a local roadside diner. At that moment Purdy’s mob arrives on the scene and holds Tibbs at gunpoint. Tibbs shouts at Purdy to check Delores’ purse, that it contains money Ralph gave her for an abortion, which he got when he robbed and killed Colbert. Purdy grabs the purse and looks inside, and realizes Tibbs is right. Purdy confronts Ralph for getting his sister pregnant, and a startled Ralph shoots Purdy dead. Tibbs grabs Ralph’s gun, and just then Gillespie arrives on the scene. Ralph is arrested and confesses to Colbert’s murder: he had gone to ask Colbert for a job at the new factory, but ended up attacking him and taking his money. “That’s all. I didn’t mean to kill him,” are the final words of Ralph’s taped confession.

The final scene shows Tibbs boarding a train bound for Philadelphia, as Gillespie, having carried his suitcase, respectfully bids him farewell.

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The film score was composed, arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones, and the soundtrack album was released on the United Artists label in 1967. The title song performed by Ray Charles, composed by Quincy Jones, with lyrics by Alan and Marilyn Bergman was released as a single by ABC Records and reached #33 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and #21 on the Hot Rhythm & Blues Singles chart.

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AllMusic’s Steven McDonald said the soundtrack had “a tone of righteous fury woven throughout” and that “the intent behind In the Heat of the Night was to get a Southern, blues-inflected atmosphere to support the angry, anti-racist approach of the picture … although the cues from In the Heat of the Night show their age”. The Vinyl Factory said “this soundtrack to a film about racism in the South has a cool, decidedly Southern-fried sound with funk-bottomed bluesy touches, like on the strutting ‘Cotton Curtain’, the down ‘n’ dirty ‘Whipping Boy’ or the fat ‘n’ sassy ‘Chief’s Drive to Mayor'”.

What a great movie, what  great soundtrack !

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Personnel:
The Quincy Jones Orchestra
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Gil Bernal (vocals on 08.)
Clarke Boomer (vocals on 16.)
Ray Brown (bass)
Glen Campbell (vocals, banjo on 09.)
Ray Charles (vocals on 01., piano on 15.)
Don Elliott (human instrument)
Roland Kirk (flute)
Billy Preston (organ on 01.)
The Raelettes (background vocals on 01.)
Bobby Scott (tack piano)
Travis Lewis (vocals on 16.)

French frontcover:
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Tracklist:
01.In The Heat Of The Night 2.32
02. Peep-Freak Patrol Car 1.35
03. Cotton Curtain 2.41
04. Where Whitey Ain’t Around 1.28
05. Whipping Boy 1.30
06. No You Won’t 1.35
07. Nitty Gritty Time 2.07
08. It Sure Is Groovy! 2.34
09. Bowlegged Polly 2.03
10. Shag Bag, Hounds & Harvey 3.47
11. Chief’s Drive To Mayor 1.07
12. Give Me Until Morning 1.12
13. On Your Feet, Boy! 2.03
14. Blood & Roots 1.11
15. Mama Caleba’s Blues 5.33
16. Foul Owl 2.32

Music: Quincy Jones
Lyrics: Alan Bergman and Marilyn Bergman

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Various Artists – Bossa Nova Instrumentals (2012)

FrontCover1.jpgBossa nova is a style of Brazilian music, which was developed and popularized in the 1950s and 1960s and is today one of the best-known Brazilian music styles abroad. The phrase bossa nova means literally “new trend” or “new wave” A lyrical fusion of samba and jazz, bossa nova acquired a large following in the 1960s, initially among young musicians and college students. (by wikipedia)

In the late 1950s and early ’60s, songwriters like the classically-trained Antonio Carlos “Tom” Jobim and the soft-voiced guitarist João Gilberto created a smoother, jazz-influenced version of the Samba – which itself was a product of the nation’s poorer classes. Middle-class Brazilians preferred the newer sound, which was dubbed Bossa Nova, or “The New Way.” Bossa Nova is velvet sophistication atop a feathery five-against-four rhythm, and is most famously epitomized by Gilberto’s “Girl from Ipanema.” American jazzmen like Stan Getz – who went on to collaborate frequently with Gilberto and Herbie Mann visited Brazil and brought the Bossa Nova to international attention. Some commercial distortion followed, but Bossa Nova continues to influence modern Brazilian pop and other regional styles today. (by urbandictionary.com)

And here´s a rare sampler … I found in the net many, many years ago .. .compiled by a Mr. “GB” …

And: the music is much better than this more or less silly cover … !!!

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Tracklist:
01. Grupo Cabana: One Note Samba (Jobim) 2.34
02. Dick Farney: Valsa De Uma Cidade (Veleso) 2.57
03. Eumir Deodato: O Amor Em Paz (Once I Loved) (Jobim/de Moraes) 3.14
04. Laurindo Almeida & The Bossa Nova All Stars: Petite Fleur (Bechet) 2.14
05. Os Carioquinhas: Gadu Namorando (Lalau/Vermelho) 1.57
06. Baden Powell: Improviso Em Bossa Nova (Powell) 2.09
07. Sergio Mendes: Oba La La (Gilberto) 2.30
08. Grupo Cabana: Favela (Jobim/de Moraes) 3.38
09. Waltel Branco: Deixa A Nega Gingar (de Castro) 2.08
10. Roberto Menescal: Surf Board (Jobim) 2.08
11. Quincy Jones: Se E Tarde Me Pardoa (Lyra/Boscoli) 
4.25
12. Antonio Carlos Jobim & Claus Ogerman: Agua De Beber (Jobim/de Moraes) 2.52
13. Meirelles E Copa 5: Diz Que Fui Por Ai (Rocha/Keti) 1.37
14. Oscar Castro Neves: Chora Tua Tristeza (Castro Neves/Bonfa/Schiffrin) 1.36
15. Cal Tjader: Souled On (Tjader) 4.21
16. Antonio Carlos Jobim: Stone Flower (Jobim) 3.26
17. Joao Donato: Sambou Sambou (Mello/Donato) 2.19
18. Walter Wanderley: Bicho Do Mato (Ben) 1.54
19. Rio 65 Trio: Upa Neguinho (Lobo/Guarnieri) 2.08
20. Quincy Jones: Soul Bossa Nova (Jones) 2.48
21. Roberto Menescal: Surfboard (Jobim) 2.08
22. Laurindo Almeida & The Bossa Nova All Stars: Desafinado (Jobim) 3.11
23. Sabastio Tapajos: Rio Das Ostras (Silveira) 2.25

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Peggy Lee – Blues Cross Country (1962)

FrontCover1Blues Cross Country is a 1962 studio album by Peggy Lee, principally arranged by Quincy Jones, with some arrangements by Benny Carter. The album can be described as a concept album, consisting of a musical journey across the United States through swinging blues songs, many of which were written by Lee with other contributors.Blues Cross Country is a 1962 studio album by Peggy Lee, principally arranged by Quincy Jones, with some arrangements by Benny Carter. The album can be described as a concept album, consisting of a musical journey across the United States through swinging blues songs, many of which were written by Lee with other contributors.
Blues Cross Country was the second of Lee’s two albums featuring arrangements by Jones. He had also arranged her previous studio album, If You Go (1961). (by wikipedia)

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Peggy Lee and Quincy Jones

One of Peggy Lee’s most intriguing concept LPs of the ’50s and ’60s, Blues Cross Country teams her with the Quincy Jones Orchestra on a set of swinging blues set all over America, almost like a continental version of Sinatra’s “Come Fly with Me.” She balances standards like “Basin Street Blues,” “St. Louis Blues,” “I Left My Sugar (In Salt Lake City),” and “Goin’ to Chicago Blues” alongside collaborations with Jones on “Los Angeles Blues,” “New York City Blues,” and “The Train Blues.” (She is also the lyricist of four other songs PeggyLee02on the album.) Though Jones’ arrangements are often a touch brassier than the blues standards can handle, Lee contributes just the right blend of vigor and feeling to the songs. Blues Cross Country also includes her first waxing of the Leiber & Stoller song “Kansas City,” which looks forward to her successful performances of their “I’m a Woman,” “Is That All There Is?,” and the Mirrors album. At a little over half-an-hour, it is a brief LP, and the 1999 CD reissue has two additional tracks. From the same spring 1961 sessions that produced the album came Lee’s single recording of Cy Coleman and Carolyn Leigh’s “Hey! Look Me Over,” the most popular song to emerge from the 1960 Broadway musical Wildcat, also arranged by Quincy Jones. Skipping ahead five years, there was another Lee single, “The Shining Sea,” which she wrote with Johnny Mandel, who also arranged it. Neither song fits in with the album’s concept, but they at least add more than four minutes to its running time. (by William Ruhlmann)

This not only a hot easy listening album, but a great album with Big Band music with a real hot voice … Peggy Lee at her best !

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Personnel:
Bob Bain (guitar)
Max Bennett (bass)
Hoyt Bohannon (trombone)
Aubrey Bouck (french horn)
Dennis Budimir (guitar)
Larry Bunker (percussion)
Pete Candolli (trumpet)
Benny Carter (saxophone, tuba)
Buddy Collette (saxophone)
Bob Cooper (woodwind)
Bob Fowler (trumpet)
Vern Friley (trombone)
Justin Gordon (saxophone)
Conrad Gozzo (trumpet)
Joe Graves (trumpet)
Bill Green (saxophone)
Chico Guerrero (percussion)
Bill Henshaw (rench horn)
Plas Johnson (saxophone)
Artie Kane (organ)
Harry Klee (woodwind)
Bobby Knight (trombone)
Peggy Lee (vocals)
Lou Levy (piano)
Stan Levey (drums)
Sinclair Lott (french horn)
Lew McCreary (trombone)
Dick Nash (trombone)
Jack Nimitz (saxophone)
Earl Palmer (drums)
Bill Perkins (saxophone)
John Pisano (guitar)
Al Porcino (trumpet)
Emil Richards (percussion)
George Roberts (trombone)
Howard Roberts (guitar)
Frank Rosolino (trombone)
Jimmy Rowles (piano)
Bud Shank (woodwind)
Jack Sheldon (trumpet)
Tommy Shepard (trombone)
Henry Sigismonti (french horn)
Frank Strazzeri (piano)
Toots Thielemans (guitar)
Ray Triscari (trumpet)

Arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones

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Tracklist:
01. Kansas City (Leiber/Stoller) – 2:29
02. Basin Street Blues (Williams) – 3:04
03. Los Angeles Blues (Lee/Jones) – 2:38
04. I Left My Sugar in Salt Lake City (Lange/ Rene) – 2:53
05. The Grain Belt Blues (Lee/Raskin/Schugler) – 1:52
06. York City Blues (Jones/Lee) 3:21
07. Goin’ to Chicago Blues (Basie/Rushing) – 2:37
08. San Francisco Blues (Lee/Raskin) – 2:37
09. Fisherman’s Wharf (Lee/Raskin) – 3:11
10. Boston Beans (Lee/Raskin/Schugler) 2:05
11. The Train Blues (Jones/Lee) 2:42
12. Saint Louis Blues (Handy) – 2:15
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13. Hey, Look Me Over! (Cy Coleman/Leigh) – 1:55
14. The Shining Sea (Lee/Mandel) – 2:45

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Quincy Jones – Plays (Songs) For Pussycats (1965)

FrontCover1An impresario in the broadest and most creative sense of the word, Quincy Jones’ career has encompassed the roles of composer, record producer, artist, film producer, arranger, conductor, instrumentalist, TV producer, record company executive, magazine founder, multi-media entrepreneur and humanitarian. As a master inventor of musical hybrids, he has shuffled pop, soul, hip-hop, jazz, classical, African and Brazilian music into many dazzling fusions, traversing virtually every medium, including records, live performance, movies and television.

Released in 1965, Quincy Plays for Pussycats is a bright, cheeky big-band album done in a more commercial pop style than previous Quincy Jones albums. Nonetheless, there’s plenty to enjoy here. From the hipster reworking of the Tom Jones hit “What’s New Pussycat?” to the buoyant lounge music version of “The Hucklebuck,” this is swinging ’60s jazz for the martini set. (by Matt Collar)

What a line-up: Kenny Burrell  – Gary Burton  – Jim Hall – Thad Jones – Roland Kirk – Lalo Schifrin – Zoot Sims – Toots Thielemans !!!

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Personnel:
Patti Brown (piano)
Kenny Burrell (guitar)
Gary Burton (vibraphone)
Billy Byers (trombone)
Jimmy Cleveland (trombone)
Curtis Fuller (trombone)
Urbie Green (trombone)
Jim Hall (guitar)
Milt Hinton (bass)
Thad Jones (trumpet)
Roland Kirk (saxophone)
Melba Liston (trombone)
Oliver Nelson (saxophone)
Joe Newman (trumpet)
Jerome Richardson (saxophone, flute)
Ernie Royal (trumpet)
Lalo Schifrin (piano)
Zoot Sims (saxophone)
Toots Thielemans (harmonica)
Julius Watkins (flugelhorn)
Chris White (drums)
Kai Winding (trombone)
Phil Woods (saxophone)
Snooky Young (trumpet)

Arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones

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Tracklist:
01. What’s New Pussycat? (Bacharach/David) 2.45
02. A Taste Of Honey (Scott/Marlow) 2.37
03. Sermonette (Adderley) 2.51
04. A Walk In The Black Forest (Jankowski) 2.53
05. Mack The Knife (Weil) 2.34
06. Moon River (Mancini/Mercer) 2.34
07. Take Five (Desmond) 3.31
08. Gravy Waltz (Brown/Allen) 2.44
09. I Hear A Symphony (B.Holland/Dozier/E.Holland) 3.08
10. Mr. Lucky (Mancini/Livingston/Evans) 2.27
11. Cast Your Fate To The Wind (Guaraldi) 2.47

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Quincy Jones, 1965

Art Farmer & Quincy Jones – Last Night When We Were Young (1957)

LPFrontCover1Last Night When We Were Young is a studio album by trumpeter Art Farmer, with an orchestra of strings arranged and composed by Quincy Jones. It was recorded in two sessions in 1957.
The beauty of Art Farmer’s tone is well featured on this out of print ABC/Paramount album. Farmer is backed by a string orchestra arranged by Quincy Jones as he plays lyrical solos on eight standards and Dizzy Gillespie’s “Tangorine.” Farmer mostly sticks close to the melodies but he makes such tunes as “Two Sleepy People,” “Ill Wind,” and “When I Fall in Love” sound fresh and pretty. (by Scott Yanow)

This album be renamed “Art for Lovers”. It’s a change of pace from his bop orientated ’50s lps on prestige- and a welcomed one at that. I’m usually cautious of “horns and strings” albums but this one works because Quincy Jones keeps the arraingments tasteful without allowing the strings to become overwhelming. Art’s fans will not be disappointed because his trademark beautiful warm and fuzzy tone is on dislpay throughout the first nine tracks. Of lesser importance are the last four jazzy tracks recorded earlier in ’53 with some swedish allstars. (by John W.)

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Personnel:
Addison Farmer (bass)
Art Farmer (trumpet, flugelhorn)
Barry Galbraith (guitar)
Osie Johnson (drums)
Hank Jones (piano)

Arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones

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Tracklist:
01. Two Sleepy People (Carmichael/Loesser) 3.20
02. Someone To Watch Over Me (Gershwin) 3.34
03. I Concentrate On You (Porter) 2.51
04. I´ll Wind (Arlen/Koehler) 3.42
05. Last Night When We Were Young (Arlen/Harburg) 2.58
06. Out Of This World (Arlen/Mercer) 4.11
07. When I Fall in Love (Young/Heyman) 3.32
08. Tangerine (Schertzinger/Mercer) 2.46
09. What’s Good About Goodbye? (Arlen/Robin) 3.39
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10.  Pogo Stick (Jones) 6.17
11. Liza (Gershwin) 5.34
12. Jones Bones (Jones) 5.40
13. Sometimes I’m Happy (Caesar/Grey/Youmans) 5.52

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Quincy Jones – Gula Matari (1970)

FrontCover1With his second and last album under the Creed Taylor aegis, the complexities of Quincy Jones’ catholic, evolving tastes start to reveal themselves. We hear signs of his gradual gravitation toward pop right off the bat with the churchy R&B cover of Paul Simon’s mega-hit “Bridge Over Troubled Water,” dominated by Valerie Simpson’s florid soul vocal and a gospel choir. His roots fixation surfaces in the spell-like African groove of the title track, a dramatic tone poem that ebbs and flows masterfully over its 13-minute length. From this point on, it’s all jazz; the roaring big band comes back with a vengeance in “Walkin’,” where Milt Jackson, Herbie Hancock, Hubert Laws, and other jazzers take fine solo turns, and things really get rocking on Nat Adderley’s “Hummin’.” Major Holley is a riot with his grumble-scat routine on bass. The whole record sounds like they must have had a ball recording it.(by Richard S. Ginell)

QuincyJonesPersonnel:
Pepper Adams (saxophone)
Wayne Andre (trombone)
Danny Bank (saxophone)
Seymour Barab (cello)
Ray Brown (bass on 01., 03. + 04.)
Ron Carter (bass on 02.)
Richard Davis (bass on 02.)
Don Elliott (bass marimba on 02.)
Eric Gale (guitar)
Al Grey (trombone)
Herbie Hancock (piano)
Hilda Harris (vocals)
Major Holley (bass, vocals)
Freddie Hubbard (trumpet)
Marilyn Jackson (vocals)
Milt Jackson (vibraphone)
Bob James (piano)
Jimmy Johnson (percussion)
Hubert Laws (flute)
Barbara Massey (vocals)
Danny Moore (trumpet, flugelhorn)
Kermit Moore (cello)
Benny Powell (trombone)
Jerome Richardson (saxophone)
Ernie Royal (trumpet)
Bobby Scott (piano)
Lucien Schmit (cello)
Alan Shulman (cello)
Valerie Simpson (vocals)
Warren Smith (percussion)
Marvin Stamm (trumpet, flugelhorn)
Maretha Stewart (vocals)
Tony Studd (trombone)
Grady Tate (drums)
Toots Thielemans (guitar, whistle)
Gene Young (trumpet, flugelhorn)

Arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones

BackCover1Tracklist:
01. Bridge Over Troubled Water (Simon) 5.09
02. Gula Matari (Jones) 13.02
03. Walkin’ (Carpenter) 8.02
04. Hummin’ (Nat Adderley) 8.07

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When you’re weary
Feeling small
When tears are in your eyes
I will dry them all

I’m on your side
When times get rough
And friends just can’t be found
Like a bridge over troubled water
I will lay me down
Like a bridge over troubled water
I will lay me down

When you’re down and out
When you’re on the street
When evening falls so hard
I will comfort you

I’ll take your part
When darkness comes
And pain is all around
Like a bridge over troubled water
I will lay me down
Like a bridge over troubled water
I will lay me down

Sail on Silver Girl,
Sail on by
Your time has come to shine
All your dreams are on their way
See how they shine
If you need a friend
I’m sailing right behind
Like a bridge over troubled water
I will ease your mind
Like a bridge over troubled water
I will ease your mind